Wigod de Wallingford, Earl of Wallington

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Wigod de Wallingford (de Warwick), Earl of Wallington

Also Known As: "Wigot", "of", "Warwick"
Birthdate: (50)
Birthplace: Warwick, Warwickshire, England
Death: Died in Picardie, Somme, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Wulgent (Wolgeat) de Warwick, Earl og Warwick and NN de Warwick
Husband of Erminhild de Warwick
Father of Ælfwine, sheriff of Warwick; Turchill Wallingford and Lady Ealdgyth de Wallingford
Half brother of Wigot De Warwick

Occupation: Lord, Overlord, Earl of Wallington, Warwick
Managed by: Kevin Lawrence Hanit
Last Updated:

About Wigod de Wallingford, Earl of Wallington

Wigod

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wigod (also spelt Wigot) was the eleventh century Saxon thegn or lord of the English town of Wallingford, and a kinsman of Edward the Confessor.

After the Battle of Hastings, during the 1066 Norman invasion of England, William the Conqueror made for London, but was repulsed at the River Thames. Wigod invited William to Wallingford where he then crossed the river, aiding him in his conquest of England. The Domesday Book records him as both a Lord and an Overlord in a number of places in 1066.[1]

His daughter Ealdgyth married Robert D'Oyly, one of William's lords. He became lord of Wallingford upon Wigod's death. Wigod's son, Tokig or Toking, died in battle supporting William the Conqueror.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wigod

Anglo-Saxon and Norman[edit]

There are two entries in Domesday Book for Selly Oak (Escelie). The first entry for Selly Oak records a nuncupative (oral) will and is out of conventional order.[13] Wulfwin had leased the manor for the term of three lives and the newly appointed Bishop of Lichfield, Robert de Limesey, used the will to challenge the loss of his land. "Wulfwin bought this manor before 1066 from the Bishop of Chester, for the lives of three men. When he was ailing and had come to the end of his life, he summoned his son, the Bishop of Li (chfield?), his wife and many of his friends and said: ‘Hear me, my friends, I desire that my wife hold this land which I bought from the church so long as she lives, and that after her death the church from which I received it should accept it back. Let whoever shall take it away from it be excommunicated’. The more important men of the whole County testify that this was so." The first entry records Bartley Green as an outlier, or dependency of Selly Oak, while the second entry doesn’t include Bartley Green but records Selly Oak is held as two manors.The second entry also shows that Wibert had been replaced as sub-tenant by Robert suggesting the challenge may have been partially successful.[14] The Bishop of Chester owned Lichfield and its members. These include Harborne, in Staffordshire until 1891, which was held by Robert.[15]

Wulfwin owned several manors which indicates he was wealthy and important, possibly an aristocrat. Indeed, he has been described as a great thegn, the son of Wigod, and the grandson of Woolgeat, the Danish Earl of Warwick. His mother was the sister of Leofric III, Earl of Mercia. The possessions that came to him by the Dano-Saxon marriage of his parents seem to have been rather extensive. In King Edward the Confessor’s time Wulfwin (also referred to as Alwyne and Ulwin) was sheriff and through his son Turchill, who came to be Earl of Warwick, the Ardens and the Bracebridges trace their descent from the Old Saxon kings.[16]

Engelsk Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selly_Oak

Turchill de Arden was called Turchill de warwick but also known as Tchill and thorkell it isn't totally known where he came from according to The arden family he is the son of Ailwin Howne known as Aelfwine de Warwick, Sheriff of Warwick but there possible reason to believe that he also could be the son of thorkell the tall aka thorkell the high who invaded the country of England in 986 ad and remained there until his death or disappearance in 1023 ad.

Accordening to the Arden family his family goes back to guy son of siward but due to the legands of guy and siward its not sure if he really exhisted some might argue this but no one really knows be from his family is great and I am proud to have such great men in my family line but the truth still remains

Thorkell the Tall, also known as Thorkell the High in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles (Old Norse: Þorke(ti)ll inn hávi; Norwegian: Torkjell Høge; Swedish; Torkel Höge: Danish: Torkild den Høje) was a Jomsviking, a son of the Scanian chieftain Strut-Harald, a brother of Jarl Sigvaldi, commander of the Jomvikings and the legendary stronghold, mythical Jomsborg, on the Island of Wollin, while himself a notable lord.

Thorkell took part in the Battle of Hjörungavágr in 986 and in the Battle of Swold in 1000. He attacked England in 1010, landing near Ipswich on the shores of the river Orwell at Nacton with a large army, defeating the local army sent from Ipswich. He was eventually paid an unusually large Danegeld in 1011.

In 1012, Thorkell's men took Archbishop Alphege hostage, who had previously been instrumental in negotiating danegeld payments. It is said that Alphege refused to be exchanged for ransom organised by Eadric Streona as he did not wish to further impoverish his countrymen. As a consequence of this he was murdered by Thorkell's men during a drunken feast. Sensing that he was losing control over his men, Thorkell and his loyalists defected and he and his men entered into the service of king Ethelred the Unready, whom they fought under in 1013 against the invasion of king Sweyn Forkbeard and his son Cnut. After the death of Sweyn, and the English attacks on the Danish invaders which drove his son to abandon the conquest, Ethelred's forces were turned against the Jomsvikings in his service. Thorkell's brother Heming was killed,[1] and he went back to Denmark, with a score to settle in England. He was to return with the future king, in 1015, and the invasion's success meant he was proclaimed to be the Jarl of East Anglia, in 1017, after the coronation of the Viking king of England. An explanation for Cnut the Great's acceptance of Thorkell's allegiance, not to mention his military prowess, may be that he was in fact his childhood mentor, and the Jomsvikings were also of special worth to Cnut. He himself held a score against the men responsible for the betrayal of oaths of allegiance given by the English nobles after his father Forkbeard's conquest. If it was Thorkell's men who taught Cnut to fight his battles, such bonds as these were surely hard broken, even with opposition in war.

In 1021, though, Jarl Thorkell fell out with king Cnut,[3] and had to make himself scarce and went to Denmark. This appears to have been as a result of a trial of his wife, who was found guilty of poisoning his son by his first marriage, with the help of a witch. Thorkell had sworn to her innocence and consequently lost face. He was soon reconciled with Canute again, who proclaimed him Jarl of Denmark once more, although he seems to disappear in 1023, as there is no mention of him after this point.[4] It may be he was simply too old for any more conflict, and the final years of his life spent at court, yet with no military commands. It may also be that he was cast out of the kingdom, to return to Jomsborg, or Scane, and lived the rest of his days as a wayward old soldier. Equally, he might have been dead soon after he was made Jarl of Denmark, and the causes either natural or malevolent.

While we are sure Thorkell is undoubtedly a real historical figure, his career, especially its early part, is steeped in legendary associations with the mysterious Jomsvikings, which too often distract and distort from the facts of his life.

ALWVNE, who in the general survey, is styled, Alwinus Vicecomes. " The reason whereof," observes Dugdale, " I conceive to be either, because that he did exercise the power and authority of the Earle of Mercia, (seil. Earl Leofrike, his uncle) here in Warwickshire as his ancestors had done, for which respect he and they have been reputed earls, as I have already showed, and have ranckt them in that degree ; or else that he hath the custody of the county to the king's immediate use." Alwine left issue, TURCHILL DE WARWICK.

TURCHILL DE WARWICK, whose name stands likewise in the catalogue of earls. This nobleman, a man of great power and note, was lord of vast landed possessions, at the time of the CONQUEST, as appears by the general survey. He married two wives, and had issue by both: by the first, three sons, viz. SlWARD. Peter, a monk in the Abbey of Thorney. Ralph. By the second Leverunia, one son, OSBERT, for whose descendants, see BRACEBRIDGE, of Athertlone, p. 270.

The issue of Turchill de Warwick, assumed the surname of ARDEN, from a Woodland tract, amongst these territorial possessions in the county of Warwick.


From: John Ravilious GEN-MEDIEVAL ARCHIVES Subject: A Domesday descent: Thorkill of Warwick to William Farrar Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2006

Thorkill de Arden of Kingsbury, co. Warwicks. tenant in Warwickshire at Domesday Book, 1086

' Keats-Rohan [Domesday people, p429] says that Turchill (Thorkil) de Warwic was the son of Aethelwine sheriff of Warwick (d. c. 1083). "Described by the Abingdon Chronicle as 'a great nobleman ...dwelling in the region of Arden' (Chron. Abing. ii, 8), he was exceptionally wealthy for an Englishman of 1086. According to a detailed investigation [by A. Williams, 'A vice-comital family in pre-Conquest Warwickshire', Anglo-Norman Studies, xi,] most of his holding in Domesday Warwickshire was a family inheritance, and many of his English tenants were his relatives. Domesday names two of them, Guthmund and Ketelbern, as his brothers. In the time of William II his tenancy in chief was made part of the newly created earldom of Warwick, which was given to Henry, brother of the count of Meulan of 1086, several of whose manors had formerly been held by members of Thorkil's family. Thorkil left issue by two marriages, the second to a woman called Leveruna, mother of his principal heir, Siward." [Rosie Bevan[2], cites DP 429[1

Spouse: NN [1st wife] [6] Children: Siward de Arden Spouse: Leofrun [2nd wife] [6] Children: Osbert

REFERENCES: 1. Katherine S. B. Keats-Rohan, "Domesday People," The Boydell Press, 1999, Vol. I. 2. Rosie Bevan, "Agnes, wife of Geoffrey de Clinton," 10 July 2000, cites DD 429 and other sources 3. Kay Allen, AG, " [Fwd: Re: Bracebridge of Kingsbury]," 8 Feb 1999, cites VCH Warwick 6: 104, and Nichol's Hist etc. Leicestershire Vol. 3, pt. 2:1145 re: the Bracebridge family. 6. Hon. George Wrottesley, "Pedigrees from the Plea Rolls," The Genealogist (N.S.), Vol. XX, 1904, pp. 28 et seq.


The Arden family, descended from Turchil de Eardene, whose father Aelfwine was sheriff of Warwickshire pre-1066. [Brice Claggit, SGM]


By the reign of Edward the Confessor, Kingsbury was held by Earl Leofric of Mercia and his wife, the Countess Godiva but they were deprived of it by William I who gave it to Turchill de Arden after the Norman Conquest.

The Domesday entry for the village describes it as an estate of about 700 acres worked by 33 villeins who held land in return for services rendered to the Lord of the manor. There was an area of woodland to the north-east, two priests and a mill valued at 9s 4d making it an estateof average wealth.

Turchill de Arden's wife was Godiva's granddaughter Leverunia and from them the manor of Kingsbury passed by marriage into the Bracebridge family.


From A HIstory of Castle Vale, by Geoff Bateson:

THE BATTLE OF HASTING AND GIFTS TO THE CHURCH ...the Manor of Berwood covered what is now Castle Vale and also included some land at Minworth, Curdworth and the land now covered by Pype Hayes Park At the time of the Battle of Hastings in 1066 this manor was one of the forty-two manors belonging toTurchill de Warwick, Earl of Mercia. On King Harold’s march southwards to meet the invading Normansat Hastings he called on noblemen along the route to send men to help him. After the battle those nobles who had supported the defeated Harold had their lands confiscated. Others, like Turchill, who had not supported Harold were allowed to keep some of all of their lands. Turchill kept most of his land but had to give up the title of Warwick. He chose as his new family name that of Arden. The early recorded history of Castle Vale is therefore the early history of the manor of Berwood as it was affected by the changing fortunes of the Arden family

[ www.birmingham.gov.uk]


From:Rosie Bevan Post on GEN-MED ARCHIVES Subject: Re: Origins of the Arden Family Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2000

Keats-Rohan [Domesday people, p429] says that Turchill (Thorkil) de Warwic was the son of Aethelwine sheriff of Warwick (d. c. 1083).

"Described by the Abingdon Chronicle as 'a great nobleman ...dwelling in the region of Arden' (Chron. Abing. ii, 8), he was exceptionally wealthy for an Englishman of 1086. According to a detailed investigation [by A. Williams, 'A vice-comital family in pre-Conquest Warwickshire', Anglo-Norman Studies, xi,] most of his holding in Domesday Warwickshire was a family inheritance, and many of his English tenants were his relatives. Domesday names two of them, Guthmund and Ketelbern, as his brothers. In the time of William II his tenancy in chief was made part of the newly created earldom of Warwick, which was given to Henry, brother of the count of Meulan of 1086, several of whose manors had formerly been held by members of Thorkil's family. Thorkil left issue by two marriages, the second to a woman called Leveruna, mother of his principal heir, Siward."


Marriage 1: LEOFRUN b: ABT 1075 in England Children 1. Siward de ARDEN b: ABT 1084 in of Arden, Warwickshire, England 2. Peter de Arden , a Monk b: ABT 1090 in of Arden, Warwickshire, England 3. Ralph de ARDEN b: ABT 1100 in of Hampton in Arden, Warwickshire, England

Marriage 2: UNKNOWN Children 1. Osbert de Arden , of Kingsbury b: ABT 1119 in Kingsbury, Tamworth, Warwickshire, England 2. Roger de Arden , of Honiley b: 1120 in Honiley, Warwick, Warwickshire, England 3. Suvardus de Arden , of Redburn b: ABT 1122 in Redbourne Cheney, Wiltshire, England


http://www.timeref.com/hpl1348.htm

Om Wigod de Wallingford, Earl of Wallington (Norsk)

Wigod Warwick Jarl av Wallingford (Lord,Overlord)

Wigod (også stavet Wigot) en saksiske thegn eller Herre av den engelske byen Wallingford, og en slektning av Edvard Bekjenneren. Han levde i det ellevte århundre.

Etter slaget ved Hastings i 1066 og den normanniske invasjonen av England forsøkte Vilhelm erobreren å ta London, men ble slått tilbake på Themsen. Wigod inviterte William til Wallingford hvor han deretter krysset elven, og hjalp han i hans erobring av England. Dommedagsboken registrerer ham som både herre og overlord på en rekke ulike steder i 1066.

Han var gift med Erminhild Deres Wigots datter Ealdgyth giftet seg med Robert D'Oyly, som ble herre over Wallingford etter hans død, Sønnen, Tokig eller Toking, døde i kamp da han støttet Vilhelm Erobreren, De hadde også sønnen Aelfwine

Hentet fra engelsk Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wigod

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Wigod de Wallingford, Earl of Wallington's Timeline

1020
1020
Warwick, Warwickshire, England
1040
1040
Age 20
Wallingford, Warwickshire, England
1042
1042
Age 22
Herefordshire, England
1045
1045
Age 25
Wallingford, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
1070
1070
Age 50
Picardie, Somme, France