Sancho VI el Sabio, rey de Navarra

Is your surname de Navarra?

Research the de Navarra family

Sancho VI el Sabio, rey de Navarra's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Related Projects

Sancho VI 'o Sabio' de Navarra, rey de Navarra

Spanish: Rey Sancho VI "El Sabio" De Navarra, El Sabio
Also Known As: "King Sancho VI of /Navarre/", "Le Sage", "King of Navarre", "The /Wise/", "le Sage", ""The Wise"", "called the Wise (el Sabio)", "Sancho VI (the Wise)"
Birthdate:
Death: June 27, 1194 (61-62)
Pamplona, Navarre, Navarre, Spain
Place of Burial: Nájera, Rioja, Rioja, Spain
Immediate Family:

Son of García Ramírez V “el Restaurador”, Rey de Navarra y Pamplona and Marguerite de l'Aigle
Husband of Sancha, Reina consorte de Navarra
Father of Berengaria of Navarre, Queen consort of England; Sancho VII el Fuerte, rey de Navarra; Fernando, infante de Navarra; Constanza, infanta de Navarra; Blanche de Navarre, comtesse consort de Champagne and 1 other
Brother of Blanca de Navarra, reina consorte de Castilla and Margherita di Navarra, regina consorte di Sicilia
Half brother of Rodrigo García; Vela Ladrón de Guevara and Sancha de Navarra, vizcondesa consorte de Narbona

Occupation: King of Navarre, 1150-94; my 22nd great uncle's father-in-law., Rey de Navarra
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sancho VI el Sabio, rey de Navarra

Sancho VI of Navarre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Sancho VI Garcés (c. 1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudején and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty of Cazorla in 1179. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.

He married Sancha of Castile in 1157, the daughter of Alfonso VII. Their children were:

  1. Sancho VII of Navarre
  2. Ferdinand
  3. Ramiro, Bishop of Pamplona
  4. Berengaria of Navarre (died 1230 or 1232), married Richard I of England
  5. Constance
  6. Blanca of Navarre, married Count Theobald III of Champagne, then acted as regent of Champagne, and finally as regent of Navarre

Sancho VI of Navarre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sancho VI Garcés (c. 1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudellén and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty in 1163. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.

He married Sancha of Castile in 1157, the daughter of Alfonso VII. Their children were:

Sancho VII of Navarre

Ferdinand

Ramiro, Bishop of Pamplona

Berengaria of Navarre (died 1230 or 1232), married Richard I of England

Constance

Blanca of Navarre, married Count Theobald III of Champagne, then acted as regent of Champagne, and finally as regent of Navarre


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sancho_VI_of_Navarre


Sancho VI Garcés (c.1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García VI Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudellén and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty in 1163. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.


Sancho VI Garcés (c. 1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudellén and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty of Cazorla in 1179. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.

He married Sancha of Castile in 1157, the daughter of Alfonso VII. Their children were:

Sancho VII of Navarre

Ferdinand

Ramiro, Bishop of Pamplona

Berengaria of Navarre (died 1230 or 1232), married Richard I of England

Constance

Blanca of Navarre, married Count Theobald III of Champagne, then acted as regent of Champagne, and finally as regent of Navarre


BIOGRAPHY: Encyclopaedia Britannica Micropaedia, 1981, Vol VIII, p843, Sancho VI the Wise:

"Died 1194, King of Navarre (Pamplona) from 1150 and son of Garcia V the Restorer. Sancho was the first to be called king of Navarre; previous kings were known as kings of Pamplona. In 1151 Castile and Aragon agreed to partition Navarre, but Sancho avoided the destruction of his kingdom by accepting Alfonso VII of Castile as his overlord and marrying Alfonso's daughter."

d. June 27, 1194

byname SANCHO THE WISE, Spanish SANCHO EL SABIO, king of Navarre (Pamplona) from 1150 and son of García IV (or V) the Restorer.

Sancho was the first to be called king of Navarre; previous kings were known as kings of Pamplona. In 1151 Castile and Aragon signed at Tudillén a treaty for the partition of Navarre. By skilled diplomacy Sancho avoided the destruction of his kingdom, accepting Alfonso VII of Castile as his overlord and marrying Alfonso's daughter. He himself intervened in Castilian affairs during the minority (1158-70) of Alfonso VIII. In 1176 both countries submitted their longstanding territorial disputes to Henry II of England as arbiter, who assigned Rioja to Castile. Sancho accepted this decision. He was a legislator of importance, conceding many municipal fueros (charters) and protecting Jews and immigrants (francos) from the north.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.


Sancho VI Garcés (c. 1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudellén and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty of Cazorla in 1179. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.

He married Sancha of Castile in 1157, the daughter of Alfonso VII. Their children were:

Sancho VII of Navarre

Ferdinand

Ramiro, Bishop of Pamplona

Berengaria of Navarre (died 1230 or 1232), married Richard I of England

Constance

Blanca of Navarre, married Count Theobald III of Champagne, then acted as regent of Champagne, and finally as regent of Navarre


Mi nuevo libro, LA SORPRENDENTE GENEALOGÍA DE MIS TATARABUELOS está ya disponible en: amazon.com barnesandnoble.com palibrio.com. En el libro encontrarán muchos de sus ancestros y un resumen biográfico de cada uno, ya que tenemos varias ramas en común. Les será de mucha utilidad y diversión. Ramón Rionda

My new book, LA SORPRENDENTE GENEALOGÍA DE MIS TATARABUELOS is now available at: amazon.com barnesandnoble.com palibrio.com. You will find there many of your ancestors and a biography summary of each of them. We have several branches in common. Check it up, it’s worth it. Ramón Rionda

Acerca de Rey Sancho VI "El Sabio" De Navarra, El Sabio (Español)

Sancho VI “el Sabio”

  • 2.1 consolidación por vasallaje de la restauración dinástica
  • 2.2 rex Navarre
  • 2.3 Castilla sella alianzas con monarquías europeas
  • 2.4 los castellanos atacan los territorios riojanos
  • 2.5 el rey de Inglaterra, árbitro entre Castilla y Navarra
  • 2.6 Ricardo “Corazón de León”, duque de Aquitania
  • 2.7 nuevas alianzas de Navarra
  • 2.8 los cambios en la sociedad y la nueva vida urbana

Al acceder Sancho VI el Sabio al trono de Navarra en 1150, éste se encuentra todavía en una situación de sumisión y dependencia de Castilla. En sus primeros años de reinado - al menos hasta la muerte en 1157 de Alfonso VII de Castilla y poco después la de su hijo Sancho III “el Deseado” en 1158 - este hecho condiciona el reyno navarro y constituye la principal preocupación del Rey para consolidar la restauración dinástica que se había hecho en la persona de su padre García V Ramírez.

2.1 consolidación por vasallaje de la restauración dinástica

A la muerte de su padre García V Ramírez “el Restaurador” Sancho tiene aproximadamente 17 años y en ese tiempo las minorías de edad o el acceso de un joven rey al trono son siempre circunstancias de inestabilidad política que, en el caso de la joven dinastía navarra restaurada, podrán ser aprovechadas por sus vecinos de Castilla y Aragón para volver a sus tradicionales apetencias de reparto del viejo reyno, cuna de sus tronos..

El reinado de Sancho el Sabio será largo - 44 años hasta su fallecimiento en el año 1194 - y pasará por épocas en que se podrá poner en duda la continuidad de la dinastía e incluso del Reyno. Pero a su término surgirá una Navarra prestigiada, fiscal y económicamente fuerte, legislativamente desarrollada, modélica en la institucionalización jurídica municipal y foral, e insertada con respeto en el concierto de relaciones internacionales con las monarquías europeas. La diplomacia, habilidad, inteligencia y sentido de la justicia - incluso con valor y coraje - así como su prestigio personal, entendimiento cultural y religiosidad, le han valido a este rey el reconocimiento histórico de “ Sabio”.

Posiblemente la restructuración interna del reyno comenzó siendo todavía joven el Rey. La documentación histórica nos habla en una primera etapa principalmente de sus esfuerzos para defender el territorio de la monarquía y consolidar la dinastía. Y para ello el Rey no tiene otra opción - como en la época de su padre García - que buscar el apoyo y protección de Alfonso VII de Castilla, aunque ésto hará que la nobleza navarra esté siempre más pendiente de las prebendas a obtener del castellano que de los compromisos de lealtad con su rey, a menudo incumplidos.

Pretende Sancho llevar a cabo una alianza con Aragón gobernado por Ramón Berenguer, pero Castilla no lo va a consentir. Pronto se va a celebrar la boda en Calahorra del infante Sancho de Castilla con la infanta Blanca, hermana del rey Sancho de Navarra, como hacía algún tiempo lo habían acordado sus padres. Aprovechando el viaje a Calahorra, el 27 de enero de 1151 se reúnen en Tudejen - cerca del lugar fronterizo del “mojón de los tres reyes” donde convergen las mugas de Aragón, Castilla y Navarra - Alfonso VII y su hijo Sancho de Castilla con el conde de Barcelona Ramón Berenguer para negociar un reparto de Navarra. Tres días después se celebra la boda y a buen seguro el joven rey navarro - que había llevado a su hermana al altar - no sabría nada de esta conspiración, que no pudo llevarse a efecto. Castilla y Aragón volvían a tener las apetencias de reparto de Navarra que tantas veces habían sentido en la época del anterior rey García, aunque los historiadores han interpretado que se trataba de una amenza de Castilla para tener al rey navarro bien sujeto en el vasallaje.

Debió pensar el rey Sancho la conveniencia de seguir reforzando la alianza de familia con Castilla pues dos años después, el 2 de junio de 1153, el propio Rey celebraba en Soria sus esposales con la hermana de su cuñado, la infanta Sancha de Castilla, hija también de Alfonso VII. La gobernación del “reino de Nájera” - una astucia castellana para controlar los disputados territorios riojanos - que había sido creado el año 1143 en ocasión de la tregua que convinieron Alfonso VII y García V Ramírez, está encomendada al infante Sancho de Castilla. También es éste el titular del “reino de Artajona” (5) que su hermana bastarda Urraca había recibido en dote al casar con el rey navarro García V Ramírez “el Restaurador”.

Los lazos con Castilla eran tan poderosos, la autoridad de Alfonso VII tan real, que el rey Sancho VI de Navarra debió de sentirse muy solo en esta época viendo cómo los nobles navarros tenían su atención puesta en las campañas militares que contra los moros se preparaban de contínuo en la corte castellana.

No obstante, la muerte de Alfonso VII en el año 1157 y la llegada al trono de su hijo Sancho no viene acompañada con la usual inestabilidad ya que el infante llevaba tiempo asociado al gobierno de su padre sabiendo ya mover con destreza las tramas nobiliarias de la corte y conociendo las fortalezas y debilidades de las alianzas de Castilla con los reinos vecinos. Alfonso VII había dividido sus reinos al fallecer, de modo que el infante Fernando había heredado el reino de León y Sancho solamente el de Castilla. Esto permitía a Sancho ocuparse más plenamente que su padre de los asuntos con sus vecinos de Navarra y Aragón. No habían pasado tres meses del fallecimiento de Alfonso VII que Sancho “el Sabio” se presenta en Soria el 11 de noviembre para rendir vasallaje a Sancho III de Castilla, celebrándose entonces el casamiento del rey navarro con la infanta Sancha de Castilla cuyos esponsales hacía ya cuatro años que se habían celebrado, también en Soria. Las relaciones entre ambos reyes serían entonces cordiales ya que el rey castellano devuelve pocos meses después al navarro los territorios del “reino de Artajona”. Es un primer logro territorial de Sancho “el Sabio”, “quando rex don Sango recuperavit Artassona et alias villas de Navarra”.

2.2 rex Navarre

Sancho III de Castilla solamente sobrevive un año a su padre Alfonso VII, muriendo el 31 de agosto del año 1158. Su hijo Alfonso VIII - sobrino del rey Sancho “el Sabio”- tiene tres años al morir su padre y reinará en Castilla durante 58 años. Esta minoría de edad en Castilla - en donde surgirán de inmediato discordias entre Manrique de Lara, a quien Sancho III había encomendado la tutela de su hijo Alfonso, y los Castros - y el próximo fallecimiento el 8 agosto de 1162 de Ramón Berenguer IV, permitía al rey Sancho VI despreocuparse del acoso a que había sido sometida la dinastía navarra desde su difícil restauración en el año 1134. El nuevo rey de Aragón Alfonso II es todavía un niño de 10 años de edad a la muerte de su padre Berenguer. Los nobles navarros ven la ocasión propicia para asentar sus lealtades de nuevo con su Rey, al que ven ahora encarnando un futuro más seguro para su Reyno y para sus intereses nobiliarios.

Sancho VI el Sabio ve entonces el momento oportuno para elevar la categoría de su dinastía al nivel de “rex”, que desde muy antiguo en la historia había tenido. Y es desde aproximadamente el año 1162 cuando se generaliza en los documentos reales y eclesiáticos tal tratamiento de “rex Navarre”, en lugar de “Pampilonensium rex”. A partir de entonces el rey Sancho abandona su consideración de vasallo del rey de Castilla, aunque el papado de Roma no reconocerá esta elevación monárquica hasta muerto el Rey en el año 1196, reinando ya su hijo Sancho VII “el Fuerte”.

Sancho el Sabio es quien toma ahora la iniciativa aprovechando las minorías de edad en Castilla y en Aragón. Firma con los tutores aragoneses un acuerdo de paz por trece años, lo que le permite cubrirse las espaldas para tomar la mayor parte de los territorios riojanos del recientemente creado reino de Nájera - con la excepción de Nájera y Calahorra - en una campaña de seis meses que dió comienzo en octubre de 1162 y que le permitió adentrarse incluso hasta cerca de Miranda de Ebro. La zona de Vizcaya al mando de Lope Díaz de Haro permaneció en la zona castellana pero el Duranguesado, Guipúzcoa y Álava estarían con Navarra. La casa de Haro seguía dominando para Castilla una parte de La Rioja.

También suscribe Sancho el Sabio en Fitero en el año 1167 un acuerdo con Castilla que trae sosiego a las fronteras y luego otro en Vadoluengo al año siguiente con Aragón prorrogando la paz veinte años, e incluso llegando a entendimientos para guerrear juntos contra los musulmanes de Murcia. Son unos tímidos intentos de Sancho el Sabio de participar más activamente en la Reconquista. Llegará a establecer un señorío en Albarracín (1167), aunque sería más exacto atribuir este establecimiento al guerrear de un noble navarro - Ruiz de Azagra - al servicio del rey castellano.

La debilidad castellana y aragonesa va sin embargo desapareciendo a medida que sus respectivos reyes van creciendo en edad, experiencia de gobierno y unión y lealtad de los nobles en torno a ellos. Alfonso VIII tiene ya cerca de 24 años cuando ajusta con Sancho de Navarra en 1179 un acuerdo para poner fin a las discordias que les enfrentaban desde hacía ya casi diez años por razón de los territorios de La Rioja. Ya desde el año 1170 los jóvenes monarcas aragonés y castellano (de 18 y 15 años respectivamente) habían suscrito en Sahagún (4 de junio) un acuerdo de amistad.

2.3 Castilla sella alianzas con monarquías europeas

Una tía de Alfonso VIII, Constanza de Castilla, había sido reina de Francia desde el año de su matrimonio con Louis VII en la primavera de 1153 hasta su muerte el año 1160. Una hija de Constanza y Louis VII, de nombre Marguerite, había casado con Henri “the Young” - hijo del rey de Inglaterra Henri II (1133-1154-1189) y Leonor de Aquitania - que murió anteriormente a su padre en el año 1183 siendo el trono heredado por su hermano menor Ricardo I “Corazón de León” (1157-1189-1199) (6).

También Alfonso VI de Castilla había casado en primeras y en quintas nupcias con Agnès y con Beatrix hijas del duque Guillermo VIII de Aquitania, bisabuelo éste de Leonor de Aquitania.

Todo esto nos está indicando que el joven rey castellano Alfonso VIII habría tenido la ocasión de relacionarse con su prima hermana Marguerite en la corte de Inglaterra en donde habría conocido a la extraordinaria reina y duquesa Leonor de Aquitania que va a condicionar de manera sorprendente las relaciones entre Francia e Inglaterra. No es aventurado pensar que el matrimonio de Alfonso VIII cuando tenía 15 años de edad con la princesa Leonor Plantagenêt - hija de los reyes ingleses Henri II y Leonor de Aquitania y que tenía solamente 8 años al casar en el año 1170 - surgiría de estos círculos familiares. Leonor Plantagenêt daría a Alfonso VIII 12 hijos.

Esta boda entre Alfonso VIII y Leonor habría inquietado sin duda al rey Sancho de Navarra pues la princesa Leonor aportaba en dote a su matrimonio el ducado de Gascuña - frontera norte con Navarra - surgiendo así una peligrosa alianza familiar entre la dinastía de Castilla y la francesa Plantagenêt de Inglaterra que dominaba toda la Aquitania, que ya comprendía el ducado de Gascuña. La fecha de la boda es el año 1170 y ocurre poco después del tratado de amistad de Sahagún entre los reyes castellano y aragonés.

2.4 los castellanos atacan los territorios riojanos

Mediado el año 1173, con la ayuda de Aragón, comienza Castilla la guerra de recuperación de los territorios riojanos que había tomado Sancho el Sabio de Navarra entre el otoño del año 1162 y marzo de 1163, aprovechando la minoría de edad de Alfonso VIII. La ofensiva castellana fue precedida de una astuta estrategia para atraer hacia Castilla no pocos nobles navarros que poseían plazas en esos territorios. El ataque comienza por el asalto al castillo riojano de Quel sobre los cortados del río Cidacos y las tropas castellanas no tardan en penetrar hasta Artajona y luego Pamplona. El rey Alfonso II "el Casto" de Aragón - que por entonces (enero 1174) había casado con la castellana Sancha, tía de Alfonso VIII - había llevado sus ejércitos por el valle del Ebro destruyendo la fortaleza sobre la peña de Milagro que Pedro I de Aragón y Navarra había tomado a la taifa de Zaragoza a finales del siglo XI. En el año 1176 continuaba el conflicto. Las tropas castellanas habían vuelto ese año al interior de Navarra y habían tomado el castillo de Leguín que defendía el corredor que desde Lumbier hasta Aoiz daba acceso a Pamplona.

La guerra había durado tres años, hasta el 25 de agosto de 1176, en que Alfonso VIII y Sancho el Sabio se reúnen entre Nájera y Logroño y acuerdan someter el contencioso a un arbitraje con el rey Henri II de Inglaterra a quien se le reconocía un gran prestigio en Europa, no obstante siendo el inglés suegro de Alfonso VIII de Castilla.

2.5 el rey de Inglaterra árbitro entre Castilla y Navarra

El laudo no pudo contentar a ninguna de las partes. Los embajadores de Sancho VI de Navarra (7) basaban sus argumentos en la pertenencia de los territorios riojanos - por el inapelable derecho de conquista a los musulmanes ya desde principios del siglo X - al rey de “Pamplona y Nájera” Sancho IV Garcés, a cuya muerte alevosa en Peñalén le habían sido arrebatados por los castellanos. Entraron los embajadores en todos los detalles para explicar cómo el rey de Castilla había usado la fuerza cada vez que Navarra había querido ejercer la autoridad que le correspondía en aquellos territorios. Los navarros solicitaron que volvieran las fronteras a donde se habían establecido en el año 1037, tras la batalla de Tamarón, es decir en una línea aproximada que unía las cercanías de Santander con los Montes de Oca.

Los embajadores castellanos (8) fundaban sus alegaciones en una perspectiva histórica distinta. En primer lugar, se debía restablecer la situación existente al tiempo de los acuerdos de 1087 entre Sancho I Ramírez y Alfonso VI de Castilla, por lo que reclamaban las tierras vascongadas y riojanas y exigían también compartir con el rey navarro la soberanía de Tudela. Solicitaban además una indemnización de cien mil marcos de oro por daños y rentas cesantes.

El 6 de marzo de 1176, el rey Henri II preside en Londres la primera reunión arbitral. Ante la dificultad de comprensión de las alegaciones orales, el Rey aplazó las reuniones y solicitó se pusieran aquellas por escrito, lo que ordenó se hiciera en tres días.

El laudo arbitral decidió que la situación territorial debía volver a donde se encontraban las fronteras en la fecha en que ambos litigantes fueron reyes simultaneamente, es decir en el momento de la muerte de Sancho III de Castilla, en 1158. Consecuentemente Navarra debía devolver a Castilla las tierras riojanas tomadas en la campaña de 1162-1163 y Castilla debía restituir a Navarra los enclaves que había tomado en la campaña de 1173 a 1176. El rey castellano debía además indemnizar al navarro con tres mil maravedíes anuales durante diez años. Ambos reyes estaban también obligados a respetar por siete años la tregua que habían acordado en el año 1176.

Al no contentar el laudo a ninguna de las partes, no se cumplió. Para Sancho VI era muy grave aceptar que la conquista navarra de los territorios riojanos a los musulmanes en el siglo X quedara ahora invalidada y sujeta a negociación, arbitraje o incitación a reconquista. Pero el laudo tenía una gran virtud para el rey Sancho el Sabio pues consideraba que los vínculos vasalláticos del rey de Navarra hacia el de Castilla eran desde ahora inexistentes, con lo que la titulación de “rex Navarre” tenía un refrendo jurídico y reconocimiento en las cortes europeas. Sancho VI conservará ésto último y mantendrá vigente las situaciones adquiridas en los territorios riojanos. Puesto que el laudo arbitral no fue demasiado claro en la cuestión de los territorios vascongados, Sancho VI mantuvo también en ellos su autoridad.

El conflicto seguía pendiente y como primera medida, los reyes de Aragón, de Castilla y Fernando II de León acuerdan en el mes de junio de 1177 romper la tregua que mantenían desde el año 1173 con el califa almohade Abu Yaqub Yusuf y deciden no contar con Navarra para llevar el esfuerzo de Reconquista. Se iniciaba así otra época de acoso al rey de Navarra volviendo a los viejos pactos para repartirse el Reyno de Navarra que no podría extenderse por ninguna frontera. En marzo del año 1179 los acuerdos castellano-aragoneses de Cazola venían a confirmar con un lujo de detalles las ambiciones de reparto de Navarra que movía a sus reyes.

El 15 de abril Sancho VI el Sabio acepta con habilidad diplomática y serenidad calculada un acuerdo definitivo de paz, zanjando en favor de Castilla las cuestiones territoriales que les separaba, en línea con el laudo arbitral del rey inglés. Los territorios riojanos que Sancho había tomado en la campaña de 1162-1163 eran así restituídos a Castilla - con ciertas condiciones de gobernación conjunta - mientras que se devolvían a Navarra las plazas de Álava - en donde Navarra mantendría su particular régimen señorial - que antes había ocupado Alfonso VIII. El río Nervión marcará de nuevo la frontera de Navarra. Sancho VI reconocía también la soberanía de Castilla sobre las tierras burgalesas y sorianas que hasta cerca de Numancia e incluyendo la sierra de Cameros, Ágreda y las Cinco Villas riojanas habían pertenecido desde hacía mucho tiempo a los reyes de Pamplona. Los acuerdos representaban una solemne declaración de paz entre los soberanos de Castilla y de Navarra, en los que no se vislumbra ya ninguna dependencia vasallátiva del rey navarro hacia el castellano.

En ese momento puede darse por terminado el período de “restauración” de la dinastía de Navarra que, desde el año 1134, había tomado 45 años.

La paz de abril de 1179 habría llenado de satisfacción a la reina de Navarra, la castellana Sancha, tía carnal del rey Alfonso VIII. Pero moría al poco tiempo en agosto de ese mismo año 1179. Era ahora importante para el rey navarro buscar alianzas matrimoniales para sus hijos que fueran idóneas para poner al Reyno al abrigo de un nuevo comienzo de hostilidades con los vecinos reinos cristianos hispanos. Cortada Navarra de una expansión hacia el sur, impedido por la alianza entre Aragón y Castilla de su deseo de participar en la Reconquista de territorios musulmanes, era de buen sentido que el rey Sancho se inclinara por mirar más allá de los Pirineos.

Y lo llevará a efecto sin ser consciente por supuesto de que esta mirada hacia el norte colocaría a Navarra durante más de tres siglos en estrecho contacto dinástico con casas reales francesas.

2.6 Ricardo “Corazón de León”, duque de Aquitania

El matrimonio de Alfonso VIII de Castilla con una princesa de la casa real inglesa había inquietado a Sancho “el Sabio” ya que la reina de Inglaterra, Leonor de Aquitania (9) (1122- 1204), era la titular del ducado de Aquitania que estaba unido al de Gascuña desde el año 1039. El ducado de Aquitania se extendía desde el río Loira hasta el Garona y el ducado de Gascuña desde este río hasta los montes Pirineos, incluído Bearn y Labourd. Leonor de Aquitania había casado en primeras nupcias con el rey Luis VII de Francia (1120-1137-1180) y tras la anulación en 1152 de este matrimonio, casó en segundas nupcias con el duque de Normandía, el francés Henri de Anjou Plantagenêt, que poco después tomaría la corona de Inglaterra como Henri II (1133-1154-1189).

Los vastos territorios de Aquitania que Leonor había aportado a la corona de Francia en ocasión de su primer matrimonio, pertenecen ahora a la corona inglesa que tiene el inmenso territorio anglo-angevino desde Escocia hasta Navarra. Por este feudo de Aquitania y otros como Normandía que poseían los Plantagenêt en territorio francés deben rendir vasallaje al rey de Francia. Henri de Anjou había rendido vasallaje a Luis VII en el año 1151 por el ducado de Normandía - antes de tomar la corona de Inglaterra - y vuelve a hacerlo en el año 1154 después de haberla tomado por todos sus feudos continentales que ahora incluyen además Maine, Anjou, Bretaña y Poitou con Aquitania que ya va unida con el ducado de Gascuña.

Este vasallaje será fuente de interminables conflictos entre Francia e Inglaterra en lo que se conoce como la guerra de los Cien Años que comienza a mediados del siglo XIV pero cuyos antecedentes se están ya larvando en este época del siglo XII.

Quizá movida por las infidelidades del rey inglés con su favorita Rosamond Clifford, Leonor de Aquitania establece en el año 1170 su corte en Poitiers, en donde se instala con sus hijos y es en ese año cuando casa a su hija de 8 años de edad - también llamada Leonor - con Alfonso VIII de Castilla. Tres años después, en 1173, promueve una revuelta de sus hijos con apoyo de Escocia y Francia en un intento de destronar a su esposo el rey Henri II, pero ello le habría de costar quedar confinada casi 15 años, hasta el año 1189 en que muere su esposo el Rey y hereda el trono su segundo hijo varón Ricardo “Corazón de León” (1157-1189-1199). Leonor en su intento de derrocar al Rey había previsto entregar Aquitania a su hijo Ricardo y a Henry “the young” (+ 1183) Normandía, Perche, Anjou e Inglaterra.

En el año 1179 Henri II otorga el ducado de Aquitania a su hijo Ricardo “Corazón de León” y Leonor es entonces invitada a salir de su confinamiento y acude a la solemne ceremonia y festejos que se preparan para su hijo el nuevo duque. Su hermano mayor Henry “el Joven” está destinado a heredar la corona de Inglaterra, de modo que Ricardo - que realmente se había criado con su madre Leonor en Poitiers y seguramente no hablaba el idioma sajón - es quien va a regir los destinos de este territorio de mucha mayor extensión que las posesiones de dominio del rey de Francia.

No podía prever Ricardo que su hermano mayor Henry fuera a morir el año 1183 y que sería él quien finalmente llevaría la corona de Inglaterra. Tras la muerte de su hijo Henry, Leonor vive de nuevo con el rey Henri II en palacio, pero dos años más tarde volverá a confinarla privándole de libertad. En el año 1189 muere el Rey y Leonor se ausenta de Inglaterra para ir en busca de su hijo predilecto Ricardo, el duque de Aquitania.

2.7 nuevas alianzas de Navarra

         2.7.1 el vecino ducado de Gascuña
         2.7.2 la infanta Berenguela reina de Inglaterra
         2.7.3 la infanta Blanca condesa de Champagne

2.7.1 el vecino ducado de Gascuña

La princesa Leonor Plantagenêt había aportado en dote a su matrimonio con Alfonso VIII de Castilla en 1170 el importante ducado de Gascuña, siendo Burdeos su capital y extendiéndose desde el río Garona hasta los Pirineos. Pero fue previsto en las capitulaciones matrimoniales que no podría hacer uso del ducado en vida de la Duquesa, su madre Leonor de Aquitania. El ducado estaba dividido en una serie de vizcondados y señoríos que rendían vasallaje al duque de Aquitania. Uno de ellos era Labourd que había sido constituído en favor del rey navarro Sancho III el Mayor por su tío el duque Sancho VI Guillaume a principios del siglo XI (1023). Pero con la reunión de los ducados de Gascuña y Aquitania a la muerte del duque Eudes de Aquitania (1039) había quedado sin efecto la relación de dependencia de Labourd con Navarra.

En el año 1189, cuando Ricardo “Corazón de León” accede al trono inglés, su madre Leonor de Aquitania tiene ya 67 años, una edad muy avanzada en aquel tiempo. El riesgo de que Alfonso VIII hiciera valer a la muerte de la vieja duquesa la dote de su esposa Leonor ante su cuñado Ricardo - el rey de Inglaterra y duque de Aquitania - habría obligado al rey Sancho VI el Sabio a hacer mil cábalas para evitarlo. Según todos los indicios, su hijo el infante Sancho (VII) - casi de la misma edad que el rey Ricardo - mantenía con éste una buena relación, al menos desde la crisis de Bearn de 1170 que obligó la presencia en los Pirineos de Ricardo para invalidar los acuerdos de vasallaje que los señores de Bearn y otros de su influencia se proponían llevar o habían ya llevado a cabo con el rey de Aragón.

Ya desde el año anterior de 1169 la reina Leonor de Aquitania había encomendado a su hijo Ricardo de 12 años de edad el gobierno del ducado de Aquitania, sin duda asistido por ella misma. Sancha, la hermana del rey Sancho VI de Navarra, había casado en el año 1153 con el vizconde Gaston V de Bearn. Muerto éste sin descendiencia en 1170, su hermana Marie - a quien el rey de Aragón Alfonso II había casado con el Senescal de Cataluña Guillermo de Montcada - busca protección otorgando vasallaje al rey aragonés y muere poco después en el año 1173. Es un período de inestabilidad en el vizcondado de Bearn y Ricardo “Corazón de León” estará atento a los acontecimientos que son estrechamente vigilados desde su atalaya en la región, el castillo de Mauleón. El conocimiento que Sancho VI y su hijo el infante Sancho (VII) tienen de la familia de Bearn podía ser una circunstancia que Ricardo “Corazón de León” apreció y utilizó en esta crisis y de donde parece puede suponerse habría nacido la estrecha relación que luego mantendrían. En la crisis de Bearn de 1170 Ricardo Corazón de León tiene unos 13 años y el infante de Navarra Sancho (VII) unos 16.

A partir de 1173, cuando la reina Leonor es confinada y privada de libertad en Inglaterra, la gobernación del extensísimo ducado de Aquitania queda realmente en manos únicamente del joven infante Ricardo de Inglaterra, desde su centro en la corte aquitana de Poitiers. En la expedición de Ricardo al ducado de Gascuña en los años 1176 y 1177 para asegurar la obediencia de algunos señores vasallos, tras la toma de la importante plaza de Dax, ataca Bayona y entra luego en Labourd. En enero de 1177 está en los valles de Cize limpiando la ruta jacobea de los nidos de asaltantes de peregrinos que saqueaban en aquella zona.

Solamente caben algunas hipótesis sobre lo ocurrido ese invierno en que Ricardo se encuentra en el Pirineo. Pero coincide el momento en que los “tenentes” del nuevo castillo de San Juan de Pié de Puerto son leales al rey de Navarra, siendo éste probablemente el comienzo de una larga presencia de Navarra en los territorios de Ultrapuertos. Y coincide este hecho con la destrucción que Ricardo llevó a cabo de la fortaleza de Usacoa junto a San Juan el Viejo, lugar de refugio de los asaltantes de la ruta y coincide también con el declive de la autoridad del vizconde labortano Arnaldo Beltrán en la zona (10).

En el año 1178 Ricardo debe de nuevo ponerse al frente de sus tropas para venir a Dax y acercarse al vizcondado de Bigorre en donde se le negaba obediencia, asunto en el que intervino el rey Alfonso II de Aragón para garantizarle la sumisión del vizconde a su autoridad. En 1187 el vizconde de Bigorre rinde vasallaje al rey de Aragón.

Desde la muerte en el año 1183 del heredero Henry de la corona de Inglaterra, las relaciones entre Ricardo y su padre el rey Henri II eran particularmente hostiles y se vieron agravadas por la apasionada admiración y desvelos que el rey Henry II tuvo con su prometida Alix de Francia - hermana del rey Philippe II Auguste - y con la vuelta a confinamiento de la reina Leonor en el año 1186. Las ocupaciones ahora de Ricardo lo habrían alejado de la frontera sur del ducado de Gascuña y es imaginable que hubiera solicitado a Sancho VI de Navarra y en particular a su hijo el infante Sancho que velaran por sus intereses en la zona, como lo haría más tarde cuando partió para la Cruzada a los Santos Lugares.

2.7.2 la infanta Berenguela reina de Inglaterra

Ricardo Corazón de León tiene unos 32 años al heredar el trono inglés en 1189 y es soltero aunque comprometido - ya desde el año 1169 - con Alix (Adelaïde), hija del rey de Francia Louis VII, por su tercer matrimonio con Adèle de Champagne.

Sancho el Sabio sabrá hacer valer los intereses de vecindad entre Navarra y Gascuña y conseguirá que Ricardo no case al final con Alix - muy al disgusto de su hermano Philippe II Auguste que ha heredado el reino en el año 1180 - sino con su hija, la infanta de Navarra Berenguela. El éxito ante Castilla es definitivo. El rey de Castilla Alfonso VIII había casado con Leonor, una hija del rey Henri II de Inglaterra. Pero ahora la infanta Berenguela de Navarra va a casar nada menos que con el propio rey inglés Ricardo. El rey de Navarra había así logrado contrarrestar la dote que Alfonso VIII había obtenido y que peligrosamente para Navarra le otorgaba derechos sobre el vecino ducado de Gascuña.

A la muerte de Henry II en julio de 1189, su hijo Ricardo permanece en Inglaterra hasta el final de ese año y en febrero de 1190 se acerca de nuevo a Gascuña. Mantiene en la abadía de La Réole una reunión con numerosos prelados y nobles gascones que según algún historiador inglés debió aprovechar para comunicarles su decisión de contraer matrimonio con la infanta Berenguela de Navarra. Este anuncio sería delicado pues invalidaba su anterior y viejo compromiso con Alix, hermana del rey de Francia.

Los historiadores se han preguntado sobre las razones que habrían inducido al rey Ricardo a efectuar esta elección para asegurar un heredero en el trono de Inglaterra y no han faltado numerosas leyendas que atribuyen al vigor y dedicación de su madre la reina Leonor la elección de la princesa navarra, considerada de gran belleza.

Históricamente y políticamente, los historiadores se inclinan a pensar que el rey Ricardo buscó la alianza matrimonial con sus vecinos de Navarra para encontrar en ellos la protección que necesitaban sus territorios gascones durante su proyectada ausencia a los Santos Lugares. Y en ello habría tenido importancia la enemistad que le mostraba el poderoso conde Raymond V de Toulouse (1148-1195) que quedaría peligrosamente atrás en su condado, sin participar en la Cruzada. En relación con ello se ha avanzado la hipótesis de que Ricardo habría encontrado útil para sus propios intereses que el rey de Navarra tuviera autoridad en sus territorios gascones de Cize, siendo quizá ello una explicación del comienzo de la expansión de Navarra en Ultrapuertos. Y ello - siguiendo una hipótesis en parte documentada - se habría plasmado en las capitulaciones matrimoniales entre el rey Ricardo y la princesa navarra Berenguela (11).

La boda se celebró el 12 de mayo de 1991 en la capilla de San Jorge de la catedral de San Juan de Limassol (12) en la isla de Chipre que el rey Ricardo había tomado al duque de Cilicia, Isaac Ddoukas Comnenus (13) en su expedición a Tierra Santa. Una tempestad había lanzado el 8 de mayo algunos barcos de los cruzados contra las costas chipriotas y el duque Isaac, invocando el derecho de derelicto o abandono de nave, se hizo con todos los enseres y vituallas de algunos barcos de la expedición en los que se cree estaban a bordo Berenguela y su futura cuñada la reina-viuda Joan de Sicilia, nuera ésta de la infanta Margarita de Navarra y reina de Sicilia, hermana de Sancho VI el Sabio. El rey Ricardo conservó algunos barcos y fuerzas con las que pudo entrar en la isla y conquistarla. En la boda estuvo ausente el rey Philippe II Auguste de Francia quien se encontraba ofendido por la ruptura del compromiso de matrimonio del rey Ricardo con su hermana Alix.

Tras la brillante conquista de San Juan de Acre el 13 de julio de 1191, el rey Philippe II Auguste decide adelantar su regreso a Francia iniciando desde su llegada un acoso a todos los territorios de la corona inglesa en Francia lo que será el principal antecedente - de los muchos que hubo - para explicar más tarde la guerra de los Cien Años en el siglo XIV. La reina Berenguela y su cuñada la reina viuda de Sicilia Joan abandonaron Tierra Santa el 29 de septiembre de 1192 - antes que el rey Ricardo que lo haría el 9 de octubre - y estuvieron en Roma donde les dió acogida el Papa. Marcharon luego a Marsella desde donde fueron acompañadas por Provence por el rey Alfonso II de Aragón. Luego fueron acompañadas a Poitou por Raymond de Saint-Gilles del condado de Toulouse con quien casaría en segundas nupcias la reina viuda Joan. Desde su vuelta, Berenguela se encuentra en la corte de Poitiers, principalmente en el castillo de Chinon en el valle del río Loire. Durante tres años no vería a su esposo el rey Ricardo.

Ricardo no pudo tomar Jerusalén pero consiguió del sultán Saladino garantías de buen trato y acogida a los peregrinos. Alertado el rey Ricardo de las conspiraciones de su hermano Juan sin Tierra en Inglaterra y de los despojos que en sus territorios de Normandía estaba llevando a cabo el enemistado rey Philippe II Auguste, se embarca de vuelta a Occidente en octubre de 1192. Temiendo que el rey francés le tienda una emboscada si se presenta en el puerto de Marsella, pone sus barcos rumbo al mar Adriático con idea de seguir luego una ruta por tierra.

Tras un naufragio cerca de Venecia, llega Ricardo a Viena y el duque Leopoldo de Austria, que se había considerado insultado por el rey Ricardo en la toma de San Juan de Acre, lo hace prisionero el 21 de diciembre entregándolo en febrero de 1193 al emperador Enrique VI el Grande. Fue liberado un año más tarde en Mayenne, el 4 de febrero de 1194, tras acordar un compromiso de pago de un importante rescate de 150.000 marcos de plata que el Emperador utilizó para su conquista de Sicilia, poniendo así fin al poderío normando en la isla. Tras su liberación y como garantía del posterior pago del rescate el rey Ricardo hubo de entregar rehenes. Entre ellos se encontraba su cuñado, el infante Fernando de Navarra, hijo de Sancho VI “el Sabio”, que permaneció dos años como rehén.

Ricardo y Berenguela habían vuelto separadamente de la Cruzada y ya no llevarían vida marital. El rey murió el año 1199 y Berenguela en1230.

2.7.3 la infanta Blanca condesa de Champagne

A la muerte del rey Sancho VI el Sabio en 1194 su hija la infanta Blanca tiene 17 años - su hermana mayor Berenguela unos 24 - y no ha casado todavía.

La infanta Blanca casa con Thibaud de Champagne, un nieto de Leonor de Aquitania y por lo tanto también emparentado a través de ésta con los mismos círculos de la familia real inglesa. Su padre es Henri I “el Liberal” (1127-1152-1181) y su madre la princesa Marie (1145-1198), hija del primer matrimono del rey Louis VII con Leonor de Aquitania y por lo tanto hermana consanguínea del rey Philippe II “Auguste” quien en esa época está en plena lucha armada contra Ricardo “Corazón de León”. Puesto que Leonor de Aquitania era a su vez la suegra de la infanta Berenguela por su segundo matrimonio con el rey inglés Henri II, no es difícil imaginar que la familia real navarra seguía moviéndose en un mismo círculo de relaciones al casar a las infantas Blanca y Berenguela.

De todo ello se ha sugerido que el rey de Francia Philippe II Auguste pudo haber promovido el matrimonio de un hijo de su hermana Marie con la Casa de Navarra, precisamente para neutralizar el apoyo de esta Casa a su enemiga la corona de Inglaterra.

Henri “el Liberal” había sido compañero cruzado del rey Louis VII en la segunda Cruzada de 1147 a cuyo lado luchó distinguiéndose en el combate del “Meandro” que dispersó a los turcos. Fue un gran diplomático en su tiempo, participando con habilidad en la resolución de todos los conflictos entre Louis VII, el pontífice Alejandro III, el rey inglés Henri II Plantagenêt y el emperador Federico Barbarroja. Tuvo también la visión de fijar el calendario de las seis ferias de Champagne convirtiendo el condado de Champagne en el primer centro de intercambios comerciales en Occidente, lo que redundó en una gran riqueza y esplendor cultural y artístico en el condado. Fue un gran amante de las letras y apasionado estudioso de la Historia.

Thibaud III (1179-1197-1201) había heredado a los 18 años de edad el condado de su hermano Henri II al morir éste sin descendencia en 1197. Tan pronto como asume las riendas del condado, el rey Philippe II Auguste le invita a acompañarle en su lucha contra el rey Ricardo de Inglaterra. Su primera participación en la lucha es en la batalla de Gisors en Normandía (1198) cuya fortaleza se pierde en favor del inglés. Al año siguiente, el 1 de julio de 1199, casa el joven conde Thibaud III con la infanta Blanca de Navarra hermana del rey Sancho VII “el Fuerte” pero muere de fiebres de tifus el 24 de mayo de 1201 en su palacio de Troyes a los 22 años de edad. La condesa Blanca dará a luz un hijo póstumo, el conde Thibaud IV de Champagne, que en el año 1234, a la muerte de su tío Sancho VII “el Fuerte”, se convertirá en el rey Teobaldo I de Navarra. El rey Philippe II Auguste viene a Provins y es el padrino de bautizo de Teobaldo en la iglesia de Saint-Quiriace.

La regencia de Blanca de Navarra en el condado de Champagne se va a prolongar durante un largo período de 21 años. Desconoce todavía el condado pues lleva solamente dos años viviendo en él. El rey Philippe II “Auguste” le ofrece su protección, aunque le pone como condición el deber de no casar de nuevo sin su consentimiento. Tal era la preocupación del Rey de que este condado tan importante pudiera caer en manos del duque de Borgoña u otra de las familias feudales francesas enemiga de la corona, que trae a Teobaldo para ser criado en la corte de Francia. El joven Teobaldo, con solamente 13 años de edad participa en 1214 junto al rey francés en la victoria de Bouvines contra el rey inglés Juan sin Tierra y sus aliados.

El niño-conde va a conocer en la corte de Louvre en París a su prima la infanta Blanca de Castilla - hija del rey Alfonso VIII de Castilla y de Leonor Plantagenêt - que había casado con el heredero de la corona, el futuro Louis VIII “le Lion”. Blanca de Castilla es 13 años mayor que Teobaldo y siente una especial predilección por el niño-conde a quien le introduce en el mundo de los trovadores y poetas que Blanca acoge en la corte de París. Los sentimientos de cariño de Teobaldo hacia Blanca fueron patentes en la corte y fue a ella a quien “el chansonnier y poeta trovador” dedicó muchas de sus notables poemas y canciones. Teobaldo recibe en 1222 la espada de Caballero del rey Philippe II Auguste cesando entonces la regencia de su madre la condesa viuda. Y en el año 1234 toma la corona de Navarra a la muerte de su tío Sancho VII el Fuerte.

Al llegar al capítulo relativo a la Casa de Champagne tendremos ocasión de retomar los hechos del rey Teobaldo I de Navarra y Champagne.

2.8 los cambios en la sociedad y la nueva vida urbana

Hasta la mitad del siglo XII la expansión de las órdenes monásticas es espectacular. Coincide en gran medida con los avances de la Reconquista cuando los monasterios se convierten en agentes sociales de repoblamiento, de actividad económica y de difusión religiosa y cultural. Todo ello va acompañado de una vuelta a la simplicidad que propugnan los monjes cistercienses en respuesta a conceptos de pureza espiritual. Frente al esplendor de la Orden de Cluny y de la riqueza de la Iglesia todo debe ahora “ir desnudo”. Todo el ambiente de la época lleva a una “monacalización” no solamente de la Iglesia sino incluso de la sociedad misma. El ciudadano ideal es el monje y el monje es el cristiano ideal. Incluso los guerreros deben ahora tomar el hábito de monje. Y así las órdenes militares - en particular los Templarios y los Hospitalarios de San Juan - conocerán un desarrollo espectacular.

En la segunda mitad del siglo XII, más bien al final de ese siglo, los desarrollos urbanos han llevado en cambio a apreciar una cultura más del pensamiento que de la espiritualidad y se sienten los primeros balbuceos de la escolástica que va a diversificar y ampliar el pensamiento cristiano. La enseñanza comienza a salir de los monasterios y de las escuelas episcopales para llegar a la plaza pública. Maestros laicos comienzan a impartir enseñanzas, lo cual es novedoso. En el siglo XII se afirma el papado a la vez que se aleja de las preocupaciones religiosas - como las cruzadas - proyectando cada vez más influencia sobre los poderes temporales mientras continúa la reforma gregoriana. La Iglesia está sin embargo decidida a enmarcar la sociedad en base a la unidad de la fe y adopta métodos coercitivos con una nueva legislación que lleva como instrumento la pena de muerte por el fuego que redime. Se organiza la Inquisición en varios países.

A principios del siglo XII la población es eminentemente rural. En la primera mitad del siglo XII comienzan sin embargo a florecer centros urbanos en donde los primeros formadores son principalmente extranjeros - francos - asentados muchos de ellos a través de su llegada inicial al recorrer la ruta Jacobea. Con fines de repoblación, especialmente en las zonas fronterizas, los reyes otorgan privilegios y franquicias a las nuevas villas que se van creando. Y este conjunto de normativas municipales incorporan los derechos y deberes que corresponden a sus moradores, con lo que se está creando el marco jurídico que no solamente ampara a las personas contra las arbitrariedades y servilismo que conllevan los vínculos de vasallaje, sino que en cierto modo, regula y crea un marco de actuación a las profesiones artesanales y al comercio. Ello dará lugar a la aparición y vigoroso desarrollo de una nueva clase social urbana, los “burgueses o francos”. Es un factor de profundo cambio social con notables efectos, no solamente en la vida económica, sino por supuesto en las costumbres e incluso en la lengua. Es el tiempo de fuerte penetración de la “lengua occitana” traída por los “francos” y luego extensamente utilizada también en la corte de Navarra.

Sancho VII “el Sabio” favorece decididamente la creación de nuevos núcleos urbanos constituyendo las “buenas villas” o villas reales, “de realengo”, en las que se integran mayoritariamente pobladores autóctonos navarros dedicados a la agricultura pero en una condición social ya alejada del servilismo que imponía el vínculo de sumisión a los “infanzones” y “ricoshombres” (14). Los "labradores" irán así sustituyendo el viejo vínculo personal de servilismo por otros puramente económico-fiscales.

Estas “villas reales” se añaden a las “villas francas”, también llamadas “burgo”, y tenderían a equipararse a éstas en sus privilegios y franquicias. A pesar del florecimiento urbano, la sociedad sigue caracterizándose por su ocupación y residencia rural. Los “labradores” habitan lugares - aldeas - que dependen jurídicamente de un “señor” (del rey, “ de realengo”; de una institución de la Iglesia, “de abadengo”; o de un señor noble laico, “de solariego”). Los labradores cultivan las tierras del señor y pueden llegar a ser propietarios de las tierras y su casa, pero pagan la “pecha” a su señor. Los que no eran propietarios se denominaban “collazos” y se encontraban en una situación más servil y cuya adscripción real y permanente a la tierra hacía que el señor lo pudiera transferir con ésta.

En el siglo XII se generaliza en Navarra una vida social urbana en que, con ciertas limitaciones y a veces distanciamientos, se mezclan pobladores de distinto origen - de procedencia, de etnia o de religión -, navarros, francos, musulmanes y judíos. El rey otorga a veces fueros diferenciados a cada grupo de población, constituyéndose en algunas ciudades - como Pamplona - distintos barrios o burgos que acogían a estos grupos poblacionales.

El núcleo originario de población se encontraba en Pamplona en la “ciudad episcopal”, cerca de la Catedral. Por ser sus pobladores los “navarros” habría comenzado a llamarse “la navarrería”, para distinguir este barrio del que se constituye en la primera mitad del siglo XII en las inmediaciones de la iglesia de San Cernin - o San Saturnino - para acoger a los inmigrantes “francos”. Fue Alfonso I “el Batallador”, rey de Aragón y de Navarra, el que otorgó el señorío sobre la “navarrería” de Pamplona a su prelado en ocasión de otorgar en el año 1129 (15) el fuero de Jaca a los francos establecidos en el burgo de San Cernin.

Surgirá luego un tercer “burgo” llamado “la Población” de San Nicolás en el que se mezclarán ambas etnias. Las rivalidades que sin duda surgieron llegarían a una gran violencia un siglo más tarde cuando sería reprimida en el año 1276 por los ejércitos del rey francés Philippe III “le Hardi”, regente del Reyno de Navarra.

Un gran número de pequeñas iglesias y ermitas de estilo románico tardío se levantan en Navarra a todo lo largo del siglo XII, entre las que solamente podemos señalar aquí algunas y ponemos como ejemplo cisterciense a Eunate y Torres del Río o los monasterios de La Oliva, Fitero, Iranzu o la catedral de Tudela, entre otros. Roncesvalles vendría un poco más tarde ya en tiempos de Sancho VII “el Fuerte”, mientras que algunos templos de Estella - San Miguel y San Pedro de la Rúa - tienen influencias castellanas y musulmanas. En general, en el valle del Ebro siguió siendo muy importante la población de origen musulmán que normalmente mora fuera de los recintos amurallados y se ocupa en la agricultura y los oficios, entre los que destaca su buen hacer en la “maestría” o albañilería. En Navarra y Aragón la eclosión constructiva de iglesias cristianas tras la liberación del control musulmán ocupa a los musulmanes que siguen radicando en las villas cristianas y su “maestría” en la construcción dará como resultado las innumerables huellas de estilo “mudéjar” en las iglesias. Todavía hoy en día en la Ribera del Ebro se suele llamar “obra de moro” a la obra bien realizada, con “maestría”.

Artística y culturalmente el caso de Tudela es excepcional y en esa ciudad residió largamente Sancho VI “el Sabio” y su hijo Sancho VII “el Fuerte”. Las corrientes culturales que se entremezclan en Tudela con 400 años de pasado musulmán, los aportes de origen pirenáico-carolingio aragonés, la inmigración “franca” de lengua “occitana”, el progresivo desarrollo escrito de una lengua romance autóctona, algunas reminiscencias de hablas vascuences, o el esplendor que tomó la cultura hebrea, hicieron de Tudela el auténtico crisol de culturas de Navarra en la época.

Con el rey Sancho VI “el Sabio” el desarrollo de nuevas villas es espectacular y sería entrar en otra materia señalar las características jurídico-municipales de cada una de ellas. Se pretende señalar aquí solamente la dedicación y acierto con que el Rey supo dotar a cada nueva ciudad del marco jurídico apropiado a cada situación. El “fuero de Jaca ”, seguramente inspirado de precedentes aquitano-gascones, fue un modelo utilizado en varias otras villas y diversas variantes de éste llegaron a aplicarse en las cartas fundacionales de lugares alejados del Pirineo. Otorgado primero a Estella (1164), una versión “estellesa” es otorgada luego a San Sebastián (aproximadamente en 1180), en donde el rey Sancho VI quiere crear un puerto a Navarra asentando allí pobladores gascones (16). Los acuerdos del año 1179 con Castilla aseguraban al rey navarro en esta zona de Guipúzcoa. Ya antes, en tiempos de Sancho el Mayor - gran protector del monasterio de San Salvador de Leyre - fueron precisamente los monjes de este monasterio los que fundaron en Hernani otro monasterio que pusieron bajo la advocación de San Sebastián. Hecho que sin duda tendría influencia cuando el rey Sancho el Sabio fundó y otorgó fuero a San Sebastián. Poco después, en 1181, Sancho el Sabio concedía otro fuero - una versión “logroñesa” del fuero de Jaca - a los pobladores de la pequeña aldea de Gasteiz - llamada por el rey Nova Victoria.

Primero Sancho el Mayor, luego Sancho el Sabio y finalmente la dinastía de los Teobaldos de Champagne - importadora de modelos avanzados franceses - son los representantes regios que más habrán contribuído a la formación de un reino con caracteríticas propias.

Copiado de: http://www.lebrelblanco.com/10.htm?&cap=2 Por Danilo Armando López Rodríguez

Sancho VI of Navarre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Sancho VI Garcés (c. 1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudején and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty of Cazorla in 1179. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.

He married Sancha of Castile in 1157, the daughter of Alfonso VII. Their children were:

  1. Sancho VII of Navarre
  2. Ferdinand
  3. Ramiro, Bishop of Pamplona
  4. Berengaria of Navarre (died 1230 or 1232), married Richard I of England
  5. Constance
  6. Blanca of Navarre, married Count Theobald III of Champagne, then acted as regent of Champagne, and finally as regent of Navarre

Sancho VI of Navarre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sancho VI Garcés (c. 1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudellén and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty in 1163. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.

He married Sancha of Castile in 1157, the daughter of Alfonso VII. Their children were:

Sancho VII of Navarre

Ferdinand

Ramiro, Bishop of Pamplona

Berengaria of Navarre (died 1230 or 1232), married Richard I of England

Constance

Blanca of Navarre, married Count Theobald III of Champagne, then acted as regent of Champagne, and finally as regent of Navarre


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sancho_VI_of_Navarre


Sancho VI Garcés (c.1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García VI Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudellén and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty in 1163. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.


Sancho VI Garcés (c. 1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudellén and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty of Cazorla in 1179. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.

He married Sancha of Castile in 1157, the daughter of Alfonso VII. Their children were:

Sancho VII of Navarre

Ferdinand

Ramiro, Bishop of Pamplona

Berengaria of Navarre (died 1230 or 1232), married Richard I of England

Constance

Blanca of Navarre, married Count Theobald III of Champagne, then acted as regent of Champagne, and finally as regent of Navarre


BIOGRAPHY: Encyclopaedia Britannica Micropaedia, 1981, Vol VIII, p843, Sancho VI the Wise:

"Died 1194, King of Navarre (Pamplona) from 1150 and son of Garcia V the Restorer. Sancho was the first to be called king of Navarre; previous kings were known as kings of Pamplona. In 1151 Castile and Aragon agreed to partition Navarre, but Sancho avoided the destruction of his kingdom by accepting Alfonso VII of Castile as his overlord and marrying Alfonso's daughter."

d. June 27, 1194

byname SANCHO THE WISE, Spanish SANCHO EL SABIO, king of Navarre (Pamplona) from 1150 and son of García IV (or V) the Restorer.

Sancho was the first to be called king of Navarre; previous kings were known as kings of Pamplona. In 1151 Castile and Aragon signed at Tudillén a treaty for the partition of Navarre. By skilled diplomacy Sancho avoided the destruction of his kingdom, accepting Alfonso VII of Castile as his overlord and marrying Alfonso's daughter. He himself intervened in Castilian affairs during the minority (1158-70) of Alfonso VIII. In 1176 both countries submitted their longstanding territorial disputes to Henry II of England as arbiter, who assigned Rioja to Castile. Sancho accepted this decision. He was a legislator of importance, conceding many municipal fueros (charters) and protecting Jews and immigrants (francos) from the north.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.


Sancho VI Garcés (c. 1133 – June 27, 1194), called the Wise (el Sabio), was the king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.

Son of King García Ramírez and Marguerite de l'Aigle, he was the first to use the title "King of Navarre" as the sole designation of his kingdom, dropping Pamplona out of titular use.

His reign was full of clashes with Castile and Aragón. He was a monastic founder and many architectural accomplishments date to his reign. He is also responsible for bringing his kingdom into the political orbit of Europe.

He tried to repair his kingdom's borders which had been reduced by the Treaties of Tudellén and Carrión, which he had been forced to sign with Castile and Aragón in his early reign. By the Accord of Soria, Castile was eventually confirmed in its possession of conquered territories. He was hostile to Raymond Berengar IV of Aragón, but Raymond's son Alfonso II divided the lands taken from Murcia with him by treaty of Cazorla in 1179. In 1190, the two neighbours again signed a pact in Borja of mutual protection against Castilian expansion.

He died on June 27, 1194, in Pamplona, where he is interred.

He married Sancha of Castile in 1157, the daughter of Alfonso VII. Their children were:

Sancho VII of Navarre

Ferdinand

Ramiro, Bishop of Pamplona

Berengaria of Navarre (died 1230 or 1232), married Richard I of England

Constance

Blanca of Navarre, married Count Theobald III of Champagne, then acted as regent of Champagne, and finally as regent of Navarre


Mi nuevo libro, LA SORPRENDENTE GENEALOGÍA DE MIS TATARABUELOS está ya disponible en: amazon.com barnesandnoble.com palibrio.com. En el libro encontrarán muchos de sus ancestros y un resumen biográfico de cada uno, ya que tenemos varias ramas en común. Les será de mucha utilidad y diversión. Ramón Rionda

My new book, LA SORPRENDENTE GENEALOGÍA DE MIS TATARABUELOS is now available at: amazon.com barnesandnoble.com palibrio.com. You will find there many of your ancestors and a biography summary of each of them. We have several branches in common. Check it up, it’s worth it. Ramón Rionda