Sgt. Abraham Doolittle

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Abraham Doolittle

Also Known As: "Abraham Doolittle Sr"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England
Death: August 11, 1690 (65-73)
Wallingford, New Haven County, Connecticut Colony
Place of Burial: Wallingford, New Haven County, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Edward Doolittle and Elizabeth Doolittle
Husband of Joane Doolittle and Abigail Doolittle
Father of Daniel Doolittle; Sgt. Abraham Doolittle; Elizabeth Brockett; Sarah Abernathy; John Doolittle and 9 others
Half brother of Mary Doolittle; John Doolittle, of Rumney Marsh; Timothy Doolittle; Daniel Doolittle; Joshua Doolittle and 2 others

Occupation: Deputy eight times from New Haven, Conn.
Immigration Year: About 1641
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sgt. Abraham Doolittle

From https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/15058772/abraham-doolittle

Buried at Center Street Cemetery in Wallingford, CT Original Epitaph: "AD 70 1690"

Later Memorial:

"In Memory of Hon. Abraham Doolittle. Died Aug 11, 1690 ae 70. Born in England and was progenitor of the family in America. Father of thirteen children. Survived by seven sons and three daughters. Widow Abigail Moss died Nov 5 1710 ae 69. First wife Joane Alling is buried in New Haven. Abraham was at Boston 1640. At new Haven 1642. At Wallingford 1669. Was one of four trustees in management of the plantation until after the incorporation of Wallingford in 1670. One of the committee to found the first church in this town. Marshall of New Haven Colony 1662 until union with Conneticut. Deputy to general court from New Haven and from Wallingford...town treasurer 1871. Townsman 1874 and other years. Sergeant of first train band 1873. Member of vigilance committee 1675...

This stone erected AD 1918. Original stone inscribed AD 70."

Family

He married to Joane ALLING/ALLEN before 1640 in England. (364)(2723) (2724)

Children were: Sarah DOOLITTLE , Abraham DOOLITTLE, Elizabeth DOOLITTLE, Mary DOOLITTLE, John DOOLITTLE, Abigail DOOLITTLE.

He married to Abigail MOSS on 2 Jul 1663 in New Haven, New Haven Colony.(2725) (2726)

Children were: Samuel DOOLITTLE , Joseph DOOLITTLE, Abigial DOOLITTLE, Ebenzer DOOLITTLE, Mary DOOLITTLE, Daniel DOOLITTLE, Theophilus DOOLITTLE.

Source: http://www.familyorigins.com/users/b/l/o/Peter-E-Blood/FAMO5-0001/d21.htm (dead link)

Biography

Sargeant Abraham DOOLITTLE was born about 1620 in England. (2690)(2691) (2692) He emigrated about 1641 to Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony. (2693)(2694) According to William Doolittle, the planters who came to America were typically descended from nobility and were educated. Little information about there exodus from England is available, however, because these Puritans disagreed with the policies of the government and Church of England and therefore were "religious outlaws, unworthy to mention." They were well to do but feared the government might confiscate their possessions. They therefore typically left quitely and without record of their debarking. He moved before 1642 to New Haven, New Haven Colony.(2695) (2696) Abraham and his family made the journey to settle in New Haven. William Doolittle describes the early emigration of settlers from the Massachusetts tot he New Haven Colony, "Companies of them would thread their way on foot over the perilous journey of two weeks, through the unbeaten and almost trackless paths of an unknown forest, having deep, muddy soil and swiftly flowing streams, without bridge or ferry. He Recevied, as one of nine persons, about 3 acres of land. in 1643 in New Haven, New Haven Colony. (2697) He was Elected Chief Executive Officer of New Haven Coloney at age 25 in 1644 in New Haven, New Haven Colony. (2698)(2699) Abraham must have been a clearly organize and charismatic fellow to be given such a responsibility at only 25 years old. Abraham's responsibilities included affairs concerning relations with Indians, neighboring communities, defence of the colony, apportionment of land, trade with England, the Caribbean, and other colonies, and issues of agriculture. He took the oath of a freeman in 1644 in New Haven Colony. (2700) He moved in 1669 to Wallingford, New Haven, CT.(2701) (2702) Abraham moved to a totally unsettled place about 12 miles north of New Haven village, to a tract of land purchased from the Indians. Abraham is alleged to have been the first white man to explore the forests beyond the Quinnipac River. Eventually, other families settled near Abraham until, in 1670, they incorporated the new settlement as the Town of Wallingford. Like New Haven village, Wallingford was an agricultural community comprised of planters. In 1669, its residents, including Abraham, signed a covenant with God, essentially promising that they will behave as good Christians. Genealogist William Doolittle calls Wallingford "the cradle" of the Doolittle family. He describes the homes of early settlers as being typically 16 by 18 feet, built of untrimmed logs cut by ax and fitted by auger. The floors, roof and doors were cut from undressed slabs hewn from logs and fasten with wooden pins. The door was attached with wooden hinges and fastened by a wooden latch and bolt (iron nails and lumber were not available until the arrival of blacksmiths and millers). The chimney was built of stone or sticks and covered with clay. The hearth was large to provide heat in severe winters. Oiled paper was used in windows (glass was rarely used). Cutter (640) says DOOLITTLE's house was in the lower part of the town of Wallingford, and was fortified by a picket fort. An old well within the enclosure was still in use at the time of Cutter's writing (1915). He was member of a great number of town committees between 1669 and 1688 in Wallingford, New Haven Colony. (2703) Abraham was appointed to a many committees following Wallingford's incorporation:

1669-1672: A committee of three to manage the affairs of the community (later Wallingford)

1672: A committee to adjust the boundary between New Haven and Wallingford (North Haven was not incorporated until 1786).

1672: The committee on approbations (choosing which new settlers are admitted to the town).

1673-1688: Various committees concerning highway construction. In 1673, Abraham was appointed Surveyor of Highways. In 1679, the committee laid out a highway along the west side of the river.

1675: A committee to establish the first church in Wallingford (congregational). This task was delayed two years by the Indian War.

1675: Vigilance Committee on town defense during the King Phillip's War.

1675: A committee to care for the town's stock of powder, lead and ammunition.

1677: Chosen to oversee the construction of the mill dam. He was Duputy from New Haven to the General Assembly at Hartford between 1670 and 1685 in New Haven, New Haven Colony.(2704) Abraham was elected to this office seven times. It was necessary to be respected and of high character to be chosen for a prominent office. He granted 12 acres of land in the town's first apportionment before 1671 in Wallingford, New Haven, CT. (2705) He Granted land for planting plus another 2.5 acres on Wharton's brook, where a mill was built in 1674 in 1671 in Wallingford, New Haven, CT.(2706) He was Town Teasurer in 1671.(2707) (2708) In addition to being appoint Treasurer, during the 20 years after the incorporation of Wallingford, Abraham took such an active part in the affairs of the town that he was "appointed to almost every position of responsibly within the gift of his fellow townsmen." He served as a Sargeant appointed to Wallingford town traine band in 1673. (2709)(2710) Abraham built a picket fort around his house for protection against Indian attack. During the King Phillip's War, the General Assembly in Hartford was so fearful of a mass exodus of settlers that it imposed a 100 pound fine and corporal punishment for any settler between 14 and 70 who left the Colony. All males over 16 (except magistrate and church officers) were required to bear arms at all times, even in the field or at church, where the head of the family sat at the outer end of the pew in order to quickly respond (a practice which continued for hundreds of years afterward). This required that residents be completely furnished with arms, including "a musket, a sword, bandaliers, a rest, a pound of powder, 20 bullets fitted to their musket, or 4 £ of pistol shot, or swan shott at least" and be ready to show such arms for inspection. Sentinels stood watch during the night. During the King Phillip's War, 600 settlers were killed and many more wounded. Indians destroyed 13 towns, burned hundreds for buildings, and drove off stock. Thousands of Indians fortified themselves in a log barricade stockade at Pettyguamsquat in Northern Connecticut. In the winter of 1675, the settlers attacked the stockade and "burned without mercy warriors, squaws, helpless old redskins and children. They killed three hundred Indian braves and took hundreds of prisoners, while those that escaped fled to the swamps and passed the cold, stormy night in the deep snow with shelter, food, or fire." Witnesses to the massacre described hideous sheiks, the cries of women and children, and the yells of warriors. The war lasted over a year, and when it was over, the Indians of southern New England had forever lost their power. He awarded 10 acres as recompense, for him to plant English Hay seed, for a period of 6 years. in Jun 1673 in Wallingford, New Haven, CT. (2711) He was Town Selectman between 1674 and 1688 in Wallingford, New Haven Colony.(2712) He served several terms, but not continuously during this period. In 1684, Abraham was led an inquest into the first case of drowning in the town. He was Deputy to the General Court (a representative). between 1679 and 1685 in Wallingford, New Haven Colony. (2713) Did not serve this term continuously. During this time, Abraham was authorized to purchase from the Indians "any" of the land adjacent to the town. As a result, Abraham purchased a large tract which includes present day Meriden. By 1685, Abraham was 65 years old. Genealogist William Doolittle speculates that Abraham must have been receiving support from his sons and daughters regarding his private affairs and farming into order to spend so much time on public duties. He granted four acres by the town "as a gratuitie" in 1680 in Wallingford, New Haven, CT. (2714) He was an Elected "sealer of leather" in 1683 in Wallingford, New Haven, CT.(2715) He granted 9 acres on either side of Wharton's Brook, in addtion to that years regular divsion in 1689 in Wallingford, New Haven, CT. (2716) He died on 11 Aug 1690 in Wallingford, New Haven, CT. (2717)(2718) (2719) (2720) He left, according to his inventory, £342 after 11 Aug 1690 in Wallingford, New Haven Colony.(2721) He was buried in Unknown cemetery, Wallingford, New Haven, CT. (2722) Abraham's gravestone, still sanding in 1901, is the oldest in Wallingford. It is very modest, merely a common field stone one foot high and wide and four inches thick, bearing only his initials, "AD 70 1690." According to Cutter (640), "Abraham Doolittle was the first white man to explore the forests north of New Haven."


Sources

  • Families of Ancient New Haven by Donald Lines Jacobus, pg. 546, 1219
  • http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mscheffler&id=I26643#s3
  • Torrey - New England Marriages Prior to 1700Torrey, Clarence Almon with a revised introduction by Gary Boyd Roberts, New England Marriages Prior to 1700 (Baltimore, MD, Genealogical Pub. Co., 1985)Page: p. 226
  • Barbour VR - Wallingford Title: White, Lorraine Cook, general editor, The Barbour Collection of Connecticut Vital Records; Wallingford 1670-1850 (Baltimore, Genealogical pub. co., 2002)Page: p. 121
  • Families of Ancient New Haven (JacobusTitle: Jacobus, Donald Lines, compiler, Families of Ancient New Haven [CT] (Baltimore, Genealogical Pub. Co., 1974)Page: v. 1, p. 15l v, 3, p. 546
  • Families of Ancient New Haven (Jacobus)Title: Jacobus, Donald Lines, compiler, Families of Ancient New Haven [CT] (Baltimore, Genealogical Pub. Co., 1974)Page: v. 5, p. 1219

.


GEDCOM Source

@R1050710867@ U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Yates Publishing Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,7836::0

GEDCOM Source

Source number: 23970.003; Source type: Pedigree chart; Number of Pages: 3 1,7836::347904

GEDCOM Source

@R1050710867@ Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1619; Birth city: Wallingford; Birth state: CT 1,4725::4009917

GEDCOM Source

@R1050710867@ Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1619; Birth city: Wallingford; Birth state: CT 1,4725::4009917

GEDCOM Source

@R1050710867@ U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Yates Publishing Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,7836::0

GEDCOM Source

Source number: 23970.003; Source type: Pedigree chart; Number of Pages: 3 1,7836::347904

GEDCOM Source

@R1050710867@ Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1619; Birth city: Wallingford; Birth state: CT 1,4725::4009917

GEDCOM Source

GEDCOM Source

Ancestry Family Tree http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=113334805&pid=8233

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Sgt. Abraham Doolittle's Timeline

1619
August 20, 1619
Age 1
Kidderminster, Worcester, England
1620
August 20, 1620
Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England
August 20, 1620
Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England
1649
February 12, 1649
New Haven, New Haven Colony
1650
May 28, 1650
New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
1652
April 12, 1652
Wallingford, New Haven County, Connecticut Colony
1655
June 14, 1655
New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut Colony
1659
May 22, 1659
New Haven, New Haven Co, CT