Stephan Ernst Riess

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Stephan Ernst Riess

Birthdate: (86)
Birthplace: Dillingen, Bavaria, Germany
Death: December 17, 1985 (86)
Escondido, San Diego, California, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Franz Wolf Riess and Mrs. Riess
Husband of Thelma Josephine McKinney Riess

Occupation: Geo-chemist, metallurgist, mining engineer and dowser, world renouned geologist
Managed by: Della Dale Smith-Pistelli
Last Updated:

About Stephan Ernst Riess

The following information about Stephan Ernst Riess, my great uncle, is from Wikipedia: Born in 1898 to the Prussian Army officer Herman Franz Wolf Riess von Scheurnschloss and his wife (née Koch) in Dillingen on the Danube, Kingdom of Bavaria (by that date part of the German Empire), he joined a "school ship" at the age of 14 to train to become a sailor.

A few years later he served aboard a German Navy ship that was sunk during the 1916 Battle of Jutland in the North Sea. He was saved from the frigid sea by the British and became a prisoner of war. While a POW in England he began to learn English. After World War I he returned to Germany where he studied chemistry and metallurgy. Affected by the crisis of the post-war years of the Weimar Republic, Riess would travel to Australia and South America and ultimately the United States where he ended up in California working industrial mine concerns.

During the late 1920s and early 1930s while working at mines throughout the American Southwest he experienced frequent flooding of mining operations by inexplicable and sometimes immense flows of subterranean water. Because of an open mind, curiosity and honesty about life, Riess began to study these phenomena as a new area of research.

While working for Hoover Family interests in El Dorado Canyon south of Las Vegas, Nevada, where all water was piped great distance and elevation from the Colorado River, Riess worked with a crew to hand dig his first primary water well. When the source was struck, laborers scrambled from the pit to avoid drowning; eventually the free-flowing water created a lagoon until it was brought under control. By 1935 because of a chemical "soup" he had created to leach precious metals from low-grade complex / primary non-free milling ore, he was invited to Stanford University to meet with the family of Herbert Hoover. They had lengthy discussions about the flooding out of mines. As a result, Riess was appointed to the position of Chief Metallurgist for the Bureau of Mines and encouraged to continue his research of this water phenomenon. During World War II Riess worked with the federal government to determine which mines in North America had sufficiently high grades of ore to support the war effort.

Steve Riess - Simi Valley, California: As a mining engineer in the 1940's Riess had access to government and mining company assay laboratories. In order to investigate the problem of subterranean water, he began taking soil and rock samples from the failed mines and submitted them to chemical analysis. Riess thereby developed a body of test data leading to a previously undetected pattern. These waters, he noted: 1.) Emanated from below and surged upward, often to elevations far above the water table even in zones of no known aquifer with little precipitation, usually in hard rock. 2) Was chemically associated with Plutonic rock (which solidifies deep in the Earth where the cooling is slow and the various minerals have had time to crystallize) and not with any of the aggregate usually associated with meteoric water. 3.) Traveled in a vertical or semi-vertical direction from the interior of the Earth toward the surface in hard rock faults or fissures.

By 1954, often together with drilling manager Jim Scott, Riess had sited and drilled 70 of these hard rock wells, usually located in distressed areas of little or no rainfall. In the midst of an extended drought in California, his work would come to the attention of news reporters, water resource bureaucrats, politicians, businessmen, farmers and industry leading to the publication of Salzman's book in 1960. By the late 1970s he had documented over 800 primary water wells and attracted a group of professionals who would launch The Riess Foundation and, in the 1980's, The Riess Institute to train the next generation of primary water specialists. Christopher Bird nominated Riess in 1982 for the Right Livelihood Award, considered the alternative Nobel Prize. The committee asked that his name be resubmitted in 1983. His legacy continues in the vision of the Primary Water Institute established by his protege and friend Pal Pauer.

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In the early 50's, a geo-chemist, metallurgist, mining engineer and dowser named Stephan Riess theorized that a vast supply of water ran under the Mojave desert large enough to supply the needs of all the people in southern California. Riess's conclusions were corroborated by a study done by civil engineers. Their findings revealed that there was as Riess called it, primary water traveling in the deep rock fault system under the desert that had nothing in common with the water in the alluvium sedimentary aquifers. This rock fissure water was also so pure that chlorination was unnecessary, and it ran like deep, life-giving veins in the earth. In fact, Riess contended that most underground water did not originate via precipitation that had gradually percolated through the soil as previously thought. Water is incompressible, so once it has reached a depth where the density of the soil becomes equal to its own, it simply cannot "seep" downward any further. He felt instead that the largest quantities of water underground were formed from the elements within the earth, and constituted primary water that had never seen the surface of the earth before. Freshwater springs that spew forth large volumes of water off the coast of islands are good examples.

As proof of his theory, Riess drilled a number of deep, successful wells, and turned barren, California desert land into fertile, productive acreage. A southern California magazine, Fortnight, ran a 2-part article in 1953, and diagnosed why such a discovery was ignored by local politicians. There was simply too much money to be made in the vast water transport systems planned that California's financial and political leadership had to ignore Riess's discovery. Riess asked, "Why should huge sums of money be spent to build pipe lines over great distances, when Mother Nature has created her own pipe lines? It is certainly far more economical to pump water vertically up 450 feet than to pump and transport it laterally for 450 miles!"

By 1958, Riess's work was noticed by the Israeli government and they invited him to find water for their new city of Eliat on the Red Sea's Gulf of Aquaba. Riess met with the then Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion and his advisors who urged him to go ahead with his search for water as soon as possible. On May 29, 1959, the Jerusalem Post announced that the Riess-located well was sufficient enough to supply a city of more than 100,000 people including industry and outlying villages!

Several active Riess wells today:

Escondido, California:

Riess and his successor, Morad Eghbal, each located several wells in the late 1970's on private property both for the personal use of the owner as well as for the commercial water development for surrounding towns that needed to purchase water. These wells are in operation and producing today.

Cottonwood, Idaho:

The city of Cottonwood was running out of water and the traditional, professional geologists the city had hired to find water declared that there was no hope of success. The city then turned to Stephan Riess. Riess immediately located two wells for them. The first generated more than 250 gallons per minute. The second, produced over 500 gallons pre minute. At the city's request, Riess returned to locate a third well for Cottonwood's future expansion. This well produced over 550 gallons per minute. All three wells continue to supply the city of Cottonwood today.

How does the Riess Institute know where to drill for Earth-generated water?

Conventional water locators pick a spot to drill, looking for an aquifer or saturated zone in the overburden. Recently, with sophisticated satellite photography and "remote sensing," water can be found in rock using a technique called "fracture trace analysis." Large fractures are identified by satellite photography for exploratory drilling.

The Riess method uses mineralogy, petrology and structural geology precisely to locate high pressure/low temperature hydrothermal systems that have previously been encountered randomly by engineers in mine and tunnel flooding incidents.

Historically, all water is believed to come only from the hydrologic cycle. Yet, a growing body of evidence suggests that water might be generated deep within the Earth in great quantity. The Riess Institute at its Totten Field Laboratory, over the last decade, has drilled, collected and tested waters captured from great depths in a number of bore holes. Totten well #3, at 6000 ft, known to be the deepest 4 inch cored water research well in the continental US. Results from Totten #3 now indicate some waters there may not be part of the hydrologic cycle at all, but rather from deep-seated geologic interaction within the Earth's interior.

The Riess Institute identifies the dynamics of "new" water generation deep within the Earth's interior, which, after rising to the surface, is added to the Earth's hydrosphere. This vertical component of our model is linked to the horizontal components of water distribution (i.e. hydrologic cycle and theories of watersheds). As such, the Institute is able to obtain specific water signatures which identify sources of waters originating from deep within the Earth.

Morad Eghbal, Hydrogeologist, Principal Researcher and Project Manager, The Riess Institute.

SOURCE: Modern Energy Research Library, website: http://merlib.org/node/5062

Riess (1898-1985) was a Bavarian-born mining engineer and geologist who emigrated to the United States in 1923. While working in a deep mine at high elevation in the 1930s, after a load of dynamite had been set off in the bottom of it, Riess was amazed to see water come gushing out in such quantities that pumps installed to remove it at the rate of 25,000 gallons per minute could not make a dent in the flow. Staring forth into the valley below, Riess asked himself how water that supposedly had trickled into the Earth as rain could rise through hard rock into the shafts and tunnels of a mine nearly at the top of a mountain range.

The temperature and purity of the water suggested to Riess it must have a completely different origin than ordinary groundwater. Since none of the textbooks he had studied had referred to what seemed to confront him as an entirely anomalous phenomenon, he decided to look into it further. In 1957, after Riess had been working on the problem nearly two decades, Encyclopedia Britannica's Book of the Year ran the following statement:

Stephan Riess of California formulated a theory that "new water" which never existed before, is constantly being formed within the earth by the combination of elemental hydrogen and oxygen and that this water finds its way to the surface, and can be located and tapped, to constitute a steady and unfailing new supply.

This is not the place to document the incredible success Riess had over fifty years of practice drilling water wells at sites where professional hydrologists and geologists flatly predicted that not a drop of water could be found. But the central questions that arise are: How far have scientists actually gone to determine the nature and amount of deep-seated, Earth-generated water, and in what way is society capable of accommodating the developments which would inevitably accompany the acceptance of this discovery and paradigm shift?

In his foreword to Salzman's book, the English philosopher and writer Aldous Huxley comments poignantly: "It remains to be seen whether those who are now regarded as experts in the field of hydrology and the politicians whom they advise will also agree that a good case has been made and that large-scale experimentation is in order." Since Huxley penned that sentence more than a quarter century ago, there has been no such experimentation, large or small, funded by hydrologic officials, state or federal, in the United States, or elsewhere in the world. Only private investors and entrepreneurs with foresightful initiative have dared to carry the research forward.

By 1958, Riess' exploits came to the attention of the Israeli government, which invited the mining engineer and geologist for an official visit to find water for the then-new city of Eilat on the Red Sea's Gulf of Aqaba. After a flight to Tel Aviv, he met with Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion and his advisors, who urged him to go ahead with his search as soon as possible. Less enthusiastic were a group of leading Israeli geologists, who, like their American counterparts, vigorously opposed Riess' theory and methodology of water development. "Only after a protracted session during which I explained it," Riess would later . relate, "did they agree that my proposal had merit." This was confirmed by Israel's chief water geologist at the time, Arie Issarof, who in a letter, wrote:

"As a geologist who is occupied with water research in arid zones, I am fully aware of the limitations of our orthodox methods, in geohydrological possibilities which may be opening up before us while applying these methods. I decided, encouraged by my superiors, to cooperate with Mr. Riess' research for primary waters in our arid zones." High in the mountainous country along the Israel-Jordan border, Riess located the first of several wells about a mile and a half from Eilat itself. As Meir Ben-Dov wrote in the Jerusalem Post:

The site chosen is where a five meter-wide cleft, running vertically through the mountain, is crossed at right angles by a similar cleft, hardly twenty centimeters across. The bowels of the earth in erupting have filled these clefts with an igneous intrusion of a sort, soapy-feeling, mottled brown rock called gabbro. The drill slowly worked its way downward, alternately in igneous intrusion and again in granite as the cleft in the rock snaked its way downward.

During the work, problems linked to cave-ins and the jamming of drill pieces beyond the Israeli drilling team's experience were finally solved when Riess' associate, Jim Scott, who had worked with him on many wells over the years, was sent to Israel to supervise operations.

On May 29, 1959, the Jerusalem Post published an estimate that the amount of water struck in the Riess located wells was enough to supply a city of more than 100,000 persons including industry, air-conditioning, parks, gardens, and a dozen outlying villages. Analysis of the water, stated the newspaper, revealed that the Eilatis, used to drinking water with 3,000 parts per million of dissolved mineral salts (TDS), now had a supply with only 1/6 that amount of TDS. For his work in Israel, Ben-Gurion presented Riess with a medal and his wife with a sterling silver-bound copy of the Talmud in English.

The astounding find was not lost on Arab leaders, neighbors of Israel. Invited to Cairo by Egypt's Gamal Abdel Nasser, Riess became the only exception to a rigid years-long stricture prohibiting Americans who had visited Israel from setting foot in Arab lands. Along the Nile, Riess located several water wells on rocky promontories for well-known Egyptians before flying on to the Sudan at the invitation of the Mahdi, where a revolution disrupted his planned geological exploration for water. This prompted his return home.

In fact, Riess' exploits in drilling for fresh water were not quite as unusual as it might have seemed then, because his was perhaps the most recent of a number of accomplishments in this area by others, such as Leo Picard, a contemporary and fellow German who had been born into a Jewish family in 1900 in the city of Wangen near Konstanz, Germany. From 1924 to the present, Picard devoted his life to geology and groundwater exploration in what was then Palestine and is now Israel, following completion of his academic training in geology at the University of Freiburg, Germany. His accomplishments are in addition to and related to those of Riess, ones that we will not have an opportunity to revisit in this short space. Nor is it possible now to delve into the life and work of Fritz Josef Heidecker, another contemporary of Stephan Riess, who was born in 1912 in Georgensgmuend in Mittelfranken, Germany, as the third son of an old, established Jewish family, whose documented lineage goes back to 1650. Fritz Josef Heidecker was another builder in the Middle East who devoted much time and energy to building wells during the infancy of the State of Israel.

FROM ANOTHER SOURCE: http://unveiling.18.forumer.com/a/water-from-solid-rock_post291.html

The late Stephan Riess gave us a theory of "primary" water generated in the rocks. (from: Thinking of Water by Bob Fryer (published in The American Dowser, Winter 1990, v30, n1, pp 55-56)

In the early 50's, a geo-chemist, metallurgist, mining engineer and dowser named Stephan Riess theorized that a vast supply of water ran under the Mojave desert large enough to supply the needs of all the people in southern California. Riess's conclusions were corroborated by a study done by civil engineers. Their findings revealed that there was as Riess called it, primary water traveling in the deep rock fault system under the desert that had nothing in common with the water in the alluvium sedimentary aquifers. This rock fissure water was also so pure that chlorination was unnecessary, and it ran like deep, life-giving veins in the earth.

In fact, Riess contended that most underground water did not originate via precipitation that had gradually percolated through the soil as previously thought. Water is incompressible, so once it has reached a depth where the density of the soil becomes equal to its own, it simply cannot "seep" downward any further. He felt instead that the largest quantities of water underground were formed from the elements within the earth, and constituted primary water that had never seen the surface of the earth before. Freshwater springs that spew forth large volumes of water off the coast of islands are good examples.

As proof of his theory, Riess drilled a number of deep, successful wells, and turned barren, California desert land into fertile, productive acreage. A southern California magazine, Fortnight, ran a 2-part article in 1953, and diagnosed why such a discovery was ignored by local politicians. There was simply too much money to be made in the vast water transport systems planned that California's financial and political leadership had to ignore Riess's discovery. Riess asked, "Why should huge sums of money be spent to build pipe lines over great distances, when Mother Nature has created her own pipe lines? It is certainly far more economical to pump water vertically up 450 feet than to pump and transport it laterally for 450 miles!"

By 1958, Riess's work was noticed by the Israeli government and they invited him to find water for their new city of Eliat on the Red Sea's Gulf of Aquaba. Riess met with the then Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion and his advisors who urged him to go ahead with his search for water as soon as possible. On May 29, 1959, the Jerusalem Post announced that the Riess-located well was sufficient enough to supply a city of more than 100,000 people including industry and outlying villages! (from: Water Dowsing & Other Creative Alternatives by Melvin D. Saunders)

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The researcher who goes against current puts his credibility and career at risk. Just think about the fierce hostility of traditional medicine versus homeopathy, or the treatment reserved to Stephan Riess and Jacques Benveniste! (from: Homage to Viktor Schauberger(1885-1958) by Adelia Bertetto)

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  • The Mystery of Water*

Since antiquity, the source of water generated from deep within the Earth has been a mystery. How does one explain sources of water throughout the world that produce thousands of gallons of water per minute, often in dry areas with cilantro rainfall or at high altitudes? There are clear examples of this phenomenon which stand out.

The Ain Figeh spring Syria alone supplies water for the over one million residents of Damascus and is also the principal source for the Barada River. A report on this spring by the World Bank reads: The principal emergence for the spring which has been enclosed in a structure since Roman times resembles an underground river several meters across which flows up and out of the limestone formation of the mountain. The total flow has averaged about 132, 000 gallons per minute."

In the 1930's, Stephan Riess, Bavarian-born mining engineer and geologist, experienced an unexpected gush of water while working in a mine shaft. The temperature, chemistry and purity suggested to Riess that it must have a completely different origin than ordinary ground water considered part of the hydrologic cycle. Following further independent research, and building on the work of other eminent geologists, he concluded that in various rock strata, deep in the earth, water was continually generated under particular conditions of temperature and pressure and forced up in rock fissures where it could be drilled for and tapped.

Finding the answer to the mystery of these unexplained water sources by locating and successfully drilling wells that produced potable water became the life work and ambition of Stephan Riess.

Conventional hydrology speaks of a static supply of water created once early in the Earth's history being constantly recycled. Stephan Riess saw new additions of water flowing vertically, from beneath the surface adding to the hydrologic cycle. This water in turn, becomes bound up on the surface partially in plants, sediments and subduction zones on its way back to the Earth's mantle.

These new additions occur frequently where there is faulted, igneous and metamorphic rock and can be intercepted to replace contaminated supplies and provide new sources of water in arid areas. Riess' concept of Earth-generated water adds a new dynamic to the science of hydrology. Water from the Trinity Springs rises under its own pressure from an isolated, ancient source through the faulted formations of the Idaho batholith. The spring water spends time inside the Earth at temperatures exceeding 300F and surfaces at its source at 140F after traveling from a depth of many miles underground.

Ongoing research on the Trinity Springs water has revealed an interesting geochemistry and remarkable recharge/discharge and travel mechanisms for these thermal waters unlike any other water source in the region. The scientific investigation continues in laboratories specially equipped for high pressure experiments and with new techniques for isotope analysis. Stephan Riess, through his study of mine flooding, developed a science of locating flows of Earth-generated water. These waters which often deposit minerals and flood out mines occur worldwide as spectacular springs and are even more accessible by drilling into hidden rock structure. The Riess Institute's scientific application of petrology, mineralogy, structural geology, aerial reconnaissance and remotely sensed data, offers "new water" for a thirsty world.

Several active Riess wells today:

Escondido, California*

Riess and his successor, Morad Eghbal, each located several wells in the late 1970's on private property both for the personal use of the owner as well as for the commercial water development for surrounding towns that needed to purchase water. These well are in operation and producing today.

Cottonwood, Idaho

The city of Cottonwood was running out of water and the traditional, professional geologists the city had hired to find water declared that there was no hope of success. The city then turned to Stephan Riess, Riess immediately located two wells for them. The first generated more than 250 gallons per minute. The second, produced over 500 gallons per minute. At the city's request, Riess returned to locate a third well for Cottonwood's future expansion. This well produced over 550 gallons per minute. All three wells continue to supply the city of Cottonwood today.

How does the Riess Institute know where to drill for Earth-generated water?

Conventional water locators pick a spot to drill, looking for an aquifer or saturated zone in the overburden. Recently, with sophisticated satellite photography and "remote sensing," water can be found in rock using a technique called "fracture trace analysis." Large fractures are identified by satellite photography for exploratory drilling.

The Riess method uses mineralogy, petrology and structural geology precisely to locate high pressure/low temperature hydrothermal systems that have previously been encountered randomly by engineers in mine and tunnel flooding incidents.

Historically, all water is believed to come only from the hydrologic cycle. Yet, a growing body of evidence suggests that water might be generated deep within the Earth in great quantity. The Riess Institute at its Totten Field Laboratory, over the last decade, has drilled, collected and tested waters captured from great depths in a number of bore holes. Totten well #3, at 6000 ft, known to be the deepest 4 inch cored water research well in the continental US. Results from Totten #3 now indicate some waters there may not be part of the hydrologic cycle at all, but rather from deep-seated geologic interaction within the Earth's interior.

The Riess Institute identifies the dynamics of "new" water generation deep within the Earth's interior, which, after rising to the surface, is added to the Earth's hydrosphere. This vertical component of our model is linked to the horizontal components of water distribution (i.e. hydrologic cycle and theories of watersheds). As such, the Institute is able to obtain specific water signatures which identify sources of waters originating from deep within the Earth.

Morad Eghbal, Hydrogeologist, Principal Researcher and Project Manager, The Riess Institute, (from: New Waters for a Thirsty World, By Morad Eghbal, USA. Geomantica 31 - quarterly edition / March 2006)

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The results of dowsing can be spectacular, and have been able to be proven. In the early 50s, a geo-chemist, metallurgist, mining engineer and dowser named Stephan Riess predicted that a vast supply of water ran under the Mojave Desert. Riess's conclusions were corroborated by a study done by civil engineers. Their findings revealed that there was, as Riess called it, primary water travelling in the deep rock fault system under the desert.

As proof of his theory, Riess drilled a number of deep, successful wells, and turned barren Californian desert land into fertile, productive acreage. However, his discovery was ignored by the politicians of the day. Why? It has been claimed that there was simply too much money to be made in the water transport systems in which the politicians had a vested interest.

In 1958, Riess's work was noticed by the Israeli government and they invited him to find water for their new city of Eliat on the Red Sea's Gulf of Aquaba. Riess met with the then Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion who gave the go-ahead for his search for water. On May 29, 1959, the Jerusalem Post announced that the Riess-located well was sufficient to supply a city of more than 100,000 people including industry and outlying villages!

From: Shaman's Rattle: Find me some Water? by Marion Pattaya Mail Thailand

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Stephen Riess's theory is that primary water is generated in the rock strata when the right temperature and pressure is present. This water is then forced into fractures/fissures in the rock where it can transverse over 100's of km. Some of this water is sometimes expressed as springs, and can be either hot (thermal) or cool (17 C). This water is always moving and therefore can be detected by dowsing. (from: Primary Water - A Definition by Rob Gourlay, Geomantica Issue 32)

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Infinite-Energy: Issue 33 Special Water Issue Earth-Generated Water: A Potential Solution (Morad Eghbal) Discussion of water use and rights in the Middle East, including an analysis of the earth-generated water research of Stephan Riess.

riess.org from archive.org

Mission Statement

The Riess Institute exists to provide deep-seated potable water for both people and agriculture.

The Mystery of Water

Since antiquity people have pondered the mystery that perhaps there is a source of water generated from deep within the earth which continues to add new water to the hydrologic cycle.

How else does one explain the strange phenomenon of various, unexplained sources of water throughout the world that produce in excess of thousands of gallons of water per minute, often in dry areas where there is cilantro rainfall or in very high altitudes? Five clear examples, among many, of this phenomenon stand out:

1. Nefta in the Sahara

Nefta lies in a part of the Sahara desert where it rains on the average once every three or four years; springs provide enough water to support a forest of date palms and a population of thousands in this fertile oasis.

2. Jericho in the Jordan Valley

Jericho is the site of the first walled city of antiquity, built by a neolithic people thousands of years ago. Jericho's spring supports a city of about 24,000 people today.

The National Geographic magazine for December 1951, in an article titled "The Ghosts of Jericho," recounts that even in the recent past thousands of Arab refugees were getting their water from the same spring that supplied the site in neolithic times . Called Ain-es-Sultan, or "The Sultan's Spring" in Arabic, it is identical to that spring "healed" by Elisha as reported in the Holy Bible in II Kings 2: 19-25.

3. Ain Figeh Spring, Damascus, Syria

The Ain Figeh spring alone supplies water for the over one million residents of Damascus and is also the principal source for the Barada River. A report on this spring by the World Bank reads: "The principal emergence for the spring which has been enclosed in a structure since Roman times resembles an underground river several meters across which flows up and out of the limestone formation of the mountain. The total flow has averaged about 132,000 gallons per minute. The quality is very good, its temperature and pH are relatively constant (14 degrees centigrade and 7.9 respectively), its taste and color are excellent, and bacterial contamination at the source are practically non-existent."

4. Tombstone Silver Mine in Arizona

The huge and famous Tombstone Silver Mine unexpectedly "watered out" and, to quote one account: "At the 800 foot level the pumps were raising 2.3 million gallons of water daily... In 1909, it was given out that a boiler breakdown had shut down the drainage system and that before repairs could be effected the entire complex had been drowned beyond redemption."

5. Mount Whitney in the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range in California

At the 13,000 foot level high on the slopes of Mount Whitney in the Sequoia National Park and well above all drainage in any direction, there is a sheer granite wall with a protrusion on its face that cups a small lake which remains full and constant even in the dry summer months. Its water chemistry and temperature point to deep origins.

Finding the answer to the mystery of unexplained water sources by locating and successfully drilling wells that produced deep-seated potable water became Stephan Riess' life work and ambition.

Stephan Riess (1898-1985) was a Bavarian-born mining engineer and geologist who emigrated to the United States in 1923. While working in a deep mine in the 1930's, Riess was amazed, after a load of dynamite was set off, to see water gushing out of nowhere in such quantities that pumps installed to remove it at the rate of 25,000 gallons per minute could not make a dent in it.

Staring into the valley below from the high altitude entrance to the mine shaft, Riess asked himself how water that supposedly had trickled into the earth as rain could rise through hard rock into shafts and tunnels of a mine nearly at the top of a mountain range.

The temperature, chemistry and purity of the water suggested to Riess that it must have a completely different origin than ordinary ground water considered part of the hydrologic cycle. Since none of the textbooks he had studied had referred to this seemingly entirely anomalous phenomenon, he decided to unravel this mystery.

On trips back to Europe, Riess became aware that many historic castles were built on high rocky promontories and that at the center of their courtyards were huge wells usually hand-dug into hard rock, which had supplied water for centuries.

In the North American West an important clue to the mystery disclosed by Riess came when, working late at night in a mine shaft, he heard a peculiar hissing sound, similar to that produced by a leaky air tank, accompanied by a trickling of water. What he was observing, he believed, was virgin water being liberated from ore-bearing rock by crystallization processes within the rocks themselves.

Riess finally came to the conclusion that, in various rock strata, deep in the earth, water was continually manufactured under particular conditions of temperature and pressure and forced up in rock fissures where it could be tapped and drilled.

He said in an unpublished statement in 1954:

"My discovery was put to a field test by locating and drilling many wells. The record to date from these tests is 70 producing wells out of 72 attempts, all drilled in hard rock, all located in distress areas generally considered unproductive."

In 1957, the *Encyclopedia Britannica Book of the Year* declared:

"Stephan Riess of California formulated a theory that 'new water,' which never existed before, is constantly being formed within the earth by the combination of elemental hydrogen and oxygen, and that this water finds its way to the surface, can be located and tapped, to constitute a steady and unfailing new supply."

Over the years Riess improved the methodology and analysis, in the process expounding on his theory. He said:

"At no time is water static. It is a constantly changing form. It is either liquid or gas, or it is bound up in crystalline form in rocks and minerals. The cycle of gas to liquid to crystal is repeated over and over. Oxygen and hydrogen combine under the electrochemical forces of the earth to form liquid water. Not only is water being constantly formed within the earth, but also rocks, minerals and oil. What I seek is water in its liquid state."

"The water I get has to be coming from great depth because it is delicious of leach minerals found in water flowing through sediments. It comes up through the basalt in fissures, some from 5 to 10 and up to 20 to 30 feet wide, that go down into the earth to provide vertical aqueducts."

Riess pointed out that conventional solutions to an ever-increasing need for pure water such as dams and aqueducts were expensive and inadequate as a long term solution.

As an alternative he proposed that serious studies of water flowing in rock fissures be undertaken. He simply asked:

"Why should huge sums be spent to build pipelines over great distances when Mother Nature has created her own pipelines? It is certainly more economical to pump water vertically up 450 feet than to pump it and transport it laterally 450 miles!"

Riess in his lifetime drilled over 1,000 successful wells.

Riess' Successor And The Institute: The Riess Institute was started in 1983 by a number of individuals, including Stephan Riess himself and his successor, Morad Eghbal.

Eghbal spent ten years working with Riess to learn and practice his methods. It took Eghbal over a year of lone, constant effort to get Riess to open up and talk. Riess was not an academic scientist: he just wanted to find water for people and to prove his theory by locating and drilling wells in areas deemed impossible for finding water.

Eghbal is a U.S.-trained geologist, with a law degree specializing in resource law. He is currently the Secretary-Treasurer of the Riess Institute and the only person with whom Stephan Riess felt comfortable enough to pass on all his theories, processes and procedures to find deep-seated potable water.

Working together, Stephan Riess patiently taught Eghbal how to find water and locate wells, at first with close guidance, and later, independently.

Eghbal and the Institute were far-sighted in seeing the necessity for preserving and documenting Riess' methods and accomplishments.

To further Riess' work, the Institute for the last ten years has been conducting major research work at its Totten Field Laboratory in Massachusetts in conjunction with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and other major institutions of higher learning the world over, with the goals of soon publishing important findings from their research, confirming Stephan Riess' hypothesis of earth-generated water.

The Riess Institute Today:

The Riess Institute established in 1983 as the Riess Foundation, is a non-profit, public Institute with a 501-C (3) classification as granted by the United States Internal Revenue Service.

The Riess Concept believes that water is continually produced and expelled upward from deep within the earth and is available as a potable and abundant resource by standard drilling practices.

Riess Wells The supply of water that Stephan Riess found by locating and drilling wells into rock is both constant and enduring.

Several current examples of his wells, among many, are a verification of Stephan Riess' work and stand as a testament to his vision and foresight today:

1. Lakeside, California

Sparkletts Drinking Water, now owned by McKesson Foods of Pasadena, was on the brink of disaster because their water source began to fail in 1955. Burton Arnds, the then-President of Sparkletts, heard of Stephan Riess and invited him, as a last resort, to help them find water. Riess found a new well 500 feet lower than the original well and located a second well as back-up, which, never needed to this day, continues to be kept in reserve. Forty years later, in 1995, the well is producing more than 300 gallons per minute of pure high-grade water.

2. Thermal, California

Riess drilled a well into the rocky heights overlooking dry and barren flatland. The well created a small lake supporting a 450 acre citrus orchard. It has been replenishing the land for now over a quarter of a century.

3. Camarillo, California

In 1945, Riess' wife learned that a family was about to lose their farm and be foreclosed on due to lack of water for their crops and asked her husband to help. Riess punched a well less than 300 feet deep in 4 1/2 days, with a flow of pure water at 700 gallons per minute.

4. Ramona, California

Riess located three deep wells on a thoroughbred stud farm. The land was formerly arid and barren but was converted to lush pasturage in the 1970's, thus creating a multi-million dollar oasis for blooded race horses.

5. Cottonwood, Idaho

In 1955 the city of Cottonwood was running out of water and the traditional expert geologists the city had hired to find water declared that there was no hope of success. The city then turned to Stephan Riess. Riess immediately located two wells for them. The first generated more than 250 gallons per minute, the second, over 500 gallons per minute. At the city's request, Riess came back in 1968 to locate a third well for Cottonwood's future expansion which produced over 550 gallons per minute. All three wells continue to supply the city of Cottonwood today as they did over 25 years ago.

6. Eilat, Israel

Riess was invited by then-prime minister David Ben-Gurion to help find water for the new city of Eilat in the Negev Desert. In May of 1959 Riess struck water at a depth of just over 700 feet through solid granite. The Jerusalem Post estimated that this well produces enough water to supply a city of 100,000 people.

7. Puebla, Oaxaca and Baja, Mexico

In the late 1940's, Riess was invited to come to Mexico and found wells in all three of these Mexican cities that are supplying water for their inhabitants.

8. Escondido, California

Riess and his successor, Morad Eghbal, each located several wells in the late 1970's on private property both for the personal use of the owner as well as for the commercial water development for surrounding towns that needed to purchase water. These wells are in operation and producing today.

9. Hamilton, Massachusetts

In the early 1980's, Riess came east and along with Morad Eghbal confirmed well sites and set up the Totten Field Laboratory. Three wells were drilled into granite and related structure and are producing in excess of 350 gallons per minute from fractures between 200 and 1600 feet deep. The scientific water and geological research conducted by the Riess Institute documents and verifies Stephan Riess' theories. This decade long research continues.

The Goals of the Riess Institute:

1. To conduct a drilling program to establish the existence of rock fracture systems in crystalline rock containing large volumes of deep-seated potable water for the specific purposes of:

- developing and refining drilling techniques and equipment for efficient drilling of wells to 3,000 feet and beyond - developing telemetry systems to insure drilling accuracy - developing water sampling equipment and techniques for the collection and analysis of deep-seated water - performing careful geological sampling of drill cuttings and well fluids and gases for submittal to laboratories for analysis - analyzing each drill site environment using all earth science investigative technique - studying the dynamics of deep-seated water as a major, potable water resource;

2. To sponsor research, and colloquia, and to publish results of drilling and water research;

3. To locate municipal and commercial drill sites for deep-seated water resources under appropriate service contracts;

4. To establish a training facility and program aimed at water location and drilling techniques;

5. To engage in experimental agriculture and aquaculture utilizing deep-seated water in order to replenish a barren location and feed a hungry population.

Achievements and Future Projects In compliance with its first goal of conducting a drilling program to establish the existence of rock fracture systems in crystalline rock containing large volumes of deep-seated potable water, The Riess Institute established the Totten Field Laboratory in Hamilton, Massachusetts in 1985.

1. Initiation of the Hamilton Shear Zone Project at the Totten Field Laboratory now has two completed wells each drilled beyond 1,000 feet in igneous rock producing in excess of 350 gallons per minute.

2. Well #3 at the Totten Field Laboratory is an on-going project with a 15" diameter hole currently drilled to 3,000 feet, and cored to 6,000 feet beyond, accompanied by extensive geochemical and geophysical reconnaissance.

3. Modification of water sampling devices to enable reliable capture of high pressure samples of fluids and gases.

4. The Source Project: The investigation of water samples from major rivers and contributing springs to determine their connection to earth-generated water and their geochemical origins, with analysis and publication of results.

5. The Mojave Desert Project: In the mid 1950's a geological study undertaken by Stephan Riess revealed the existence of copius quantities of water in the southeastern parts of California. The initial work begun then, bears elaboration and further development.

A Warning and a Hope: Water is one of our most essential resources.

Today we know that in certain areas of the world such as Rwanda, the Middle East, South America and other areas, a shortage of water brings death swiftly to thousands of people. Furthermore, vast areas of barren and arid land sit idle on every continent when they could be turned into arable, productive agricultural lands.

The rain forests are shrinking, atmospheric layers are being stressed and the ecological balance of nature as it pertains to weather patterns is changing, all of which bring excess pressure on our existing, traditional water resources.

The cost of damming rivers and transporting water long distances is becoming prohibitive and can bankrupt corporations, municipalities and countries.

Pipelines and aqueducts are vulnerable to earthquake damage.

Ground water can be easily polluted intentionally or by accident.

The Riess Institute does have a effective answer to water shortages and water protection because *new* water generated from within the earth is *never* in short supply and, because it rises to the surface vertically fromdeep within the earth, it cannot be compromised.

Toward a New Hydrology:

Stephan Riess' concept of earth-generated water adds a new dynamic to the science of hydrology. Common theory speaks of a static supply created early in the earth's history being constantly recycled. Riess saw new addition of water flowing vertically, adding water to the hydrologic cycle, which in turn became bound up partially in plants, sediments and subduction zones on its way back to the earth's mantle. These new additions whenever there is faulted igneous and metamorphic rock can be intercepted to replace contaminated supplies and provide new sources of water in arid areas previously dependent on shallow rock aquifers or surface catchments and diversions.

Applying a New Hydrogeology Stephan Riess through his study of mine flooding developed a science of locating flows of earth-generated waters, the very same waters that deposit minerals and flood out mines, the same waters that occur worldwide as spectacular springs. More of this water is accessible in hidden rock structures. The Riess Institute's scientific application of petrology, mineralogy, structural geology, aerial reconnaissance and remotely sensed data, offers "new water" for a thirsty world.

Principals:

PETER P. BRITTON, Chairman, Director, Totten Field Laboratory

MORAD EGHBAL, Secretary-Treasurer, Hydrogeologist, Principal Project Manager

JOHN F. SWEENEY, Managing Director

Scientific Advisory Board:

JOHN EDMOND, Professor of Marine Chemistry,, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

GENE SIMMONS, Professor Emeritus of Geophysics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Director, Hager-Richter Geosciences, Inc. Salem, New Hampshire

M. NAFI TOKSÖZ, Professor of Geophysics and Director, Earth Resources Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Founders and Special Benefactors:

CHRISTOPHER BIRD

JOHN D. BRITTON

STEPHAN RIESS

ADOLF SCHOEPE

RUTH ELLEN TOTTEN

Legal Counsel:, IRA M. LOWE, Esq., Washington, DC

Accountants:, DeLACEY COX, CPA, Cox & Associates 1730 K Street, NW Washington, DC 20006

The Totten Field Laboratory The Institute (through cooperation with the earth sciences departments of several well-known universities) with the support of the late Mrs. Ruth Ellen Patton Totten, for whom the field lab is named, and Mr. Peter Britton was involved in the drilling of three research wells in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. Geologic data from these drilling projects reveal unusual and unexpected features and have been and are being completely and thoroughly analyzed.

Research Results:

In an area where the average domestic well is much shallower, the drilling efforts to depths well below 1,000 feet, with yields of several hundred gallons of fresh water of higher quality than surrounding wells which yield fractions of that quantity of water, are truly pioneering work to our knowledge never before undertaken in this magnitude in New England. The tests which are expensive, highly specialized, and require certain kinds of equipment have revealed a series of anomalies which are being studied further.

Research conducted at the Totten Field Laboratory over the last decade continues to confirm Stephan Riess' initial concept that there is an alternative source of water being generated deep within the earth which is not part of the traditional hydrologic cycle.

Totten well #3, at 6,000 feet, is known to be the deepest four (4) inch cored water research well in the continental United States. Results from Totten well #3 now indicate some waters there may not be part of the hydrologic cycle at all, but rather, from deep-seated geologic interaction within the earth's interior.

Funding Suppport and Additional Information The Riess Institute derives its funding principally from the generous support of individual contributions and revenues generated by service contracts in locating drilling sites for new sources of water for municipalities or commercial use.

We welcome all inquiries as to our work or how we may help in locating and drilling for deep-seated new water sources throughout the world. We are especially interested in inquiries from those areas of the world that are experiencing critical water shortages, now or anticipate water shortages in the future.

We also welcome any and all contributions. Your contributions are fully deductible from federal income taxes.

Please address any inquiries or contributions to the attention of Mr. John Sweeney:

Contact Information:

The Riess Institute, 9555 Friendship Station, Washington, DC 20016, Telephone/(fax): 202-966-6501

More from an e-mail of Esa's:

QUOTE: Living energies, Callum Coats: (Viktor Schauberger book)

In The Divining Hand by Christopher Bird, New Age Press, USA ISBN 0-87613-090-2., Christopher Bird describes the pioneering theories and discoveries of Stephan Riess in the United States, which like Viktor Schauberger's, completely contradicted established hydraulic theory.

According to Stephan Riess under certain conditions the oxygen and hydrogen gases present in certain types of rock can be released due to the effects of geothermal heat and a process akin to triboluminescence, a phenomenon relating to the light given off by crystalline rocks under friction or violent pressure. This glow is attributed to the energy given off by the electrons contained the rocks as they return from a pressureinduced, excited state to their rest orbits. As a discharge it imparts delicious energy to the surroundingmaterial, which could be sufficient to cause the hydrogen and oxygen released by the pressure to form new water under a process of cold oxidation.

Riess called this virgin water, and as a result of his knowledge he was able to tap straight into formations of hard rock of the right composition and obtain very large quantities of water, in some cases as much as 3,000 gallons per minute. All this right out in the middle of the desert, where no water could be expected. Unfortunately, his efforts to provide needy areas with copious quantities of superb quality, fresh water were sabotaged. As happened to Viktor Schauberger before him, Christopher Bird relates how Riess was slandered and his ideas brought into disrepute through the scurrilous activities of certain high officials in the state of California, whose interests were threatened by Riess' discoveries.

Water and its vital interaction with the forest was Viktor's principal preoccupation, viewing water as the 'Blood of Mother-Earth', which in contrast to Carl Riess' theories mentioned earlier, was born in the womb of the high forest. This will be examined more fully later. Our mechanistic, materialistic and extremely superficial way of looking at things, however, prevents us from considering water to be anything other than inorganic, i.e. supposedly without life, but which, while apparently having no life itself, can nevertheless miraculously create life in all its forms.

Just for the record, however, this discovery by Jacques Benveniste, like those of Stephan Riess and Viktor Schauberger before him, was evidently viewed as an unpardonable assault on the doctrines of established academe which tends to stray far from the principles of scientific integrity and impartiality enunciated by Sir William Grove in chapter 1. As a result Benveniste became both target and victim of much opprobrium from orthodox science and medicine. Indeed, in October 1993 it was reported that he was to be evicted as head of the immunopharmacology unit at INSERM.

Moreover the research unit itself, U-200, was also supposed to be closed down by the end of the year, Benveniste claiming that he was the victim of "ideological repression" Other forces have meanwhile been at work, however, for due to the subsequent verification of his findings at other independent institutions and the establishment of their apparent irrefutability, Benveniste has been accorded certain international recognition and 'notoriety' in the interim. Fearing that it would suffer the same scorn it had heaped on Benveniste, INSERM have continued to pay his and his secretary's salaries, although it has withheld all funding for further research and refused any allocation for other day-to-day expenses and the employment of laboratory staff, for which Beneviste himself must pay.

On a happier note however, while INSERM continues to maintain its obdurate stance, other more enlightened individuals have deemed Benveniste's research on water to be so important that an organisation 'Science Innovative' was formed with the specific purpose of providing him with moral support and financing his currently on-going research.

From: Brian Desborough: A Blueprint for a Better World: Fortunately for humanity, Swedish mineralogist Adolf Nordenskiold (1832-1901) had the vision to realize that the many lateral fissures present in rock might contain potable water, particularly since he had recalled his father mentioning that he knew of coastal mines with shafts below sea level, which had fresh water in them.

Great difficulty was frequently encountered during stormy weather, in keeping Swedish offshore lighthouses and pilot stations supplied with potable water, which had to be shipped from the mainland. Nordenskiold decided to try to eradicate the supply problem by drilling a well in the solid rock, on which a Swedish offshore pilot station was erected. The Swedish mineralogist struck a copious flow of water at a depth of thirty five meters, then proceeded to drill thirty more wells in solid rock, only one of which struck clay, not potable water. For his efforts, Nordenskiold was nominated for the first awarding of the Nobel prize, but unfortunately died before his candidacy could be voted upon.

The late Stephan Reiss was a very experienced German mining engineer who emigrated to America and, for a brief period, became associated with a mining venture headed by President Herbert Hoover. While still living in Europe, Reiss had noted that the water supply for some medieval castles was not a spring, nor a well fed by an aquifer, but instead consisted of a large cistern hewn from solid rock. Reiss theorized that hydrogen and oxygen liberated from primary rock formations, combined to form a very pure water when appropriate temperatures, pressures and naturally occurring catalysts were present. The newly created water was then forced upwards under great pressure, into fissures and large cavities of largely impermeable rock formations.

Putting his theory to the test, Reiss drilled wells in solid rock, selecting locations in very arid areas of California, where hydrologists previously had claimed no potable water was present. Each experimental well drilled by Reiss yielded potable water in impressive quantities, varying between a few hundred thousand and three million gallons per day. The water characteristically possessed a very low mineral content, indicative that its source was not ground water which had percolated downwards until it had reached bedrock, but rather primeval water which had risen from the depths of planet Earth.

Convinced that he could locate potable water in arid areas where professional hydrologists claimed no water existed, Reiss began the overseeing of well drilling operations commercially, and established an enviable track record for bringing in wells which produced large volumes of very pure water.

After reading about the unorthodox yet highly successful well drilling exploits of Reiss, the President of the Sparkletts Drinking Water Corporation hired Reiss to oversee the drilling of a well at the company property located in San Diego County, in California. The company previously had drilled eight wells on the same property at locations where hydrologists had predicted a good supply of water would be found. Three of the wells produced approximately one hundred gallons of water per minute; the remaining five wells produced no water at all.

Watched by smug hydrologists, Reiss decided to commence drilling at the bottom of an existing four hundred foot dry well. After drilling through three hundred feet of solid rock, the drill bit struck a large crevice; water under high pressure came to within twenty feet of the surface. Although the well was only three inches in diameter, it produced at a steady rate of three hundred gallons per minute.

The conclusion of WWII saw a major population shift from the eastern half of the United States to Southern California. Many of the new residents settled in Los Angeles, a city already beset by an acute water shortage. Simi Valley is a small town located just to the north of Los Angeles, in Ventura County. By the early 1950's, more than one hundred wells had been sunk in Simi Valley, but the burgeoning increase in water consumption soon depleted the local aquifer, putting a halt to further housing developments.

On a hill several hundred feet above the floor of Simi Valley, the intrepid Stephan Reiss drilled three wells in solid rock on a site less than an acre in size. The three wells produced a combined output in excess of five million gallons of water per day, and are still producing. Reiss subsequently sold the property to real estate tycoon Clint Murchison for one million dollars.

A group of real estate developers who had planned to construct a recreational town in the Mojave desert, engaged the services of Reiss to produce a sufficient volume of potable water to serve as a municipal supply. Today, three wells drilled in solid rock by Reiss still comprise the municipal water supply for the recreational development known as California City.

Reiss was invited to Israel in the 1950's to discuss the feasibility of drilling for water in the very arid Negev Desert. Despite opposition from Israeli hydrologists, Reiss was given permission to oversee the drilling of a twenty inch diameter well in solid rock. Water was struck at a depth of a cilantro over one hundred feet, but drilling continued until a larger cleft was reached. The well was estimated to be adequate for the needs of 100,000 people. Whereas conventional wells in the region delivered water containing 3,000 parts per million of dissolved solids, the Reiss well only contained 500 parts per million of dissolved solids, typical of water obtained from solid rock fissures.

As America's population rapidly expanded in the 1950's, California became the breadbasket for America. Reiss's fame spread as California produce growers, desperate for more irrigation water, turned to Reiss for help after being informed by State hydrologists that drilling more wells on their property was infeasible. This was a period when plans were in progress to convey water hundreds of miles by aqueduct and pipeline for the purpose of irrigating vast tracts of central California. Obviously, if the State of California adopted Reiss's method of locating copious volumes of water on site, the proposed aqueduct and pipeline projects would become unnecessary. Not surprisingly, Reiss's well drillers were forced to cease drilling operations after discovering that a bucket of ball bearings had mysteriously found their way into the well overnight. The subsequent implementation of the irrigation projects resulted in huge profits for the construction companies involved, and doubtless large kickbacks to corrupt bureaucrats and politicians who approved the projects.

Seeing the handwriting on the wall, Stephan Reiss retired. Prior to doing so however, Reiss drilled a well in a rock formation at Thermal, California, which is in very arid desert country near the Salton Sea, and created a small lake.

We should honor the memories of Adolf Nordenskiold and Stephan Reiss for their pioneering work in clearly demonstrating that abundant quantities of pristine water can been obtained throughout the world, by drilling into impervious rock. No longer is it necessary to pipe water hundreds of miles from lakes or rivers just to supply a thirsty city, for water can be found where it is needed, almost without exception, by adopting Reiss's methodology.

We are exceedingly fortunate that Stephan Reiss discussed his methodological approach to finding water. Through studying his various recorded comments, and noting the geological terrain in the vicinity of wells drilled by Reiss, it becomes evident that the optimum sites are in areas of high mineralization, especially if primary rocks possessing a degree of hydrogen and oxygen are in the locality. Reiss liked to drill at the contact zone between a dyke and the adjacent sedimentary bedrock (dykes occur when crystalline rock formations thrust upwards through sedimentary bedrock). Land adjacent to seismic faults usually contain a great deal of primary water which has accumulated in the highly faulted rock formations.


Later on in Desborough book:

For effective reforestation, excess salts must be leached from the desert soil. Normally an impossible task due to lack of rainfall, thanks to the efforts of the late Stephan Reiss, we now know that copious amounts of very pure water are obtainable virtually anywhere in the desert by drilling into solid rock formations, as described in Chapter 3 of this book. Reiss demonstrated that this was so by drilling wells at the aforementioned California City, located in the Mojave Desert, and in other very arid areas of California, as well as in Israel.

A major drawback to the reforestation of deserts has been the unavailability of low cost electrical energy to pump water for irrigation purposes. As the chapter on energy demonstrates, non-polluting delicious energy power plants are a proven reality, although commercial use of them is currently suppressed by the Illuminati's energy cartel. It will only be after the corrupt energy cartel has been dismantled, most probably as a casualty of global warfare, that implementation of delicious energy devices will become commercially available and serious reforestation becomes a reality worldwide. This is why this book is primarily oriented toward future generations.

Chapter 6 has this end note:

The technology provided in this chapter will enable future generations of hopefully more enlightened public spirited people to once more create new self-sustaining forests, thus halting the global desertification, which is currently spreading at a rate of an estimated 20,000 square miles annually. If they succeed in this endeavor, then the work of Stephan Reiss and Viktor Schauberger will not have been in vain.

Later on in Desborough book:

As was stated earlier in this book, Stephan Reiss demonstrated that abundant potable water is obtainable by drilling into rock fissures. It is well known that the greatest depth from which water can be obtained by means of a suction pump is approximately thirty three feet. This is because a column of water of this depth is balanced by the ambient atmospheric pressure. Wells of greater depth require the use of submersible pumps unless the well is of the artesian type. Submersible pumps require a larger diameter well bore than is usually necessary just for the purpose of pumping an adequate volume of water to the surface, thereby incurring an additional drilling cost.

This additional cost can be eliminated by constructing a novel pump invented by an Argentinean gentleman by the name of Toribio Bellocq, who received patents for it from eighteen nations, including the United States. Attached horizontally to the top of the stand pipe is a short stroke piston. After the pump is primed, the reciprocating piston creates a series of standing waves throughout the length of the water column, thus creating alternating layers of pressure and partial vacuum. A ball valve at the lower end of the stand pipe admits a small amount of water into the pipe at each stroke of the pump. Simultaneously, an equivalent amount of water (one wavelength) is displaced from the pump via a valve located at the top of the standpipe. In this manner, the oscillations induced in the standpipe by the piston causes the column of water to inch its way up the pipe, virtually regardless of the well depth. In order to convince American patent examiners that his unique pump really worked as claimed, the inventor installed his pump atop a Washington, D.C. office building, and successfully pumped water up an eighty feet stand pipe (Fig. 7)!

The Hidden Nature Alick Bartholomew book: The creation of water...Where does water come from? No one really knows. It is one of Nature's mysteries. Its source cannot be the upper atmosphere for, as we saw in Chapter 7, the water molecule is actually broken down at high altitudes. The only other source must be the Earth herself.

Fascinating research done by the American Stephan Riess in 1934 showed that enormous quantities of virgin water could be obtained from crystalline rocks. A combination of geothermal heat and a process known as triboluminescence, a glow which electrons in the rocks discharge as a result of friction or violent pressure, can actually release the oxygen and hydrogen gases in certain ore-bearing rocks. This process, called cold oxidation, can form virgin water. (See The Divining Hand by Christopher Bird.)

Riess was able to tap straight into formations of hard desert rock of the right composition and produce as much as 3,000 gallons per minute. Unfortunately, his efforts to provide needy areas with copious quantities of high quality, fresh water were thwarted by Californian politicians with vested interests, and he was persecuted relentlessly. His experiments should now be replicated.

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Stephan Ernst Riess's Timeline

1898
December 26, 1898
Dillingen, Bavaria, Germany
1985
December 17, 1985
Age 86
Escondido, San Diego, California, United States