Sverker II of Sweden

Is your surname Karlsson?

Research the Karlsson family

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Sverker II "the Younger" Karlsson, King of Sweden

Swedish: Sverker II "den Yngre" Karlsson, Kung av Sverige
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Sverige (Sweden)
Death: July 17, 1210 (45-46)
Gestilren, Västergötland, Sverige (Sweden) (died in the Battle of Gestilren)
Place of Burial: Alvastra, Östergötland, Sverige
Immediate Family:

Son of King Charles VII Sverkersson of Sweden and Queen Christina Stigsdatter of Sweden
Husband of Bengta Hvide, Queen of Sweden and Ingegerd Birgersdotter av Bjelbo
Father of Princess Christina av Mecklenburg; Princess Helena Sverkersdotter, of Sweden; Margaretha Sverkerdatter, av Sverige; Prins Karl Sverkersson (d.y.), av Sverige; Kung på Öland Ingemund Johan Sverkersson and 4 others
Brother of Sophie Karlsdatter av Sverige

Occupation: Kung av Sverige
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sverker II of Sweden

Sverker d.y. Karlsson

  • Son of King Charles VII Sverkersson of Sweden and Queen Christina Hvide
  • Sverker was a son of King Karl Sverkersson of Sweden and Queen Christine Stigsdatter of Hvide, a Danish noblewoman. Through his mother, he was a cousin's son of the Danish kings Canute VI and Valdemar Sejr. His parents' marriage has been dated to 1162 or more probably 1163.

KINGS of SWEDEN [1133]-1222 (FAMILY of SVERKER)

Project MedLands Sweden


SVERKER, son of --- (-murdered 24/25 Dec 1156). Sverker's parentage is not known. According to Saxo Grammaticus, he was "of modest origins"[122]. Under King in Östergötland. He was installed as SVERKER I King of Sweden in [1133/34] in succession to Magnus Nielsson of Denmark. married firstly as her third husband, ULVHILD Haakonsdotter, widow first of INGE II Halstensson King of Sweden and secondly of NIELS King of Denmark, daughter of HAAKON Finsson & his wife --- (-before 1143). Her second marriage is referred to by Saxo Grammaticus who states that "Ulvildam Noricam", wife of "Nicolaus", was secretly abducted by King Sverker but their "connection was accepted as a marriage"[123]. Fagrskinna names “Úlfhildr dróttning, dóttir Hákonar Finnssunar Hárekssunar or Þjóttu” as mother of “Karl konungs”, adding that she had first married “Nikolás Danakonungr”, secondly “Ingi Sviakonungr Hallsteinssunr” and thirdly “Sverkir konungr Kolssunr”[124]. married secondly (after 1143) as her third husband, RYKSA Swantosława of Poland, widow firstly of MAGNUS I "den Stærke/the Strong" King of Denmark and secondly of [VOLODAR], daughter of BOLESŁAW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his second wife Salome von Berg-Schelklingen ([1116/17]-after 25 Dec 1155). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Rikissam" as the only daughter of "dux Vergescelaus de Polonia" and his wife Agnes, specifying that "primo fuit regina Suecie", that by her second husband "regi Russie nomine Musuch" she was mother of "Sophiam reginam Dacie et Rikissam", the latter marrying "imperatoris Castelle Alfunso"[125]. This appears to be a confused account which contradicts other sources in many aspects. She was known as RIKISSA in Sweden. Her third marriage is confirmed by Knytlíngasaga which records that [her son] “Knúti konúngi” fled to ”Sörkvir konúngr átti Rikizu, módur Þeirra Knúts konúngs ok Súffiu” after being defeated by King Svend III[126]. The marriage is also confirmed by the Liber Census Daniæ which records that the estate of [her son by King Sverker] “Bulizlaus” was inherited by his sister Sofia Queen of Denmark [Ryksa%E2%80%99s daughter by her second husband][127].

King Sverker I & his first wife ULVHILD Haakonsdotter had four children

  • 1. JOHAN Sverkersson (-murdered [1153/54]). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. He appears to have been his father's designated heir but was killed (by peasants?) some years before his father's death[128].
  • 2. KARL Sverkersson (-murdered Visingsö 12 Apr [1166], bur Alvastra Abbey). His parentage is stated by Saxo Grammaticus[129]. He succeeded in 1161 as KARL I King of Sweden. married (1163) KRISTIN Stigsdatter [Hvide], daughter of STIG Tokesen "Hvitaleder/White leather" [Hvide] & his wife Margrete Knudsdatter of Denmark. Snorre names (in order) "the Danish king Valdemar…and daughters Margaret, Christina and Catherine" as the children of "Canute Lavard" & his wife, recording that Margrete married "Stig Hvitaled" and that their daughter was "Christina, married to the Swedish king, Karl Sorkvison, and their son was king Sorkver"[130]. Fagrskinna names (in order) “Valdimarr konungr ok Kristin ok Katerin or Margareta” as children of “Knútr lávardr, bródir Eiriks eimuna” and his wife, noting that Margrete married “Stigr hvitaledr”, father of “Nikoláss ok Kristinar er átti Karl konungr Sverkissunr”[131]. Morkinskinna records that “Karl Sørkvisson king of the Swedes” married “Kristín” daughter of “Stígr hvítaledr” and his wife Margret[132].

King Karl & his wife KRISTIN Stigsdatter had one child

  • a) SVERKER Karlson(-killed in battle Gestilren 17 Jul 1210, bur Alvastra Abbey). Snorre names "king Sorkver" as son of "the Swedish king, Karl Sorkvison" & his wife[133]. Fagrskinna names “Sverkir konungr, fadir Jóans konungs” as son of “Kristinar er átti Karl konungr Sverkissunr”[134]. He succeeded in 1196 as SVERKER II "den yngre/the younger" King of Sweden. The Saga of King Sverre records the accession of "Sorkvi Karlsson" after the death of "King Knut of Sweden"[135]. “Swerco filius Karoli Regis rex Sweorum” donated property to the monks of Nydala by charter dated to [1196/1210][136]. The Icelandic Annals record the battle in 1208 between "Svercherum Caroli filius" and "Ericum Canuti filium, Suecorum reges"[137]. Deposed 1208. married firstly BENGTE Ebbesdatter Galen, daughter of EBBE Sunesen [Galen] from Knardrup & his wife ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. married secondly INGEGÄRD Birgersdotter, daughter of BIRGER Bengtsson "Brosa" Jarl in Sweden & his wife Brigida of Norway (-after 1210). Snorre names (in order) "Ingegerd…married to the Swedish king Sorkver [and] a second daughter…Kristin and a third Margaret" as the daughters of "Earl Birger Brose" & his wife[138].

King Sverker II & his first wife BENGTE Ebbesdatter had two children

  • i) KARL Sverkersson (-murdered in the mountains near Trondheim 1198). The Saga of King Sverre records the marriage of "Karlson of King Sorkvi" and "Ingibiorg daughter of King Sverri"[139]. married INGEBORG Sverresdatter, of Norway, daughter of SVERRE King of Norway & his first wife Astrid Rösdatter.
  • ii) HELENA Sverkersdotter (-after 1240). A charter dated 1237 refers to the marriage of “S. Fulconis ducis filius” and “E. Suerchonis Regis filia” after her abduction from Vreta convent[140]. married (before 1237) SUNE Folkason Jarl in Sweden, son of FOLKER Birgersson [Folkunge] Jarl in Sweden & his wife (-1247).

King Sverker II & his second wife INGEGÄRD Birgersdotter had two children

  • iii) KARL Sverkersson (-1213). The Icelandic Annals record the death in 1213 of "Carolus Svercheri filius"[141]. If King Sverker was his father, Karl must have been from the king´s second marriage, after the death of his older half-brother of the same name.]
  • iv) JOHAN Sverkersson (1201-Visingsö 10 Mar 1222, bur Alvastra Abbey). Snorre names "King Jon" as the son of "the Swedish king Sorkver" and his wife Ingegerd[142]. Morkinskinna names “King Jón” as son of “King Sørkvir”[143]. The Saga of King Sverre records the death of "Earl Birgi Brosa" in the same year as Sverre King of Norway [in 1202], commenting that "the Swedes then took Jon son of King Sorkvi…one year old"[144]. Fagrskinna names “Sverkir konungr, fadir Jóans konungs” as son of “Kristinar er átti Karl konungr Sverkissunr”[145]. He succeeded in 1216 as JOHAN I King of Sweden, crowned [1219]. The Icelandic Annals record the succession in 1216 of "Johannes Svercheri filius" who reigned for six years[146]. The Icelandic Annals record the death in 1222 of "Johannes Sverkeri filus rex Suecorum"[147].
  • 3. INGEGÄRD (-1172, bur Vreta Abbey). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. married (1156) KNUD III Magnussen, Joint King of Denmark, son of MAGNUS I "den Stærke/the Strong" King of Denmark & his wife Ryksa [Swantos%C5%82awa] of Poland ([1129]-murdered Roskilde 9 Aug 1157).
  • 4. INGEGÄRD (-1204). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. Prioress at Vretakloster 1164.

King Sverker I & his second wife RYKSA Swantosława of Poland had one child

  • 5. BURISLAV (-before 1173). His parentage is indicated by the following document: the Liber Census Daniæ records that the estate of “Bulizlaus”, son of King Sverker, was inherited by his [half-]sister Sofia Queen of Denmark[148]. Contender for the throne [1168/73].

King Sverker had one [illegitimate] son by an unknown mistress

  • 6. KOL The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.

Source Project MedLands Sweden - https://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SWEDEN.htm#SverkerIIdied1210

History

Sverker was a son of King Karl Sverkersson of Sweden and Queen Christine Stigsdatter of Hvide[3], a Danish noblewoman. His parents' marriage has been dated to 1162 or 1163.

When his father Karl had been murdered in Visingsö in 1167, apparently by minions of the next king Canute I of Sweden, Sverker was taken to Denmark while a boy and grew up with his mother's clan of Hvide, leaders of Zealand. Sverker also allied himself with the Galen clan leaders in Skåne who were close to the Hvide, by marriage through lady Benedikte Ebbesdotter of Hvide. The Danish king supported him as claimant to Sweden, thus helping to destabilize the neighboring country.

When King Canute I of Sweden died in 1196, his sons were only children. Sverker was chosen as the next king of Sweden, surprisingly without quarrel. He returned to his native country, however being regarded quite Danished. His uncontested election was largely thanks to Jarl Birger Brosa whose daughter, Ingegerd Birgersdotter of Bjelbo, Sverker married soon after his first wife had died.

Reign

King Sverker confirmed and enlarged privileges for the Swedish church and the Valerius Archbishop of Uppsala. The privilege document of 1200 is the oldest known ecclesiastical privilege in Sweden. Skáldatal names two of Sverker's court skalds: Sumarliði skáld and Þorgeirr Danaskáld. In 1202 Earl Birger died and the late jarl's grandson, Sverker's one-year old son John received the title of Jarl from his father. This was intended to strengthen him as heir of the crown.

Around 1203, Canute's four sons, who had lived in Swedish royal court, began to claim the throne and Sverker exiled them to Norway. His position as king became unsecured from this point forward. The sons of Canute returned with troops in 1205, supported by the Norwegian party of Birkebeiner, but Sverker succeeded in winning in the Battle of Älgarås, where three of the sons fell. The only survivor returned with Norwegian support in 1208 and in the Battle of Lena, Sverker was defeated. Sverker's troops were commanded by Ebbe Suneson, the father of his late first wife and brother of Andreas Sunesen, Archbishop of Lund. King Eric X of Sweden drove Sverker to exile to Denmark.

Pope Innocentius III's attempt to have the crown returned to Sverker did not succeed. Sverker made a military expedition, with Danish support, to Sweden, but was conquered and killed in the Battle of Gestilren in 1210. The ancient sources state that "he was killed by the Folkung clan".

Family

With his first wife, the Danish noble Benedicta Ebbesdatter (Galen, apparently not Hvide as otherwise alleged, b. c. 1165/70, d. 1200), whom he married before 1190 when yet living in Denmark, Sverker had at least one well-attested daughter, Helena Sverkersdotter , as well as possibly further children, such as Karl (who died in adolescence at the latest, if ever lived; but his existence is from the record that he is alleged to have married a daughter of king Sverre of Norway), and possibly even two other daughters (if they existed, their names are given by reconstructive history research as Margaret and Kristina - however they may just have been Sverker's first wife's kinswomen). Later pretensions of the House of Mecklenburg claim that Sverker's daughter (if he had such) Christina was their ancestress, wife of Henry II of Mecklenburg ("Henry Borwin" in some later texts).

The second marriage in 1200 with Ingegerd Birgersdotter of Bjelbo, daughter of the Folkunge Jarl Birger Brosa produced a son and heir, Jon (1201–1222), who was chosen king of Sweden 1216 as John I of Sweden.

His certain daughter Helena Sverkersdotter married (earl) Sune Folkason of the family of Bjelbo, justiciar of Västergötland. Their daughters Catherine of Ymseborg and Benedicta of Ymseborg became pawns in marriages to gain Swedish succession after 1222, when the Sverker dynasty went extinct in male line. Catherine was married to the rival dynasty's heir Eric XI of Sweden but they remained apparently childless. Benedikte married Svantepolk of Viby and had several daughters, who married Swedish noblemen. Several Swedish noble families claim descent from Benedikte.

Om Sverker II of Sweden (Norsk)

Sverker d.y. Karlsson

Sverker den yngre Karlsson, född 1164, död 17 juli 1210 vid slaget vid Gestilren (stupad), var kung av Sverige 1196–1208, son till kung Karl Sverkersson och drottning Kristina Stigsdotter Hvide. Regeringstid 1196-1208 Ätt Sverkerska ätten. Föräldrar Kung Karl Sverkersson och drottning Kristina

Gemål(er)

1. Bengta, från före 1190

2. Ingegärd från 1200 ca

Sverkers barn


Med Bengta (gift c. 1180):.

1.Helena, gift med jarl Sune Folkesson (Bjälboätten) lagman i Västergötland

2.Karl (död 1198).

3.Kristina (död 1252), gifte med Henrik Borwin II av Mecklenburg (har även ansetts vara dotter till kung Karl I).

4.Margareta (född 1192), gift med Wizlaw I av Rügen.

Med Ingegärd (gift 1200):

1.Johan (1201-1222), svensk kung 1216 (ej att förxäxla med Jon Jarl).

2.Ingrid, abbedissa i Vreta

Sverkers liv


Då Sverkers far, kung Karl dödats 1167 på Visingsö av Knut Eriksson i kampen om kungakronan, fördes Sverker till sin mor Kristina "hvítaleð"s släkt i Danmark för en säkrare uppväxt. När kung Knut dog omkring 1196 var hans söner för unga för att någon av dem kunde väljas till kung, Sverker återkom till Sverige och valdes till kung med jarlen Birger Brosas stöd.

Sverker gifte sig med den danska stormansdottern Bengta Hvide senast 1190 och de fick minst tre barn. Hon dog före 1200 då Sverker gifte om sig med Birger Brosas dotter Ingegerd och de fick sonen Johan.

Under Sverkers tid kulminerade maktkampen mellan Sverkerska ätten och Erikska ätten. Sverker hade nära kopplingar till påvestolen och främjade kyrkans politik i Sverige och en stark kungamakt medan den Erikska ätten främjade en nationell kyrka, kungens rätt att utse biskopar samt stormännens traditionella regionala makt och självbestämmande. Danska intressen stödde också Sverker som ville utöka det danska riket, bland annat sökte Valdemar II Sejr att införliva Västergötland med Danmark genom att stödja Sverker med danska trupper men misslyckades i slaget vid Lena.

Kyrkoprivilegier


Sverker utfärdade det äldsta kända generella kyrkoprivilegiet i Sverige genom donations och privilegiebrev för Uppsala domkyrka och ärkebiskopen Olof Lambatunga år 1200. Privilegierna innebar bland annat att man skilde på civilrätt (världslig) och kanonisk rätt (kyrklig) som betyder att präster inte kunde dömas av en civildomstol i brottsmål utan bara av ett domkapitel. Kyrkan i Sverige blev också befriad från viss kunglig beskattning och blev därmed ett eget frälse. I gengäld erbjöd kyrkan den skriftliga administration som var nödvändig i systemskiftet från flera regionala maktcentra ledda av stormän mot en mer central kungamakt och rättsapparat som Sverker sökte bygga upp.

Stridigheter och död


Kung Sverkers välde var omstritt, och när Birger Brosa dog 1202 ökade motsättningarna mellan de olika stormannagrupperna. Knut Erikssons fyra söner som dittills vistats vid hovet sökte sig till Norge. När Sverker utsåg sin minderårige son Johan till jarl reagerade de Erikssonska bröderna med ett uppror. Understödda av den norska gruppen birkebeinarna drabbade de samman med Sverkers här i slaget vid Älgarås 1205 i Tiveden. Tre av bröderna dödades vid slaget och den överlevande Erik Knutsson, flydde därefter till Norge.

Erik Knutsson återkom med en norsk här och mötte kung Sverker vid slaget vid Lena 31 jan 1208. Sverker hade dansk hjälp och hans svärfar, Ebbe Sunesson Hvide ledde den danska hjälphären som enligt medeltida källor uppgick till 18.000 man (troligen starkt överdrivet). Men Erik besegrade Sverkers här och valdes till kung av Sverige medan Sverker flydde med sin familj och ärkebiskop Valerius till Danmark.

Påven Innocentius III stödde Sverker mot Erik och stormannafraktionen med ett påvligt brev 1209 vilket hindrade Erik att officiellt bli krönt till kung i Sverige. I ett sista försök att återerövra riket samlade Sverker ihop en dansk här och mötte Erik och folkungarna vid den oidentifierade orten Gestilren i juli 1210, där Sverker stupar. Västgötalagens kungakrönika nämner att det var folkungar som dödade kung Sverker och att deras ledare Folke Jarl stupade också där. Sverker begravdes i ättens begravningskyrka i Alvastra.

Slaget vid Gestilren


Bakgrund

Slaget vid Gestilren 1210 hade föregåtts av en flera generationer lång maktkamp mellan de erikska och sverkerska ätterna.

Under 1130-talet hade den östgötske stormannen Sverker den äldre erkänts som kung också av uppsvearna och i Västergötland. Sverker förlorade dock med tiden sin position i Uppsala, där istället Erik Jedvardsson (sedermera Erik den helige) valdes till kung 1150. Efter att Sverker lönnmördats 1156 blev Erik även härskare bland dennes besittningar. Erik Jedvarsson mötte dock själv döden 1160, då han mördades av den danske prinsen och tronpretendenten Magnus Henriksson. 1161 utropades Sverker den äldres son Karl till kung, och han antog kungatiteln Rex Svecorum et Gothorum ('Svearnas och götarnas konung').

Karl Sverkersson mördades även han 1167, av Erik den heliges son, Knut Eriksson, som då vann regeringsmakten. Åren som följde präglades av politiskt samförstånd, och vid hans naturliga bortgång 1195 överfördes kronan till Sverker den yngre Karlsson. Men sedan denne utsett sin minderårige son till jarl orsakade Knut Erikssons fyra söner 1205 ett uppror, då slaget vid Älgarås i Tiveden stod. Tre av bröderna dödades vid slaget och den ende överlevande av Knut Erikssons söner, Erik Knutsson, flydde därefter till Norge.

1208 utmanade han ånyo kung Sverker, då slaget vid Lena (alias Kungslena) i Västergötland utkämpades. Utgången av detta slag tvingade kung Sverker att fly till Danmark, för att två år senare, med hjälp av danska trupper, återvända i syfte att återta sin förlorade krona. Men vid Gestilren triumferade så Erik Knutsson på nytt, samtidigt som Sverker stupade. Samma år kröntes kung Erik.

Slaget vid Gestilren markerade slutet för maktkampen mellan de båda erikska och sverkerska kungaätterna. Efter nära ett sekel av konflikter stabiliserades det politiska läget i Sverige, och en konsolidering av riket tog fart.

Myt eller fakta?

Det hävdas i diverse historisk litteratur att den Erikska och den Sverkerska ätten skall ha drabbat samman vid Gestilren den 17 juli 1210.

I flera böcker nämns att Sverker den yngre Karlsson skulle ha haft stöd av danskt kavalleri. Ett är dock klart: några danskar nämns inte i källorna. I historisk litteratur har det hävdats att Sverker den yngre Karlsson haft ett danskt kavalleri med sig, ibland preciserat till 18 000 man, men sanningen är att detta (till skillnad mot slaget vid Lena) inte bekräftas i de danska källorna. De nämner bara att Sverker dött, och att vinnare av striderna är Erik Knutsson som i lugn och ro kan regera Sverige. Men kort tid efter det påstådda slaget gifte han sig dessutom med den danske kungens dotter Rikissa av Danmark och det var på den tiden den största eftergiften man kunde ge i ett politiskt försök att ena länder i fred.

Danmark var vid denna tid involverat i strider i Baltikum, och slaget kan ses som en inrikes uppgörelse mellan Sverkerska och Erikska ätten.

Det är okänt huruvida det under slaget har använts långbågar eller huruvida kavalleri spelat någon roll i striderna. Det kan lika gärna ha varit gerillakrig i skog, eller ett plötsligt anfall mot en gård, och vem som var anfallare, och vem som var försvarare finns heller inga källor för.

Var låg Gestilren?

 

Man har inte kunnat lokalisera Gestilren. Det har förekommit olika förslag genom tiderna, men man har inte vid någon av de föreslagna platserna hittat så mycket som en pilspets som skulle kunna hänföras till stridigheter.

Föreslagen plats i Västergötland


Kyrkoherden Thore Odhelius utpekade i mitten av 1700-talet Varvs socken i Västergötland som platsen för slaget och där restes år 1910 en minnessten (58°11′46″N 13°49′38″O / 58.19611, 13.82722) över slaget. Inskriptionen på stenen lyder "Gud skydde Sveriges rike! Sjuhundra år efter slaget vid Gestilren reste Västgötar denna sten 1910". Stenen ägs av Stiftelsen Västergötlands museum. Odhelius preciseringsförsök går troligen tillbaka till Johannes Messenius som i Scondia Illustrata på 1630-talet placerade slaget i närheten av Lena. Källor som nämner en plats med det exakta namnet Gestilren i Västergötland saknas, med undantag av vissa ortnamn vilka man dock antar är uttryck för en lokal tradition uppkommen under sen tid. Den enda medeltida källa som placerar slaget i Västergötland är ett över 200 år senare tillägg av en okänd skrivarhand i Västgötalagens kungakrönika (se nedan) som troligen var den källa som Messenius anlitade.

Föreslagen plats i Uppland


Den enda orten i Sverige som, enligt en kyrkoräkenskapsbok, kallats Gestilren (el. Gestillreen/Gästillreen), låg i Frösthults socken i Uppland och skall enligt en teori sedermera ha uppgått i grannbyn Gästre.[1] Att andra samtida källor som behandlar trakten kring Frösthult aldrig nämner ett Gestilren har gjort Bergs fynd svårbedömda. För några år sedan (2004) tog dock ortnamnsforskaren och professorn Staffan Fridell ställning för Gästre i Frösthult. Genom en avancerad historisk språkanalys kommer Fridell till slutsatsen att Gestilren och Gästre "är samma by och samma namn. Närmare bestämt anser jag att Gæstilren är en ursprungligare form av namnet Gästre."[2]. Fridell har efter en senare och mer omfattande undersökning av samtliga källupggifter om slaget framlagt ytterligare språkvetenskapliga argument som talar för Gästre. Fridell menar att den samlade forskningen efter 1998 (Rahmqvist, Berg, Sandblom och Larsson) successivt gjort det "alltmer sannolikt att byn Gästre i västra Uppland är identisk med det medeltida Gestilren" [3].

Denna plats, byn Gästre i Uppland, framhålls också av bröderna Lindström i boken Svitjods undergång och Sveriges födelse, med en utförlig argumentation som knyter platsen till de stormannaätter som kan lokaliseras till det ursprungliga Fjädrundaland, vilket enligt författarna kan visas omfatta inte bara det i dag kända området i Uppland, utan också de östligare delarna av dagens landskap Västmanland.

Andra förslag


Andra alternativa placeringar av Gestilren har gjorts av Gunnar Linde, som lyfte fram Göstrings (förut Gilstrings) härad i Östergötland, samt av Lars Gahrn, som vill förlägga slaget till havs.

Jan Guillou och Arn


I beskrivningen av slaget i Jan Guillous tredje bok om riddaren Arn Magnusson återfinns bland annat anfallande danskar, och Sveriges räddare i form av Folkungaätten, med specialutbildat kavalleri, samt alkoholiserade svear som inte kunde strida till häst. Dessa böcker är dock skönlitterära och saknar alltså källbeläggning.

Sverker II (English exonym: Sweartgar; Swedish: Sverker den yngre or Sverker Karlsson, born before 1167 – died July 17, 1210) was King of Sweden from 1196 to 1208.

English

Sverker was a son of King Karl Sverkersson of Sweden and Queen Christine Stigsdatter of Hvide[3], a Danish noblewoman. His parents' marriage has been dated to 1162 or 1163.

When his father Karl had been murdered in Visingsö in 1167, apparently by minions of the next king Canute I of Sweden, Sverker was taken to Denmark while a boy and grew up with his mother's clan of Hvide, leaders of Zealand. Sverker also allied himself with the Galen clan leaders in Skåne who were close to the Hvide, by marriage through lady Benedikte Ebbesdotter of Hvide. The Danish king supported him as claimant to Sweden, thus helping to destabilize the neighboring country.

When King Canute I of Sweden died in 1196, his sons were only children. Sverker was chosen as the next king of Sweden, surprisingly without quarrel. He returned to his native country, however being regarded quite Danished. His uncontested election was largely thanks to Jarl Birger Brosa whose daughter, Ingegerd Birgersdotter of Bjelbo, Sverker married soon after his first wife had died.

Reign

King Sverker confirmed and enlarged privileges for the Swedish church and the Valerius Archbishop of Uppsala. The privilege document of 1200 is the oldest known ecclesiastical privilege in Sweden. Skáldatal names two of Sverker's court skalds: Sumarliði skáld and Þorgeirr Danaskáld. In 1202 Earl Birger died and the late jarl's grandson, Sverker's one-year old son John received the title of Jarl from his father. This was intended to strengthen him as heir of the crown.

Around 1203, Canute's four sons, who had lived in Swedish royal court, began to claim the throne and Sverker exiled them to Norway. His position as king became unsecured from this point forward. The sons of Canute returned with troops in 1205, supported by the Norwegian party of Birkebeiner, but Sverker succeeded in winning in the Battle of Älgarås, where three of the sons fell. The only survivor returned with Norwegian support in 1208 and in the Battle of Lena, Sverker was defeated. Sverker's troops were commanded by Ebbe Suneson, the father of his late first wife and brother of Andreas Sunesen, Archbishop of Lund. King Eric X of Sweden drove Sverker to exile to Denmark.

Pope Innocentius III's attempt to have the crown returned to Sverker did not succeed. Sverker made a military expedition, with Danish support, to Sweden, but was conquered and killed in the Battle of Gestilren in 1210. The ancient sources state that "he was killed by the Folkung clan".

Family

With his first wife, the Danish noble Benedicta Ebbesdatter (Galen, apparently not Hvide as otherwise alleged, b. c. 1165/70, d. 1200), whom he married before 1190 when yet living in Denmark, Sverker had at least one well-attested daughter, Helena Sverkersdotter , as well as possibly further children, such as Karl (who died in adolescence at the latest, if ever lived; but his existence is from the record that he is alleged to have married a daughter of king Sverre of Norway), and possibly even two other daughters (if they existed, their names are given by reconstructive history research as Margaret and Kristina - however they may just have been Sverker's first wife's kinswomen). Later pretensions of the House of Mecklenburg claim that Sverker's daughter (if he had such) Christina was their ancestress, wife of Henry II of Mecklenburg ("Henry Borwin" in some later texts).

The second marriage in 1200 with Ingegerd Birgersdotter of Bjelbo, daughter of the Folkunge Jarl Birger Brosa produced a son and heir, Jon (1201–1222), who was chosen king of Sweden 1216 as John I of Sweden.

His certain daughter Helena Sverkersdotter married (earl) Sune Folkason of the family of Bjelbo, justiciar of Västergötland. Their daughters Catherine of Ymseborg and Benedicta of Ymseborg became pawns in marriages to gain Swedish succession after 1222, when the Sverker dynasty went extinct in male line. Catherine was married to the rival dynasty's heir Eric XI of Sweden but they remained apparently childless. Benedikte married Svantepolk of Viby and had several daughters, who married Swedish noblemen. Several Swedish noble families claim descent from Benedikte.


Sverker d.y. Karlsson, död 1210, kung i Sverige 1196-1208, son till Karl Sverkersson.

Efter fadern, Karl Sverkerssons död 1167 på Visingsö, fördes Sverker till Danmark, där han växte upp. Han gifte sig i Danmark med den danska stormannadottern Benedikta Ebbesdotter.

Efter Knut Erikssons död erkändes Sverker 1196 som kung i Sverige. Han förde som kung en kyrkovänlig politik och utfärdade år 1200 den svenska kyrkans tidigast kända donations- och privilegiebrev till Uppsala domkyrka.

Efter att Sverker upphöjt sin nyfödde son Johan till jarl blossade fejden med den erikska ätten åter upp 1204 och året därpå segrade Sverker i ett slag vid Älgarås i Västergötland. Tre av Knuts söner dödades, men en fjärde, Erik, kom undan. Ett år senare, 1206, svängde krigslyckan igen och Sverker flydde till Danmark.

Sverker besegrades den 31 januari 1208 i slaget vid Lena (nuvarande Kungslena) av medlemmar av den Erikska ätten; när han i juli 1210 sökte återvinna kronan stupade han vid Gestilren i Västergötland (nära Falköping)

Källa: http://historiska-personer.nu/


Noteringar

Sverker d.y. Karlsson var kung av Sverige 1196-1208. Son till Karl Sverkersson. Sedan fadern 1167 dödats av Knut Eriksson fördes Sverker till Danmark där han växte upp. Efter Knut Erikssons död valdes han 1196 till kung. Han förde en kyrkovänlig politik och hans 1200 utfärdade privilegiebrev för kyrkan är det äldsta kända generella kyrkoprivilegiet i Sverige. Sverkers välde var dock omstritt. Han besegrade Knut Erikssons söner vid Älgarås 1205 men blev själv besegrad vid Kungslena 1208. Sverker vistades därefter en tid i Danmark. I ett försök att återerövra riket stupade han vid Gestilren, vilket blev slutet på slaget.

Källa: "Nationalencyklopedin



Swerker II Młodszy, szw. Sverker den yngre Karlsson – król Szwecji w latach 1196–1208 z dynastii Swerkerydów.

Urodził się przed rokiem 1167, być może w 1164. Syn króla Szwecji Karola VII i Krystyny, córki duńskiego możnego Stiga Tokesena zwanego Hvitaledhr (czyli Białoskóry).

W kwietniu 1167 ojciec Swerkera, król Karol VII zginął w zamku na wyspie Visingsö na jeziorze Wetter w walce z ludźmi Knuta Erikssona z wrogiego rodu Erykidów (wcześniej Karol VII zamordował ojca Knuta – Eryka IX). Po śmierci ojca Swerker wraz matką uszedł do duńskiej wówczas Skanii, gdzie uzyskał poparcie krewnych swej matki z rodu Hvide oraz króla Danii Waldemara I, będącego wujem matki Swerkera. Gdy Knut Eriksson zmarł w 1195, Swerker bez większych problemów objął władzę w Szwecji i w 1196 został wybrany na króla (potomkowie Knuta byli wtedy w wieku dziecięcym). Zdobycie korony królewskiej nie było możliwe bez poparcia jarla Birgera Brosa (zm. 1202), który jeszcze za panowania Knuta Erikssona stał się jednym z najpotężniejszych możnych w Szwecji. Po zawarciu porozumienia z jarlem Swerker pojął za żonę jego córkę – Ingegardę. Chcąc zyskać przychylność Kościoła król w 1200 obdarował duchowieństwo nowymi przywilejami: zwolnił kler z podatków i nadał mu immunitet. Zjednawszy sobie Kościół Swerker II nie uchronił się jednak przed atakiem swych świeckich przeciwników. W 1205 miała miejsca pierwsza z bitew, (pod Älgarås), jakie Swerker miał stoczyć ze zwolennikami rodu Erykidów, którym przewodził teraz syn Knuta – Eryk. Swerker pobił Erykidów pod Älgarås, ale już w 1208 został pokonany w decydującej bitwie pod Leną, gdzie zginął m.in. królewski zięć Knut Birgersson. Po przegranej Swerker II utracił władzę w Szwecji i mimo pomocy wojsk duńskich prowadzonych przez króla Waldemara I drugi raz w życiu musiał uchodzić do duńskiej Skanii. Swerker nie pogodził się z porażką i w 1210 roku powrócił do Szwecji, gdzie jednak 17 lipca poległ w bitwie pod Gestilren. Uważa się, że ostatnia bitwa króla Swerkera II miała miejsce na terenie zachodniego Götalandu (Västergötland), choć są głosy historyków przyjmujących, że było na obszarze Upplandu.

view all 17

Sverker II of Sweden's Timeline