Thomas Chevers, Sr.

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Thomas Chevers, Sr.

Also Known As: ""Chivers""
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Monkstown, County Dublin, Ireland
Death: February 07, 1663 (55-56)
Surry, Surry County, Virginia
Immediate Family:

Son of Henry Chevers and Catherine Chevers
Husband of Rebecca Chevers, Immigrant and Abigale Jane (Griffen) Chevers
Father of Thomas Chevers, Jr.; Petronella Chevers; Elizabeth Cartwright; John Chevers, Sr.; William Chavis and 5 others
Brother of Esquire Walter Chevers; Margaret Chevers and Patrick Chevers

Occupation: surgeon, planter, husbandman
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Thomas Chevers, Sr.

copied, not merged 1244h 11/21/2013 from various matches

Thomas Chevers WikiTree FREE Birth: 1607 - Monkstown Castle, Monkstown Ireland Death: Feb 7 1663 - Surry , VA Parents: Henry Chevers, Catherine Fitzwilliam Child: William Chevers Siblings: Walter Chevers, Patrick Chevers, Margaret Chevers Adds: father, mother, more complete death date, sibling(s)

Thomas Chevers MyHeritage family trees Hubbard Family Tree in Hubbard Family Website, managed by Jennifer Soria (Contact) ... Wife: Jane Chevers (born Griffen) Children: William Chevers Shivers, Thomas Chevers Shivers, Petronella Chevers, Elizabeth Chevers, John Shivers, William Shivers, Thomas Chevers Adds: sibling(s), spouse(s) and child(ren)

data from Ancestery.com 11/.21/22013

Thomas Chivers Birth abt 1620 in Dublin, Ireland Death abt 1664 in Surry, VA

Birth 1620 abt Dublin, Ireland Marriage to Miss Unk 1642 abt Age: 22 Dublin, Ireland Will 1664 8 Feb Surry, VA Death 1664 abt Age: 44 Surry, VA View Details + Add Comment Comments No comments have been added yet. Family Members Parents Henry Chivers 1583 –

Catherine FitzWilliam 1590 –

Spouse & Children Miss Unk 1623 – 1663

Thomas Chivers Jr. 1643 –

Petronella Chivers 1645 – 1681

Elizabeth Chivers 1647 – 1676

John Chivers 1650 – 1716

William Chivers 1660 – 1725


Thomas Chevers - The Imigrant b. 1607 - Monkstown, Dublin County, Ireland d. Feb 7-8 1663-64 - Surry County , Va

Excerpt by Thomas Montgomery Reference document links for complete versions

Possibly the Thomas, who, with others of the family, was listed as an officer of the 1649 lot loyal to King Charles I and King Charles II thus losing his lands in the Barony of Bargy, County Wexford, by Cromwellian confiscation.

In the same month and year that his brother was banished to Connaught, Thomas set sail for the colony of Virginia, in the ship RICHARD AND BENJAMIN, commanded and outfitted by Captain John Whitty. They sailed from London and landed in Lancaster County, Virginia in January, 1654/5. Other passengers included Thomas Chetwood, Robert Osborne, William Moult - and Thomas Crowder, who died and left a non-cupative will witnessed by Thomas Chevers. Crowder's was not the only death on that long voyage: Seth Hayward, Jr., also died. Seth left no will nor witnesses to his intent. Both Hayward's and Crowder's belongings were returned to their heirs by Captain Whitty.

Thomas Chevers brought with him at least four children: Thomas, Peternell, Elizabeth and John. His wife appears to have accompanied him, and they had at least one, if not two, more children in the New World.

Thomas's son John is the founder of the New Jersey line of Shivers, his son Thomas (Jr.) is the founder of the Maryland line, and William is the founder of the Georgia and Carolina lines.

While Thomas's occupation was listed as chirurgeon (surgeon), no record exists of him studying at any of the known medical schools of the day. While an archivist at Trinity College, Dublin, stated that it was likely he studied with a physician rather than in an academic setting, there is no record of Thomas practicing as a surgeon in Virginia. By all accounts, he became a landowner and practiced husbandry.

He was also engaged with community affairs. He does not appear to have lingered long in Lancaster County. 1658 sees him serving on a grand jury in Isle of Wight County and by 1660, the approximate year his son William was born, he purchased land of one Ralph Creed. It is the purchase of this land that presents us with Thomas Chevers, planter and practitioner of husbandry "For and in consideration of two good Young Cowes to be such as shall be chosen by me Ralph Creed out of ye whole stocke of Tho: Chiffers his cattle upon demand as also for ye payment of ffower Thousand pounds of good Tobacco and Corke payable 10th of October next and foure thousand pounds more of like tobacco and Corke to be paid the 20th day of October thence next comeing which shall be in ye year 1660 I the said Ralph Creed have bargained and sold unto Tho: Chiffers...Eleven hundred and odd Acres of Land At ye head of Sunken Marsh neare upper Chippoakes in Surry County...to be held by ye said Tho: Chivers..." It was Thomas's children who eventually settled the spelling of the name into its current form, Shivers.

It is apparent from the deed quoted above, and from the lack of evidence of surgical practice, that Thomas had come to this country equipped much as his brother Walter had been for Connaught: with family and possibly livestock. Or, he may have used the arrearages for service granted him (after his migration) under Charles II, if collected, to purchase livestock. The intent would have been logical: to start a new life and, as the second son of a second son, to make a better place for self and family.

Some idea of Thomas's way of life in the New World can be gleaned from elements of his will quoted by his son William in various land conveyances. An example is the conveyance of the old Ralph Creed land, the last family homestead, to Benjamin Harrison on 6 October 1691, which mentions that the land is sold with "houses, orchards, gardens, woods, ways and waters, with free privilege of hunting, hawking, fishing and fowling." The phrases well describe the lifestyle of a 17th century landowner. The mention of orchards is especially important, as orchards represented an attempt to diversify from the staple money crop, tobacco. Thomas's grandson, John Shivers of Maryland, in one lease of land was charged with setting out an orchard (1701 lease from John Cross of Anne Arundel County, Maryland).

Following the restoration of Charles II to the throne, Thomas's uncle in Ireland applied for and was eventually restored to some of the Chevers land, most particularly, the land at Killyan. Thomas made no effort to return to Ireland. He must have been satisfied with his lot in the new world he was helping to construct. He died, probably, in February 1663/4. His son William later stated that he had received the Ralph Creed land in his father's will dated 8 February 1663/4. The will is missing, but probably provided for all of the children, now scattered: Thomas had gone to Maryland in June 1663 to work for Benjamin Rozer of Charles County. Peternell followed, being in Calvert County as early as 1665, transported by Edward Dorsey. John arrived later, transported by 1675 by Maurice Baker. Peternell has documented contact with the Quakers of Calvert County, and John likely also joined the Society of Friends in Maryland. Fox's preachings and that of many other Quakers were making a considerable stir in the area. Elizabeth remained behind. Past the age of 14, she was able to choose her own guardian. which she did. In the papers filed at various times relating to Elizabeth and her brother William, it is stated that the guardian owed her money to buy a horse.

She appears to have been caretaker for William, and probably for John. William would have been an infant or no more than four when his father died: William was most likely born about April of 1660, able to choose his own guardian in 1676 and claiming his inheritance in 1681. The date of birth of John Shivers of New Jersey was estimated at 1650: it could easily have been 1652 or 1654, leaving him a minor at his father's death and establishing the basis for the later story of the brothers who parted.


Thomas Chivers (Chevers / Cheevers) was born about 1607 on the family estate which included Monkstown Castle, County Dublin, Ireland. Thomas is the first known member of the Chevers / Chivers family to emigrate to the new world. Thomas set sail for the colony of Virginia in late 1652 from London aboard the ship RICHARD AND BENJAMIN, commanded and outfitted by Captain John Whitty (incidentally, also a native of Monkstown, Dublin, Ireland and likely acquaintance of Thomas; who's influence may have been key in Thomas' decision to leave Ireland and begin a new life in colonial America). Upon arriving in the new world, Thomas was accompanied by his wife and at least four children: Thomas, Petronella, Elizabeth and John. At least one child, William, was born in the new world. The family reportedly first landed in Lancaster County, Virginia, then on to the Jamestown settlement in January, 1653, and settled ultimately across the James River from Jamestown in Surry County, Virginia. We learn of Thomas' passage not from a passenger list, but due to an unfortunate incident all too common on voyages of the period - the death of fellow passenger aboard the RICHARD AND BENJAMIN Thomas Crowder, who died at two o’clock in the morning of January 28, 1653. Thomas Chevers (also spelled "Chivers" in the document) is listed as a witness to his will (recorded as transcribed as follows): “These are to certify to all those whom these presents may come that we whose names are hereunder written are and at all times to testify upon oath the truth of this last order desire and will of Mr. Tho: Crowder who departed this life ye 28th of January 1653 Viz that about two o’clock of the morning ye sd Tho: Crowder being very sick and weak desired Capt John Whittey comandr of the ship Rich & Benjamin in which ship ye sd Crowder then was to come unto him with ye sd John Whittey & presently did & then & there in the presence of us Tho: Chetwood Mercht Tho: Chevers, Chirurgeon (surgeon) Robt Osborne Carpenter & Wm Moulte planter in Virginia ye sd Th Crowder did will and order ye sd John Whittey to be pleased to oversee and dispose of all ye goods whatsoever belonging unto him aboard ye ship Rich & Benja & otherwise gave him power to receive all debts oweing unto him in ye country of Virginia & to manage all his affairs there & to return & ansr thereof to his excrs in England ye sd Crowder willing that what goods were returned to England should be equally divided amongst his brother’s & sister’s children. For witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands this 29th of January 1653. Tho: Chetwood Tho: Chivers Jurant coram me ye dec Martes 1653 The mark of Teste me Jo: Carter Robt RO Osborne Recordat 26 March 1654 William Moult” Following his arrival in America, Thomas seems to have adopted the spelling "Chivers" for his surname. Record keepers in Britain and early colonial America were not conscientious spellers, the spelling of names often being phonetic. Hence, the spelling of the name "Chivers" in early colonial records includes the derivations "Chevers, Chavis, Cheevers, Chiffers, Shivers, Shives, Shieves, Chavers, Chaves" etc. As was the case with Thomas, there were instances when Chevers descendents assumed one of these name derivations that has continued to this day down through the generations. There is also evidence that some Chivers descendents (through Thomas or his sons / grandsons) living in colonial Virginia may have been of mixed race - particularly among those who assumed the name "Chavis" and "Chavers" (www.freeafricanamericans.com/Chavis_family.htm). Thomas' occupation upon landing was listed as "chirurgeon" (surgeon), although no record exists of him studying at any of the known medical schools of the day. An archivist at Trinity College, Dublin, stated that it was likely he studied with a physician rather than in an academic setting. Although there is no record of Thomas formally practicing medicine in Virginia, it is almost certain that his skills were at times utilized in that isolated, primitive colonial environment. Thomas was the second son of Henry Chevers, the Chevers' being a renowned aristocratic family in Ireland / England / Scotland with Norman roots that extended back to the inner circle of William the Conqueror, who became King of England following his victory at the Battle of Hastings, England in 1066. Clues as to why Thomas would leave his life of affluence, uproot his family and move to the harsh conditions of early colonial America are evident in the political climate of the times in Ireland and throughout Britain, which most certainly factored in his decision. Following the English Civil War (a conflict between King Charles I of England and the English Parliament led by Oliver Cromwell, 1642-49), the victorious Cromwell posed severe repercussions against presumed "Royalists," in England, Scotland and Ireland who had been loyal to the former king. Such repercussions included executions, imprisonment and/or the confiscations of lands, estates and titles. Political alignments also created the opportunity for the Cromwellian Protestants to exercise religious persecution as well, as most of the presumed Irish Royalists (including the Chevers family) were Catholic. This is evidenced in the instance when Cromwellian troops massacred the women of Wexford at the Crosse, seven Franciscans (including one Didacus Chevers, a relative of uncertain connection) - five priests and two lay persons - who were also killed. Thomas is likely the "Thomas Cheevers" (a common alternate spelling of the surname), who, with others of the family, was listed as "an officer of the 1649 lot loyal to King Charles I and King Charles II" thus losing his lands in the Barony of Bargy, County Wexford, during the Cromwellian persecutions. It was during the time of this great distress that Thomas left Ireland with his family to begin a new life in the new world. Following Thomas' departure, the "Cromwellian Settlement ," commencing A. D. 1657, finalized the acts of Cromwell, and includes a listing of forfeited properties including those held by members of the Cheevers (Chevers) family: Barony of Forth: John Cheevers, George Cheevers, Esq. [also listed as George Cheevers] ; John Cheevers; Marcus Cheevers, Esq. [also listed as Marcus Cheevers]; Richard Cheevers. Barony of Bargy: John Cheevers, Esq. (also John Cheevers], Maystowne, George Cheevers, Esq. George Cheevers , Thomas Cheevers and Arthur Cheevers. This listing also includes several members of the Whitty family, including Nicholas Whitty, Richard Whitty, Esq., and Richard Whitty, the Younger. In 1658, Oliver Cromwell died, leaving his son Richard as Lord Protector of Britain, which included England, Wales, Ireland and Scotland. Richard was generally disliked, and by 1659, the call was out for Charles I son, Charles II (a Catholic) to return to the throne. When Charles II returned to England and to the throne in May, 1660, many subjects who had been loyal to Charles II while in exile had their property returned. Meanwhile in America, on the 20th of May, 1659, less than a year before Charles II took the throne and while negotiations for the return of confiscated properties was being promoted, Thomas Chivers purchased some 1100 acres of land in Surry County, Virginia from one Ralph Creed: "For and in consideration of two good Young Cowes to be such as shall be chosen by me Ralph Creed out of ye whole stocke of Tho: Chiffers his cattle upon demand as also for ye payment of flower Thousand pounds of good Tobacco and Corke payable 10th of October next and foure thousand pounds more of like tobacco and Corke to be paid the 20th day of October thence next comeing which shall be in ye year 1660 I the said Ralph Creed have bargained and sold unto Tho: Chiffers. His heires and successors for ever Eleven hundred and odd Acres of Land At ye head of Sunken Marsh neare upper Chippoakes in Surry County which was lately in ye Occupation off Richard Hill and sould unto mee [sic] the said Ralph Creed by Geo: Jordan by order of Court and alsoe by ordr of ye Grand Assembly...to be held by ye said Tho: Chivers...ye sd Ralph Creed Doe further ingoiyn my Selfe to Deliver unto ye sd Tho: Chivers or his assigns A pattent for ye said Tract of land in his and there owne names upon reasonable demand And a witnesse of ye truth hereof as also to binde me…to ye true and faithful performance hereof I the said Ralph Creed for my Selfe and them have hereunto Sett my hand and seale ye 20th of May 1659. Sealed Signed and Delvd in ye psence of Ralph Creed his black wax marke R Tho: flood Christ CL Lewis, Acknowledged in Court by Ralph Creed et uxor." Despite the promise of favorable conditions that would prevail with Charles II assumption of power, Thomas apparently made no effort to return to Ireland, being satisfied with his life and lot in the new world. Some idea of life for Thomas in the new world can be gleaned from elements of his will quoted by his son William in various land conveyances. An example is the conveyance of the old Ralph Creed land, the last family homestead, to Benjamin Harrison on 6 October 1691, which mentions that the land is sold with "houses, orchards, gardens, woods, ways and waters, with free privilege of hunting, hawking, fishing and fowling." The phrases well describe the lifestyle of a 17th century landowner. The mention of orchards is especially important, as orchards represented an attempt to diversify from the staple money crop, tobacco. Likewise, Thomas had wisely chosen to engage in some degree of animal husbandry, since cattle were also in rare commodity: hogs were the more staple livestock. It should be noted that Thomas’s grandson, John Shivers (Chivers) of Maryland, in one lease of land was charged with setting out an orchard (1701 lease from John Cross of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. We also know that Thomas was active in local affairs, having served on a Grand Jury in neighboring Isle of Wight County, where he also may have owned land. Thomas' presence in Surry County is well documented in several historical works, including "Claremont Manor: A History" by Eve S. Gregory - a narrative history of early Surry County, Virginia), and land records which indicate his land holdings as near Chippokes Creek and Sunken Marsh between Smiths Fort and the present location of the College (on the James River across from the old Jamestown, Virginia settlement). There is also an indication that Thomas maintained correspondence with his brother, Walter, back in Ireland. It appears from the record that Walter’s oldest son, Walter Chevers (Chivers) Jr., embarked from the port of Bristol, England arriving in Virginia in 1661 (COLDHAM, PETER WILSON. The Bristol; Registers of Servants Sent to Foreign Plantations, 1654-1686. Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co.,1988). Like so many of the early settlers arriving in America, Walter was bound over to work as an indentured servant /apprentice to one Richard Homewood (1 August 1661) for 4 years. The Homewoods were neighbors to Thomas Chivers in Surry County and later to his son Thomas in Maryland. When Thomas' wife died is not known: by all accounts she pre-deceased her husband, since with his death his children were listed as orphans. Thomas died after 8 February 1663/64. His son William later stated that he had received the Ralph Creed land in his father's will dated 8 February 1663/64. His will has not been found. The preceding is based primarily upon research compiled by Thomas Montgomery, PhD in his work CHRONICLES AND CONNECTIONS, Pittsburgh, PA (Copyright © January 2001) in a LIMITED EDITION prepared for "THE CHEVERS (CHIVERS) AND SHIVERS FAMILIES" (Mr. Montgomery is a descendent of Thomas through his son Thomas, their family name now "Shivers". A copy of the full text of this work with references is in the possession of descendent Jeffrey F. Chivers). In response to a query regarding the connection of the above referenced Thomas Chevers (arriving in America in 1653) and the royal Chevers family in Ireland: "There is a reasonably detailed article on the Chevers family (spelled with one "e") in Burke's Irish Family Records [1976] and probably also in its predecessor publication, Burke's Landed Gentry of Ireland. It does list a Thomas, son of Henry Chevers and Catherine Fitzwilliam, but only a name and no further information - specifically, no indication that he went to America. . . The Chevers family picked up a royal descent (from Edward I) relatively early (via the Welles family), but this Thomas Chevers doesn't seem to be noted as a "gateway ancestor" in any of the common collections of royal descents of American immigrants. This could be a new discovery - or, on the other hand, a case of genealogical grafting of family trees." From: "John Higgins" <jthiggins@sbcglobal.net> Subject: Re: Ancestors of Thomas CHEEVERS - CHEVERS - or CHIVERS, of Dublin, Ireland Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2004 17:10:35 -0800 References: <001a01c4caaa$a14c4dc0$3954af18@houston.rr.com> Summary It is with the children of Thomas Chevers that the name in America began to be transmogrified into Chivers, Chavers, Shivers, etc. by the grace of scribes in Maryland, Virginia, the Carolina's and New Jersey. The children, beginning with Thomas the Younger, made their own way after leaving home, and did quite well for the most part. The youngest, William, left behind in Virginia, had it both easiest and toughest. Inheriting the Ralph Creed land, he lost it within 11 years of his assumption of it. Later generations, as they spread throughout the United States, did well. Marcus Shivers noted in his book that while some of the family went into Scotland in the 1860s – and then left that country – no one of the Chevers clan appears to have returned to Ireland.

---------------------------------------------------------NOTES------------------------------------------------

Thomas Gibson was father of Jane the Younger's brother, Gibson Gibson, and therefore husband of Elizabeth Chavis. (so Elizabeth was married to Thomas and the Peter) Edmond Howell is godfather of Gibson Gibson--See 23 Dec. 1679 & 28 March 1672] http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Gibson_Gowen.htm


Sources for the following information are found in:

1) Paul Heinegg's book, FREE AFRICAN AMERICANS of NORTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA, and SOUTH CAROLINA From the Colonial Period to About 1820, Vol. 1, 5th Edition, CHAVIS FAMILY, p. 282. 2) Thom Montgomery, PhD, CHEVERS/SHIVERS FAMILY CHRONICLES AND CONNECTIONS, Limited Edition, January 2001, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Available on free pages at Roots Web. Well sourced information. 3) A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire. CHEVERS-VISCOUNT MOUNT-LEINSTER, pp. 116-117. By Patent dated 23 August 1889. (Lineage database-on-line). www.ancestry.com/interactive/48558/Extinct Peerages. 4) www.melungeon.blogspot.com

HISTORY IN IRELAND Thomas was the second son of Henry (also a second son) and Catherine (Fitzwilliam) Chevers born in 1607 at Monkstown Castle, Dublin County, Ireland (source 3). He listed his occupation as chirugeon (surgeon) on his landing in America though no record exists of his study at the medical schools in Ireland. Thomas is thought to have studied medicine with a physician. He did not pursue medicine in America, raising crops and animals instead. There are indications that he held land near the old Wexford property in the Barony of Bargy, Ireland where his grandfather, John Chevers, was born. Like his older brother Walter, Thomas's land and titles were confiscated by Oliver Cromwell's associates in December, 1653. Authorized under Cromwellian regulations on 26 November 1653, Thomas, his wife (unnamed) and four children sailed on the ship, Richard and Benjamin, under Capt. John Whitty, who accepted land in Virginia for shipping debts and was entrusted with various documents for transport. While at sea, Thomas Chevers/Chivers witnessed the will of Thomas Crowder on 29 January 1654 just before Crowder's death. The journey at sea lasted about two months. When Charles II was restored to the throne in 1659, much of the confiscations were reversed; however, those who were Catholics seldom received any justice. Those who served in the Wars of Ireland and listed in Forfeiting Proprietors, Ireland, Under the Cromwellian Settlement - Commencing A.D. 1657 included some Cheevers (alternate spelling of Chevers): Barnaby, Christopher, John, Richard, Thomas and William. His uncle, John Chevers, applied and eventually obtained some of the Chevers land, particularly the land at Killyan. Thomas never returned to his homeland of Ireland. He is considered by Chevers/Shivers genealogist Dr Thom Montgomery of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania to be the founder of major lines of the Chevers/Shivers family in Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey. (with one exception above (source 2).

LIFE IN AMERICA Arriving at the James River in Virginia early in 1654 with his wife and four children, Thomas purchased livestock and began raising tobacco. He became active in local affairs, serving on a Grand Jury in neighboring Isle of Wight County in June 1658 to determine land ownership between Major Nicholas Hill and John Snellock. His fifth and last child, William, was born in Surry County, Virginia about 1660. On 20 May 1659 Thomas purchased 1,100 acres of land at the head of Sunken Marsh near upper Chippoaks Creek in Surry County, Virginia from Ralph Creed Doe for two young cows, 4,000 lbs of tobacco by Oct 1659 and 4,000 lbs of tobacco in October 1660. One source states that this land bordered the Gibson family into which his daughter, Elizabeth, would join to become the maternal line of Gibsons in early Virginia (source 4). This was the last family homestead which contained "houses, orchards, gardens, woods, and waterways with privilege of hunting, hawking, fishing and fowling" as described in his will. Thomas wisely chose to engage in animal husbandry, raising cattle and hogs. (source 2 with exception noted above)

Apparently Thomas maintained correspondence with his brother, Walter, because Walter's eldest son, Walter Jr, sailed for the New World apprenticed to Richard Homewood in Bristol for 4 years. The Homewoods were neighbors of Thomas in Surry County and to his son, Thomas Jr in Maryland. (source 2)

DEATH & BURIAL Indications are that his wife preceeded him in death. Thomas died after writing his 8 February 1664 will, replacing an earlier will of 1651. There is no known record of his burial site but it is presumed (by Margaret Stinson Combs) that he was buried somewhere on his Surry County property. His death left his two youngest children orphans. Elizabeth remained in Virginia and was most likely caretaker of William, who was no more than four years old when his father died. She was between 14 and 16. Elizabeth was bound as apprentice to Robert Cartwright on 13 Apr 1664 until she was of age (16, 18 or 21). She had two known sons with Thomas Gibson: Gibson Gibson and Hubbard Gibson. Wiliam chose his guardian, William Carpenter of Surry County. (source 1)

William inherited his father's 1,100 acres of land in Surry County in 1681 when he came of age, with the assumption that Elizabeth had preceded him in death by then. Over time, however, William lost his inherited land. He began selling off his land in parcels shortly after May 1681. By 1690 he was heavily in debt but by 1725 had regained some property. (source 2)

Thomas Jr went to Maryland in June, 1663 to work for wealthy planter, Colonel Benjamin Rozer of Charles County, to pay off his debt for transportation there. He settled primarily in the Anne Arundel County after working off his debt. Petronella followed to Maryland sometime before 1665 in Calvert County when Edward Dorsey claimed land for her transportation. It was said she was a considerable personality and an astute business woman She has documented contact with Quakers of Calvert County. John arrived in Maryland by 1675, transported by Maurice Baker, and likely also joined the Society of Friends in Maryland. By 1693, he was in New Jersey where he prospered as a butcher and wise investor. (source: 2)

LINEAGE (source 3) Lists Chevers lineage back to Thomas's 6th great-grandfather, John Chevers 1395-1425 and likely connection to the knight, Sir William Chevers, who came with Strongbow in the Norman Invasion of Ireland in 1167 and who was granted land in the county of Wexford, Ireland as payment for his loyalty and service.

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Thomas Chevers, Sr.'s Timeline

1607
1607
Monkstown, County Dublin, Ireland
1643
1643
Monkstown, County Dublin, Ireland
1645
1645
Dublin, Ireland
1647
January 1, 1647
Dublin, Ireland
1648
1648
Monkstown, County Dublin, Ireland
1650
January 1, 1650
Monkstown, Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, County Dublin, Ireland
1650
Monkstown, County Dublin, Ireland
1660
April 1660
1660
Surry, Surry County, Virginia