Thomas Southard, of New Amsterdam

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Thomas Southard, Sr.

Birthdate: (74)
Birthplace: Leyden, Holland, Netherlands
Death: 1689 (74)
Hempstead, New York
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Southard's mother
Husband of Annica Antonis Southard
Father of Thomas Southard, Jr.; Abraham Southard; Sarah Bedell; John Southard; Margaret Hendrickson and 4 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Thomas Southard, of New Amsterdam

He probably came over on a Dutch ship directly from Holland to New Amsterdam (later New York City) around the 1640's. It appears he worked as a farm hand for his future father-in-law, Anthony Jansen, who was a rather well-to-do farmer of Gravesend, to pay for his passage over. While working for Mr. Jansen, Thomas married his oldest daughter, Annica Jansen. Together, they had several children:

  • Isaac Southard
  • Thomas S Southard, II
  • Sarah Southard
  • John Southard
  • Margaret Southard
  • Mary Southard
  • Abraham Southard
  • Unice Southard
  • Abigail Southard

After their marriage, Thomas bought a farm of 200 acres adjoining his father-in-law's. Both Anthony and Thomas were of a disagreeable sort and soon started quarreling over several cows, which were to be Annica's dowry which Anthony reneged upon, and ended up in court in 1653. After losing the court case, Thomas sold his farm and bought a new farm 20 miles away in Hempstead on 8 Dec. 1655. Eventually, he owned about 214 acres of land at this location.

Thomas died without leaving a will. The courts divided about 80 pounds, that comprised the monetary estate, among the five daughters and awarded the real property to the oldest son, Thomas II, under the assumption that he would work out an acceptable division of the Southard homestead 214 acres with his brothers. But Thomas was reluctant or unable to divide the homestead to the satisfaction of those concerned.

His brothers petitioned the court, and after many delays, a committee of Arbitration was appointed. In 1706, this committee made a recommendation and the court made it binding.

The homestead was divided into three parts. The north third was given to John; the south third went to Thomas, who at this time apparently had a homestead elsewhere; and the central third went jointly to Abraham and Isaac.

There were two possible reasons for this award of the central third: One was that the widowed mother was living with Isaac. Another was that Abraham did not marry, and he too apparently lived with Isaac and his family. When Abraham died in 1725, he willed his part to Abraham, son of Isaac.

The family affairs were settled. There are indications that the family of Thomas II and those of his brothers were not friendly during several later generations.

notes

Do not confuse with Thomas Southworth born in Leyden, Holland to Edward Southworth and Alice Carpenter.

origins

From https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/southworth-southard/about/background retrieved July 2016:

Surname DNA Project for Southard, Southworth, Suthers, Southward, Southern, Southwood... and more

A concerted effort is underway to determine the English origins of these and many more surnames. For example, did Constant and Thomas Southworth of Plymouth, Massachusetts truly descend from Gilbert, son of Hugh de Croft, who was given the Manor of Southworth at Samlesbury? And was Thomas Southard, of New Amsterdam who m. Annica Antonis Southard related to this family? How do some of the other spellings relate to these families, if at all? This is becoming very interesting, as can be seen in the Results tables on the following pages. We can certainly conclude, on the basis of DNA testing, that Thomas Southard was not related to Constant and Thomas Southworth at least in the last thousand years. We do not yet have proof that this American Southworth line descends from the Samlesbury line that includes Gilbert, son of Hugh de Croft.


"Southard or Southart, Thomas, of Gd [Gravesend], (sup.) English, m. Annica da. of Anthony Jansen from Salee. Bought Dec. 20, 1650, of Thomas Applegate the one half of the lot Applegate bought of Randell Hunt, as per Gd. rec. Owned plantation-lot No. 11 in Gd in 1653. He quarreled with his father-in-law Anthony Jansen about the ownership of cattle, on which Anthony was imprisoned by the local court of Gd, but released by the higher one of the colony, as per p. 136 of Calendar of Dutch Man. He appears to have removed to Hempstead, where he resided in 1670, having sons Thomas Jr. and John, whose descendants reside in that locality. He was also probably the ancestor of the Southards of N.J.... " See Samuel, son of Thomas, Jr. for more info.

From a Family Group Sheet in LDS online site: "It was fortunate for me that Jane and Jim were still in New Jersey when I found I had yet another family of that state to be researched. Jacob Falkenburg, grandson of the first Henry Jacob Falkenburg, married a Phoebe Southard. Jane and Jim found this researched by Ralph Potter at the New Jersey Historical Society in Newark. The first American Southards were not of which we can be proud. Let us hope that their unlovable characteristics were diluted through the years by other more gentle traits given to us by other ancestors. "Thomas Southard was the first of this family in America. He was probably of a family of English dissenters who went first to Holland -- as he was born there about 1615, possibly in Leyden. He settled at Gravesend, Long Island and went to work for a farmer named Anthony Jansen. Anthony was of a somewhat higher station in life and a man of property on Long Island. His father was Jan Jansen Van Haarlem. As you know, Haarlem is a city in Holland and no doubt that district in New York got its name from that Dutch city. "Anthony and Grietje Reyniers were married on board the ship that brought them to America ca 1631. Annica, the first of their four daughters, was born around 1632 in what is now lower Manhattan in New York City. In a mutually agreeable arrangement Thomas Southard and Annica Jansen were married. Thomas was probably looking to a dower, and Anthony no doubt happy to have one of his daughters off his hands. Thomas bought land of Anthony whereby making them neighbors. Court records show Anthony to be mean and quarrelsome, and at odds with the law, with the church pastor and his wife, and finally with Thomas who was no less contentious. When it became apparent that things would be no better between the families, Thomas and Annica moved to Hempstead, Long Island. There they raised their family of 9 children. They died there, he in 1688. Annica was still living in 1698. Their second son, John, was our ancestor. "As the sons grew to manhood they found it more difficult to live in Hempstead as they felt more Dutch than English. "In the years before the Revolution, feelings ran high between the American rebels and those loyal to the crown. Their English neighbors insisted they take sides. To escame this, many Southards decided to leave Hempstead, some going up the Hudson River and others going to Connecticut. Our John had married Grace Carman who lived on a neighboring farm. I believe she was the daughter of either Joseph or Caleb Carman. Thus the name ...."[jpmartin.ged]

Searched New York City, Reformed Dutch Church Marriage Records, 1639-1695 on Ancestry.com 12 Jun 1999 - no Southards."Southard or Southart, Thomas, of Gd [Gravesend], (sup.) English, m. Annica da. of Anthony Jansen from Salee. Bought Dec. 20, 1650, of Thomas Applegate the one half of the lot Applegate bought of Randell Hunt, as per Gd. rec. Owned plantation-lot No. 11 in Gd in 1653. He quarrelled with his father-in-law Anthony Jansen about the ownership of cattle, on which Anthony was imprisoned by the local court of Gd, but released by the higher one of the colony, as per p. 136 of Calendar of Dutch Man. He appears to have removed to Hempstead, where he resided in 1670, having sons Thomas Junr and John, whose descendants reside in that locality. He was also probably the ancestor of the Southards of N.J.... " See Samuel, son of Thomas, Jr. for more info.

From a Family Group Sheet in LDS online site: "It was fortunate for me that Jane and Jim were still in New Jersey when I found I had yet another family of that state to be researched. Jacob Falkenburg, grandson of the first Henry Jacob Falkenburg, married a Phoebe Southard. Jane and Jim found this researched by Ralph Potter at the New Jersey Historical Society in Newark. The first American Southards were not of which we can be proud. Let us hope that their unlovable characteristics were diluted through the years by other more gentle traits given to us by other ancestors. "Thomas Southard was the first of this family in America. He was probably of a family of English dissenters who went first to Holland -- as he was born there about 1615, possibly in Leyden. He settled at Gravesend, Long Island and went to work for a farmer named Anthony Jansen. Anthony was of a somewhat higher station in life and a man of property on Long Island. His father was Jan Jansen Van Haarlem. As you know, Haarlem is a city in Holland and no doubt that district in New York got its name from that Dutch city. "Anthony and Grietje Reyniers were married on board the ship that brought them to America ca 1631. Annica, the first of their four daughters, was born around 1632 in what is now lower Manhattan in New York City. In a mutually agreeable arrangement Thomas Southard and Annica Jansen were married. Thomas was probably looking to a dower, and Anthony no doubt happy to have one of his daughters off his hands. Thomas bought land of Anthony whereby making them neighbors. Court records show Anthony to be mean and quarrelsome, and at odds with the law, with the church pastor and his wife, and finally with Thomas who was no less contentious. When it became apparent that things would be no better between the families, Thomas and Annica moved to Hempstead, Long Island. There they raised their family of 9 children. They died there, he in 1688. Annica was still living in 1698. Their second son, John, was our ancestor. "As the sons grew to manhood they found it more difficult to live in Hempstead as they felt more Dutch than English. "In the years before the Revolution, feelings ran high between the American rebels and those loyal to the crown. Their English neighbors insisted they take sides. To escape this, many Southards decided to leave Hempstead, some going up the Hudson River and others going to Connecticut. Our John had married Grace Carman who lived on a neighboring farm. I believe she was the daughter of either Joseph or Caleb Carman. Thus the name ...." on a ship named the Falcon, according to tradition Thomas Southard's father is presumed to be Thomas (ID 3983) (1579->1615), but no proof has been found. An analysis of all the Southards and Southworths in England and Holland at the time points to this conclusion.

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Thomas Southard, of New Amsterdam's Timeline

1615
1615
Leyden, Holland, Netherlands
1640
1640
Age 25
1640
Age 25
America
1658
1658
Age 43
Long Island, Nieuw-Nederland
1660
1660
Age 45
Hempstead, Long Island, NY (USA)
1662
1662
Age 47
Hempstead, New York, United States
1663
1663
Age 48
Hempstead, Nassau, NY
1664
January 1, 1664
Age 49
Gravesend, Long Island, Province of New York
1666
1666
Age 51
Hempstead, New York