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Walton Hale

Birthdate: (80)
Birthplace: Cazenovia, Madison, New York, United States
Death: April 2, 1888 (80)
Wethersfield Springs, Wyoming, New York, USA
Place of Burial: Little Valley, Cattaraugus, New York, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Pvt. Reuben Hale, Jr. and Martha Hale
Husband of Jennette Hale
Father of David A. Hale; Priscilla Drew; Elizabeth Squires; Ira Hale; Lewis Hale and 10 others
Brother of William Hale and Isaac Hale
Half brother of Orpah Clark; Clarissa Hale; Levi Hale; Eunice Barnes; Tamar Hale and 2 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Walton Hale

Find A Grave Memorial# 61247076 Walton Hale and Janette Hollister were married at Dansville, Steuben, NY abt. 1828 as their first child is born 1829.

Enumerated in 1860 with wife Jeanette and children, and son David Hale living next door with his wife and children at Little Valley, Cattaraugus, New York. "United States Census, 1860", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC44-5Q4 : 30 December 2015),

Enumerated at Leon, Madison County New York, in 1875, with Janette (born Steuben County) and children. In this census he states he was born in Cazenova (sic) and is 68 years old making him born in 1807-08 in Madison County, New York. In other census' he states he was born in Canisteo, which is a town near Dansville, Steuben, New York.

Upon his birth, Walton stated his father moved back to New York (Cattaraugus County) from Pennsylvania.

Reuben Hale Jr. (April 24, 1760-April 9, 1828) was a soldier in the revolution (as was his father) and had two wives and according to his pension papers removed to Franklin, Delaware, New York. The Hale family continued to live in areas located close to Franklin, New York. It seems he may have named his daughter after his cousin Emily Hale Smith.

Census shows Walton and Janette living in Steuben County New York until 1832-33, when they decamped and moved to Cattaraugus County, New York.

Walton's wife and eldest children are born in Steuben County, New York. He became a farmer. One of his sons is born in Ohio, so he seems to have traveled west and returned. On one census, he states his father's place of birth as Pennsylvania. On others, New York. On various census documents he gives his birth date from 1804-1810, finally settles on 1808.

Walton and Janette are found living in 1880 in Little Valley, Cattauraugus, N.Y.. He states his age as 70, his father and mother being born in N. Y. Grandson William A. Hale, age 16, is living with them as are daughter Lydia Hale Kent, age 38, and her children Gracie, age 2 and Henry, age 0 an infant.

Walton Hale is listed in the 1840 New York census living in Mansfield, Cattaraugus,N.Y. with Janette Hollister Hale. In the 1855 census, he states he was born in Cazenovia, Madison, New York and has lived in Little Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York for 13 years. He is living next door to the Davis family whose they will have blood ties with in the next generation through the Plugh family (Myrtie Plugh marries Effner Davis).

Isaac W. Hale, son of Isaac Hale, is also found living in Carrollton, Cattaraugus, New York in 1850. He states he was born in PA in 1802, so he may be Walton's first cousin.

Others living with Isaac W. Hale in 1850 in Cattaraugus Co. are :

Nancy McKune Hale (wife) b. N.Y. age 45

John age 23 b. PA (1837)

Estha age 22 b. PA 1838)

Isaac Hale age 20 b. PA (1840)

Malvina Hale age 18 b. PA (1832)

Achsa Hale age 16 b. PA (1834)

Silas P. Hale age 11 b. NY (1839)

Reuben W. Hale age 5 b. N.Y. (1845)

. At the time of Walton's birth, New York and Vermont were warring over territory Vermont having declared itself an independent republic from it's surrounding neighbors New Hampshire and New York. Vermont abolished slavery in 1777, while it was still independent, and when it joined the United States as the 14th state in 1791 it was the first state to join untainted by slavery. Despite the Continental Congress refusal to recognize that the Vermont Republic had declared its independence from New York and New Hampshire, the Green Mountain Boys – those of the former New Hampshire Grants - supported and fought for American Independence. The Hale family had originally migrated from Conneticut to Guilford, Vermont, which was originally Guilord, New York, which may explain him saying his father was born in New York. The Hale family has long been allied with other pioneer families such as the Bigelows, Coles, Andrews, Bishops and more since the time of their original settling of Massachusetts.

"United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCTK-THV : accessed 8 April 2016), Walton Hale, Mansfield, Cattaraugus, New York, United States; citing family 192, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCTK-THV : 9 November 2014), Walton Hale, Mansfield, Cattaraugus, New York, United States; citing family 192, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

"United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MZZ3-PYX : 14 July 2016), Walton Hale, Little Valley, Cattaraugus, New York, United States; citing enumeration district ED 18, sheet 295C, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0812; FHL microfilm 1,254,812. _________________________________________________________________________________

Genealogy of the Hale Family. 149

Children of William Hale*^ and Molly' Morse Hale :

1 Benaiah Young', b. 9 Aug., 1785; m. Sarah H. Hustex.

2 Amos', b. 3 June, 1787; m. , had d. Hannah, d. at Enfield.

3 John, b. 7 June, 1789; resided in Ithaca, N. Y., "an extensive

farmer. "

4 Lois Ayer', b. 30 Aug., 1791; m. 1st, H. G. Axlen; 2d, Thomas

Maesh; resided in Andover. 6 Mary', b. 6 Nov., 1793.

6 WilUam', b. 13 Jan., 1796; m. Lois Pettingill; resided in Pitts-

burgh, Pa., booliseller.

7 Moses', b. 1800; m. Sally Eaton.

5 Aaron B.', b. 4 Jan., 1803; m. 1st, Nancy Jef^ees; 2d, Sarah

Thompson. 9 Lucinda', b. 1805; m. Matthew Bryant, Esq., of Enfield.

10 Rhoda', b. 1807; m. Cukrier; resided in Grafton, N. H.

11 Leonard', b. 1810; m. at Haverhill resided in Richmond, Vt.

https://archive.org/stream/genealogyofdesce00hale/genealogyofdesce00hale_djvu.txt

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OR

(V) Moses (2), son of Moses (1) Hale, was born about 1760. He removed from Rutland, Vermont, to St. Lawrence county, N.Y., about 1830, with seven adult sons, and all except Asa H. lived in the towns of Stockholm and Norfolk. He died at Stockholm, N.Y.

Children:
William, Moses, Aaron, Alvin, Luther, Emma, Nancy, Asa Hilan, who is mentioned below. 
(VI) Asa Hilan, son of Moses (2) Hale, was born in 1814 at Rutland, Vermont, died at Norwood, N.Y. 1898. He had a common school education in his native town. He learned the trade of shoemaker in Vermont. He came from Vermont to Stockholm, N.Y., whence he went to Batavia and Rochester, N.Y. Later he went to Ogdensburg, N.Y. for a short time, locating finally in Norwood. He worked at his trade in all these towns. 
He married in western New York, 1839, Sarah, born 1817, died 1893, daughter of Rev. Chever and Mary (Hale) Felch, granddaughter of Asa Hale, of Rutland, great-granddaughter of Moses Hale, mentioned above. Nathan Felch, father of Rev. Chever Felch, was a solider in the revolution on the Lexington alarm, and later in the Massachusetts Line in Westchester county, New York. Dorcas (Mead) Hale, mother of mary (Hale) Felch, was daughter of Colonel James Mead of Rutland, who commanded a regiment of Vermont troops during the revolutionary war. From this family Charles Mead Hale is named.
Children of Asa H. Hale:
1. Mary, lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.
2. Edward W., employed in the sub-treasury in New York City; married Minna Field; children: Frank S., Alice L., Ella C. and William Asa.
3. Frances H., lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.; widow of David Z. Brockett.
4. Agnes L., graduate of Potsdam Normal school, teacher of higher mathetmatics in the Girls' High School of Brooklyn, N.Y.
5. Elizabeth, principal of public school No. 98, Manhattan, N.Y.
6. Charles Mead, mentioned below.

Source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hubbard/NNY_index/hale.htm ________________________________________________________________________________

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Walton or Walter Hale is found living in Little Valley, Cattaraugus, New York in 1865. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nycattar/1865indx/littlevalley1865.htm

Walton is found still living in Little Valley, Cattaraugus, New York in 1880 census with Janette. http://www.familytreenow.com/record/lKjvOVjm-i4-GKatP5aZYw

"United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MZZ3-PYX : 14 July 2016), Walton Hale, Little Valley, Cattaraugus, New York, United States; citing enumeration district ED 18, sheet 295C, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0812; FHL microfilm 1,254,812.

Found in 1880 Federal Census with Family, Little Valley, Cattaraugus Co., New York 1880

http://www.paintedhills.org/CATTARAUGUS/1880Census/1880TownofLittleValley.html

Last First Age Occupation Born House # Page #

HALE, Keziah E 49 Keeping House NY 227 19

HALE, David 49 Farmer NY 227 19

HALE, DAvid 1m home NY 230 19

HALE, Emma 8 school NY 230 19

HALE, Janette 68 helps with house NY 226 19

HALE, Levi 14 school NY 230 19

HALE, Mary 26 Keeping House NY 230 19

HALE, Nathan D 28 works on farm NY 227 19

HALE, Thomas 35 Farmer NY 230 19


HALE, Thomas 6 school NY 230 19

HALE, Walter 70 Farmer NY 226 19

HALE, William 4 home NY 230 19


HALE, William A 16 grandson NY 226 19

Found in the Little Valley, New York Census 1855:

HALE, DAVID House # 35 Family # 37 Page #182


HALE, WALTON House # 34 Family # 36 Page# 182

Source: http://www.paintedhills.org/CATTARAUGUS/1855Census/1855LittleValleyIndex.html

Found in the Little Valley, New York Census of 1865:

Hale, Walton LDS Microfilm # 435 Hale, David LDS Microfilm # 435

1865 TOWN of LITTLE VALLEY INDEX

NEW YORK STATE, CATT. CO.

Contributed & Transcribed by PHGS Member: Mary Jane Warrior http://www.paintedhills.org/CATTARAUGUS/1865Census/1865Littlevalleyindex.html

1875 Still living in Little Valley (both Walton and David as per 1875 census).

Will Testators: HALE, ALBERT COLDSPRING NY-5-13-349 HALE, ESTHER M. OLEAN NY-5-12-343 HALE, NATHANIEL NAPOLI

Napoli Cemetery: HALE, Edwin died 4-28-1849 - Son of Nathanial & Sylvia Hale HALE, Nathaniel died 7-2-1838 age 80 HALE, Nathaniel S. died 8-2-1841 age 78

http://www.paintedhills.org/CATTARAUGUS/SNapoliCem.html

Father Candidates:

1.)(V) Moses (2), son of Moses (1) Hale, was born about 1760. He removed from Rutland, Vermont, to St. Lawrence county, N.Y., about 1830, with seven adult sons, and all except Asa H. lived in the towns of Stockholm and Norfolk. He died at Stockholm, N.Y.

Children:
William, Moses, Aaron, Alvin, Luther, Emma, Nancy, Asa Hilan, who is mentioned below. 

3.Jonathan Hale was born Oct. 12, 1786; died May 12, 1857, at Pierrepont, New York. His school education was limited, and from an early age he was employed in the lumbering business in the Mohawk Valley, rafting timber. When he was twenty years old he came to Canton, N.Y., where he worked on a farm. In 1839 he settled at Pierrepont, where he spent the remainder of his days. He was a well-to-do farmer and a useful citizen. Though he had little schooling he was a student of the Bible and read many books.

He married (first) Madina Farwell; (second) Abigail Waterman (Wood) Hayward, born in Barnard, Vermont, Jan 29, 1799, died March 24, 1877, daughter of Samuel Wood and widow of Charles Hayward, by whom she had one son.
Children of first wife:
1. Esther, married Tyler Brown.
2. John F., married Lydia Brown.
3. Abigail B., married Lewis Richardson, of Nicholville.
4. Elizabeth.
Children of second wife:
5. Mary Ann, born March 15, 1827, died March 16, 1827.
6. Lavinia, June 13, 1828, died Feb. 1, 1835.
7. Jonathan A., ,mentioned below. 

Jacob Pickaed" (Jacob^ Joseph*, SamueP, etc.) m. Tabitha. Their children were :

1 Isaac', b. 10 Aug., 1788.

2 Nathaniel', b. 24 Oct., 1791.

3 Abigail', b. 17 Jan., 1801.

Thomas Pickard* (Samuel') m. 23 May, 1722, Mehitable, d. of John and Mercy (Dickinson) Dresser. She was b. in Eowley 6 July, 1694. ]^o children appear in Eowley records, uor do deaths of either Thomas or Mehitable appear there. Probably removed from Eowley.

Hale family complete original genealogy: http://archive.org/stream/ancestrydescenda00hale/ancestrydescenda00hale_djvu.txt

Husband of Jennett Hollister. Father of Ira Hale, Nathan David Hale, Elizabeth Hale, Pazellar/Pagellen Hale, Lewis Hale, William D. Hale, James R. Hale, Walton/Walter Hale, Emily Hale, Thomas Leo Hale, Lucinda "Lucy" J. Hale, Jennette R. Hale, Estella Hale, http://www.paintedhills.org/CATTARAUGUS/AnnisCem.html

Children of Jennette Hollister and Walter Hale: David, b. 1827 Ira or Asa, b. 1829 Elizabeth, b.1831 unknown, b. 1833 Lewis, 1836 William, b. 1839 James, b. 1841 Emily, b. 1844 Lucy, b.1847 Jennetta, b. 1849 ___________________________________________________________________________

Family Genealogy Hale family of Bradford, Essex, MA:

http://www.famhist.us/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I6166624&tree=allfam ___________________________________________________________________________

David J. Hale, 1835 Census, Hornesville, Steuben, Co., NY John K. Hale, 1835 Census, Hornellsville, Steuben, Co., NY (barrister)

http://www.newhorizonsgenealogicalservices.com/1835-census-ny-steuben-hornellsville.htm

Grandfather candidate:

John K. Hale Possible father

 Hon. John K. Hale was born in the state of Maine. He first settled in Addison and came to Hornellsville in 1836, where for more than twenty years he was at the head of the Hornellsville bar. In 1856-57 he was a member of the state senate and shortly afterward removed to the west where he died.
    Thomas J. Reynolds located in Hornellsville in 1819. For a time he practiced in partnership with Hon. John K. Hale and subsequently with Mr. Brundage. During the later years of his life he engaged successfully in lumbering and farming. He died in 1867.

http://genealogytrails.com/ny/steuben/roberts_gazetteer_5.htm

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Jasper, Steuben Co. New York, Census 1892 William Hale born 1832 Permelia Hale born 1837 Maude Hale 7 years old Ralph Hale 29 years old Carrie Hale 23 Gertie Hale 2

http://genealogytrails.com/ny/steuben/census_1892_Jasper_d1_p1.html

  • ***Found Benning Hale, Java, New York
     Found Burt Plugh, Java New York

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=77852202&ref=wvr

http://archive.org/stream/gazetteerbiograp00beer/gazetteerbiograp00beer_djvu.txt

http://www.ournorthernroots.com/getperson.php?personID=I25105&tree=family001

Walton Appears in

Collection Title Matches Census - US Federal 1860 2 City Directories - New York 1

Possible brother or cousin from Steuben. Ebenezer Hale. Possible Sister: Fanny Hale Possible sister: Cynthia Hale born 1799 Canandaigua, New York,

Possible fathers Daniel hale Polly Bartlett Hale

Source: http://raims.com/jury.html

Ebenezer:brother? Source: http://ontario.nygenweb.net/ontariorepublicantimesmarriagedeath.htm

Birth: Jan. 8, 1787 Death: Mar. 4, 1871


Burial: Pioneer Cemetery Canandaigua Ontario County New York, USA


Created by: Butterfly~Kisses Record added: Apr 16, 2011 Find A Grave Memorial# 68454597

Diocese of New York Catholic

Address: Main St. Canandaigua , New York

Hannah Hale b. 1794 http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~havens5/p1391.htm

Notes for EBENEZER HALE: 1850 Census Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York:  Ebenezer Hale, age 63, male, occupation farmer, born in New Hampshire.  Mary _____?, age 60, female, born in Massachusetts. 

1860 Census Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York:  Ebenezer Hale, age 73, male, occupation gentleman farmer, born in New Hampshire.  Mary _____?, age 70, female, born in Massachusetts. 

Individual Record FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19  Ebenezer HALE (AFN: 1BXZ-304) Pedigree  Sex: M Family  Event(s):  Birth: Abt. 1786  Marriage(s):  Spouse: Mary HAYDEN (AFN: 1BXZ-31B) Family  Marriage: 20 Aug 1814 

Notes for EBENEZER HALE: 1850 Census Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York: Ebenezer Hale, age 63, male, occupation farmer, born in New Hampshire. Mary _____?, age 60, female, born in Massachusetts.

1860 Census Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York: Ebenezer Hale, age 73, male, occupation gentleman farmer, born in New Hampshire. Mary _____?, age 70, female, born in Massachusetts.

Individual Record FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19 Ebenezer HALE (AFN: 1BXZ-304) Pedigree Sex: M Family Event(s): Birth: Abt. 1786 Marriage(s): Spouse: Mary HAYDEN (AFN: 1BXZ-31B) Family

Marriage: 20 Aug 1814 MARY HAYDEN, b. 18 Jul 1790, Conway, Franklin Co, MA; d. Bet. 1861 - 1870, Canandaigua, Ontario Co, NY; m. EBENEZER HALE, 20 Aug 1814, Canandaigua, Ontario Co, NY; b. 1787, New Hampshire; d. Bet. 1861 - 1870, Canandaigua, Ontario Co, NY.

	Notes for MARY HAYDEN:

1850 Census Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York: Ebenezer Hale, age 63, male, occupation farmer, born in New Hampshire. Mary _____?, age 60, female, born in Massachusetts.

1860 Census Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York: Ebenezer Hale, age 73, male, occupation gentleman farmer, born in New Hampshire. Mary _____?, age 70, female, born in Massachusetts.

Individual Record FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19 Mary HAYDEN (AFN: 1BXZ-31B) Pedigree Sex: F Family Event(s): Birth: 18 Jul 1790 <Conway, Franklin, Ma> Parents: Father: Moses HAYDEN (AFN: 152C-G85) Family Mother: Triphena FRENCH (AFN: 1BXZ-2MV) Marriage(s): Spouse: Ebenezer HALE (AFN: 1BXZ-304) Family Marriage: 20 Aug 1814

Source:

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/a/r/Lawrence-Carroll/GENE16-0117.html

New York Marriages: https://www.nysoclib.org/collection/nyc-marriage-death-notices-1857-1868

"United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MZZ3-PYJ : accessed 26 February 2016), Lydia A Kent in household of Walton Hale, Little Valley, Cattaraugus, New York, United States; citing enumeration district ED 18, sheet 295C, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0812; FHL microfilm 1,254,812.

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History of Dansville, NY From: Landmarks of Steuben County, New York Edited by: Hon. Harlo Hakes Assisted By: L. C. Aldrich and Others D. Mason & Company, Publishers, Syracuse, New York, 1896

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DANSVILLE - Originally, this town composed all the territory that is now Dansville, Fremont, Wayland and portions of Howard and Cohocton. It was one of the original towns of the county, formed in March, 1796, and was named from Daniel P. Faulkner, an early and spirited citizen familiarly known as Captain Dan. Parts of Cohocton and Howard were taken off in 1812, a part of Wayland in 1848, and of Fremont in 1854. A portion was also annexed to Sparta in 1822, and a part of Cohocton was reannexed April 26, 1834. Reduced to its present limits, Dansville contains 30,000 acres of land. The surface is chiefly upland divided into ridges by the narrow valleys of small streams. The declivities of the hills are steep and their summits are 300 to 400 feet above the valleys. The streams are the head branches of Canaseraga Creek, flowing north, and of Canisteo River, flowing south. The soil is a sandy and gravelly loam in the east and north, and gravel underlaid by hardpan in the southwest part of the town.

Notwithstanding the fact that the early settlement of this town was much delayed by reason of the uninviting character of the land, it appears that when once begun the population increased rapidly, and in 1812 there were 666 inhabitants in the district. There seems also to have been made a mistake regarding the fertility of the land in this region as later years and persistent effort developed the fact that Dansville possessed natural resources almost equal to any portion of the county. Today, as a potato producing section it leads all others in this part of the State; and William C. Healey is one of the most extensive farmers and growers.

In proof of this statement we may quote from the words of a writer of local history in 1812, as follows: "This is an excellent tract of land, well and variously timbered, and the soil is various though commonly good for a rich farming country. There is a large marsh in the west part, and Loon Pond, near the center, is about one mile broad. There are three grain mills, four or five saw mills, an oil mill, paper mill, fulling mill, and a carding machine." Speaking of the locality of Dansville village, the same writer says: "The valley embracing this settlement contains 3,000 acres of choice lands and the soil is warm and productile. There is a road from Bath to Dansville that leads diagonally across the center of this town, and another between Dansville and Ontario county leads across the northern part." At about this time there were 100 taxable inhabitants in the town.

The pioneers of Dansville were Isaac Sterling and Samuel Gilson (some authorities say Gibson) who made a settlement about a half mile east of Burn's Station in the year 1804. These settlers were followed very soon afterward by James, John and Major Jones, Frederick Fry, William Young, Thomas and Nathaniel Brayton, Tisdale Haskin, Thomas and John Root, Joshua Healey, Charles Oliver, Joseph Phelps, Elisha Robinson, William C. Rogers, Jesse Bridge, Josiah Pond, Joseph Cobb, Martin Smith, Newman Bell, Putnam Rich, better known as Put. Rich, Judge David Demeree, Jehial, Gross and James Gates, Arad Sheldon, Silas Brookins, Isaiah Goodno and Venare Cook. The settlers were principally Vermonters from Addison and Rutland counties, from the old towns of Pittsford, Benson, Orwell, Shoreham, and Salisbury. They were descendants of Green Mountain stock and left their homes in that rich locality for an uncertain future in an undeveloped country. However, as Vermonters, they were men of great determination and by their efforts early succeeded in placing Dansville among the first towns in Steuben county.

As early as 1806 pioneer Isaac Sterling opened a public house on the old Arkport and Dansville road, and as this was a much traveled highway it is said that within a very few years there was a tavern at every mile on the road, and .the woods were alive with noisy oxteamsters who hauled staves to Arkport, from which point they were boated down the Canisteo to market. Indeed settlement must have been rapid for in 1811 James Jones opened a school not far from Doty's Corners. Rufus Fuller built a saw mill in 1816, and four years later built a gristmill and another saw mill, taking the stones from Oak Hill. The grist mill was carried away by high water about 1823. The settlement by the Vermont colony was begun in 1815 and continued for the next five years at which latter time pioneership ceased, as the population in 1820 was 1,565.

However, among the other pioneers and early settlers we may mention the names of Osgood Carleton, 1815, Jesse Churchill, tavern keeper in 1816, Timothy Atwood, surveyor and school teacher, William S. Lemon, whose son James P., born March, 1816, was the first white child born in the town. Chauncey Day settled in 1816. The locality known as Sandy Hill was settled principally by Germans, among whom Alexander Leib, John Hayt, Alexander Green and Jacob Kurtz, seen. and jr., were the first corners. The patriarch of this locality was John Brail, whom every one knew as "Grandpap Brail." He came to Dansville in 1817. Among the early German families in this locality were the surnames of Bolinger, Rider, Kersh and Schu. On Oak Hill a settlement was made in 1816-17 by Moses Hulbert, Joshua Williams, Daniel, George and Hubbard Griswold, William C. Rogers, Thomas Buck, George Butler and Joshua Woodward. One of the first marriages in the town, June 16, 1818, was that of Cyril Buck and Philena Hall. Dr. Thomas M. Bowen settled east of Beachville in 1819 and was an early postmaster at South Dansville. Eli Carrington, Timothy, Nathaniel and Meyer Wallace, Vermonters, joined the settlement in 182o. Here Arad Sheldon opened a tavern, and the place soon became a business center. It was named Beachville, after Aaron, Robert and John Beach, brothers, who were prominent tavern and store keepers.

With settlement thus rapidly accomplished, Dansville early became an important division of the county. Its greatest population was attained in 1840, the inhabitants then numbering 2,725. However, by subsequent reductions in its territory, and the natural decline in population and interest noticeable in nearly all purely agricultural towns, Dansville has a population, according to the enumeration of 1892, of only 1,544

The organization of Dansville was effected on April 4, 1797, at which time the town contained its original area, and before any reductions to its territory had been made. At that time the population could not have numbered more than 200 inhabitants. The meeting was held in the village of Dansville at the house of Samuel Faulkner, at which time James Faulkner and Isaac Van Deventer were elected overseers of highways, and David Fuller, collector. The first records of the town are somewhat obscure and imperfect, yet we know that in 1799 Daniel P. Faulkner was elected supervisor, James Hooker, town clerk, and Alexander Fullerton, William Porter and John Phoenix, assessors. The first justices, who of course at the time were appointed, were Isaac Van Deventer, 1807, Jonas Cleland, 1809, Stephen Haight, 181o, and John Metcalfe, 1811.


The town officers for the year 1895 are as follows: Lorenzo Hulbert, supervisor; C. C. Wood, town clerk; L. K. Robinson, D. G. Haynes, Philip Webb and C. Byron Wallace, justices of the peace; D. H. Griswold, Alexander Smart and Wendell Gessner, assessors; Valentine Weber, collector; Daniel Eveland, highway commissioner; John C. Grobe, overseer of the poor; John Haight, Peter Schubmehl and Charles O. Currey, excise commissioners.

The supervisors of Dansville, in succession, have been as follows: Daniel P. Faulkner, 1799; Alexander Fullerton, 1799, to fill vacancy; Jacob Van Deventer, 800; Amariah Hammond, 1800, to fill vacancy; Samuel Faulkner, 1801; Amariah Hammond, 1802-06; Richard W. Porter, 1807-08; Jared Irwin, 1808, to fill vacancy; Samuel Cuthbert-son, 1809; Jared Irwin, 181o; Jonathan Rowley. 1811-12; Wm. B. Rochester, 1813; Thomas McWharton, 1813-15; James Faulkner, 1816-18; Joshua Healey, 1819 and 1811-12; James Faulkner, 1820; Charles Oliver, 1827-32; Nathaniel Brayton, 1833; Aaron W. Beach, 1834-36; Joel Carrington, 1837-39; Timothy Wallace, 1840-42; Joshua Healey, 1843; Charles Oliver, 1844 and 1847-48; Leeds Allen, 1845- 46; Joel Carrington, 1849-50, and 1854; Luther White, 1851-53 Wm. W. Healey, 1855, '58 and '6o; Eli Carrington, 856-57; Wm. A. Woodard, 1859; Chas. S. Ackley, 1861-62; Wm. W. Healey, 1863; Dyer L. Kingsley, 1864-68; Benj F. Kershner, 1869; Warren Wallace, 1870-71; Fred. M. Kreidler, 1872; Morgan H. Carney, 1873-74; Lewellyn S. Healey, 1875-76; Chas Oliver, 1877-8o; D. Campbell, 1881; J. McWoolever, 1882-83; Morgan L. Miller, 1884; Peter S. Pealer, 1885-86; C. M. Ackley, 1887-89; C. S. Kreidler. 1890-91; Lorenzo Hurlburt, 1892; Ira G. Day, 1893; Lorenzo Hurlburt, 1894-95. From first to last, the social and industrial history of Dansville has been rich and interesting, although during the last thirty years there has been witnessed a gradual decline in population in the town. The first important event in local annals was the anti rent conflict, in which the people felt a deep anxiety, for their interests were greatly affected by the distress prevailing at that time throughout the region. In the measures for relief the leading men were actively engaged, and in the Bath convention of January, 183o, the town was represented by Thomas M. Brown, Peter Covert, Annis Newcomb, Leeds Allen and Martin Smith. However, this disturbing period had hardly passed before there was visited upon the people here the dreadful cholera scourge of 1834, as a result of which many persons in the town met premature death. Nothing further of a serious nature took place to disturb the serenity of town affairs and progress until the outbreak of the war of 1861-5, during which period the patriotism and loyalty of Dansville were tested and found true. Many of the brave sons of the town were enlisted among the volunteer regiments of the county, and several still sleep in southern graves.

Due care and attention have also been given to the spiritual and educational welfare of the youth of the town, and during the period of its history no less than five church societies have been organized and edifices provided for religious worship. In 1811 James Jones opened a primitive school in the town, although several years passed before districts were formed and schools provided for each. However, at a much later period, two academic institutions were founded at Rogersville, the principal village of the town, and from that time Dansville occupied a front rank among the educational localities of the entire region. As at present disposed. the town is divided into fourteen districts, each of which is provided with a comfortable school house. During the school year 1893-4, fourteen teachers were employed, and 357 children were in attendance. The value of school property in the town is estimated at $6,000. The town received of public moneys, $1,610.83, and raised by tax, $1,701.94. Fourteen trees were planted in 1893.

Among the religious societies- of this town which have passed out of active existence, we may mention the Evangelical church, organized in the German settlement on Oak Hill in 1863, and also the Catholic mission, established in the same locality as early as 1834. A Baptist society was also formed in Dansville about 1820, but this, too, is among the things of the past

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Walton Hale's Timeline

1808
1808
Madison, New York, United States
1829
December 11, 1829
Age 21
Little Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York, United States
1829
Age 21
Steuben, New York, United States
1831
1831
Age 23
Steuben, New York, United States
1833
January 28, 1833
Age 25
Dansville, Livingston, New York, United States
1838
1838
Age 30
Cattaraugus, New York, USA
1839
1839
Age 31
Livingston, New York, USA
1840
January 7, 1840
Age 32
Cattaraugus , New York, USA
1842
1842
Age 34
New York, USA
1844
1844
Age 36
Little Valley, Cattaraugus, New York, USA