Sir John Forster, 1st Governor of Bamborough

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Sir John Forster, 1st Governor of Bamborough

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Etherstone Castle, Durham, England (United Kingdom)
Death: 1220 (39-48)
Bamburg Castle, Northumberland, England
Place of Burial: England
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir William Forester and Unknown Forster
Husband of Unknown Forster
Father of Sir Randolph Forster, 2nd Governor of Bamborough

Occupation: General in the Third Crusade, 1st Governor of Bamborough Castle, Governor of Bamborough Castle, Knight, 1st Gov of Bamborough
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sir John Forster, 1st Governor of Bamborough

Sir John Forster d 1220 was one of the line of Northumberland Forsters.

According to Forster family accounts, in 1191, Sir John Foster accompanied King Richard I "Richard the Lionheart" to Palestine during the 3rd Crusade.

Sir John saved the life of the king during the battle of Acre or Akka, near modern day Haifa, Israel. By way of gratitude, the king granted Sir John Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland. Sir John's descendants lived at Bamburgh Castle for over five hundred years.

Bamburgh castle is a well-preserved castle in Northumberland County on the east coast of England. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamburgh_Castle

Sir John Forster's descendants included several who were named High Sherrif of Northumberland: See: Wikipedia

Beginning in the 1600's, other descendants were given the title Baronet, which is a title of lesser nobility between that of a knight and a baron. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forster_Baronets

Many accounts exist regarding the Forster line. See, for example: http://www.fostername.com http://www.sallysfamilyplace.com/Wheeler/bamburgh_castle.htm



During the Third Crusade [1189 - 1193] At the siege of Acre, A. D. 1191, a party of Sarcens having sallied forth and surround King Richard [1189 - 1199], he would have been overpowered and made prisoner had not Sir John Forster, who seeing from a distance the danger in which the King was placed, pushed forward with couched lance followed by his retainers shouting, "To the rescue! A Forester! A Forester!."

 The King who for his bravery and timely assistance received from King Richard a  grant to bear a Chevron Vert on his shield. He was knighted and made Governor of Bamborough Castle.
There is a monument to his memory in Bamborough Abbey bearing his effigy in full armor.

The Forester family were the principal chieftains in Northumberland and allied by marriage with all the eminent northern families. Many of the family were distinguished for their deeds of chivalry and warlike actions.



accompanied Richard the Lion Hearted to Palestine where he received the honor of Knighthood for his valor. He was among those who compelled King John to sign the Magna Carta in 1215.

[http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~fosterfamily/fost...]

And the following info from the following link:

[http://www.timgreenwood.org/greenwoodtree/791.htm]

Noted events in his life were:

• Knight, 1191. In 1191 Sir John Forster rode with King Richard I the Lion Heart to Palestine. He saved the life of English King Richard at Acre. He was knighted and made Governor of Bamborough Castle. on Farm Island, off the rugged coast Northumberland, which later was the scene of the daring efforts of the heroic Grace Darling. Sir John was succeeded by his heir and son Randolph.



He accompanied King Richard I to the Holy Land on the Crusades and became hero of the Battle of Acre by saving Richard’s life. He was there knighted by Richard The Lionheart for bravery, and appointed the Governor of Bamborough. He was also later one of the knights who compelled King John to sign the Magna Carta at Runymede in 1215. His wife, alas, is again unknown, but they had a son, Randolph.

In 1191 Sir John Forster rode with King Richard I the Lion Heart to Palestine. 
 He saved the life of English King Richard at Acre.  He was knighted and made Governor of Bamborough Castle. on Farm Island, off the rugged coast Northumberland, which later was the scene of the daring efforts of the heroic Grace Darling. Sir John was succeeded by his heir and son Randolph. Sir Randolph died in 1256 and was succeeded by his son, Alfred. Sir Alfred died in 1284 and was succeeded by his son, Reginald. Sir Reginald was succeeded by his son Richard m. 1356  Sir Richard died in 1371 was succeeded by his son William. Sir William died aft 1422 was succeeded by his son Thomas b 1397 five Sir Thomas's in a row. all Governors of Bamborough.
the fifth Sir Thomas died in 1589. He was succeeded by his brother John Sir John died in 1602 and was succeeded by his eldest son Nicholas [born out of wed-lock] Sir Nicholas died and was succeeded by his son Claudius Sir Claudius died in 1623 and was succeeded by his brother John

1st  Governor of Bamborough  During the 3rd Crusade, in  1191, Sir John Forster rode with King Richard I  the Lion Heart to Palestine.   He saved the life of English King Richard at Acre.   He was knighted and made Governor of Bamburgh Castle. on Farm Island, off the rugged coast Northumberland.    Pierce reports he was one of the nobles who compelled King John to sign the Magna Carta in 1215, but I don’t his name on the list.   I don’t think he was quite of Baron stature.

There is reported to be a monument to his memory in Bamburgh Abbey bearing his effigy in full armor. [The only reference I can find to Bamburgh Abbey is a reference in the British National Archives to a rental in the time of Henry VIII]

Bamburgh Castle is built on a basalt outcrop, the location was previously home to a fort of the native Britons known as Din Guarie and may have been the capital of the British kingdom of the region (see Gododdin, Bryneich and Hen Ogledd) from the realm’s foundation around 420 until 547, the year of the first written reference to the castle. In that year the citadel was captured by the Anglo-Saxon ruler Ida of Bernicia (Beornice) and became Ida’s seat. It was briefly retaken by the Britons from his son Hussa during the war of 590 before being relieved later the same year.

His grandson passed it on to his wife Bebba, from whom the early name Bebanburgh was derived. The Vikings destroyed the original fortification in 993. The Normans built a new castle on the site, which forms the core of the present one. William II unsuccessfully besieged it in 1095 during a revolt supported by its owner, Robert de Mowbray, Earl of Northumbria. After Robert was captured, his wife continued the defence until coerced to surrender by the king’s threat to blind her husband.

Bamburgh then became the property of the reigning English monarch. Henry II probably built the keep. As an important English outpost, the castle was the target of occasional raids from Scotland. In 1464 during the Wars of the Roses, it became the first castle in England to be defeated by artillery, at the end of a nine-month siege by Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick.

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Sir John Forster, 1st Governor of Bamborough's Timeline

1176
1176
Etherstone Castle, Durham, England (United Kingdom)
1220
1220
England
1220
Age 44
Bamburg Castle, Northumberland, England
1220
Age 44
England
????
Govenor of,Meaux France,Reign of,Henry V