WILLIAM KINZEY OSBORNE

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WILLIAM KINZEY OSBORNE

Birthdate: (79)
Death: 1917 (79)
Immediate Family:

Son of Jeremiah Osbourne and Mary Rebecca Osborne
Husband of MARY SALOME OSBORNE
Father of CAMUEL BROOKS OSBORNE
Brother of JOSEPH MCDOWELL OSBORNE; CHARLES LAFAYETTE OSBORNE; HENRY CLAYPOOL OSBORNE; REBECCA EVELYN COX and SARAH MARGARET MACKEY

Managed by: Patti Kay Gourley
Last Updated:

About WILLIAM KINZEY OSBORNE

Birth: Feb. 14, 1838

North Carolina, USA

Death: May 9, 1917

North Carolina, USA

Son of Jeremiah and Mary Rebecca Fletcher Osborne. Married Mary Salome Thomas 26-Mar-1863 Henderson Co., NC, Rev. J. B. Marsh officiating. He volunteered for service under the Confederate flag in 1862 at an age of 24 and was assigned for duty in the 25th North Carolina Infantry commanded by Captain Francis W. Johnstone. Veteran of the Battle of Seven Pines, near Richmond, VA. He and Mary had a family of eight daughters and five sons.

William is a first cousin four times removed of mine. He led an interesting life and I am proud to be related.

___________________

His story as he told it in the letter that follows;

Memories of a Confederate Soldier

Brevard, North Carolina

September 1, 1913

Mrs. T. E. Patton

United Daughter of the Confederacy

Davidson River, North Carolina

Dear Mrs. Patton:

Responding to your request for brief outline of Civil War incidents which came under my observation during the dark days of the sixties, I will endeavor to relate some happenings that may add to the interest of the work contemplated by the praiseworthy organization you are so faithfully representing.

I volunteered for service under the Confederate flag in 1862 at an age of 22 and was assigned for duty in the 25th North Carolina Infantry commandered by Captain Francis W. Johnstone with headquarters at Ashville. We had an extended drilling experience in Wilmington, North Caroline, at the conclusion of which our company responded to a call to join the Confederate forces in Virginia.

Our first engagement of consequence occurred at Seven Pines, near Richmond (VA.) in, which my file leader, Benjamin Suders, fell dangerously wounded, and many gallant heroes were left dead upon the field. Soon afterwards I became seriously ill and was sent to a hospital in Petersburg. When I had recovered sufficiently to travel, I was granted a furlough and returned home after having been "on the danger line" for one year.

Early in the year 1863 I joined General Henry's battalion and witnessed many thrilling experiences in North Carolina and Tennessee, in opposition to the "notorious bunk" designated as Kirk's Army, which was engaged in pillaging the homes of Southern sympathizers and murdering the fathers and mothers of the absent boys - who had gone out in defense of their country.

Soon after my return from the Army I was happily married to Miss Mary Thomas, a daughter of Robert Thomas, who was later actually murdered by a band of tories. The murder of Father Thomas was a most distresing occurrence and without the slightest provocation.

The band of pirates applied the torch to his property for the purpose of luring him from his home that they might carry out their develish purpose of molesting. Seeing the fences enclosing the farm being rapidly consumed, he sent the negroes out to extinguish the flames, little dreaming that a company of murders were awaiting in ambush to pounce upon them like vulchers (sic) upon a dead carcass. When the faithful slaves did not return, we supposed they were fighting the fire, and I went out to assist them only to be taken captive at the point of two double barrel shot guns. Father Thomas followed me and met with similar fate.

Four members of the gang then entered the house occupied by defenseless women and children, and robbed of everything of value including an automatic revolver belonging to Mr. Thomas, with which he was shot to death on the departure of the heartless mob who took to the woods after the dastardly deed had been consumated.

I afterwards learned that I too, had been marked for slaughter, but this purpose was not carried into effect. I presume that their hearts (?) failed them after a defenseless old patriot lay dead at their feet.

Shortly before the close of the war, in 1865, I believe, my own father, Jeremiah Osborne, escaped death by surrendering all the money he happened to have in his possession. Members of the same gang responsible for the death of "Uncle Bobbie" Thomas visited the home and demanded his money.

Upon being refused, my father was tied to a stake and would have burned to death had he persistently refused to inform his captors where $300 in gold had been deposited for safe keeping.

On securing this bounty, they proceeded to terrorize other members of the family and stripped the house of everything of value before taking their departure for the mountain fastnesses which separated them from civilization and decency.

At due time my mother was knocked senseless with a pistol in the hands of a Tory whom she declined to give information concerning the whereabouts of household goods he desired to appropriate to the use of his crowd.

I could go on indefinitely relating experiences similar to the above, reciting the murders of our patriotic fathers and the indignities to which Southern mothers were forced to submit, but doubtless many others will comply with your request for like information, and I shall refrain from further encumbering your records.

Thanking you for this opportunity of making a small contribution to a work which is destined to place the South in a proper position before this country, and wishing you complete success in the valuable service you are rendering the old Veterans, I am

Most respectfully yours,

William K. Osborne

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WILLIAM KINZEY OSBORNE's Timeline

1838
1838
1880
1880
Age 42
1917
1917
Age 79