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About Samuel Tanner

Samuel Tanners Revo War Deposition 1833 Jackson Co, VA His pension app was rejected. But DAR states he served in Indian wars after revolutionary war.

In 1832 , Robert Lisdall, a Baptist minister, preached in a log cabin near the town of Spencer, at the residence of one Samuel Greathouse on Spring Creek on the first Sunday in July 1832. "I preached to the people as God gave me strength from his word, (Mat 2 32) in the wilderness of Virginia" -- from an old diary of this Evangelist. In 1835 this same "man of God" organized a "society" or church near the place of his first preaching. From the roll book of that organization we get the following pioneer names; Mrs Sam Tanner, (Sam. Tanner himself refused to "sign" because as he expressed it, he would not give away the [illegible - either kingdon or freedom] of the forest for the right to go he din't know where) -- Josephus Jr. of Roane County, VA

:-) the whole Josephus Jr. story is a hoot... ha ha...

The following comes from Don Norman:

   Samuel Tanner, a son of Edward and Rachel Tanner, was born May 15,

1759 and died in Roane County VA (WV) in 1850. He married Sudna Carpenter November 28, 1791. Sudna was a daughter of Solomon and Sudna (Hughes) Carpenter. The family were the first settlers in present day Spencer, WV, arriving there May 14, 1812.

   Samuel applied for a pension as an Indian scout in 1777 in the

militia company commanded by Captain Hall. Request No. R 10389. His request was refused.

Samuel Tanner was the first settler at Spencer, and the first in Roane County, barring a little cluster of cabins built near Osborne's Mills on Big Sandy, about 1810. Tanner is usually credited as coming from Randolph County. I think it is pretty well established fact that he sojourned for a time on Mill Creek or at Warth's Bottom, and if Jesse Carpenter was a brother to his wife, he may have spent from one to several years in Meigs County, Ohio, before coming to try his fortune in the wilderness of what was then Wood County.

Tanner had been living under the 'rock' at what is now Spencer, over a month before war had been declared against Great Britain, the War of 1812.

On the 14th day of May, 1812, Samuel Tanner, Sudner Carpenter Tanner, his wife, Jonathan Wolfe from Hacker's Creek settlement, and a boy named Tate, came to the site of Spencer and camped under the rocks at the end of the point near the residence of Harry C. Woodyard.

This 'cave' - so called - had long been used by both white men and Indians as a camping spot. Logs were cut and split into puncheons and stood up along the edge of the overhanging rocks, for an outside wall. The rocks overhead served for a roof and the floor was of stone. A rude fireplace was constructed at one end and the smoke was allowed to go up through a crevice of the rocks or out into the room, as might happen. Another portion was into a stable. Leaves were piled into the back corners of the living room, a puncheon table and a few stools were added and they were ready for housekeeping.

They lived under this rock until the next spring. A field was cleared on the table land between the 'house' and where the Ravenswood Pike now is. This was planted in late corn and the little family prospered. Most of their sustenance being provided from the surrounding forests.

It was while living under this rock that their eldest daughter, Elizabeth Tanner, is supposed to have been born, and it is said that she was the first white child born in Roane County.

Jonathan Wolfe later married Bridget Runyan, and lived on Spring Creek. The boy, Tate, is lost sight of altogether. Next spring the Tanners erected a cabin across Tanner's Run and nearly on the site of what was long known as 'the old Fisher House', an old frame building unpainted and weather beaten, which was still standing in 1872. This building was then the first house in town, and was used as a court house when the county was organized in 1856.

The log cabin which was built by Tanner stood until about 1855. In this cabin on May 9, 1813, Tanner's son, Elijah, was born. Some claims are that Elijah was the first white child born in Spencer District.

There was a trail up Spring Creek which led to the Kanawha Salt Works above Charleston. Another trail, from Weston and Hacker's Creek settlements, passed through Gilmer County to the Ohio River settlements and crossed the Kanawha River trail at what was long known as Bowman's Corner, now occupied by the Trader's Trust Company Bank. This point was not far from the Tanner cabin, and from this fact the place was long known as Tanner's Crossroads. Later it became Cassville, and then, perhaps about 1850, Rolls Butcher, having sold his store at Reedyville with the announced purpose of going to the gold fields of California, but instead having gone into business at Cassville, the place was ironically referred to as 'Californy' or 'New Californy', a name later adopted 'officially' and continued as California until the village was made the county seat of the new 'County of Roane', when it was named Spencer, this being the first name of Judge Roane, for whom the county was named and who was then in service on the Judicial Circuit.

Samuel Tanner, said Susy Miller, was buried on the hill above town in what is known as the Bartlett Extension, and his bones, she said, were unearthed while grading for a street back of the Clay Smith house. Samuel Tanner married a Carpenter, a sister of Joe Carpenter, and an aunt (Susan DeHart has crossed out 'an aunt') of Amos Carpenter. Of their children, I have heard names but not much further account of them: Elizabeth; Elijah; William; Jesse; and James.

History of Spencer, West Virginia

In the year of 1812, Samuel Tanner and his family, along with Jonathan Wolfe, traveled from Harrison County to Roane County, to the site of what is now the city of Spencer, West Virginia. This piece of land lying on the waters of Spring Creek, a branch of the Little Kanawha River, seemed an ideal place to settle.
Samuel established a home for himself and his family in a cave, under the cliffs where Spencer Middle School now stands. Jesse Hughes may have been the first white man to see Roane County, but he did not settle here until much later. Jesse Hughes was so impressed with the area and painted such a beautiful picture of the place, his brother-inlaw, Samuel Tanner, decided to make the journey from Harrison County. It seemed to be an ideal place to homestead. There was a huge overhanging rock shelf, a beautiful spring, a nearby creek, and abundant game in the surrounding forest.
 The cave, long used by both white men and Indians as a camping spot, seemed like a perfect place to set up housekeeping. Logs were cut and split, then stood up along the edge of the overhanging rock for an outside wall. A crude fireplace was constructed at one end and the smoke was allowed to go up through a crevice in the rocks. Leaves were piled into the back corners of the living room, a table and stools were added and they were ready for housekeeping. The cave consisted of two rooms, side by side with a partition of rock in between. The larger room must have been some fifteen feet deep and thirty feet long with a eight foot ceiling. The smaller room was just as deep but perhaps only half a long and served as a stable for livestock. The cliffs are no more than a shadow of their original selves. Because of the danger to children, much of the shelf has been broken off deliberately. It was while living under this rock their first daughter, Elizabeth, is supposed to have been born. It is said that she was the first white child born in Roane County.
The next spring Tanner erected a cabin across Tanner’s Run. This log cabin stood until about 1855. The Tanners were so pleased with their new home in the wilderness that they carried the praise of the country back to their former homes. In 1814, other immigrants came and settled on Spring Creek, two miles below Spencer. Among the new arrivals were more members of the Tanner clan, Carpenters, Millers, and Runnions. In 1816, the name “Tanner’s Cross Roads” was bestowed upon the place for the reason that two paths bisected each other here at right angles. It was later named New California, Cassville, and finally, Spencer.
In 1835, Samuel purchased 243 acres, which included all of the land in New California from Robert Alexander for a dollar per acre (Jackson Co., Deed Book 3, page 271). At this time Samuel Tanner had lived on this land or more than twenty years. In 1850, Samuel sold half of the property to Alexander West, Jr., which encompassed all of the village, for slightly more than fifteen dollars an acre (Jackson Co. Deed Book 8, page 271). This included the land Alexander West later deeded to Roane County for the courthouse. More than seventy-five acres of this land was yet forest, but contained the water mill, the village of Cassville (Spencer) and several town lots.
Samuel Tanner was born in Augusta County, Virginia, May 15, 1759. He is thought to be son of Edward Tanner, who lived in the Jane Lew area of Harrison County, (now Lewis Co.), Virginia. Little is know of his early life until he joined the military.
In his application for a Revolutionary War Pension (dated June 22, 1833), Samuel Tanner states he entered into the service of the United States in April 1777, at Rockbridge County, Virginia. Samuel volunteered as a private in a company of militia commanded by Captain Hall and marched to Lexington, Virginia, where the company was assembled and organized. On May 10, 1777 they commenced a march towards Point Pleasant at the mouth of the Great Kanawha River, by way of Warm Springs and Hot Springs in Bath County.
They crossed the Jackson River five miles from Hot Springs, and then proceeded to the fort where Lewisburg is now located. At this point Samuel’s company joined a few companies of regulars and militia under the command of Col. George Skillern. They remained there two or three weeks of the purpose of obtaining a supply of cattle and other provisions. From there the march proceeded on by Walkers’ Meadow on the head of the Meadow River, crossing the Sewell Mountains onto the Gauley River near its mouth.  They then crossed onto the Great Kanawha a short distance below the falls. The company made camp there for about two weeks because some of the officers were ill. In August, Samuel’s company finally reached Point Pleasant, where they found the fort garrisoned with a few regulars under the command of Capt. Matthew Arbuckle. They waited there to be joined by General Hand from Fort Pitt. In October, still at Point Pleasant, Samuel was a witness to the murder of the Shawnee Chief Cornstalk, who was being held hostage in a guard house. Revolutionary soldiers had been killed by an Indian in that area and Chief Cornstalk was killed in retaliation.
Soon after this event, General Hand arrived without an army. After a few days of consultation, the expedition against the Indians was abandoned. In November they left and retraced their steps to the forts on the Greenbrier River. The company separated in December and Samuel returned home to Rockbridge County in January 1778, after serving eight months and twenty days as a private in the Revolutionary War.
Once Samuel Tanner was discharged from revolutionary service, he emigrated to the frontier settlements on the Greenbrier River. In February 1780, he volunteered as an Indian Scout under Colonel Andrew Donnally. Colonel Donnally immediately placed him under the command of Lieutenant John McClung. During the spring, summer, and fall of that year, Samuel made many excursions in the adjacent counties spying on the Indians on the Greenbrier, Kanawha, Meadow, Cole, and Guyandotte Rivers. He reported occasionally to the fort. In November 1780, after serving 9 months as an Indian spy, Samuel was dismissed from service by Col. Donnally. In June 1781, Samuel again volunteered as a private Indian spy and was placed under Ensign George Hamilton. This time he served six months and in May 1782, he volunteered again and served an additional six months. Whether Samuel Tanner actually was granted a Revolutionary War pension is unclear.
Following his exploits as an Indian Spy, Samuel married Sudna (Sudner) Carpenter on December 5, 1791 in Harrison County, Virginia (Marriage Book 1, page 15). Sudna, the daughter of Solomon Carpenter and Sudna Hughes, was born about 1765. Samuel and Sudna appear in the 1850 Jackson County Census (Roane County was not formed until 1856 from Gilmer, Kanawha, Wirt, and Jackson Counties). In the 1850 census Samuel was 96 years old and Sudna was 85. Unfortunately, no one seems to know when Samuel died or where is buried. It is suspected, however, that Samuel’s body may have been lost when a number of graves were moved from a cemetery on Locust Avenue to the Spencer Memorial Cemetery on Parkersburg Road.
It is not known for certain just how many children Samuel and Sudna had. Jesse Tanner, born about 1800 was documented as their son. Elizabeth, Joseph, Mary, Louise, Elijah, William, and James Tanner are, also, thought to be their children. They may have had several other children of which there are no records.In June 1999 a historical marker and nearby playground was dedicated in honor of Spencer’s first family. A ceremony at the Spencer Middle School near the rocky overhang marked the end of a long effort to honor the pioneer Tanner family. A cast aluminum sign at the duff is navy blue with antique gold lettering to match the colors of the former Spencer High School (now Spencer Middle School) which is pictured on both sides.  Information, also on both sides, tells of the area’s first settlers.
Written by Donna J. Walbrown(A descendant of Samuel and Sudna Tanner)January 2000

References: Harrison County, (W) Va. Marriages (Book 1, pg. 15)“West Virginians in the American Revolution” Ross B. Johnton (pg. 275) Samuel Tanner’s application for Army pension, No.10389, June 1833 1850 Federal Census, Jackson County, Virginia “History of Roane County, West Virginia 1774-1927” William H. Bishop, Esq. (pgs. 319, 320)“Hardesty’s West Virginia Counties-Roane County” (pg. 246)“Pioneers in Roane County, W.Va.”, John A. House (pgs. 304-307)“The Times Record (October 8, 1992, July 1, 1999) Early Settlers of Roane Co. (Roane County History Website) Posted 23 Nov 2013 by BillieKeaffaber38 Roane County's European Pioneers and Settlers

Jesse Hughes, of present-day Lewis County, is credited as the first Englishman to set foot in present-day Roane County. In 1772, he led a small party, including William Lowther and Elias Hughes, into the Little Kanawha Valley and is believed to have passed through the county. He told many of his relatives that the area would make a fine home. Several of his and his wife, Grace (Tanner) Hughes, relatives and children became Roane County's earliest settlers.

In 1812, Samuel Tanner and his wife, Sudna Carpenter Tanner, became Roane County's first settlers when they constructed a rudimentary shelter inside a cave in present-day Spencer. The following year, they built a log cabin. In 1814, several of their relatives moved to the Spring Creek area, just a few miles south of the Tanner homestead. Four of these families last names were recorded: Tanner, Carpenter, Miller and Runnion. John Greathouse, Samuel Tanner's cousin, arrived the following year. In 1816, the Spring Creek area became known as Tanner's Cross Roads because two paths bisected the area.

Around 1816, several families moved to the Reedy area, then known as Three Forks. By 1823, the following pioneers and their families resided in the Reedy area: Patrick Board, Robert Blosser, a Mr. Cain, a Mr. Roach, David and Thomas Seaman, and Charles Stewart.

Pension Application

Military: Samuel Tanner, Deposition for Revolutionary War pension, 22 Aug 1833, Spencer, Jackson County, Virginia. State of Virginia County of Jackson


On the 22d day of June AD 1833 personally appeared before me the subscriber a Justice of the Peace in and for the County of said and State of Virginia Samuel Tanner a resident of Spring Creek in the county of Jackson and State of Virginia aged 74 years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7t 1832. That he entered service of the United States under the following named officers and served as here in stated. In April in the year 1777, in the County of Rockbridge in the State of Virginia he volunteered as a private in a company of militia commanded by the Capt. _____ Hall, marched to Lexington in the said county, where the said company assembled and was organized and about the 10th of May commenced a march toward Point Pleasant at the mouth of the Great Kananwha river. Marched via Warm Springs and Hot Springs in the Bath County. Crossed Jackson river 5 miles from the Hot Springs. Proceeded to the fort where Lewisburg now is there joined a companies of regular and militia under command of Col George Skillern, remained here two or three weeks for the purpose of obtaining a supply of cattle and other provisions. Then proceeded on the march by Walker's meadows on the head of the Meadow River, crossing the Sewell Mountains, fell on to Gauley River near it's mouth crossing the same fell on to the Great Kanawha a short distance below the falls thereof lay here a week or two in consequence of some sickness among the officers. Then proceeded on the march to Point Pleasant where they arrived some time in the month of August. Found the fort garrisoned with a few regulars under command of Capt Matthew Arbuckle. Halted at Point Pleasant in expectation of being joined by Genl. Hand from Fort Pitt and then the which to proceded against the Indian villages on the North west side of the Ohio. In October some of the company to which declarant belonged was on the west side of the Kana river hunting. One of whom was killed by some Indians who were lurking about at which the soldiary became greatly enraged and proceeded to the guard house and killed Cornstalk and som other Indians who were detained as hostages in the fort. Soon after this event Genl. Hand arrived without an army, in consequence of which after a few days consultation the expedition against the Indians was abandoned, and some time in Nov. they left the fort and retraced their steps to the forts on the Greenbrier river, arrived here in declarant was marched to his county Rockbridge, arrived at home about the first of Jany 1778, having served 8 months and about 20 days as a private militia man.


In the year 1779, he migrated to the frontier settlements on the Greenbrier river and in February 1780 volunteered as an Indian Spy, was stationed at Col. Andrew Donnelley's fort. Placed by Col. Donnelley under the immediate command of Lieut John McClung and during the spring, summer and fall of this year made many excursions in the adjacent countries spying, to wit, on the Greenbrier, Kanawha, Meadow, Gauley, Cole and Guyandott rivers and reporting periodically to the fort. Was near the last of Nov 1780 dismiss by Col Conally, having served as private Indian spy 9 months.


In June 1781, in the county of _________ in the State of Virginia he again volunteered as a private Indian spy, was placed under the command of Ensign George Hamilton was engaged in spying as in the preceding year, subject to the orders of Col. Donneley at whose fort they were stationed and to whome they from time to time reported was engaged in spying from June 1781 until Dec 1781 making six months additional service.


In May 1782 he again volunteered as an Indian spy in the said county of Greenbrier was again stationed at Donnelleys Fort and placed under command of Ens. James Graham, was engaged in spying and reporting to the said Fort subject to the orders of Col Donnelly until Nov. Was then dismissed having performed six months additional service as a private Indian spy.


He was born in Augusta County now Rockbridge, VA on the 15th May 1759, was living there when first called into service, from thence moved to Greenbrier Co. VA where he lived until the year 1790 when he moved to Monongalia County, VA [Harrison County, VA] where he resided until the year 1802, at which time he moved to Jackson then Mason County, VA, where he still lives.


He has no documentary evidence by which to prove his services. He was at the end of the first tour of service discharged by Capt. Hall, but not knowing if ever could be of service to him did not preserve it. At the end of each years service as an Indian spy he was mercily discharged. He knows of no man living whose testimony he can procure by which to prove his services.


He hereby relinquishes every claim what ever to a pension or annuity, except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.


Sworn to and subscribed they and year aforesaid.


Samuel X Tanner (his mark)


Ye the seven several interogatories presented by the War Department he answers as follows viz - To the


1st I was born in Augusta now Rockbridge County in the State of Virginia on the 15th May 1759.


2d I have no record of my age. I remember the account there of given me by my parents.


3d When called into service I was living in Augusta now Rockbridge County, VA. I moved from thence to Greenbrier Co. VA in the year 1779 and was living there when I entered the service as an Indian spy. I have since lived in Monongalia Co., VA. I now live in Jackson County, VA.


4 I volunteered.


5th At Point Pleasant I seen Capt. R. Arbuckle a regular officer who commanded the garrison at that place, I also seen Genl. Hand who came down the Ohio from Fort Pitt & Col. George Skillern who commanded the Boutetourt troops Capt Hall Stewart & militia officers at Col. Donnally's fort. Knew Col. Donnally Col. Stewart Capt Hamilton & Capt Stewart.


6th I recd. a discharge by Capt Hall which is lost. signed by Capt Hull. From the service as a spy. I was only dismissed.


7th I am known to Elijah Runion & Jesse Carpenter in my neighborhood who can testify to my character for veracity.


We Elijah Runnion and Jesse Carpenter residing in the county of Jackson in the state of Virginia hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Samuel Tanner who has subscribed and sworn to the preceding declaration that we believe him to be 74 years of age that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution and that we concur in that opinion.


Elijah (his x mark) Runion Jesse Carpenter


Sworn and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.


And I the said Justice of the peace do hereby certify and declare my opinion, after the investigation of the matter, and after putting the investigatories prescribed by the War Department that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states. And I the said Justice do further certify, that in appease to me that Elijah Runion and Jesse Carpenter who have signed the preceeding certificate are credible persons and that their statement is entitled to credit. And I the said Justice do further certify that there is no clergyman living in the neighborhood of the above named applicant. And that him (the said applicant) resided more than 20 mile from the Court house of the said County of Jackson and from bodily infirmity is unable to travel thereto. And I the said Justice do further certify that the foregoing contains the original proceedings of my self in the matter of the application of Samuel Tanner for a pension. In testemony whereof I have hereuntio set my hand and seal this 22 day of June 1833.


Thomas Boggs (Seal) Biographical Information Posted 07 May 2018 by BillieKeaffaber38 "Pioneers in Roane County, WV" by John A. House, 1906, in the section, "Spencer and Vicinity"


Tanner Family


Samuel Tanner was the first settler at Spencer, and the first in Roane County, barring a little cluster of cabins built near Osborne's Mills on Big Sandy, about 1810. Tanner is usually credited as coming from Randolph County. I think it is pretty well established fact that he sojourned for a time on Mill Creek or at Warth's Bottom, and if Jesse Carpenter was a brother to his wife, he may have spent from one to several years in Meigs County, Ohio, before coming to try his fortune in the wilderness of what was then Wood County.


Tanner had been living under the 'rock' at what is now Spencer, over a month before war had been declared against Great Britain, the War of 1812.


On the 14th day of May, 1812, Samuel Tanner, Sudner Carpenter Tanner, his wife, Jonathan Wolfe from Hacker's Creek settlement, and a boy named Tate, came to the site of Spencer and camped under the rocks at the end of the point near the residence of Harry C. Woodyard.


This 'cave' - so called - had long been used by both white men and Indians as a camping spot. Logs were cut and split into puncheons and stood up along the edge of the overhanging rocks, for an outside wall. The rocks overhead served for a roof and the floor was of stone. A rude fireplace was constructed at one end and the smoke was allowed to go up through a crevice of the rocks or out into the room, as might happen. Another portion was into a stable. Leaves were piled into the back corners of the living room, a puncheon table and a few stools were added and they were ready for housekeeping.


They lived under this rock until the next spring. A field was cleared on the table land between the 'house' and where the Ravenswood Pike now is. This was planted in late corn and the little family prospered. Most of their sustenance being provided from the surrounding forests.


It was while living under this rock that their eldest daughter, Elizabeth Tanner, is supposed to have been born, and it is said that she was the first white child born in Roane County.


Jonathan Wolfe later married Bridget Runyan, and lived on Spring Creek. The boy, Tate, is lost sight of altogether. Next spring the Tanners erected a cabin across Tanner's Run and nearly on the site of what was long known as 'the old Fisher House', an old frame building unpainted and weather beaten, which was still standing in 1872. This building was then the first house in town, and was used as a court house when the county was organized in 1856.


The log cabin which was built by Tanner stood until about 1855. In this cabin on May 9, 1813, Tanner's son, Elijah, was born. Some claims are that Elijah was the first white child born in Spencer District.


There was a trail up Spring Creek which led to the Kanawha Salt Works above Charleston. Another trail, from Weston and Hacker's Creek settlements, passed through Gilmer County to the Ohio River settlements and crossed the Kanawha River trail at what was long known as Bowman's Corner, now occupied by the Trader's Trust Company Bank. This point was not far from the Tanner cabin, and from this fact the place was long known as Tanner's Crossroads. Later it became Cassville, and then, perhaps about 1850, Rolls Butcher, having sold his store at Reedyville with the announced purpose of going to the gold fields of California, but instead having gone into business at Cassville, the place was ironically referred to as 'Californy' or 'New Californy', a name later adopted 'officially' and continued as California until the village was made the county seat of the new 'County of Roane', when it was named Spencer, this being the first name of Judge Roane, for whom the county was named and who was then in service on the Judicial Circuit.


Samuel Tanner, said Susy Miller, was buried on the hill above town in what is known as the Bartlett Extension, and his bones, she said, were unearthed while grading for a street back of the Clay Smith house. Samuel Tanner married a Carpenter, a sister of Joe Carpenter, and an aunt (Susan DeHart has crossed out 'an aunt') of Amos Carpenter. Of their children, I have heard names but not much further account of them: Elizabeth; Elijah; William; Jesse; and James.


William Tanner was a brother of Samuel. He came to Spring Creek about 1813 or 14 and settled at the mouth of Mile Tree Run, one mile above town on Tanner's Run, which took its name from him. He was married four times, and doubtless raised a large family.


Jesse Tanner was a half brother of Samuel Tanner. He was born in 1795 and died March 26, 1885. His monument is a granite block of large size, and bears the above inscription and also the name of the widow, still living in 1904. She was his third wife.


Jesse Tanner lived four years on the farm just below Spencer. He married a sister to John Carpenter. His second wife was Judy Carpenter, the widow of John Carpenter, and his third wife was a widow, Lucinda Raines.


Mrs. Hovey (a daughter of W.R. Goff) said, "She couldn't tell what kin Jesse was to Sam, but Jesse was a good neighbor and a good man, but superstitious." He built a two story hewed log house, she could not give the location, but it was somewhere near Spencer. However, his wife died, and he would not live in the house any longer but sold his land (50 acres) to Goff.


Jim Tanner lived in Spencer in 1835. Of his children: Wash Tanner, married Katy McCune, a daughter of Peter McCune. Tom and Bas Tanner were their children.


Noah Tanner married a relative of the Davises of Harrison County. He moved from about Spencer to Wright's Run, and was killed on Tucker's Creek. He was brought home and was buried at Beech Grove. He was killed during a raid to secure supplies for the Confederate Army.


Jeff Tanner lived on the waters of West Fork.


Josh Tanner never married.


A. L Vandale once told me Old Jim Tanner (named above) lived in the end of Spencer toward Reedy, when he came in 1832. Tanner was from Lewis county.


John Wright, son of Bas Wright, told me Noah Tanner bought the Dix farm of Squire Bord, and that Bord bought it from Basil Wright.


Poach Hoff says Sam Tanner was an uncle of Tom Carpenter, who was a son of Jesse Carpenter, who went to Parchment.


On December 14, 1850, Samuel and Sudner Tanner deeded one half of their land to Alexander West and the other half to Elizabeth Tanner, their daughter. The deeds are signed by Samuel and Sudner Tanner, both making the X mark.


Though Spring Creek to Spencer or above and Reedy to Beech Grove or farther must surely have been a part of Wood County until the organization of Jackson in 1831, a pretty thorough search of the Deed Books and tax books at the Office of the County Clerk of Wood County failed to reveal the names of Samuel, William or Jesse Tanner, Thomas or Jesse Carpenter, Henry Runyan, Blosser, Greathouse, Willis Burdett, William Walker, George Parsons, John P Thomasson or Reuben Douglas, before 1813. However, I did not examine closely the old Deed Books but looked only at the General Index.


============================

From Roane Co History on Internet:


Samuel Tanner was born in Augusta County, Virginia, May 15, 1759. He is thought to be a son of Edward Tanner, who lived in the Jane Lew area of Harrison County, (now Lewis Co.), Virginia. Little is known of his early life until he joined the military. In his application for a Revolutionary War Pension (dated June 22, 1833), Samuel Tanner states he entered into the service of the United States in April 1777, at Rockbridge County, Virginia. Samuel volunteered as a private in a company of militia commanded by Captain Hall and marched to Lexington, Virginia, where the company was assembled and organized. On May 10, 1777 they commenced a march towards Point Pleasant at the mouth of the Great Kanawha River, by way of Warm Springs and Hot Springs in Bath County. They crossed the Jackson River five miles from Hot Springs, and then proceeded to the fort where Lewisburg is now located. At this point Samuel's company joined a few companies of regulars and militia under the command of Col. George Skillern. They remained there two or three weeks for the purpose of obtaining a supply of cattle and other provisions. From there the march proceeded on by Walkers' Meadow on the head of the Meadow River, crossing the Sewell Mountains onto the Gauley River near its mouth. They then crossed onto the Great Kanawha a short distance below the falls. The company made camp there for about two weeks because some of the officers were ill. In August, Samuel's company finally reached Point Pleasant, where they found the fort garrisoned with a few regulars under the command of Capt. Matthew Arbuckle. They waited there to be joined by General Hand from Fort Pitt. In October, still at Point Pleasant, Samuel was a witness to the murder of the Shawnee Chief Cornstalk, who was being held hostage in a guard house. A Revolutionary soldiers had been killed by an Indian in that area and Chief Cornstalk was killed in retaliation. Soon after this event, General Hand arrived without an army. After a few days of consultation, the expedition against the Indians was abandoned. In November they left and retraced their steps to the forts on the Greenbrier River. The company separated in December and Samuel returned home to Rockbridge County in January 1778, after serving eight months and twenty days as a private in the Revolutionary War.


Once Samuel Tanner was discharged from revolutionary service, he emigrated to the frontier settlements on the Greenbrier River. In February 1780, he volunteered as an Indian Scout under Colonel Andrew Donnally. Colonel Donnally immediately placed him under the command of Lieutenant John McClung. During the spring, summer, and fall of that year, Samuel made many excursions in the adjacent counties spying on the Indians on the Greenbrier, Kanawha, Meadow, Cole, and Guyandotte Rivers. He reported occasionally to the fort. In November 1780, after serving 9 months as an Indian spy, Samuel was dismissed from service by Col. Donnally. In June 1781, Samuel again volunteered as a private Indian spy and was placed under Ensign George Hamilton. This time he served six months and in May 1782, he volunteered again and served an additional six months. Whether Samuel Tanner actually was granted a Revolutionary War pension is unclear.


Following his exploits as an Indian Spy, Samuel married Sudna (Sudner) Carpenter on December 5, 1791 in Harrison County, Virginia (Marriage Book 1, page 15). Sudna, the daughter of Solomon Carpenter and Sudna Hughes, was born about 1765. Samuel and Sudna appear in the 1850 Jackson County Census Va.


(Roane County was not formed until 1856 from Gilmer, Kanawha, Wirt, and Jackson Counties). Unfortunately, no one seems to know when Samuel died or where he is buried. It is suspected, however, that Samuel's body may have been lost when a number of graves were moved from a cemetery on Locust Avenue to the Spencer Memorial Cemetery on Parkersburg Road. It is not known for certain just how many children Samuel and Sudna had. Jesse Tanner, born about 1800 was documented as their son. Elizabeth, Joseph, Mary, Louise, Elijah, William, and James Tanner are, also, thought to be their children. They may have had several other children of which there are no records.


The Memories and Writings of Harold David Somerville, Volume III, Compiled by Pauline Somerville Smith and Lola Mae Smith, Ravenswood, WV, 2002 pages 151-153: (Italics are mine)


"Tanner's X Roads was also know as Cassville, New California and Spencer. Tanner's X Roads was situated on Spring Creek at the mouth of Tanners Run on what was later known as the Glenville and Ripley Pike and was on the division line between Kanawha and Harrison Counties. From 1848 to 1856 it was on the divison line between Jackson and Wirt Counties running on an East and West line by the old pike, later the main street of the village. The village was named for Samuel Tanner the first settler who came about 1814 and tempoarily made his home under a rock. In the 1850 Census it shows him listed as still living here, age 96.


A post office was established here in 1846 as Tanners X Roads. . . . The post office was located on the South side of the Pike in Jackson County. . . The name of the office was changed to New California on March 11, 1852 . . .


Prior to the establishment of a post office here the people had to go to Reedyville for their mail, some 6 miles west on the Ripley Pike.


Note the P. O. Department spelled the name Tanners X Roads. In 1857 the name of the Office was changed to Spencer, then Roane County.


Other settlers were Elijah and Henry Runnion . . .


Samuel Tanner lived on the land as a squatter at first for 20 years or more. The land in the Spencer area was part of a patent belonging to Albert Gallatin patented in 1778. In 1835 Mr. Tanner purchased 243 acres at one dollar per acre which included what was both sides of the trail or pike.


A water mill was built on the bank of Spring Creek on the north side of the village on the Tanner land. In 1850 Tanner sold to Alexander West Jr. 1/2 of this tract of land. The part South of the Pike for $1850. West purchased the Tanner water mill also on the other side of the Pike and he traded it to Jacob Crislip for some land on the Left Fork of Reedy.


Another mill was built here known as the Elijah Runnion Mill, built by Henry Runnion Jr. and later operated by Henry Runnion Sr., also by James Hogg. This mill in 1855 was sold to Isaac and Gilbert Mckown, who added a carding and saw mill to it. About this time the first mill (the Crislip Mill) fell into diuse and was discarded.


The mill McKowns owned stood on the Jackson side of the Pike near what was known as hair pin curve in Spring Creek.


Major William R Goff who settled here in 1837 on a trace of land on the east side of Spring Creek adjoining the Samuel Tanner tract and later purchased the Henry Runnion lands on the south and of the Preston Trotter survey on the north and east making him over 1,000 acres in one tract . . .


Robert Fisdale organized the firt Baptist Class in 1835 some of the members were Evelyn Depue, Elizabeth Tanner, Susan and Tom Boggs, and James and Sarah Vandale.


Alexander West Jr. sold much of his land for lots and small parcels of land to settlers he had purchased from Mr. Tanner.


Reedyville Reedyville is located on the Left Reedy Fork near the affluent of Tucker and Reedyville Runs. This was the old trail from the East via Glenville. Tanners Cross Roads and Ripley to Letart Falls on the Ohio River, also on the old trail from the Poca side which crossed the dividing ridge at the head of the Reedy Creeks, came out the ridge between left and middle Riddy to Reddyville then to Tanner Cross Roads and when Wirt County was formed in 1848 the division between Jackson and Wirt from the dividing ridge followed this road by way of Reedyville to the home of Major William R. Goff just East of New California (Tanners Cross Roads). All of the Reedy District, the northern part of Spencer and the Central part of Curtis District all now in Roane County were part of Wirt County. . .


Reedyville, owing to its location on two prominent early bridal paths, one which soon developed into an important road of travel from Clarksburg and Glenville section via Ripley to the Ohio River and prominent settlers as Thomas Hardman Sr., the Thomassons, Ingrams, Burdetts, Phillip D. Cox, Rolla Butcher, Harmans, Parsons, Armstrongs, Hughes and Riddles and early mills. Reedyville was the oldest and most prominent town in the northeastern part of Jackson County for several years prior to the Civil War. . . "



            
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Samuel Tanner's Timeline

1759
May 15, 1759
Augusta County, Virginia
1795
January 1795
Age 35
Wood County, West Virginia, United States
1800
1800
Age 40
OH, United States
1800
Age 40
1802
1802
Age 42
Warth's Bottom, Jackson Co., (W)VA
1805
1805
Age 45
Warth's Bottom, Jackson Co., (W)VA
1813
1813
Age 53
Spencer, Roane Co., (W)VA
1814
1814
Age 54
Walton, Roane County, WV, United States
1815
1815
Age 55
VA, United States