Tore Håkonsson, baron

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Tore Håkonsson, baron

Also Known As: "Tore av Tønsberg", "Tore Biskopsson", "Manvik-ætten"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Nidaros, Tronheim, Norway
Death: 1317 (70-87)
Skien, Telemark, Norway
Place of Burial: Norge
Immediate Family:

Son of Haakon Toresson and Eline Toresdatter Lekum
Husband of Ingebjørg Erlingsdatter Bjarkøy and Kristine Andersdatter
Father of Håkon Thorsson; Kristin Toresdatter Bjarkøy; Elin Toresdatter Stovreim and NN Toresdotter
Brother of Borghild Haakonsdotter Bolt and Stig Håkonsen
Half brother of NN Halvardsdatter Kusse

Occupation: Baron, kansler, riksråd, Kansler 1270-76
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Tore Håkonsson, baron

Tore Håkonsson, baron

  • Tore Håkonsson Bishopsson, chancellor Lenderman / baron Sysle Mann
  • Birth year and birthplace are unknown; Died 1317; The exact date of death and the city of death is unknown; student 1271-1317
  • Tore Haakon's son, knight and baron. Mentioned as syslemand 20/3 1303 when he was on an official trip to Nissedal (Dipl. Norveg. 1, 95). Also 17/12 1315.

This article was printed on the Norwegian biographical lexicon . Newer articles can be found in Store Norwegian lexicon .

Chancellor, Lendmann / Baron, Syslemann and Diplomat. Parents: The father was Håkon (Died 1267), Bishop of Oslo and later Archbishop; the mother is unknown. Married 1276 with Ingebjørg Erlingsdotter (dead 1315), daughter of lingeman Erling Alvsson to Tanberg (dead 1283; see NBL1, bd. 3). Parent father of Erling Vidkunnsson (dead 1355); brother to Alv Erlingsson (dead 1290).

Through fifty years and under three kings, Tore Håkonsson performed an important, competent and comprehensive tenure in Norwegian governance. This occurred partly through local building as syslemann and partly as prominent dealers and advisors in foreign affairs. In the first part of his career, he also had important tasks in the central administration apparatus.

Tore Håkonsson is the first gong student in 1271 when he sealed a royal letter on the construction of a church on Voss with a chancellor's title. Truleg took over as the king's chancellor in 1270 after Askatin. The fact that he shares such an important management function in the early stage of the embedding phase testifies to administrative experience and insight and about close relationship with the king. When we then know, from Árna saga bishop, that Tore was lawfully educated (canonically) and henceforth had studied abroad, it is reasonable to conclude that he was also actively involved in the extensive statutory King Magnus starting from the middle of the 1260s. In the summer of 1273 he gathered with Audun Hugleiksson on behalf of the king to be an observer during the church litigation trial which spell the battle of the ruling over local church camps in Iceland ( local issues ). He was probably on the Borgarting in 1276, where the laws of the country acted to be our main.

As a chancellor, Tore participated in the Riksdag meeting in Bergen in the summer of 1273, where the first concordat between the church and the royal council in Norway was concluded. He was one of the world's greatest nobles who sealed the deal. In August 1277 he is one of Baronians in Tønsberg who seals, guarantees and swears for the final concordate ( parish ) between the church and the kingdom. One time before 1273 he must have got the lender's rank, which in 1277 was converted to baron. He will be the last gong referred to as Chancellor 1276, and shortly afterwards he must have left the job. It is unfortunate that he crossed the local steering booth in Austlandet.

On a regular basis, Tore was no longer in the central management apparatus. He did not participate in the magic ruler after King Magnus died in 1280, and he managed beyond the bitter church controversy early in the 1280s. At the same time, however, at least the gift of Ingebjørg Erlingsdotter, the fall of 1276, has not supported Tores' position towards the king and kingdoms, and thus his political and economic position among the nation's storms. Ingebjørg, who came from a rich family, was a simple tree-menning to King Magnus, and the king was the hepherd of the brewery of them.

Two completely different career paths were influenced by Tore Håkonsson's life course from the 1280s until he died: roll as an active emigrant and negotiate in foreign-language stables, and work in local government, primarily as a sister in Skienssysla. Everything indicates that he managed to co-operate this tenestevegane, in the sense that he never gave up his local management positions for one full-time professional diplomat career.

First and foremost, we must have legal education and linguistic and procedural training that led Tore to work in foreign countries. All in 1276 he joined the king's follow-up to the country's end, where King Magnus would mediate in the Swedish throne. In 1287 he confiscated the king's and duchess's letters of protection for the Danish peacelaughters, and in 1289 he led the English king to negotiate Norwegian interests in connection with Margrete Eiriksdotter's takeover of Scotland's throne. He worked very actively in England this autumn and was a first-time official among the Norwegian emigrants, as in Salisbury November 1289 - on behalf of the king - guaranteed a detailed treriks agreement (Norway-England-Scotland) about Margrete as Scotland's queen and heir. It was tricky at this time he also worshiped the English king and sought to be his knight. At the same time, he asked King Edvard for help with reconciliation between brother Alv Erlingsson and Norway's king. The outcome of these interventions is not known.

Together with bishop Narve of Bergen, Leia Tore sendferda as the fall of 1290 would bring Virgin Margrete to Scotland. In his pursuit was also his wife, Ingebjørg Erlingsdotter. When virgin died on Orknøyane before arriving in Scotland, Tore and the others had to make the heavy venderisa to Bergen with the dead child. Tore was also later on in active tenure for the king of the British Isles. At that time, he received 1297 English league letters to negotiate on behalf of King Eirik in England. This mission had temmeleg certainly because of the fact that Norway 1295 took France's party in the Franco-English conflict. Elles was Tore adviser to the king and duke in the decisive negotiation phase with the German seaside towns in Tønsberg in the summer of 1294. In 1290 years he participated in a guided tour in Danish waters, and in 1295 he was among the Norwegian guarantors for the preliminary Norwegian-Danish peace agreement as entered into Hindsgavl.

Also in Håkon 5 Magnusson's reign, we meet Tore in various missions on the foreign plane. He participated in the king's hike to Denmark 1300 and stood as a member of the Nordic peace agreements in the years 1309-10. The long-term diplomatic and foreign policy career of course gave Tore Håkonsson a real advisory role for the government in this field. But he never formally referred to as adviser to King Eirik, and until 1312 he became expressive mention of King Håkon's advisors. It has been assumed that he was a member of King Hakon's advice, but this is uncertain.

Key positions in the local government put a decisive role for a permanent and stable council function centrally. Turse's local village in Austlandet goes back to the end of the 1270s, and it is likely that the king's all-time he went to syslemann in Skienssysla. Nevertheless, it is only in the 1300s we have documentary material about his work there. Suddenly, he made 1302 an official trip through Telemark, and as late as 1315 he issued a testimony in a local killing case. Sadly, Tore sat in the process until he died in 1317. Son Håkon Toresson (dead about 1330) took over Skiing's sister after his father.

Tore Håkonsson accumulates after a considerable amount of landgoards, both through inheritance and poison targets, and also truleg through purchases. In correspondence to and from the English king, he becomes a regular minister as Tirricus de Campis ludi , where the campis ludi temmeleg safely aims at garden Lekum ('Leikvang') in Eidsberg. We have guessed that he cared for this garden as a mothers heritage. Earthenware material indicates that he also eight other gods in Østfold, along both sides of the Oslo fjord and in Romerike. Later correspondence also documents that Tore had acquired a cultivation soil on Orknøyane.

In the first letter in which Tore is a student, he becomes, in addition to the chancellor, titled "sira". It indicates that he was the priesthood, and one can not rule out that he was also prestigious. This is, however, less likely both because he married and because he received a verdant rank like Baron. The tower's coat of arms was divided into two semi-circles, one side adorned with stars, the other with a half-lily.

Tore Håkonsson can stand as the prototype of the "government officials who gave the Norwegian government a firmness around 1300" (Per Sveaas Andersen). His work was characterized by loyalty to the royal family, which was not always as prominent among today's top diplomats. Professionalism, and its own political ambition, seems to be the most important point of reference in his long and long working day.

Source - https://nbl.snl.no/Tore_H%C3%A5konsson_Biskopsson

———

  • Tore Håkonsson Bishopsson - Extension (NBL Article) Author: Narve Bjørgo

  Tore Håkonsson Biskopsson, birth year and birthplace are unknown; Died 1317; The exact date of death and the city of death is unknown; student 1271-1317. Chancellor, Lendmann / Baron, Syslemann and Diplomat. Parents: The father was Håkon (Died 1267), Bishop of Oslo and later Archbishop; the mother is unknown. Married 1276 with Ingebjørg Erlingsdotter (dead 1315), daughter of lingeman Erling Alvsson to Tanberg (dead 1283; see NBL1, bd. 3). Parent father of Erling Vidkunnsson (dead 1355); brother to Alv Erlingsson (dead 1290).

Through fifty years and under three kings, Tore Håkonsson performed an important, competent and comprehensive tenure in Norwegian governance. This occurred partly through local building as syslemann and partly as prominent dealers and advisors in foreign affairs. In the first part of his career, he also had important tasks in the central administration apparatus.

Tore Håkonsson is the first gong student in 1271 when he sealed a royal letter on the construction of a church on Voss with a chancellor's title. Truleg took over as the king's chancellor in 1270 after Askatin. The fact that he shares such an important management function in the early stage of the embedding phase testifies to administrative experience and insight and about close relationship with the king. When we then know, from Árna saga bishop, that Tore was lawfully educated (canonically) and henceforth had studied abroad, it is reasonable to conclude that he was also actively involved in the extensive statutory King Magnus starting from the middle of the 1260s. In the summer of 1273 he gathered with Audun Hugleiksson on behalf of the king to be an observer during the church litigation trial which spell the battle of the ruling over local church camps in Iceland (local issues). He was probably on the Borgarting in 1276, where the laws of the country acted to be our main.

As a chancellor, Tore participated in the Riksdag meeting in Bergen in the summer of 1273, where the first concordat between the church and the royal council in Norway was concluded. He was one of the world's greatest nobles who sealed the deal. In August 1277 he is one of Baronians in Tønsberg who seals, guarantees and swears for the final concordate (parish) between the church and the kingdom. One time before 1273 he must have got the lender's rank, which in 1277 was converted to baron. He will be the last gong referred to as Chancellor 1276, and shortly afterwards he must have left the job. It is unfortunate that he crossed the local steering booth in Austlandet.

On a regular basis, Tore was no longer in the central management apparatus. He did not participate in the magic ruler after King Magnus died in 1280, and he managed beyond the bitter church controversy early in the 1280s. At the same time, however, at least the gift of Ingebjørg Erlingsdotter, the fall of 1276, has not supported Tores' position towards the king and kingdoms, and thus his political and economic position among the nation's storms. Ingebjørg, who came from a rich family, was a simple tree-menning to King Magnus, and the king was the hepherd of the brewery of them.

Two completely different career paths were influenced by Tore Håkonsson's life course from the 1280s until he died: roll as an active emigrant and negotiate in foreign-language stables, and work in local government, primarily as a sister in Skienssysla. Everything indicates that he managed to co-operate this tenestevegane, in the sense that he never gave up his local management positions for one full-time professional diplomat career.

First and foremost, we must have legal education and linguistic and procedural training that led Tore to work in foreign countries. All in 1276 he joined the king's follow-up to the country's end, where King Magnus would mediate in the Swedish throne. In 1287 he confiscated the king's and duchess's letters of protection for the Danish peacelaughters, and in 1289 he led the English king to negotiate Norwegian interests in connection with Margrete Eiriksdotter's takeover of Scotland's throne. He worked very actively in England this autumn and was a first-time official among the Norwegian emigrants, as in Salisbury November 1289 - on behalf of the king - guaranteed a detailed treriks agreement (Norway-England-Scotland) about Margrete as Scotland's queen and heir. It was tricky at this time he also worshiped the English king and sought to be his knight. At the same time, he asked King Edvard for help with reconciliation between brother Alv Erlingsson and Norway's king. The outcome of these interventions is not known.

Together with bishop Narve of Bergen, Leia Tore sendferda as the fall of 1290 would bring Virgin Margrete to Scotland. In his pursuit was also his wife, Ingebjørg Erlingsdotter. When virgin died on Orknøyane before arriving in Scotland, Tore and the others had to make the heavy venderisa to Bergen with the dead child. Tore was also later on in active tenure for the king of the British Isles. At that time, he received 1297 English league letters to negotiate on behalf of King Eirik in England. This assignment had temmeleg certainly because of the fact that Norway in 1295 took France

Sources

  • Isl.Ann.
  • RN, bd. 2–3, 1978–83
  • Magnus Lagabøtes saga, i Noregs kongesoger, bd. 4, 1979
  • Biskupa sögur, i Íslenzk fornrit, bd. 17, 1998
  • NFH, del 4, bd. 1–2, 1858–59
  • G. Storm: “Om Lendermandsklassens Talrighed i 12. og 13. Aarhundrede”, i HT, rk. 2, bd. 4, 1884
  • Å. Sällström: Bologna och Norden intill Avignonpåvedömets tid, 1957
  • P. Sveaas Andersen: biografi i NBL1, bd. 16, 1969
  • K. Helle: Konge og gode menn i norsk riksstyring ca. 1150–1319, 1972
  • A. Sletten: “Plena potestas”. Ansatser til institusjonalisering av de norske kongenes diplomatiske relasjoner 1217–*
  • 1319, h.oppg. NTNU, Trondheim 2003
  • http://snl.no/.nbl_biografi/Tore_H%C3%A5konsson_Biskopsson/utdypning
  • http://nbl.snl.no/Tore_H%C3%A5konsson_Biskopsson/utdypning
  • Aarbok Romerike Historielag 1956 - https://books.google.com/books?id=43HN7vNWddgC&pg=PA45&lpg=PA45&dq=Tore+Håkonsson,+baron+and+Ingebjørg+Erlingsdatter+Tandberg&source=bl&ots=h0BsKMr_xF&sig=Cxg-2kbN1hJnLdOiYaGJXsfMj1U&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjV7Pnt6v3eAhVlHjQIHZTjCOA4ChDoATACegQICRAB#v=onepage&q=Tore%20Håkonsson%2C%20baron%20and%20Ingebjørg%20Erlingsdatter%20Tandberg&f=false
  • Håkon av Nidaros - https://lokalhistoriewiki.no/Håkon_av_Nidaros
view all

Tore Håkonsson, baron's Timeline

1230
1230
Tronheim, Norway
1277
1277
Age 47
Sweden
1285
1285
Age 55
Telemark, Norway
1317
1317
Age 87
Skien, Telemark, Norway
1320
1320
Age 87
Eidsberg, Østfold, Norge
????
????
????
Norge