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Thomas Pope

Birthdate: (75)
Birthplace: Gristmiller, Kent, England
Death: August 4, 1683 (75)
Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts
Place of Burial: Easton, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Blakie Pope; John Blakie Pope; Marcy Pope (Halsnorth) and Halsno Ann Harsnett
Husband of Anne Fallowell and Sarah Jane Pope
Father of Hannah F. Bartlett; Seth Pope, Esq.; Susannah Mitchell; Mary Peckham; John Pope and 4 others
Brother of Gylbert Pope; Sarah Miner; John Pope, III; Francis Pope; Gylbert Pope and 5 others

Occupation: Official town positions / Arrived in Mass 1630, Farmer
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Thomas Pope

Pilgrim Village Families Sketch: Thomas Pope by Robert Charles Anderson, New England Historic Genealogy Society http://www.americanancestors.org/pilgrim-families-thomas-pope/

Birth: Thomas Pope was born about 1612, based on the date of his first marriage.

Death: He died between July 9, 1683, the date of his will, and August 4, 1683, the date of his inventory.

Ship: Unknown, 1632

Life in England: Nothing is known of his life in England.

Life in New England: Thomas Pope first lived in Plymouth, but moved to Dartmouth by about 1670. He first appeared in Plymouth records in the 1633 tax list. He was a cooper by occupation. He was chosen as Plymouth constable on June 4, 1645, and as a surveyor of highways in 1651 and 1652.Thomas Pope owned property in many locations in Plymouth Colony, including Plymouth, Accushnet, Dartmouth, and Saconett.

Family: Thomas Pope married (1) Anne Fallowell on July 28, 1637, in Plymouth and had one daughter. He married (2) Sarah Jenny on May 29, 1646, and had seven children. Sarah died by July 9, 1683.

Child of Thomas and Anne Pope:

  • Hannah was born about 1639. She married Joseph Bartlett by 1663 and ha eight eight children. She died on March 12 , 1710. He died on February 18, 1711/2, in Plymouth.

Children of Thomas and Sarah Pope;

  • Susanna was born about 1647. She married Jacob Mitchell on November 7, 1666, in Plymouth and had three children.They were both killed in June 1675 during King Philip’s War.
  • Seth was born on January 13, 1648/9, in Plymouth. He married (1) Deborah Perry by 1675 and had nine children. She died on February 10, 1710/11. He married (2) Rebecca _____. He died on March 17, 1726/7, in Dartmouth. She was buried in Dartmouth on January 25, 1741.
  • Thomas was born on March 25, 1651, in Plymouth.There is no further record.
  • John was born on March 15, 1652/3, in Plymouth. He died in July 1675.
  • Sarah was born about 1656. She married (1) Samuel Hinckley on November 13, 1676, and had five children. She married (2) Thomas Huckins on August 17, 1698, in Barnstable and had one daughter.
  • Joanna was born about 1658. She married John Hathaway on March 5, 1682, in Dartmouth.
  • Isaac was born about 1664. He married Alice Freeman by 1687 and had seven children. She died about 1755.

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Thomas's will was probated in Dartmouth, MA (Plymouth county) July 9, 1683. He died August 4, 1683 and was buried in October 1683 in Dartmouth, MA.

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Thomas arrived in Plymouth, Massachusetts from England in 1627. He married his wife there, and two years later she died after giving birth to their daughter. Thomas married to a girl from Holland afterwards. He negotiated with the Indians, including King Phillip, for land, which would become a homestead for the Pope descendants.

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Came over to America on the ship "Mary and John".

Pioneers or pilgrim ancestors were Joseph, who came from England about 1634 and settled in Salem. John, of Dochester, whose name appears in the list of freemen made in 1634, as Poape, was prominent in town affairs, and one of the pillars of the church. Thomas of Plymouth our ancestor in this country, sailed from Plymouth, Eng., on the 20 of Mar., 1629, in the Mary and John." Who he was or whence he came we are not sure but we know we descended from an ancient family. We are also representatives of a numerous family. Our ancestor, Thomas had 8 children (4 sons and 4 daughters.) Two of these were killed by Philip's warriors at Dartsmouth, and yet his grandchildren numbered at least 44. In tracing a single line through 17 families, we find an average of nearly 9 to the family.

We can also claim to be representatives of a distinguished family. The literary light of the family is Alexander Pope, the most famous English poet of his century. "Poetry his only business, and idleness his only pleasure," as he said of himself. Many have occupied positions of trust and honor. In military service we have an honorable place in the records of our country. There are no less than 38 names of Popes, mainly from the Plymouth and Dorchester families, who served their country in the War of Independence.

In the mechanical and useful arts, and their practical application, the Popes have not been wanting; in short, from nearly all pursuits of life, the farm, the shop, the store, the professions of law and of medicine and the service of the Church, they have done their part and done it well.

A family of the name settled in Kent as early as the reign of Edward III. (1327-77), among the Oxfordshire descendants of which were Sir Thomas Pope (died January 29, 1558-59), guardian of Queen Elizabeth during her minority. The continual recurrence of the names Thomas and John in the Kentish families, as well as among those bearing the surname in the west of England and in this country, would appear to indicate a common descent. 

Of the life of Thomas Pope little is known beyond the brief entries which appear in the records of the town and colony of Plymouth, but these are sufficient to show that he was a man of positive character, and of some consideration in the community. His promptness in resenting a real or fancied injury, and his independent expressions of personal opinion, more than once caused him to be arraigned before the magistrates of New Plymouth, and no doubt ultimately led to his removal to Dartmouth, where he passed the last ten years of his life. The records of the colony show that in the list of rates imposed by the Court, January 2, 1632-2, and again January 2, 1633-4, he was taxed 9s. October 6, 1636, he was granted five acres of land "at the fishing point next Slowly field, and said Thomas be allowed to build." June 7, 1637, we find his name among the list of persons who volunteered to go under "Mr. Prence" on an expedition against the Pequots. July 28, 1637, he was married by Gov. Winslow to Ann, daughter of Gabriel Fallowell. He sold his property at the fishing point to John Bonham, August 28, 1640, perhaps on account of the death of his wife, the precise date of which event is unknown.

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http://archive.org/stream/cu31924029843681/cu31924029843681_djvu.txt

GENEALOGY OF THOMAS POPE (1608— 1683) AND HIS DESCENDANTS by Mrs. Dora Pope "^orden , Prof. Wm. F. Langworthy, Mrs. Blanche Page Burch with A PRELIMINARY HISTORY by the Late Franklin Leonard Pope Hamilton, N. Y. The Republican Press, 1917

GENEALOGY OF THOMAS POPE OF PLYMOUTH

THOMAS POPE, is said by Savage to have been an inhabi- tant of New Plymouth in 1631, and to have been 67 years of age in 1675. Although the authorities for these dates have not been found, there is no reason to doubt their correct- ness. If born in 1608 he would have been 21 years of age in 1629, and it may be conjectured that he came to this country soon afterward. We are told in Blake's Annals of Dorchester, that

In y e year of our Lord 1629, Divers Godly Persons in Devonshire, Somer- setshire, Dorsetshire & other places Proposed a remoue to New-England, among whom were two Famous Ministers, viz Mr. John Maverick (who I suppose was somewhat advanced in Age) and Mr. John Warham (I suppose a Younger Man) then a preacher in y e City of Exon or Exeter, in y e County of Devon. These good People met together at Plymouth, a Sea-port Town in y" S d County of Devon, in order to Ship themselues and Families for New England; and because they designed to liue together, after they should arriue here, they met together in the New Hospital in Plymouth and Associated into Church Fellowship and chose y° S d Mr. Mauerick and Mr. Warham to be their Ministers and Officers; the Rev. Mr. John White of Dorchester in Dorset (who was an active Instrument to promote y Settlement of New England, and I think a means of procuring y e Charter) being present & Preaching ye fore part of ye Day and in y e latter part of y e Day they performed y e work afore- said They set sail from Plymouth ye 20th of March, 1629-30,* ... and

arrived at Nantasket (now Hull) y 8 30th of May 1630.

These colonists settled at Mattapan in June, 1 630, and gave their settlement the name of Dorchester.

The surname of Pope was very common at that day, and is still common in Devon, Dorset and Somerset. It is not improb- able that Thomas Pope and John Pope were among the passen- gers of the Mary and John. John was a freeman of Dorchester, September 3, 1634, and in his will (1646) he mentions a brother

  • The vessel was the Mary and John, of 400 tons, commanded by Capt. Squeb.

io Genealogy of Thomas Pope and Descendants

Thomas, who is supposed, with some reason, to be Thomas of Plymouth.* Another of the same surname known to have emigrated from England, was Joseph of Salem, 1634; there are also Walter of Charlestown, 1634, Thomas of Stamford, Conn., 1 64 1, and John, who is listed as an emigrant to "Virginia" in l6 35, aged 28. What relation, if any, existed between these different persons and Thomas of Plymouth, can only be con- jectured. A family of the name settled in Kent as early as the reign of Edward III. (1327-77), among the Oxfordshire de- scendants of which were Sir Thomas Pope (died January 29, 1 558-59)» guardian of Queen Elizabeth during her minority. The continual recurrence of the names Thomas and John in the Kentish families, as well as among those bearing the surname in the west of England and in this country, would appear to indicate a common descent.

Of the life of Thomas Pope little is known beyond the brief entries which appear in the records of the town and colony of Plymouth, but these are sufficient to show that he was a man of positive character, and of some consideration in the community. His promptness in resenting a real or fancied injury, and his independent expressions of personal opinion, more than once caused him to be arraigned before the magistrates of New Plymouth, and no doubt ultimately led to his removal to Dart- mouth, where he passed the last ten years of his life.

The records of the colony show that in the list of rates im- posed by the Court, January 2, 1632-2, and again January 2, 1 633-4, he- was taxed 9s. October 6, 1636, he was granted five acres of land "at the fishing point next Slowly field, and said Thomas be allowed to build." June 7, 1637, we find his name among the list of persons who volunteered to go under "Mr. Prence" on an expedition against the Pequots. July 28, 1637, he was married by Gov. Winslow to Ann, daughter of Gabriel Fallowell. He sold his property at the fishing point to John Bonham, August 28, 1640, perhaps on account of the death of his wife, the precise date of which event is unknown.

November 2, 1640, he was granted "5 acres of meadowing in South Meadows toward Gavans Colebrook meadows". His

  • Rev. Charles Henry Pope, of Cambridge, Mass., has published a genealogy of the Dor-

chester Pope family, with notices of other American families of the name. The results of Mr. Pope's personal researches into the history of the English Pope families are of great interest.iand are given in full in his work which is entitled "The Pope Family." It was pub- lished by the author at 79 Franklin St., Boston, Mass., in 1888.

Genealogy of Thomas Pope and Descendants 1 1

name appears in a list, August, 1634, entitled, "The names of all the males that are able to beare armes from XVI years old to 60 years wth in the seuerall Toune Shipps." He was chosen constable June 4, 1645, and was on a jury August, 1645. In 1646 he is found in Yarmouth. May 29, 1646, he married at Plymouth, Sarah, daughter of John Jenney. In 1647, June 1, an action for slander was brought against him, confessed, authors and defendants were brought in equally guilty, and damages paid. He was chosen surveyor of highways July, 1648, and again June 6, 1651. In 1652, July 26, and in 1656, he is "on an Enquest." In "December, 1663, Thomas Pope and Gyles Rickard, Senirt" were arrested "for breaking the King's peace by striking each other, and were fined each three shillings and four pence;" and "said Pope, his striking of said Rickard's wife, and for other turbulent carriages, in word and deed, the Court have centenanced him to find sureties for his good behavior." But nevertheless his temper soon got the better of him again, for we find him, February 7, 1664, and also May 2, 1665, quarrelling with one John Barnes about that fruitful subject of dispute, a boundary. He is recorded as having taken the freeman's oath in 1668. In 1670, June 7, he was again overhauled by the authorities, and as the record says, "fined 10 shillings for vilifying the ministry." Although he was now over 60 years old, these troubles doubtless influenced him in the determination to seek a new home, and accordingly we find him with others pe- titioning the Court in 1673 for a grant of land at Saconnett (now Little Compton, R. I.) For some reason not ascertained, this project was unsuccessful, for it appears in the record that he is "Granted leave since he and others cannot secure Saconnett neck according to the grant, to look out some other place, undisposed of, for their accommodation." Acting upon this permission, he secured a large tract on the east side of the Acushnet river at Dartmouth, tradition says by direct purchase from the Indians. This location, however, must have been included within the prior purchase made by Bradford, Standish and their associates, from the sachems Wesamequen and Wamsutta, on November 29. 1652, which had been, by order of the Court in June, 1664, erected into a separate township to "be henceforth called and known by the name of Dartmouth." At a meeting of the proprietors of this purchase, held in Plymouth March 7, 1652, the township was divided into thirty-four equal shares, and

12 Genealogy of Thomas Pope and Descendants

hence it seems likely that Thomas Pope may have acquired one of the shares. A list made in 1652 shows that his mother- in-law, "Mistris Jenney," was one of the Dartmouth pro- prietors, and two of her sons, Samuel and John Jenney were among the early settlers of D. in the immediate vicinity of the Popes. Another original proprietor of Dartmouth was Robert Bartlett, whose son Joseph married, about 1662, Hannah, daughter of Thomas Pope by his first wife. The date of the re- moval of Thomas Pope to Dartmouth has not been ascertained, but it must have been about 1674. The settlement at Dart- mouth was a scattered one, and for better security and defence against the Indians, who had already begun to evince a hostile disposition, a fort or garrison house was built on the east side of Acushnet river, about half a mile north of the village of Ox- ford, the remains of which were visible until a recent date, on the lands of John M. Howland.

In the early part of July, 1675, his son John, a young man of 22, his daughter Susannah and her husband Ensign Jacob Mitchell, were killed by a party of Philip's Indians, "early in the morning as they were fleeing on horseback to the garrison, whither the Mitchell children had been sent the afternoon before" (Gen. Reg. xv. 266.) This occurrence took place near the "frog pond" on the south side of Spring Street, between William and Walnut, Fairhaven. The settlement at Dart- mouth being isolated, scattered and difficult of defence, was shortly abandoned, and the deserted plantations were quickly laid waste and the buildings burned by the savages.

The following order of Court passed by the government at Plymouth, is of interest here :

(1675, 4th of October.) This Court, takeing into theire serious considera- tion the tremendus dispensations of God towards the people of Dartmouth, in suffering the barborus heathen to spoile and destroy most of theire habi- tations, the enimie being greatly advantaged therevnto by theire scattered way of liueing, doe therefore order that in the rebuilding or resettling therof, that they soe order it as to Hue compact together, att least in each village, as they may be in a capassitie both to defend themselues from the assault of an enimie, and the better to attend the publicke worship of God, and minnes- try of the word of God, whose carelesnes to obtaine and attend vnto, wee fear, may haue bine a prouocation of God thus to chastise theire contempt of his gospell, which wee earnestly desire the people of that place may seri- ously consider off, lay to hart, and be humbled for, with a sollisitus indeauor after a reformation thereof by a vigorous puting forth to obtaine an able,

Genealogy of Thomas Pope and Descendants 13

faithful dispenser of the word of God amongst them, and to incurrage him therein, the neglect whereof this Court as they must not, and, God willing, they will not permit for the future.*

No attempt appears to have been made for some three years to reoccupy the ruined settlement. Where Thomas Pope and his family found an asylum during this time, has not been as- certained. The following extract from the Plymouth records perhaps serves to throw a glimmer of light upon this question: Wheras Phillip, late sachem of Paukanakett, and other sachems, his accomplises, haueing bin in confeaderation and plighted couenant with his ma"" collonie of New Plymouth, haue lately broken couenant with the English, and they and theire people haue likewise broken out in open re- bellion against our sou r lord Kinge Charles, his crowne and dignitie, ex- pressed by raising a crewell and vnlawful warr, murdering his leich peo- ple, destroying and burning theire houses and estates, expressing great hostillitie, outrage, and crewellty against his said ma 1 '** subjects, wherby many of them were personally slaine, and some bereaued of theire deare children and relations, among which said rebells and Indian named Popa- nooie is found to be one, who hath had a hand, and is found to be very actiue in the great crewelty and outrage acted vpon seuerall of the inhabi- tants of the towne of Dartmouth, in the said his ma' iBS collonie of New Ply- mouth, in particular it being manifest that hee was very active towards and about the destruction of seuerall of the children of Thomas Pope, late of Dartmouth aforsaid, and seueiall others of the said towne; in considera- tion wherof after due examination had of the premises, this Court doth hereby condemne and centance him, the said Popanooie, and his wife and children, to perpetuall sevitude, they likewise being found coepartenor with him in the said rebellion, and particularly that hee, the said Popanooie, is to be sold and sent out of the country. [July 13, 1677.]

It appears also that about a year previous to this (June 1 2, 1676), several Indians who had been captured and sent in by Bradford and Church were "convented before the councell" at Plymouth, being "such of them as were accused of working vnsufferable mischieffe upon some of ours."

One of these prisoners, named John-num, being accused by his fellows, acknowledged, among other misdeeds, that he was concerned in the murder of "Jacob Mitchell and his wife and John Pope, and so centance of death was pronounced against them, which accordingly emediately was ekecuted."f

The following order of Court relating to the resettlement of Dartmouth explains itself.

To John Cooke, to be communicated to such of the former Inhabitants of Datrmouth as are concerned herein.

  • Book 5th, Court Orders, p. 102.

t Plymouth Col. Rec. Ms. v 141-2.

14 Genealogy of Thomas Pope and Descendants

The councell being now assembled, considering the reason and necessitie of that order of the Generall Court made the 14 th October, 1675, respect- ing the rebuilding or resettleing the Towne of Dartmouth, a copy wheof is herewith sent, and considering withall that all the people of that place, by theire deserting it, haue left it to the possession of the enimie, which, through the good hand of God on the indeavors of this colonie is now recouered againe out of the enimies hand, do soe much the more look at it as a duty incombent on this councel to see the said order effectually attended, doe therefore hereby prohibite all and euery of the former inhabitants of the said towne of Dart- mouth, or theire or any of theire assigns, to make any entrance on, building, or settleing in any parte of the said former township of Dartmouth vntil satis- factory eccuritie be first given to the Court or councel by some of the principal persons heretofore belonging to that place, that the said Court order shall in all respects be attended by them, as the transgressors of the prohibition will answare the contrary att theire perill.*

Of the subsequent history of Thomas Pope little is known beyond what may be gathered from his will, which is as follows:

1683. July the 9th. The last will and testament of Thomas Pope, being Aged and weak of body but yet in perfect understanding and memory wherein I have of my estate as followeth; I give unto my son Seth as an addition to what I have formerly given him ten shillings in money also I give unto my grandson Thomas Pope all that my twenty-five acres of up- land and two acres of meadow lying and being on the west side of Acush- enett River be it more or less, and it is my desire that his father may take the said land into his hands and make the best improvement of it that he can for the good of my said grandson until be comes of age to make use of it himself; also it is my mind that my son Seth shall in consideration of the aforesaid land pay three pounds sterling unto my grandson Jacob Mitchell when he comes to age of twenty one years. Also I give unto my daughter Deborah Pope five pound in money, and to each of my other daughters five pound a peace in moneu; also my meddow lying at the south Meddowes in Plymouth or the value of it, I give to be equally divided amongst all my sons and daughters; also I give and bequeath unto my son Isack all my seate of land where I now dwell with all the meddowes belonging thereunto and all the privilages thereunto belonging. To him his heirs and Assigns forever, but and if it should please god that he should decease without an heir before he comes to the age of twenty and one years, then my said seat of land shall belong unto the sons of my son Seth. Also I give unto my son Isaack all my housing and household goods of all sorts, also all my cattle and horse kine and swine; Also all sorts of provisions, also cart and plowes with all the takeling belonging unto them. Also I give unto my said son Isaack all my money except that which I have given to my daughters, and I order my said son Isaack to pay all my just debts and to receive all my debts that are due unto me also I order my Indian Lydia to live with my son Isaack until he is one and twenty years of age, and my Indian gerle I give to him during his life, also it is my mind and will that my son Isaack shall make no bargain without the con- sent of his overseers until he be twenty years of age, I have made choice of

  • Book 5, Court Orders, p. 124.

Genealogy of Thomas Pope and Descendants 15

John Cook, and my son Seth and Thomas Taber to be for overseers to see this my will performed. Thomas Pope his J mark.

Signed and sealed in presence- of John Cook and Thomas Tabor.

Isaac and Seth Pope took out letters of administration on the estate November 2, 1683; which approximately fixes the date of the death of Thomas. They gave bonds in £400.

The homestead farm conveyed by the above will to Isaac Pope, contained 172 acres, and comprised the larger portion of the thickly-settled portion of the present town of Fairhaven. Its north line was a little south of the south line of the street leading east from the bridge.

Before the Acushnet cemetery was laid out, which was dur- ing the reign of Queen Anne, about 171 1, an acre of the Taber farm, half a mile or more north of the bridge, on a point of land projecting into the river, had been set apart for a burial ground, and it is there that Thomas Pope was probably buried.*

1. Thomas 1 Pope, born in 1608; died in Dartmouth in October 1683; married first, in Plymouth, Jan. 28, 1637, Ann, daughter of Gabriel and Catherine Fallowell, of Plymouth; married second, in Plymouth, May 19,1646, Sarah, daughter of John and Sarah (Carey) Jenney, of Plymouth. Child of Thomas and Ann, b. in Plymouth:

i. Hannah, 2 b.1639; d. March 12, i7io;t m. Joseph Bartlett, of Ply- mouth (b. 1639, d. 1703.) Seven children. Children of Thomas and Sarah, born in Plymouth:

2. ii. Seth, b. Jan. 13, 1648: d. March 17, 1727.

iii. Susannah, b. 1649; d. July, 1675; m. Nov. 7, t666, Jacob Mitchell.! "Ensign." They were both slain by Philip's warriors, "early in the morning as they were going to the garrison, whither they had sent their children the afternoon before. This was in Dart- mouth. Three children.

iv. Thomas, b. March 25, 1651 ; probably died young.

v. Sarah, b. Feb. 14, 1652; m. first, Nov. 13, 1676, Samuel Hinckley; m. second, Aug. 17, 1698, Thomas Huckins. Twelve children.

vi. John, b. March 15, 1653; d. July, 1675. He was killed b V Philip's warriors while fleeing to the Dartmouth garrison.

vii. Joanna, d. about 1695; m. Match 14, 1683; John Hathaway, of Dart- mouth. Six children.

3. viii. Jsaac, b. after 1663 ; d. 1 733.

  • On pages 1-20 of this genealogy, where the state is not given, Massachusetts is to be

understood. In other parts, name of state is given or is easily understood from the context.

t The gravestones of Joseph and Hannah Bartlett are on Burial Hill in Plymouth.

t The so-called "Carver house", probably the oldest house now standing (1887) m Plymouth, was built in part by Jacob Mitchell, who was a carpenter, and in it he lived after his marriage until he removed to Dartmouth. It is on the west side of Sandwich Street, about twenty rods south of the bridge.

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http://palmerhoward.net/getperson.php?personID=I1566&tree=Ancestors

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=34761910

Birth: unknown

Death: 1683 Dartmouth Bristol County Massachusetts, USA

Born by about 1612, based on date of first marriage. (According to Savage, "In 1675, he was 67 yrs. old," but no source is cited.) He came to Plymouth Colony in 1632. Died in Dartmouth between 9 July 1683 (date of will) and 4 August 1683 (date of inventory). Married: (1) Plymouth 28 July 1637 Anne Fallowell, daughter of Gabriel and Catherine (Finney) Fallowell. She died before 29 May 1646 (and probably soon after the birth of daughter Hannah). (2) Plymouth 29 May 1646 Sarah Jenny, daughter of JOHN JENNY. She died before 9 July 1683 (date of husband's will). Source: Anderson's Pilgrim Mireation


Family links:

Spouses:
 Anne Fallowell Pope
 Sarah Jenny Pope (1625 - ____)

Children:
 Hannah Pope Bartlett (1638 - 1710)*
 Seth Pope (1649 - 1727)*
 Susanna Pope Mitchell (1649 - 1675)*
 Sarah Pope Hinckley Huckins (1652 - 1727)*
  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Unknown

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Pope-72

Thomas Pope Sr.

Born about 1608 in England

Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]

Husband of Anne (Fallowell) Pope — married 28 Jul 1637 in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony

Husband of Sarah (Jenney) Pope — married 19 May 1646 in Plymouth Colony

Father of Hannah (Pope) Bartlett, Susanna (Pope) Mitchell, Seth Pope Sr., Thomas Pope, John Pope, Joanna (Pope) Hathaway, Sarah (Pope) Hinckley and Isaac Pope

Died 4 Aug 1683 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts

Notice of Unknown Origins

The birth place and ancestry of Thomas Pope are not known. It has been proposed that he was born in Ilfracombe, Devonshire to John Pope and Mercy Halsnoth, however there is no evidence to support these propositions. For that reason, Thomas is shown here without parents and with no birthplace. Please do not add them. If you have evidence to support a birth place or parents, please contact a Profile Manager. Biography

Thomas Pope was born in England, perhaps in Dorset, but his origins are unknown. He probably sailed for America in 1632, however the ship on which he sailed has not been identified. Some contend that Thomas was probably with other settlers from Dorset aboard the 'Mary and John', which sailed from Plymouth, England, March 20, 1629/30 and arrived in Nantasket (now Hull) May 30, 1630,[1] however there is no direct evidence that he sailed on the 'Mary and John.'

Thomas's biographer and descendant, Franklin Leonard Pope says: "Of the life of Thomas Pope little is known beyond the brief entries which appear in the records of the town and colony of Plymouth, but these are sufficient to show that he was a man of positive character, and of some consideration in the community. His promptness in resenting a real or fancied injury, and his independent expressions of personal opinion, more than once caused him to be arraigned before the magistrates of New Plymouth, and no doubt ultimately led to his removal to Dartmouth, where he passed the last ten years of his life."[2]

Thomas married twice and had eight children. First, he married Ann Fallowell on July 28, 1637, Plymouth, Massachusetts. They had one child, Hannah Bartlett, born about 1639. She married Joseph Bartlett by 1663 and had eight children. She died on March 12, 1710. Bartlett died on February 18, 1711/2, in Plymouth.[3][4][5][6]

Second, Thomas married Sarah Jenney, daughter of John Jenney and Sarah Carey, on May 19, 1646. They had seven children: Susannah Mitchell, Seth Pope, Thomas Pope, John Pope, Sarah Hinckley Huckins, Joanna Hathaway and Isaac Pope.[7]

At different times in his life he lived in Mattapan (Dorchester), Plymouth and Dartmouth.

He was educated enough to sign his deeds, however the inventory of his estate does not show any books or other indication of intellectual activities. He worked as a cooper. Traditionally, a cooper is someone who makes wooden staved vessels bound together with hoops and having flat ends. Examples include casks, barrels, buckets, tubs, butter churns and hogsheads.

'Thomas Pope was an able man of decided opinions, of independent positive character, and of considerable importance in the colony. He received a grant of land, served in the colonial army, was surveyor, constable, and served on the jury."[8]

He did get himself into numerous legal problems because of his temper, and that may be the reason he left Plymouth in 1673, when he moved with his family to Dartmouth. Legend has it that he landed on the shores of the Acushnet river, and apparently by direct purchase from the Wampanoag Indians, the tribe of King Philip, obtained the land which became the Pope homestead in what is now Fairhaven, Massachusetts. This legend is probably apocryphal as the area of his property had already be divided into lots in 1652. His mother-in-law, Sarah Jenney, members of her family, lived nearby.[9]

A fort was built in Dartmouth on the east side of Acushnet river for protection against Indians. In July 1675, Thomas's son John and his daughter Susannah were killed in an attack by King Philip's warriors because they were unable to make it to the fort before the attack. Susannah's children had been sent to the fort the day before. The Dartmouth Settlement was soon abandoned due the settlers' inability to defend it. After about three years, Dartmouth was again settled. It is unknown where Thomas spent this interim. When the village was resettled, all the former inhabitants, who had deserted the settlement in 1675, were prohibited from occupying the village until sufficient protection had been established. (Register, XV. 266)

On 13 July 1677, Popanooie was found to be guilty of great cruelty and outrage toward the Dartmouth settlers, and particularly in participating in the murder of several of the children of Thomas Pope, late of Dartmouth, and others. His wife and children being found partners with him in the rebellion, the whole family was sentenced to perpetual servitude and were sent out of the colony. Source: Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-169, Part One: Chronological Histories, Chapter 6: King Philip's War (1675-1676)

Thomas owned two slaves who had been taken captive during King Philip's War. Ultimately, the colonists were not allowed to keep slaves, but it is unknown what Pope did with his slaves.

He died in 1683 in Dartmouth. The precise date is not known, but it was between July 9, 1683, the date of the will and August 4, 1693, the date the inventory was taken. His wife Sarah (Jenney) Pope apparently died before he did, as she is not mentioned in his Will. Thomas left his homestead to his youngest son Isaac.

"Before the Acushnet cemetery was laid out, which was during the reign of Queen Anne, about 1711, an acre of the Taber farm, half a mile or more north of the bridge, on a point of land projecting into the river, had been set apart for a burial ground, and it is there that Thomas Pope was probably buried."[10] Time Line

   1632 - was of Plymouth in 1632 
   January 2, 1632 and January 2 1633-4 - was taxed 9 shillings 
   August 1634 - on a list entitled, "The names of all the males that are able to beare armes from XVI years old to 60 years with in the severall Toune Shipps." 
   October 6, 1636 - granted five acres "at the fishing point next Slowly Field" [PCR 1 :45]; on 7 November 1636 it was discovered that the place designated for this grant did not quite allow the full five acres [PCR 1:46]. On 2 November 1640 granted five acres "in the South Meddows towards Aggawam, Colebrook Meddowes" [PCR 1 :166]. 
   June 7, 1637 - listed among those who volunteered to go under "Mr. Prence" on an expedition against the Pequots. (Though great preparations were made, the expedition did not leave Plymouth.) 
   July 28, 1637 - Marriage of Thomas Pope and hist first wife Ann, daughter of Gabriel Fallowell, by Govenor Winslow, in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony 
   From 1637 TO 1643, Pequot War, Thomas Pope was a Member of Volunteer Company under William Holmes and Thomas Palmer during the Pequot War in 1643 
   August 28, 1640 - sold his property at the fishing point to John Bonham, [PCR 12:61] perhaps on account of the death of his wife, the precise date of which is unknown. 
   November 2, 1640 - granted "5 acres of meadowing in South Meadows toward Gavans Colebrook meadows". 
   June 4, 1645 - chosen Constable 
   August 1645 - on a jury 
   July 7, 1646 - on a jury 
   July of 1648 and again June 6 1651 - chosen surveyor of highways 
   October 1652 - Thomas Pope of New Plymouth, cooper, acquitted George Bonum of all debts owed to Pope [MD 1:132 33, citing PCLR 2:1: 13]. 
   'July 26, 1652 and in 1656 - "on an Enquest"[C. O., III : 77] 
   May 17, 1658 - Thomas Pope of New Plymouth, cooper, sold to Joseph Warren a parcel of marsh meadow at Eel River [MD 12:213 14, citing PCLR 2:1:212]. 
   June 1/11, 1658 - At the General Court, Lieut. Southworth, John Dunham, Sr., Robert Finney, John Barnes and Thomas Pope were appointed to determine the range between the lands on which Nathaniel Warren and Robert Bartlett lived. [C. O., III: 137] 
   March 24, 1661 - Thomas Pope of Plymouth, cooper, sold to Robert Ransome "all the right, title and interest he hath in his land at Lakenham ... both upland and meadow" in exchange for "twenty five acres of upland which Iyeth with a parcel of upland belonging to Jonathan Pratt Iying and being at a place called Acushenah with two acres of meadow which is yet unlaid out at Acushenah aforesaid" [MD 17:42, citing PCLR 2:2:86]. 
   1668 - recorded as having taken the freeman's oath 
   1673 - made an effort to remove to Punckateesett, on Seconnet River, later Little Compton, Rhode Island, but that plan was abandoned 
   1673 - removed to Dartmouth. 
   July 5, 1677 - Thomas Pope of Dartmouth, cooper, made a deed of gift to "Seth Pope my eldest son" of "all that my one half share or portion" at Saconett [PCLR 4:140]. 
   October 31, 1680 - Thomas Pope of Dartmouth, cooper, sold to Charles Stockbridge of Scituate, cooper, "all that my one fourth or quarter part of a grist or corn mill" in the town of Plymouth, along with one fourth of the implements and the three acres of land associated with the mill, and also "one small piece of land containing twenty six rods" [PCLR 5:187]. 
   November 2, 1680 "Thomas Pope Senior and Seth Pope both of the town of Dartmouth" sold to David Lake their share in the grant of land at Saconnet, divided and undivided, the divided part amounting to one hundred acres [PCLR 5:78]. 
   July 9, 1683 - made Will 
   August 4, 1683 - Inventory taken. 

Legal Problems

   June 1st 1647 
   An action for slander was brought against him. Confessed, authors, and defendants were brought in equally guilty, and damages were paid. 
   June, 1655 
   Robert Bartlett, "wine cooper," on 30 Janry/ 9 Febry 1653/4, bought of Samuel Hicks eleven acres of land on the south side of the town, lying on the bay, but was not to take possession until 15/25 Oct. 1654. [Col. Deeds, II: I: 97] 
   5/15 June, 1655 Bartlett he brought suit against Thomas Pope for killing a sow, and recovered eighteen shillings. [J. A., 62] 
   August 1659 
   John Howland, Francis Cooke and John Dunham, Sr., were directed by the Court to settle a controversy between Thomas Pope and William Shurtleff concerning bounds of lands at Strawberry Hill, Plymouth, and on 15/25 Sept. they performed their duty. [Col. Deeds, II: II: 28] 
   December 1663 
   Thomas Pope and Gyles Rickard, Senirt "were arrested for breaking the King's peace by striking each other, and were fined each three shillings and four pence;" and "said Pope, his stricking of said Rickards wife, and for turbulent carriages, in word and deed, the Court have centenanced him to find sureties for his good behavior." 
   February 7 1664 and May 2 1665 
   Quarrelling with one John Barnes about a boundary. 
   June 7 1670 
   Again chastised by the authorities, and "fined 10 shillings for vilifying the ministry." 

Will

   Will dated July 9, 1683 
   Letters of Administration Issued on November 2, 1683 
   Named in Will:
       Son Seth, grandson Thomas, Pope, Thomas's father, Jacob Mitchell, daughter Deborah Pope, my other daughters, son Isaak, 
       "Indian gurle" 
       Overseers: son Seth, John Cooke, John Tabor 
       Witnesses: John Cooke, John Tabor 
   The Will of Thomas Pope 
   July the 9th, 1683. The last will and testament of Thomas Pope, being aged and weak of body but yet in perfect understanding and memory wherin I have of my estate as followith: 
   I give unto my son Seth as an addition to what I have formerly given him ten shillings in money also 
   I give unto my grandson Thomas Pope all that my twenty-five acres of upland and two acres of meadow lying and being on the west side of Acushenett River be it more or less, and it is my desire that his father may take the said land into his hands and make the best improvement of it that he can for the good of my said grandson until he comes of age to make use of it himself; also it is my mind that my son Seth shall in consideration of the aforsaid land pay three pounds sterling unto my grandson Jacob Mitchell when he comes to age of twenty one years. 
   Also I give unto my daughter Deborah Pope five pound in money, and to each of my other daughters five pound a peace in money; also my meddow lying at the south Meddowes in Plymouth or the value of it, I give to be equally divided amongst all my sons and daughters; also 
   I give and bequeth unto my son Isack all my seate of land where I now dwell with all the meddowes belonging therunto and all the privilages therunto belonging. To him his heirs and assigns forever, but and if it should please God that he should decease without an heir before he comes to the age of twenty and one years, then my said seat of land shall belong unto the sons of my son Seth. Also I give unto my son Isaack all my housing and household goods of all sorts, also all my cattle and horse kine and swine; 
   Also all sorts of provisions, also cart and plowes with all the takeling belonging unto them. Also I give unto my said son Isaack all my money except that which I have given to my daughters, and I order my said son Isaack to pay all my just debts and to receive all my debts that are due unto me also I order my Indian Lydia to live with my son Isaack until he is twenty years of age, and my Indian gerle I give to him during his life, also it is my mind and will that my son Isaack shall make no bargain without the consent of his overseers until he be twenty years of age, I have made choice of John Cooke, and my son Seth and Thomas Taber to be for overseers to see this my will performed.
       Signed and sealed in prsence Thomas Pope his marke 
       of John Cooke 
       and Thomas Tabor; 

[Plym. Col. Wills, 4:2: 50]

   Isaac and Seth Pope took out letters of administration on the estate November 2 1683, and the inventory was taken on August 4, 1683, which Thomas died between July 9 and August4, 1683. "The homestead farm conveyed by the above will to Isaac Pope, contained 172 acres, and comprised the larger portion of the thickly-settled portion of the present town of Fairhaven. Its north line was a little south of the south line of the street leading east from the bridge." [11] 

Inventory

August The 4th: 1683

A true Inventory of the Lands goods and Chattle of Thomas Pope of the Towne of Dartmouth Late Deceased;

   Impr: the housing and the seate of Land belonging 
   therunto 100 00 00 
   Item 25 acrees of upland and 2 acrees of meadow 
   lying on the west side of Cushenett River 10 00 00 
   Item 7 acrees of upland and 7 acrees of Meddow 
   att Plymouth 20 00 0 
   Item 2 oxen and 2 steers 10 00 00 
   Item 5 Cowes and halfe a yeerling 11 10 00 
   Item 4 Calves 02 00 00 
   Item 1 horse and 1 mare 06 00 00 
   Item his swine 05 00 00 
   Item Cart & plow Tackling 03 00 00 
   Item for tooles of all sorts 02 00 00 
   Item 2 Guns 02 10 0 
   Item 3 beads and the beding belonging to them 20 00 0 
   Item potts and nettles & puter 05 0 0 
   Item wearing Clothes 05 00 0 
   Item Chests and other houshold Lumber 05 00 0 
   Item Cotten ucole & sheeps wool and yearne 05 00 0 
   Item Corn and other provision 27 00 0 
   Item this yeares Crope of Corn 10 00 0 
   Item in Mony 32 00 0 
   Item an Indian Gerle 10 00 0 
   Item Debts Due unto him 01 00 0 
   sume 274 00 0

Taken by us the Day & yeer above written

   Thomas Tabor 
   Arther Hathawey 

Order Regarding Dartmouth

           "The following order of Court relating to the resettlement of Dartmough explains itself: 
           "To John Cooke, to be communicated to such of the former Inhabitants of Dartmouth as are concerned herein. 
           "The councell being now assembled, considering the reason and necessitie of that order of the Generall Court made the 14th October, 1675, respecting the rebuilding or resettleing the Towne of Dartmouth, a copy wheof is herewith sent, and considering withall that all the people of that place, by theire deserting it, have left it to the posession of the enimie, which, throught he good hand of God on the indeavors of this colonie is now recovered againe out of the enimies hand, do soe much the more look at it as a duty incombent on this councel to see the said order effectually attended, doe therfore hereby prohibite all and every of the former inhabitants of the said towne of Dartmouth, or theire or any of theire assigns, to make any entrance on, building, or settleing in any pte of the said former townshipp of Dartmouth untill satisfactory eccuritie be first given to the Court or councel by some of the principal psons heretofore belonging to that place, that the said Court order shall in all respects be attened by them, as the transgressors of the prohibition will answare the contrary att theire pill."[12] 

Sources

   Source: S76 Title: Founders of Early American Families - Emigrants from Europe 1607-1657 Author: Colket, Meredith B Publication: General Court of the Order of Founders and Patriots of America, Cleveland, OH, 1975 Repository: #R62 
   Source: S97 Title: www.gencircles.com 
   Source: S99 Author: Susan E. Roser Title: Mayflower Increasings, 2nd Edition Publication: Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1995 
   Source: S132 Title: Annals of the Town of Dorchester, Number Two, 1750 Author: James Blake Publication: David Clapp, Jr., Boston, 1846 Available without charge at Google Books 
   Source: S142 Title: Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England Author: Savage Publication: Broderbund, 1994 
   Source: S185 Title: Genealogy of Thomas Pope and his Descendants Author: Dora Pope Worden Publication: 1917 
   Source: S278 Title: Mayflower Families Publication: http://www.mayflowerfamilies.com 
   Source: S294 Title: New England Historical and Genealogical Register: Early Rehoboth Families and Events, Volume: 99 Author: Bowen, Richard Le Baron Publication: 1945 Repository: #R28 
   Source: S401 Title: Pioneer Popes Author: Sutherland, Amelia Pope Publication: Waupaca, WI 
   Source: S402 Title: A History of the Dorchester Pope Family 1634-1888 Author: Pope, Charles Henry Publication: author, Boston, MA, 1888 Repository: #R62 
   Source: S459
   Source: S100 Author: Robert Charles Anderson Title: The Great Migration Begins, Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633 Publication: New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, MA 1995 
   Source: S498 Title: Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England Author: Nathaniel B. Shurtleff & David Pulsifer Publication: Boston, 1855-1861 
   Source: S531 Title: Descendants of Edward Small of New England Author: Underhill, Lora Altine Woodbury Publication: Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston, 1934 
   Source: S553 Author: Pope, Franklin Leonard Title: Genealogy of Thomas Pope of Plymouth Publication: New England Historical and Genealogical Register: Volume 42, Jan 1888, Pages 45-62 Repository: #R28 
   Records of William Spooner of Plymouth, MA & his descendants Thomas Spooner, 1883[13] 
   FindAGrave 
   The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 42 Accessed 11 April 2014 

Footnotes

   ↑ #S132
   ↑ #S553 Page 46
   ↑ Source: #S553 Page: 47
   ↑ Source: #S531 Pages: 666 - 667
   ↑ Source: #S498 Court Orders, vol. 1: 63
   ↑ Source: #S100 Pages 1496-1499
   ↑ Source: #S100 Pages 1496-1499
   ↑ Source: #S401 Pages 10-11
   ↑ #S553 Page 47
   ↑ #S553 Page 47
   ↑ #S553 Page 47
   ↑ Source: #S402 Page: pp. 280-285
   ↑ Source: #S97 Text: Mayflower & Cape Cod Genealogy by Harry C. Hadaway, Jr

view all 15

Thomas Pope's Timeline

1608
January 13, 1608
Gristmiller, Kent, England
1610
September 27, 1610
Age 2
Ilfracombe, Devonshire, England
1639
August 27, 1639
Age 31
Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States
1649
January 13, 1649
Age 41
Plymouth, Plymouth Colony
June 14, 1649
Age 41
Plymouth, Plymouth
1651
March 25, 1651
Age 43
Plymouth, (Present Plymouth County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts), (Present USA)
1653
March 15, 1653
Age 45
Plymouth, (Present Plymouth County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts), (Present USA)
1654
1654
Age 45
Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Colonial America