Sir Robert Henry Bunch, Baronet

Is your surname Bunch?

Research the Bunch family

Sir Robert Henry Bunch, Baronet's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Sir Robert Henry Bunch, Baronet

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States
Death: September 29, 1856 (60)
Pacho, Pacho, Cundinamarca, Colombia
Place of Burial: Bogotá, D.C., Bogotá, Colombia
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir George Bunch, Baronet and Elizabeth Woodside
Husband of Mary Fitch Bayley and Dolores Mutis Amaya
Partner of Marcela Maldonado
Father of Robert Bayley Bunch, inglaterra; Charlotte Amelia Bayley Bunch; George Bayley Bunch; Petronila Bunch Maldonado; Roberto A. Bunch Maldonado, Alcalde de Pacho (1859), Concejal de Pacho (1860) and 2 others
Brother of Charlotte Bunch

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sir Robert Henry Bunch, Baronet

The unknown gentleman. Santiago Key Ayala [S. Letters]

Among the most notable documents written by Bolivar, the "Letter of Jamaica" shines through the accurate appreciation of the character of Hispanic Americans, so deep and so sagacious people. It has been called "the prophetic letter" because in it the future liberator makes predictions about the possible course of the various Spanish American peoples, forecasts legitimated by accurate observation, and then largely by history, then future , the same people.

It was written as we all know to "a gentleman of the island that was interested in the things of America and the Spanish-American independence." So, addressed to a correspondent incognito, the Charter of Jamaica, reproduced, commented, highlighted by biographers and critics naturally raises a question of passionate interest. It seems that so far the question has not received a satisfactory response. Who was this gentleman whom Bolivar-say ASI- anointed with that exposure stopped their political ideas? Person pro, not to be doubted, as Bolivar put such an emphasis on future confide his thoughts Libertador. Well deserving would be such consagradora choice. And now, well deserves his name attached unwavering quedase the Great Man and the largest company in the liberation of the continent mode. It has not happened like this: "Incognito stroll through history." 

I have found it worthwhile to clear the unknown and I have dared to try. If someone has preceded me in the effort, at least I will provide some interesting facts. If my attempt whatever wrong, I will underscore the value of an illustrious memory to which we owe gratitude and respect. Well, in any case, the gentleman to whom I dared to attribute the honor of being the correspondent of the Charter of Jamaica, fully deserves such an honor. Noble and generous gentleman! Bolivar was able to understand, who then, when they met, was but an exile, almost helpless, dreamer of a dream apparently unrealizable in its magnitude and its difficulties. And that gentleman did not belong to the group of dreamers. Businessman, clear financial vision, ruled in Jamaica home banking and managed to make it an economic factor [7/99] powerful. In very clear business acumen comprehensive insight united political ideal. He descended from a Scottish family, loyal to the Stuarts, who knew how to sacrifice himself for his political convictions in Britain and dragged them persecution. His firmness was then rewarded by fate, and finally to the illustrious family ceased times and misfortunes befell the consideration, wealth, power and honor. Such is the story in broad strokes, the BUNCH family emigrated from Britain in the reign of George II, installed in British antilla of Jamaica, where it took root, and was hotbed of great men of action and company expanded her influence vast territories. The head of the family when he was banished, was the baronet Sir Robert H. Bunch, founder of the banking firm. What happened in managing the house, his son Robert H. Bunch, junior, who extended business founding branches in other countries. Now the firm Bunch & Company handled million pounds.

We ignore how and by whom was presented Bolivar junior banker Bunch, or if introduced himself. Bolivar caused big impression on the banker. Bunch junior understood at which point flow of energy, perseverance, vision, and scope was contained in this young ardent that he intended to liberate a continent. He became interested in the plans of Bolivar, was erected in generous protector, untainted by personal gain, of Liberating company. Both had deep faith in the ability and the good faith of the Liberator. He offered his protection and promised financial support for the purchase of arms and ammunition. He did not stay in promises. Bunch Bolivar provided a loan of thousands of pounds, without fiduciary guarantees of any kind, merely on the word of Bolivar. Thanks to such effective aid, Bolivar could put together expeditions and push towards winning their ideal deliverer. 

Let now the letter of Jamaica on such historical background, as if written in translucent paper, to see coincidences that give light to warn our hypothesis. I confess now that not many; but I observe that there is no opposition able to rebut.

The first positive data is contained in the heading of the letter. It is run by a South American to a gentleman of this island (Jamaica), and reply to another gentleman Bolivar. The South American has recognized the importance of the initial document, to the point of rushing to answer. You can ensure that the gentleman was incognito important person, not only because of interest in the fate of the Spanish American continent, but also for the elevation of its concepts. I think these two qualities are essential to explain the rush of Bolivar and both the depth and height of the response. It is easy to see immediately the correspondent incognito is judged by Bolivar man whom he can talk and you should talk not with high-sounding expressions, and warm apostrophes, but with clear and fair reasoning. Bolivar exposed with rational arguments positivistic faith and the odds even more security, the complete success of the company's Latin American liberation. He tells a man [8/99] noble sentiments, which usually subject to calculation activities and would not settle for romantic outbursts. The correspondent has been attracted by the misfortunes of South America and want to know what degree of truth in the complaints of Hispanic settlers. also you wish to know what action items can bring to your ideal settlers Hispano America; and the company achieved, what they propose to do for the freedom and autonomy once conquered. To these interrogations answered dutifully, together of course, Bolivar, without committing any more than necessary, before excusing their ignorance, but rather providing a painting to meet the requirements of the correspondent. Bolivar has rightly understood the importance of winning the good will of the other party and change its current interest in cooperation for the company resolved that he, Bolivar, is determined. The Knight of the island would be powerful enough that their cooperation was substantial and generous enough to subject of an agreement. Mr. Robert H. Bunch filled these two conditions. 

Jamaica's letter offers few key elements to identify the correspondent. He and Bolivar were interested in hiding because he was not ideological concepts, but of present and future action, facts of military operations from a British possession. From Mr. Bunch they had to take extra precautions, represented by the entity and extensive ramifications of their businesses. He was also the son and successor of baronet Sir Robert H. Bunch, expelled from their homeland by the government of Great Britain. The letter is public knowledge with the necessary precautions, but this is a compromise, not only between the Liberator and noble protector but to responsible opinion. According to O'Leary says he saw the light in a newspaper of Kingston. It has not been demonstrated accuracy of this statement but I am inclined to accept it as true because O'Leary lived in Jamaica after Bolivar's death and there was concerned, as is well known, to collect documentation with a view to writing life Liberator. Of course, if it is not yet able to present positive test, with the finding of the paper, the case can not be invoked as evidence of its absence. Is logically induce the publication would not make one of the most important newspapers in Kingston. Moreover, O'Leary had close relations with the Bunch family, not only in Jamaica but later in Bogota, where Robert H. Bunch, junior, Protector of Bolivar, and for me, the unknown gentleman correspondent Liberator resided, he founded a house of Banking and encouraged various industrial companies, with splendid success. He is a son of O'Leary, the third great friend Robert Bunch, grandson of a baronet, is Simon B. O'Leary, the compiler and editor of the memoirs of the historian aide Bolivar, who supplied us with the guarantee of its signature and witness in a solemn hour, an additional feature of the old gentleman Jamaica. Bunch junior attended in New Granada, where he now resides, the long ordeal of Bolivar. The Liberator take the coast road between the reproaches of his enemies and misunderstanding of peoples. Your health is in [10/99] ruins. His personal fortune, too. Lack of pecuniary resources even for the final stage. The old gentleman Jamaica, so gentleman now as before, three hundred pesos facilitates: interesting example of the symmetries of life. In British antilla, junior Bunch welcomes seers dreams of Bolivar for the great work to be undertaken. It is still nubarrosa aurora, the ascending branch of the curve toward the shining pinnacle. In Cartagena the finished work, the crucified redeemer, glorious past, the reaction, the descending branch of the curve; the same level of misfortune. Bolivar man thinks embark for Europe. He embarks for the grave. But Bolivar Libertador, is already embarked for immortality. In both cases the curve is generous and noble hand of Mr. Robert Bunch. It deserves to be the unknown gentleman who confided his dreams of Bolivar colossus that was to be held. If some fact of my unknown does not come to invalidate the hypothesis, Mr. Robert H. Bunch, junior, was the unknown correspondent letter Jamaica: and if I was not, deserved to be.


El caballero desconocido. Santiago Key Ayala [S. Letras]

Entre los más notables documentos escritos por Bolívar, la llamada “Carta de Jamaica” resplandece por la certera apreciación del carácter de los pueblos hispanoamericanos, tan profunda y tan sagaz. Se la ha llamado “la carta profética”, porque en ella el futuro LIBERTADOR hace pronósticos sobre la línea de conducta posible de los distintos pueblos hispanoamericanos, pronósticos legitimados por la observación precisa, y luego, en gran parte, por la historia, entonces futura, de los mismos pueblos.

Fué escrita como todos sabemos para “un caballero de la isla que se interesaba por las cosas de América y por la independencia hispanoamericana”. Así, dirigida a un incógnito corresponsal, la Carta de Jamaica, reproducida, comentada, destacada por biógrafos y críticos, naturalmente suscita una interrogación de apasionante interés. Parece que hasta ahora la interrogación no ha recibido satisfactoria respuesta. ¿Quién era ese caballero a quien Bolívar ungía —digamos así— con aquella detenida exposición de sus ideas políticas? Persona de pro, a no dudarse, pues que Bolívar pone tal énfasis en confiarle sus pensamientos de futuro Libertador. Bien merecedor sería de tal consagradora elección. Y ahora, bien merecería que su nombre quedase unido de modo inquebrantable al del Grande Hombre y a la Grande empresa de la liberación del continente. No ha sucedido así: “De incógnito pasea por la Historia”.

Me ha parecido que vale la pena despejar la incógnita y me he atrevido a intentarlo. Si alguien me ha precedido en el empeño, al menos aportaré algunos datos de interés. Si mi tentativa fuere errónea, habré subrayado la valía de una memoria ilustre a la que debemos gratitud y respeto. Pues, en todo caso, el caballero a quien he osado atribuir el honor de ser el corresponsal de la Carta de Jamaica, merece plenamente tan grande honor. ¡Noble y generoso caballero! Supo comprender a Bolívar, quien para entonces, cuando se conocieron, no era sino un desterrado, casi inerme, soñador de un sueño al parecer irrealizable por su magnitud y sus dificultades. Y ese caballero no pertenecía al grupo de los soñadores. Hombre de negocios, de clara visión financiera, regía en Jamaica una casa de banca y había logrado hacer de ella un factor económico [7/99] de gran potencia. A su clarísima perspicacia de los negocios unía perspicacia comprensiva del ideal político. Descendía de una gran familia escocesa, fiel a los Estuardos, que supo sacrificarse por sus convicciones políticas en la Gran Bretaña y por ellas arrastró persecuciones. Su firmeza fué después recompensada por el destino, y al fin cesaron para la ilustre familia las épocas de las desgracias y sobrevinieron las de la consideración, la riqueza, el poderío y los honores. Tal es la historia a grandes trazos, de la familia BUNCH, emigrada de la Gran Bretaña en el reinado de Jorge II, instalada en la antilla británica de Jamaica, donde arraigó, y fué semillero de grandes hombres de acción y de empresa que dilataron su influencia por extensos territorios. El jefe de la familia cuando fué desterrada, era el baronet Sir Robert H. Bunch, fundador de la firma bancaria. Lo sucedió en el manejo de la casa, su hijo Robert H. Bunch, junior, quien extendió los negocios fundando sucursales en otros países. Ahora la firma Bunch & Compañía manejaba millones de libras esterlinas.

Ignoramos cómo y por quién fué presentado Bolívar al banquero Bunch junior, o si se presentó él mismo. Bolívar causó grande impresión en el banquero. Bunch junior comprendió al punto cuál caudal de energía, de constancia, de visión, y de alcance estaba contenido en aquel joven ardoroso que se proponía libertar un continente. Se interesó por los planes de Bolívar, se erigió en protector generoso, sin mácula de provecho personal, de la empresa Libertadora. Tuvo a la vez fe honda en la capacidad y en la buena fe del Libertador. Le ofreció su protección y le prometió ayuda financiera para la compra de armas y pertrechos. No se quedó en promesas. Bunch suministró a Bolívar un préstamo de millares de libras, sin garantías fiduciarias de ninguna especie, meramente sobre la palabra de Bolívar. Merced a tan efectiva ayuda, pudo Bolívar armar expediciones y empujar hacia el triunfo su ideal libertador.

Pongamos ahora la carta de Jamaica sobre tales antecedentes históricos, como si estuviera escrita en papel translúcido, para ver de advertir coincidencias que alumbren nuestra hipótesis. Confesaré desde ahora que no son muchas; pero observaré que tampoco hay oposiciones capaces de desvirtuarla.

El primer dato favorable está contenido en el encabezamiento de la carta. Está dirigida por un americano meridional a un caballero de esta isla (Jamaica), y es contestación a otra del caballero a Bolívar. El americano meridional ha reconocido la importancia del documento inicial, hasta el extremo de apresurarse a contestarle. Puede asegurarse que el caballero incógnito era persona importante, no sólo por el hecho de interesarse en la suerte del continente hispanoamericano, sino también por la elevación de sus conceptos. Creo que estas dos cualidades son indispensables para explicar el apresuramiento de Bolívar y a la vez el detenimiento y la altura de la respuesta. Se echa de ver inmediatamente que el incógnito corresponsal es juzgado por Bolívar hombre a quien se le puede hablar y se le debe hablar no con altisonantes expresiones, y cálidos apóstrofes, sino con raciocinios claros y justos. Bolívar expone con fe racional y con argumentos positivistas los probabilidades, más aún la seguridad, del completo éxito de la empresa de liberación hispanoamericana. Habla a un hombre [8/99] de sentimientos nobles, que acostumbra someter al cálculo sus actividades y no habría de conformarse con arrebatos románticos. El corresponsal se ha sentido atraído por las desgracias de la América meridional y desea saber qué grado de verdad hay en las quejas de los colonos hispanoamericanos. Desea asimismo saber qué elementos de acción pueden aportar a su ideal los colonos de Hispano América; y, de lograrse la empresa, qué se proponen hacer de la libertad y autonomía una vez conquistadas. A esas interrogaciones responde cumplidamente, en conjunto por supuesto, Bolívar, sin comprometerse más de lo necesario, antes excusándose de su ignorancia, mas suministrando un cuadro bastante a satisfacer los requerimientos del corresponsal. Bolívar ha comprendido con justeza la importancia de conquistar la buena voluntad de su interlocutor y cambiar su interés del momento en resuelta cooperación para la empresa en que él, Bolívar, está empeñado. El caballero de la isla sería lo bastante poderoso para que su cooperación fuese considerable y lo bastante generoso para acordarla. Mr. Robert H. Bunch llenaba estas dos condiciones.

La carta de Jamaica ofrece pocos elementos decisivos para la identificación del corresponsal. Tanto él como Bolívar estaban interesados en esconderse por cuanto no se trataba de conceptos ideológicos, sino de acción presente y futura, de hechos, de operaciones bélicas, desde una posesión británica. De parte de Mr. Bunch habían de tomarse las mayores precauciones, por la entidad que representaba y por las extensas ramificaciones de sus negocios. También era el hijo y el continuador del baronet Sir Robert H. Bunch, expulsado de su patria por el gobierno de la Gran Bretaña. La carta se hace del conocimiento público con las necesarias precauciones, pero ello constituye una especie de compromiso, no sólo entre el Libertador y el noble protector sino ante la opinión responsable. Según afirma O'Leary, vió la luz en un periódico de Kingston. No ha podido demostrarse la exactitud de esta afirmación pero me inclino a aceptarla como cierta porque O'Leary vivió en Jamaica después de la muerte de Bolívar y allí se ocupaba, según es bien sabido, en recoger documentación con la mira de escribir la vida del Libertador. Desde luego, si no se ha podido aún presentar la prueba positiva, con el hallazgo del periódico, tampoco puede invocarse el caso como prueba de su inexistencia. Es de buena lógica, inducir que la publicación no la haría uno de los más importantes diarios de Kingston. Más aún: O'Leary tuvo estrechas relaciones con la familia Bunch, no sólo en Jamaica sino después en Bogotá, donde Robert H. Bunch, junior, Protector de Bolívar, y para mí, el caballero desconocido, corresponsal del Libertador, residió, fundó una casa de Banca y fomentó diversas empresas industriales, con espléndido éxito. Y es un hijo de O'Leary, grande amigo del tercer Robert Bunch, nieto del baronet, es Simón B. O'Leary, el compilador y editor de las Memorias del edecán historiador de Bolívar, quien nos suministra, con la garantía de su firma y su testimonio en una hora solemne, un rasgo complementario del antiguo caballero de Jamaica. Bunch junior ha asistido en la Nueva Granada, donde ahora reside, al largo vía crucis de Bolívar. El Libertador toma el camino de la costa entre los denuestos de sus enemigos y la incomprensión de los pueblos. Su salud está en [10/99] ruinas. Su fortuna personal, también. Carece de recursos pecuniarios aun para la etapa final. El antiguo caballero de Jamaica, tan caballero ahora como antes, le facilita trescientos pesos: interesante ejemplo de las simetrías de la vida. En la antilla británica, Bunch junior acoge los sueños videntes de Bolívar para la grande obra que iba a realizar. Es la aurora todavía nubarrosa, la rama ascendente de la curva hacia el culmen resplandeciente. En Cartagena la obra cumplida, el redentor crucificado, el pasado glorioso, la reacción, la rama descendente de la curva; el mismo nivel de la desgracia. Bolívar, hombre, piensa embarcarse para Europa. Se embarca para la tumba. Pero Bolívar Libertador, está ya embarcado para la inmortalidad. En los dos casos de la curva, encuentra la mano generosa y nobilísima de Mr. Robert Bunch. Bien merece ser éste el caballero desconocido a quien Bolívar confió sus sueños de coloso que iba a realizar. Si algún hecho de mi desconocido no viene a invalidar la hipótesis, Mr. Robert H. Bunch, junior, fué el desconocido corresponsal de la carta de Jamaica: y si no lo fué, mereció serlo.

Acerca de Sir Robert Henry Bunch, Baronet (Español)

El caballero desconocido. Santiago Key Ayala [S. Letras]

Entre los más notables documentos escritos por Bolívar, la llamada “Carta de Jamaica” resplandece por la certera apreciación del carácter de los pueblos hispanoamericanos, tan profunda y tan sagaz. Se la ha llamado “la carta profética”, porque en ella el futuro LIBERTADOR hace pronósticos sobre la línea de conducta posible de los distintos pueblos hispanoamericanos, pronósticos legitimados por la observación precisa, y luego, en gran parte, por la historia, entonces futura, de los mismos pueblos.

Fué escrita como todos sabemos para “un caballero de la isla que se interesaba por las cosas de América y por la independencia hispanoamericana”. Así, dirigida a un incógnito corresponsal, la Carta de Jamaica, reproducida, comentada, destacada por biógrafos y críticos, naturalmente suscita una interrogación de apasionante interés. Parece que hasta ahora la interrogación no ha recibido satisfactoria respuesta. ¿Quién era ese caballero a quien Bolívar ungía —digamos así— con aquella detenida exposición de sus ideas políticas? Persona de pro, a no dudarse, pues que Bolívar pone tal énfasis en confiarle sus pensamientos de futuro Libertador. Bien merecedor sería de tal consagradora elección. Y ahora, bien merecería que su nombre quedase unido de modo inquebrantable al del Grande Hombre y a la Grande empresa de la liberación del continente. No ha sucedido así: “De incógnito pasea por la Historia”.

Me ha parecido que vale la pena despejar la incógnita y me he atrevido a intentarlo. Si alguien me ha precedido en el empeño, al menos aportaré algunos datos de interés. Si mi tentativa fuere errónea, habré subrayado la valía de una memoria ilustre a la que debemos gratitud y respeto. Pues, en todo caso, el caballero a quien he osado atribuir el honor de ser el corresponsal de la Carta de Jamaica, merece plenamente tan grande honor. ¡Noble y generoso caballero! Supo comprender a Bolívar, quien para entonces, cuando se conocieron, no era sino un desterrado, casi inerme, soñador de un sueño al parecer irrealizable por su magnitud y sus dificultades. Y ese caballero no pertenecía al grupo de los soñadores. Hombre de negocios, de clara visión financiera, regía en Jamaica una casa de banca y había logrado hacer de ella un factor económico [7/99] de gran potencia. A su clarísima perspicacia de los negocios unía perspicacia comprensiva del ideal político. Descendía de una gran familia escocesa, fiel a los Estuardos, que supo sacrificarse por sus convicciones políticas en la Gran Bretaña y por ellas arrastró persecuciones. Su firmeza fué después recompensada por el destino, y al fin cesaron para la ilustre familia las épocas de las desgracias y sobrevinieron las de la consideración, la riqueza, el poderío y los honores. Tal es la historia a grandes trazos, de la familia BUNCH, emigrada de la Gran Bretaña en el reinado de Jorge II, instalada en la antilla británica de Jamaica, donde arraigó, y fué semillero de grandes hombres de acción y de empresa que dilataron su influencia por extensos territorios. El jefe de la familia cuando fué desterrada, era el baronet Sir Robert H. Bunch, fundador de la firma bancaria. Lo sucedió en el manejo de la casa, su hijo Robert H. Bunch, junior, quien extendió los negocios fundando sucursales en otros países. Ahora la firma Bunch & Compañía manejaba millones de libras esterlinas.

Ignoramos cómo y por quién fué presentado Bolívar al banquero Bunch junior, o si se presentó él mismo. Bolívar causó grande impresión en el banquero. Bunch junior comprendió al punto cuál caudal de energía, de constancia, de visión, y de alcance estaba contenido en aquel joven ardoroso que se proponía libertar un continente. Se interesó por los planes de Bolívar, se erigió en protector generoso, sin mácula de provecho personal, de la empresa Libertadora. Tuvo a la vez fe honda en la capacidad y en la buena fe del Libertador. Le ofreció su protección y le prometió ayuda financiera para la compra de armas y pertrechos. No se quedó en promesas. Bunch suministró a Bolívar un préstamo de millares de libras, sin garantías fiduciarias de ninguna especie, meramente sobre la palabra de Bolívar. Merced a tan efectiva ayuda, pudo Bolívar armar expediciones y empujar hacia el triunfo su ideal libertador.

Pongamos ahora la carta de Jamaica sobre tales antecedentes históricos, como si estuviera escrita en papel translúcido, para ver de advertir coincidencias que alumbren nuestra hipótesis. Confesaré desde ahora que no son muchas; pero observaré que tampoco hay oposiciones capaces de desvirtuarla.

El primer dato favorable está contenido en el encabezamiento de la carta. Está dirigida por un americano meridional a un caballero de esta isla (Jamaica), y es contestación a otra del caballero a Bolívar. El americano meridional ha reconocido la importancia del documento inicial, hasta el extremo de apresurarse a contestarle. Puede asegurarse que el caballero incógnito era persona importante, no sólo por el hecho de interesarse en la suerte del continente hispanoamericano, sino también por la elevación de sus conceptos. Creo que estas dos cualidades son indispensables para explicar el apresuramiento de Bolívar y a la vez el detenimiento y la altura de la respuesta. Se echa de ver inmediatamente que el incógnito corresponsal es juzgado por Bolívar hombre a quien se le puede hablar y se le debe hablar no con altisonantes expresiones, y cálidos apóstrofes, sino con raciocinios claros y justos. Bolívar expone con fe racional y con argumentos positivistas los probabilidades, más aún la seguridad, del completo éxito de la empresa de liberación hispanoamericana. Habla a un hombre [8/99] de sentimientos nobles, que acostumbra someter al cálculo sus actividades y no habría de conformarse con arrebatos románticos. El corresponsal se ha sentido atraído por las desgracias de la América meridional y desea saber qué grado de verdad hay en las quejas de los colonos hispanoamericanos. Desea asimismo saber qué elementos de acción pueden aportar a su ideal los colonos de Hispano América; y, de lograrse la empresa, qué se proponen hacer de la libertad y autonomía una vez conquistadas. A esas interrogaciones responde cumplidamente, en conjunto por supuesto, Bolívar, sin comprometerse más de lo necesario, antes excusándose de su ignorancia, mas suministrando un cuadro bastante a satisfacer los requerimientos del corresponsal. Bolívar ha comprendido con justeza la importancia de conquistar la buena voluntad de su interlocutor y cambiar su interés del momento en resuelta cooperación para la empresa en que él, Bolívar, está empeñado. El caballero de la isla sería lo bastante poderoso para que su cooperación fuese considerable y lo bastante generoso para acordarla. Mr. Robert H. Bunch llenaba estas dos condiciones.

La carta de Jamaica ofrece pocos elementos decisivos para la identificación del corresponsal. Tanto él como Bolívar estaban interesados en esconderse por cuanto no se trataba de conceptos ideológicos, sino de acción presente y futura, de hechos, de operaciones bélicas, desde una posesión británica. De parte de Mr. Bunch habían de tomarse las mayores precauciones, por la entidad que representaba y por las extensas ramificaciones de sus negocios. También era el hijo y el continuador del baronet Sir Robert H. Bunch, expulsado de su patria por el gobierno de la Gran Bretaña. La carta se hace del conocimiento público con las necesarias precauciones, pero ello constituye una especie de compromiso, no sólo entre el Libertador y el noble protector sino ante la opinión responsable. Según afirma O'Leary, vió la luz en un periódico de Kingston. No ha podido demostrarse la exactitud de esta afirmación pero me inclino a aceptarla como cierta porque O'Leary vivió en Jamaica después de la muerte de Bolívar y allí se ocupaba, según es bien sabido, en recoger documentación con la mira de escribir la vida del Libertador. Desde luego, si no se ha podido aún presentar la prueba positiva, con el hallazgo del periódico, tampoco puede invocarse el caso como prueba de su inexistencia. Es de buena lógica, inducir que la publicación no la haría uno de los más importantes diarios de Kingston. Más aún: O'Leary tuvo estrechas relaciones con la familia Bunch, no sólo en Jamaica sino después en Bogotá, donde Robert H. Bunch, junior, Protector de Bolívar, y para mí, el caballero desconocido, corresponsal del Libertador, residió, fundó una casa de Banca y fomentó diversas empresas industriales, con espléndido éxito. Y es un hijo de O'Leary, grande amigo del tercer Robert Bunch, nieto del baronet, es Simón B. O'Leary, el compilador y editor de las Memorias del edecán historiador de Bolívar, quien nos suministra, con la garantía de su firma y su testimonio en una hora solemne, un rasgo complementario del antiguo caballero de Jamaica. Bunch junior ha asistido en la Nueva Granada, donde ahora reside, al largo vía crucis de Bolívar. El Libertador toma el camino de la costa entre los denuestos de sus enemigos y la incomprensión de los pueblos. Su salud está en [10/99] ruinas. Su fortuna personal, también. Carece de recursos pecuniarios aun para la etapa final. El antiguo caballero de Jamaica, tan caballero ahora como antes, le facilita trescientos pesos: interesante ejemplo de las simetrías de la vida. En la antilla británica, Bunch junior acoge los sueños videntes de Bolívar para la grande obra que iba a realizar. Es la aurora todavía nubarrosa, la rama ascendente de la curva hacia el culmen resplandeciente. En Cartagena la obra cumplida, el redentor crucificado, el pasado glorioso, la reacción, la rama descendente de la curva; el mismo nivel de la desgracia. Bolívar, hombre, piensa embarcarse para Europa. Se embarca para la tumba. Pero Bolívar Libertador, está ya embarcado para la inmortalidad. En los dos casos de la curva, encuentra la mano generosa y nobilísima de Mr. Robert Bunch. Bien merece ser éste el caballero desconocido a quien Bolívar confió sus sueños de coloso que iba a realizar. Si algún hecho de mi desconocido no viene a invalidar la hipótesis, Mr. Robert H. Bunch, junior, fué el desconocido corresponsal de la carta de Jamaica: y si no lo fué, mereció serlo.

view all 13

Sir Robert Henry Bunch, Baronet's Timeline

1795
October 24, 1795
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States
1820
September 11, 1820
New York, New York, United States
1826
May 27, 1826
New York, New York, United States
1828
September 10, 1828
New York, Bronx County, New York, United States
1836
1836
1838
1838
1845
April 24, 1845
Pacho, Pacho, Cundinamarca, Colombia