Samuel Irving Newhouse, Sr.

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Samuel Irving Newhouse, Sr.

Hebrew: סמואל אירווינג ניוהאוס, Sr.
Birthdate:
Birthplace: New York, New York County, New York, United States
Death: August 29, 1979 (84)
Place of Burial: Staten Island, Richmond, NY, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Meyer Newhouse (Neuhaus) and Rose Newhouse
Husband of Private and Mitzi Newhouse
Father of Samuel Irving Newhouse, Jr. and Donald Edward Newhouse
Brother of Isaac Newhouse; Ada Newhouse; Louis Newhouse; Naomi Newhouse; Theodore Newhouse and 3 others

Managed by: Randy Schoenberg
Last Updated:

About Samuel Irving Newhouse, Sr.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Irving_Newhouse,_Sr.

Samuel Irving Newhouse, Sr. (May 24, 1895 – August 29, 1979) was an American broadcasting businessman, magazine and newspaper publisher. He was the founder of Advance Publications.

Contents [show] Early life[edit] Solomon Neuhaus was born in a tenement on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, the eldest of eight children born to Jewish immigrants.[2] His father, Meier Neuhaus, was an immigrant from Vitebsk, Belarus; and his mother, Rose (née Arenfeldt), was from Austria-Hungary.[3][4] Meier Neuhaus would later Americanize his name to Meyer Newhouse.[3]

Although his father had studied to become a rabbi, he was unskilled and only worked occasionally due to poor health. The family moved to Bayonne, New Jersey where his mother supported the family by peddling linens and in 1908, his father abandoned the family for health reasons to live with his sister in Connecticut.[3] Newhouse quit school and enrolled in a six-week bookkeeping course at the Gaffrey School in Manhattan which enabled him to secure a job as an office boy working for Hyman Lazarus, a lawyer, police court judge, and politician in Bayonne. At age sixteen, he was promoted to office manager of Lazarus' law firm.[3]

Career[edit] Noting Newhouse's work ethic and enthusiasm, Lazarus tasked Newhouse to manage the money-losing Bayonne Times (a local newspaper Lazarus had acquired a majority interest in due to an unpaid legal bill) allowing Newhouse to keep half of the profits if successful.[3] Newhouse quickly determined that the paper was not earning enough fees from advertisements and took it upon himself to personally solicit new customers while also assisting them in planning the timing of store sales. The paper returned to profitability and he received a 20 percent ownership interest as payment (after continued success, his share increased to 50 percent). Later, he decided to attend law school in the evenings and in 1916, he graduated from the New Jersey Law School (now part of the Rutgers Law School) in Newark, New Jersey. His career was short-lived: he was so humiliated after losing the one case he took to trial, he paid his client the full amount of the damages he had requested.[3]

In 1922, taking all his personal savings and partnering with Lazarus, he bought 51 percent of the Staten Island Advance for $98,000 and soon returned the paper to profitability. In 1924, Lazarus died and he purchased Lazarus' share from his widow as well as the 49 percent that he did not own. Newhouse had found his calling and began to expand his empire purchasing, merging, and returning to profitability numerous papers.[3]

Business strategy[edit] Newhouse focused on purchasing bargain-priced papers in growing communities; he had no interest in starting papers or in unrelated ventures (he even declined an offer to purchase the New York Yankees). Typically, he would acquire a city's oldest newspaper and then purchase the city's second newspaper thereby allowing him to set advertising rates. Although he would generally promise to keep both papers in business and in competition, he typically would merge the two (which generally meant closing the afternoon paper and keeping the morning) effectively establishing a monopoly and then using the profits to purchase additional newspapers.[3]

Newhouse largely ran his various interests out of a brown leather briefcase and kept its figures in his head, even as they grew into an empire of 20 newspapers, as well as numerous magazines, radio stations and television stations. He never had what could be called a formal headquarters; to this day Advance Publications' corporate address is the same as that of the Staten Island Advance.

Timeline of acquisitions[edit] 1932: Long Island Daily Press 1935: Newark Ledger 1939: Newark Star Eagle merged with Newark Ledger to form the Newark Star-Ledger[5] 1939: Syracuse Herald and Syracuse Journal (merged) 1941: Syracuse Post-Standard 1945: Jersey Journal 1948: Harrisburg News, the first paper in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (He would later buy the Harrisburg Patriot and combine them into the Harrisburg Patriot-News). 1949: Advance Publications Inc. formed as the primary holding company for all his newspaper assets.[6] 1950: Portland Oregonian 1955: The Birmingham News (Birmingham, Alabama), The Huntsville Times (Huntsville, Alabama) and the St. Louis Globe-Democrat 1959: Condé Nast Publications purchased for $5 million at the suggestion of his wife. According to Newhouse, "She asked for a fashion magazine and I went out and got her Vogue." Condé Nast also published Glamour, House & Garden, and Young Bride. He soon purchased another magazine publisher, Street & Smith and merged it with Condé Nast, becoming a major magazine publisher.[6] 1961: Oregon Journal 1962: Times-Picayune and States-Item, both in New Orleans, Louisiana (merged in 1980) 1967: Cleveland Plain Dealer 1976: he purchased Booth Newspapers for $305 million, a chain of eight dailies in Michigan (Ann Arbor News, Bay City Times, Flint Journal, Grand Rapids Press, Jackson Citizen Patriot, Kalamazoo Gazette, Muskegon Chronicle, and the Saginaw News) as well as the Sunday supplement Parade. Personal life[edit] He was married to arts patron and philanthropist Mitzi Epstein (April 30, 1902 – June 29, 1989),[2] who grew up in an upper middle class, Jewish family on the Upper West Side, the daughter of silk tie importer.[3] They had two sons, Samuel Irving Newhouse, Jr., known as Si Newhouse, chairman and CEO of Advance, and Donald Newhouse, president of Advance.

Samuel Newhouse resided in Manhattan for much of his life. His great-grandson, S.I. Newhouse IV, is featured in a documentary called Born Rich about the experience of growing up as the heir to one of the world's greatest fortunes.[7] In 1942, he bought Greenlands, a working farm of 143 acres in Harbourton, Mercer County, New Jersey. In his privately published memoir, A Memo to my Children, he documented his often strained relationship with his two sons.[3]

Death and legacy[edit] Newhouse died in 1979, aged 84, in New York City of a stroke,[8] and is buried in the Baron Hirsch Cemetery on Staten Island.[9] Upon his death, he passed his voting common stock in the principal family company, Advance Publications, in trust to his six grandchildren and made his two sons the sole trustees.[2]

One of the vessels of the Staten Island Ferry is also named after him. So was the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University.[citation needed] He was inducted into the Junior Achievement U.S. Business Hall of Fame in 1989.[citation needed]

About סמואל אירווינג ניוהאוס, Sr. (עברית)

סמואל אירווינג ניוהאוס

' נולד ב-24.5.1895 נפטר 29.8.1979 היה איש תקשורת ומוציא לאור ידוע בארה"ב. אין עליו דף בעברית בויקיפדיה

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Irving_Newhouse,_Sr.

Samuel Irving Newhouse, Sr. (May 24, 1895 – August 29, 1979) was an American broadcasting businessman, magazine and newspaper publisher. He was the founder of Advance Publications.

Contents [show] Early life[edit] Solomon Neuhaus was born in a tenement on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, the eldest of eight children born to Jewish immigrants.[2] His father, Meier Neuhaus, was an immigrant from Vitebsk, Belarus; and his mother, Rose (née Arenfeldt), was from Austria-Hungary.[3][4] Meier Neuhaus would later Americanize his name to Meyer Newhouse.[3]

Although his father had studied to become a rabbi, he was unskilled and only worked occasionally due to poor health. The family moved to Bayonne, New Jersey where his mother supported the family by peddling linens and in 1908, his father abandoned the family for health reasons to live with his sister in Connecticut.[3] Newhouse quit school and enrolled in a six-week bookkeeping course at the Gaffrey School in Manhattan which enabled him to secure a job as an office boy working for Hyman Lazarus, a lawyer, police court judge, and politician in Bayonne. At age sixteen, he was promoted to office manager of Lazarus' law firm.[3]

Career[edit] Noting Newhouse's work ethic and enthusiasm, Lazarus tasked Newhouse to manage the money-losing Bayonne Times (a local newspaper Lazarus had acquired a majority interest in due to an unpaid legal bill) allowing Newhouse to keep half of the profits if successful.[3] Newhouse quickly determined that the paper was not earning enough fees from advertisements and took it upon himself to personally solicit new customers while also assisting them in planning the timing of store sales. The paper returned to profitability and he received a 20 percent ownership interest as payment (after continued success, his share increased to 50 percent). Later, he decided to attend law school in the evenings and in 1916, he graduated from the New Jersey Law School (now part of the Rutgers Law School) in Newark, New Jersey. His career was short-lived: he was so humiliated after losing the one case he took to trial, he paid his client the full amount of the damages he had requested.[3]

In 1922, taking all his personal savings and partnering with Lazarus, he bought 51 percent of the Staten Island Advance for $98,000 and soon returned the paper to profitability. In 1924, Lazarus died and he purchased Lazarus' share from his widow as well as the 49 percent that he did not own. Newhouse had found his calling and began to expand his empire purchasing, merging, and returning to profitability numerous papers.[3]

Business strategy[edit] Newhouse focused on purchasing bargain-priced papers in growing communities; he had no interest in starting papers or in unrelated ventures (he even declined an offer to purchase the New York Yankees). Typically, he would acquire a city's oldest newspaper and then purchase the city's second newspaper thereby allowing him to set advertising rates. Although he would generally promise to keep both papers in business and in competition, he typically would merge the two (which generally meant closing the afternoon paper and keeping the morning) effectively establishing a monopoly and then using the profits to purchase additional newspapers.[3]

Newhouse largely ran his various interests out of a brown leather briefcase and kept its figures in his head, even as they grew into an empire of 20 newspapers, as well as numerous magazines, radio stations and television stations. He never had what could be called a formal headquarters; to this day Advance Publications' corporate address is the same as that of the Staten Island Advance.

Timeline of acquisitions[edit] 1932: Long Island Daily Press 1935: Newark Ledger 1939: Newark Star Eagle merged with Newark Ledger to form the Newark Star-Ledger[5] 1939: Syracuse Herald and Syracuse Journal (merged) 1941: Syracuse Post-Standard 1945: Jersey Journal 1948: Harrisburg News, the first paper in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (He would later buy the Harrisburg Patriot and combine them into the Harrisburg Patriot-News). 1949: Advance Publications Inc. formed as the primary holding company for all his newspaper assets.[6] 1950: Portland Oregonian 1955: The Birmingham News (Birmingham, Alabama), The Huntsville Times (Huntsville, Alabama) and the St. Louis Globe-Democrat 1959: Condé Nast Publications purchased for $5 million at the suggestion of his wife. According to Newhouse, "She asked for a fashion magazine and I went out and got her Vogue." Condé Nast also published Glamour, House & Garden, and Young Bride. He soon purchased another magazine publisher, Street & Smith and merged it with Condé Nast, becoming a major magazine publisher.[6] 1961: Oregon Journal 1962: Times-Picayune and States-Item, both in New Orleans, Louisiana (merged in 1980) 1967: Cleveland Plain Dealer 1976: he purchased Booth Newspapers for $305 million, a chain of eight dailies in Michigan (Ann Arbor News, Bay City Times, Flint Journal, Grand Rapids Press, Jackson Citizen Patriot, Kalamazoo Gazette, Muskegon Chronicle, and the Saginaw News) as well as the Sunday supplement Parade. Personal life[edit] He was married to arts patron and philanthropist Mitzi Epstein (April 30, 1902 – June 29, 1989),[2] who grew up in an upper middle class, Jewish family on the Upper West Side, the daughter of silk tie importer.[3] They had two sons, Samuel Irving Newhouse, Jr., known as Si Newhouse, chairman and CEO of Advance, and Donald Newhouse, president of Advance.

Samuel Newhouse resided in Manhattan for much of his life. His great-grandson, S.I. Newhouse IV, is featured in a documentary called Born Rich about the experience of growing up as the heir to one of the world's greatest fortunes.[7] In 1942, he bought Greenlands, a working farm of 143 acres in Harbourton, Mercer County, New Jersey. In his privately published memoir, A Memo to my Children, he documented his often strained relationship with his two sons.[3]

Death and legacy[edit] Newhouse died in 1979, aged 84, in New York City of a stroke,[8] and is buried in the Baron Hirsch Cemetery on Staten Island.[9] Upon his death, he passed his voting common stock in the principal family company, Advance Publications, in trust to his six grandchildren and made his two sons the sole trustees.[2]

One of the vessels of the Staten Island Ferry is also named after him. So was the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University.[citation needed] He was inducted into the Junior Achievement U.S. Business Hall of Fame in 1989.[citation needed]

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Samuel Irving Newhouse, Sr.'s Timeline

1895
May 24, 1895
New York, New York County, New York, United States
1927
November 8, 1927
Age 32
New York, New York County, New York, United States
1929
1929
Age 33
New York, New York County, New York, United States
1979
August 29, 1979
Age 84
????
Staten Island, Richmond, NY, United States