Sgt. John Osgood

Is your surname Osgood?

Research the Osgood family

Sgt. John Osgood's Geni Profile

Records for John Osgood

317,858 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

John Osgood

Birthdate: (56)
Birthplace: Alton, Hampshire, England, (Present UK)
Death: October 24, 1651 (56)
Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
Place of Burial: North Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Christopher Osgood, II and Elizabeth Osgood
Husband of Sarah Ann Booth
Father of Sarah Clements; Mary Ingalls (Osgood), "The Immigrant"; Capt. John Osgood; Thomas Osgood; Elizabeth Brown (Osgood) and 4 others
Brother of Robert Osgood; Peter Osgood; Mary Foster; Christopher Osgood, III; Margaret Osgood and 1 other

Occupation: Lived in Andover, MA, Yeoman - came to America before 1638
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sgt. John Osgood

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~colby/colbyfam/b638.html#P4473

John OSGOOD was born on 23 JUL 1595 in Wherwell, Hampshire, England. He immigrated on 11 APR 1638 from England to America. He died on 24 OCT 1651 at Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Parents: Christopher OSGOOD and Elizabeth BROCKWELL.

Spouse: Sarah BOOTH. John OSGOOD and Sarah BOOTH were married on 1 JUN 1626 in Wherwell, Hampshire, England.


"Os," as a root word implicative of OSGOOD Deity, has made for itself a firm place in Osgood and other surnames which are as old as the Saxon language. John, Christopher and William Osgood, who do not seem to have been relatives, though they and their families were closely associated, settled in Massachusetts Bay Colony within a short time after the settlement of the Puritans at Plymouth.

John Osgood, born in Wherwell, Hampshire county, England, July 23, 1595, died in Andover, Massachusetts, October 24, 1651, aged fifty-six.

He came from Andover, England, and settled in Andover, Massachusetts, before 1645. He had been at Ipswich and Newbury before his settlement at Andover.

John Osgood was one of the petitioners who had liberty to begin a plantation at Hampton in 1638. On a leaf in the town records a list is written in an ancient hand, without date, but probably when most of the settlers were living, and may be considered correct: "The names of all the householders in order as they came to town: Mr. Bradstreet, John Osgood, etc." So, John Osgood was the second settler in Andover. He was a freeman in 1639, one of the founders of the church in Andover, October, 1645, and the first representative of the town in the general court in 1651.

His will was dated April 12, 1650, and probated November 25, 1651. He was married in England. His wife Sarah survived him more than fifteen years, and died April 8, 1667.

Their children were: Sarah, John, Mary, Elizabeth, Stephen and Hannah. Abbott, in "The History of Andover," mentions two more, Christopher and Thomas.

Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire, Volume 4 is the source for this and the succeeding 6 generations.


John Osgood, born in Wherwell, Hampshire County, England, July 23, 1595, died in Andover, Massachusetts, October 24, 1651, aged fifty-six. 

He came from Andover, England, and settled in Andover, Massachusetts, before 1645. He had been at Ipswich and Newbury before his settlement at Andover.

John Osgood was one of the petitioners who had liberty to begin a plantation at Hampton in 1638. On a leaf in the town records a list is written in an ancient hand, without date, but probably when most of the settlers were living, and may be considered correct: "The names of all the householders in order as they came to town: Mr. Bradstreet, John Osgood, etc." So, John Osgood was the second settler in Andover.

He was a freeman in 1639, one of the founders of the church in Andover, October, 1645, and the first representative of the town in the general court in 1651. His will was dated April 12, 1650, and probated November 25, 1651.

He was married in England. His wife Sarah survived him more than fifteen years, and died April 8, 1667.

Their children were: Sarah, John, Mary, Elizabeth, Stephen and Hannah. Abbott, in "The History of Andover," mentions two more, Christopher and Thomas.

Source: Excerpted directly from Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire: A ..., Volume 4 , Lewis Publishing Company


John Osgood Found 10 Records, 7 Photos and 380,202 Family Trees Born in England on 1602 to Christopher Osgood and Elizabeth Brockwell. John married Sarah Booth and had 6 children. He passed away on 1651 in Andover, Massachusetts, USA. Family Members Parents Christopher Osgood 1571-1615 Elizabeth Brockwell 1580-1612 Spouse(s) Sarah Booth 1597-1667 Children Stephen Osgood 1638-1691 Sarah Osgood 1628-1659 John Osgood 1637-1693 Mary Osgood 1632-1686 Elizabeth Osgood 1636-1673 Hannah Osgood 1643-1706

http://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/john-osgood_195094

ANDOVER, MASSCHUSETTS English Settlement

In 1634, the Great and General Court of Massachusetts reserved the land around Lake Cochichewick for an inland plantation. This included what is now Andover, North Andover and South Lawrence. Early colonists were offered three years' immunity from taxes, levies and services, except military service, as inducements to settle in the Andover area. A group of Newbury and Ipswich residents, led by a man named John Woodbridge, established the first permanent settlement in the Andover and North Andover area in 1641.

Shortly after they arrived, the local Pennacook tribal chief Cutshamache sold a parcel of land that included what is now Andover to Woodbridge and his followers. The price was "six pounds of currency and a coat" and permission for Roger, a local Pennacook man, to plant his corn and take alewives from the brook. A small brook, named in his honor, still meanders its way through the eastern part of town.

This notable bargain is commemorated in Andover's official seal, which can be seen on all official town stationery and is displayed in a tile mosaic on the lobby floor of the Old Town Hall on Main Street. The settlement was incorporated as a town in May of 1646 and was named Andover, most likely after Andover, England, which was near the original home of some of the first residents. The first recorded town meeting was held in settler John Osgood's home in 1656.

The old burying ground in what is now North Andover marks the center of the early town. Nearby was the meeting house and around it were clusters of homes on lots of four to eight acres. Homes were grouped together for protection from feared Indian attacks, but the Indians were fairly peaceful until King Philip's War began in 1675. "King" Philip was an Indian who organized a revolt against the white settlers throughout most of New England. Six Indian raids occurred between 1676 and 1698 until ever-increasing numbers of white settlers established control of the land.

Witchcraft

Andover did not escape one of the darkest periods of colonial history, the witchcraft trials and executions of the early 1690s. In 1692 in Salem Village, Joseph Ballard asked for help for his wife from several girls in the village who were said to have the power to detect and cure disease. After seeing Mrs. Ballard, the girls claimed that several people in Andover had bewitched her. Following a frenzy of false accusations that swept Salem Village. Andover and surrounding communities, more than 40 Andover citizens, mostly women, were eventually accused of being in league with Satan. About a quarter of them were condemned to death; as many as three were executed. Many of the rest were imprisoned for months.

The Two Parishes

Andover's first settlement was clustered around the Congregational Church meeting house, which was established in 1645. By 1705, Andover's growing population was expanding southward and a proposal was made to build a new meeting house in the south end of town. This met with strong opposition from people living near the original meeting house in the north. The dispute was finally settled in 1709 when the Great and General Court divided Andover into two parishes, North and South.

As a result, South Parish was established with Samuel Phillips as minister. A meeting house was built on Central Street where South Church now stands. Even though there were two distinct parishes the town remained politically one unit.

Revolutionary War

Records show that as early as 1765, Andover residents were feeling the desire to pull away from English rule and opposed to the growing number of taxes imposed on them by England. In 1774, Andover settlers passed a resolution prohibiting the sale of imported tea. When the first shot of the Revolutionary War was fired in April 1775, Andover men picked up their arms and headed toward Lexington. Records show that on the morning of April 19, approximately 350 Andover men marched toward Lexington. Although they did not arrive in time for battle that day, they did go on to participate in the battle of Bunker Hill two months later and fought in subsequent skirmishes with the Redcoats during the war.

Among the Andover men who were representatives to the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention were Col. Samuel Osgood, Zebadiah Abbot, John Farnum and Samuel Phillips, Jr. Mr. Phillips was later appointed by John Adams to help draft the Massachusetts state constitution.

Education

Massachusetts has the oldest public school system in the nation. It dates back to 1647, when the towns of the Massachusetts Bay Colony were ordered to provide schools at public expense. In 1700, Andover constructed its first school house, a classical grammar school, and employed Dudley Bradstreet, Jr. as its schoolmaster. Itinerant schoolmasters also spent several weeks in each section of town instructing the younger children to "read, rite, and cypher". By the middle of the 18th century, one-room schoolhouses had been built in most of the districts.

In 1778, a young Harvard graduate named Samuel Phillips, Jr., the grandson of the first minister of South Parish, convinced his father and uncles to supply the funds for a new school for boys. From its humble beginnings of educating a handful of boys in a remodeled carpenter's shop, Phillips Academy has become one of the premier private coeducational prep schools in the nation. Abbot Academy, a school for girls, was founded in 1829 and merged with Phillips Academy in 1973.

In 1807, the Massachusetts General Court authorized the founding of the Andover Theological Seminary. The seminary remained in Andover for 100 years, training missionaries for the Orient and the Pacific Islands. An agreement was reached in 1908 with Harvard Divinity School to move the seminary to Cambridge and the school's land and buildings were purchased by Phillips Academy. In 193l, the seminary joined with the Newton Theological Seminary to become the Andover-Newton Theological Seminary Seminary.

In 1850, Benjamin Hanover Punchard left $50,000 to the town to establish a free school in South Parish. Although the trustees were given "...sole discretion and power also to determine and decide whether the school shall be for males only or for the benefit of both sexes", they chose the latter. The Punchard Free School opened on Bartlet Street in 1856 and graduated its first class of seven boys and girls in 1859. But the endowment's interest could not maintain the grow http://andoverma.gov/about/history.php

view all 42

Sgt. John Osgood's Timeline

1595
July 23, 1595
Alton, Hampshire, England, (Present UK)
July 23, 1595
Wherwell, Hampshire, England, United Kingdom
July 23, 1595
Wherwell, Hampshire, Eng
July 23, 1595
Wherwell, Hampshire, Eng
July 23, 1595
Wherwell, Hampshire, Eng
July 23, 1595
Wherwell, Hampshire, Eng
July 23, 1595
Wherewell, Hamps., England
July 23, 1595
Wherewell, Hamps., England
July 23, 1595
Wherwell, Hampshire, Eng