Sir John Browne, Sr.

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Sir John Browne, Sr.

Also Known As: "Brown"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Staamford, Lincolnshire, England
Death: Died in Stamford, Lincolnshire, England
Place of Burial: Burial: Unknown
Immediate Family:

Son of William Browne De Bruin, AKA de Bruin and Lady Sarah Browne
Husband of Lady Joan Elizabeth (de Cheshire, de Kingsley) Browne and Alice Brown
Father of Sir John Brown, of Montague

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sir John Browne, Sr.

Stamford - Romans, Danes, Shakespeare, Norman castle, and 700 years of bull-running The town is best known for its medieval core of 17th–18th century stone buildings, older timber framed buildings and five medieval parish churches.[2] Stamford was rated the best place to live by The Sunday Times.[3

The Romans built Ermine Street across what is now Burghley Park and through the middle of the town, where it forded the Welland, eventually reaching Lincoln; they built a town to the north at Great Casterton on the River Gwash. In AD 61 Boudica followed the Roman 9th Legion (Legio IX Hispana) across the river. The Anglo-Saxons later chose Stamford as their main town, being on a more important river than the Gwash.

The Romans built Ermine Street across what is now Burghley Park and through the middle of the town, where it forded the Welland, eventually reaching Lincoln; they built a town to the north at Great Casterton on the River Gwash. In AD 61 Boudica followed the Roman 9th Legion (Legio IX Hispana) across the river. The Anglo-Saxons later chose Stamford as their main town, being on a more important river than the Gwash.

In 972 King Edgar made Stamford a borough. The Anglo-Saxons and Danes faced each other across the river.[7] The town originally grew as a Danish settlement at the lowest point that the Welland could be crossed by ford or bridge. Stamford was the only one of the Danelaw Five Burghs ("boroughs") not to become a county town. Initially a pottery centre, producing Stamford Ware, by the Middle Ages it had become famous for its production of wool and the woollen cloth known as Stamford cloth - which "In Henry III's reign ... was well known in Venice".[8] There was an example of this cloth, also called haberget, in Stamford Museum. Stamford was a walled town[7] but only a very small portion of the walls now remain. Stamford became an inland port on the Great North Road that superseded the Roman road Ermine Street, which passes near the town, where it forded the River Welland. Notable buildings in the town include the mediaeval Browne's Hospital, several churches and the buildings of Stamford School, a public school founded in 1532.[7]

The historian David Roffe has made a study of many aspects of the Danelaw, and his web site includes an extensive and scholarly history of Stamford Castle.[9]

A Norman castle was built about 1075 and apparently demolished in 1484.[7]HYPERL INK \l "cite_note-castle-9"[9] HYPERLINK \l "cite_note-10"[10] The site stood derelict until the late twentieth century when it was built over and now includes a bus station and a modern housing development.

A small part of the curtain wall survives at the junction of Castle Dyke and Bath Row. From the doorway within it hustings were held until around 1971, the candidates speaking from a position above the crowd.

Stamford has been hosting an annual fair since the Middle Ages. Stamford fair is mentioned in Shakespeare's Henry IV part 2 (act 3 scene 2). The mid-Lent fair is the largest street fair in Lincolnshire and one of the largest in the country. On 7 March 1190, crusaders at the fair led a pogrom; many Jews in the town were massacred.

For some 700 years Stamford was host to a riotous bull-running festival held on 13 November.[7]HY PERLINK \l "cite_note-11"[11]

South of the town is RAF Wittering, a main employer, and the Home of the Harrier . The airbase originally opened in 1916 as RFC Stamford, which closed then re-opened in 1924 under its present title.

The Stamford Mercury claims to have been published since 1695, and to be "Britain's oldest newspaper".[24] Wikipedia

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/22511065/person/20421547496/media/4?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum

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Sir John Browne, Sr.'s Timeline

1200
1200
Staamford, Lincolnshire, England
1248
1248
Age 48
Stamford, Lincolnshire, England
1260
1260
Age 60
Stamford, Lincolnshire, England
1260
Age 60
Burial: Unknown