Thornton Joel Berry

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Thornton Joel Berry's Geni Profile

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About Thornton Joel Berry

Thornton joined the Confederate army "and served throughout the war, taking part in the battle of Gettysburg and many other engagements, and being wounded near Augusta, Georgia. He was captured at the battle of the Wilderness and confined in Fort Delaware and was later taken south and placed under the fire of the Southern gun boats for six weeks, and later taken back to Fort Delaware where he remained a prisoner to the end of the war."

Thornton J. Berry joined the 9th Battalion, Virginia Infantry, Lieutenant Colonel George W. Hansborough commanding as a Corporal. This battalion was engaged in heavy fighting near Thornton's home. The Confederate forces wanted to hold onto the frontier area of their state while the Union forces wanted to gain control of the B & O Railroad and the road from Parkersburg to Staunton. Union forces under Brig. Gen. Joseph Reynolds advanced and drove in pickets of the 9th Virginia at the Greenbrier River camp (in what would be West Virginia), but the battle was a draw. Reynolds withdrew to Cheat Mountain and the Tygart River valley where he was attacked by Robert E. Lee in his first offensive of the war. The confederate attacks were uncoordinated and the Union forces (of only 300) hung on stubbornly. Lee withdrew and tried again against Laurel Mountain but called off the operation due to poor communication and lack of supplies. In December of 1861 confederate forces occupied the summit of Allegheny Mountain to defend the Staunton-Parkersburg Pike. A Union force attacked on December 13. Fighting continued for much of the morning as each side maneuvered. Finally the Union troops were repulsed, and they retreated to camps near Cheat Mountain leaving the Confederate forces in control at Camp Alleghany. During the spring of 1862 Thornton's 9th Division merged into the 25th Regiment Virginia Infantry. Thornton was made a 2nd Lieutenant in the 25th Virginia Infantry (Heck's regiment). Hecks' Regiment fought under Stonewall Jackson in May 1862 taking on Union General Fremont on the Parkersburg road. After severe fighting Fremont withdrew into western Virginia and Jackson marched against other Union columns threatening the Shenandoah Valley (the breadbasket of the confederacy). Heck's regiment helped Jackson defeat Union Armies piecemeal in a series of slashing attacks and flanking movements at Cross Keys and Port Republic. Confederate General "Stonewall" Jackson then defeated a Union army under John Pope at Cedar Mountain with A.P. Hill providing the crucial counterattack. Thornton and his regiment then marched to Sharpsburg, Maryland and the bloodbath of the battle of Antietam, the single bloodiest day in American military history with over 23,000 casualties. When the Union army moved into Virginia, Thornton and his regiment poured murderous fire from Marye's Heights onto Burnside's Union Army during the first battle of Fredericksburg. Thornton was one of 280 soldiers of the 25th regiment that went with Lee to Gettysburg fighting there July 1-3, 1863. Twenty-five percent of those 280 were disabled there. That Thorton was wounded in Georgia suggests that the 25th Virginia Infantry was sent south to help defend Georgia from Rosecrans' army of the Cumberland before the battle of Chickamauga. He recovered and went back north to help General Lee and the army of Northern Virginia defend against Grant's offensive. Fighting was fierce but inconclusive as both sides attempted to maneuver in the dense woods on May 5, 1864. Darkness halted the fighting, and both sides rushed forward reinforcements. At dawn on May 6, attacks were made along several fronts with both Union and Confederate actions achieving successes. The battle was a tactical draw. Grant, however, did not retreat as had the other Union generals before him. On May 7, the Federals

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Thornton Joel Berry's Timeline

1812
November 9, 1812
Loudoun, VA, USA
1834
December 16, 1834
Age 22
1835
December 16, 1835
Age 23
Braxton County, West Virginia, United States
1836
November 1836
Age 23
Braxton County, West Virginia, United States
1837
1837
Age 24
Braxton County, West Virginia, United States
1837
Age 24
1841
1841
Age 28
Braxton County, West Virginia, United States
1842
September 1, 1842
Age 29
West Virginia, United States
1846
1846
Age 33
West Virginia, United States
1847
1847
Age 34
Frederick County, Maryland, United States