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Will I Levy

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, United States
Death: May 15, 1904 (45)
Immediate Family:

Son of Isaac Levy and Peppi Levy
Husband of Hannah Levy
Brother of Sallie Weil; Samuel Levy and Alfred Levy

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Will I Levy

__________ The body of Mr. Will I. Levy, of 232 North Ninth street, a well known and popular broker, was found this morning about 7 o'clock by his brother, Mr. Alfred Levy, in the second story of 112 North Second street, in which building Mr. Levy had his office on the lower floor, the remainder being used by Michael Brothers as a store room for buggies. The corpse was in a buggy in a sitting posture, the head resting on the back of the cushioned seat, the left hand grasping one side of the top support. A handkerchief was neatly stuffed between collar and throat evidently to prevent the collar from hurting the neck. Mr. Levy apparently died without a struggle and appeared to by only asleep.

Dr. Reddick was immediately called and found that death ensued several hours before, the body being cold and stiff. There were no marks to indicate a violent death.

The news of the sad and unexpected death spread rapidly, and the body was removed to Effinger's about 8 a.m. The coroner was afterwards notified, and called an inquest for 2 o'clock this afternoon.

The deceased had not been in the best of health lately. He had suffered mild attacks of appendicitis, according to some of his friends, and yesterday morning complained of neuralgia. So far as known he was last seen alive yesterday morning about 10 o'clock.

Later in the day, when he did not return home, inquiries were made for him and when he still did not appear last night, search was instituted for him but he could not be found. Every place it was thought he could be, was visited and finally this morning his brother went into the second story over the office of the deceased, and there found him dead.

The inquest was held at Effinger's this afternoon at 1:30 o'clock by Coroner Peal. It had been persistently reported that Mr. Levy committed suicide, but there was nothing developed at the inquest to sustain such a theory.

Only three witnesses were head, Dr. J. T. Reddick, Mr. Alfred Levy, brother of the deceased and Mr. Abe Livingston, who was called by Mr. Levy immediately following the discovery of the body. Mr. Levy detailed the facts relative to the finding of the body. A colored boy was with him and went up stairs first. There was nothing found anywhere to indicate self destruction, Mr. Levy said. He found no bottle or anything else that might have contained poison and there was not mark on the body.

Dr Reddick stated that he made an examination and found no indications of poisons. There was no discoloration, and none of the effects of various kinds of poison were visible. Dr. Reddick explained the effects of various poisons visible when they produce death, and said that there were no evidence of any form of poisoning. It looked to him, he said, as if Mr. Levy had simply gone into the second story, sat in the buggy and gone to sleep, and while there suddenly died from heart disease or apoplexy. He gave it as his opinion that death was due to natural causes. Mr. Livingston simply testified to the position of the body, etc., when he was called.

The verdict of the jury was as follows: "We, the jury, impaneled by the coroner of McCracken county at the undertaking rooms of Mattil, Effinger & Co., having viewed the body and found it to be William I. Levy, after hearing the evidence report that he came to his death from unknown natural causes. (signed) W. H. Patterson, Gus G. Singleton, J. R. Smith, Cook Husbands, R. G. Terrell, I. Nauheim.

It was reported this morning that sealed letters to his wife and a friend were found in Mr. Levy's pocket, but there was not evidence to this effect before the coroner.

Mr. Levy, it is understood, left somewhere between, $12,000 and $25,000 life insurance, it is not known exactly how much. His death has aroused much sorrow today throughout the city, as there was not a better like man in business circles.

Mr. Levy was about 45 years old, and was born in Louisville and was a son of the late Mr. L. Levy, for many years a prominent merchant and a member of the firm of Julius Weil and Levy. He had resided in Paducah all his life and was a well liked and highly esteemed man.

He was a charter member of Paducah Lodge of Elks, being among the few who organized the lodge several years ago. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Hanna Friedman, and one little son, Will I. Jr. He also leaves two brothers, Messrs. Sam and Alfred Levy, who are members of the Loeb-Bloom firm and one sister, Mrs. Julius Weil.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=97084832


Mr. W. I. Levy Found Dead In A Buggy _________ Had Been Missing Since Yester- day Morning at 10 o;clock. _________ No Indications of Suicide -- Jury De- cides He Died From Natural Causes. __________ The body of Mr. Will I. Levy, of 232 North Ninth street, a well known and popular broker, was found this morning about 7 o'clock by his brother, Mr. Alfred Levy, in the second story of 112 North Second street, in which building Mr. Levy had his office on the lower floor, the remainder being used by Michael Brothers as a store room for buggies. The corpse was in a buggy in a sitting posture, the head resting on the back of the cushioned seat, the left hand grasping one side of the top support. A handkerchief was neatly stuffed between collar and throat evidently to prevent the collar from hurting the neck. Mr. Levy apparently died without a struggle and appeared to by only asleep.

Dr. Reddick was immediately called and found that death ensued several hours before, the body being cold and stiff. There were no marks to indicate a violent death.

The news of the sad and unexpected death spread rapidly, and the body was removed to Effinger's about 8 a.m. The coroner was afterwards notified, and called an inquest for 2 o'clock this afternoon.

The deceased had not been in the best of health lately. He had suffered mild attacks of appendicitis, according to some of his friends, and yesterday morning complained of neuralgia. So far as known he was last seen alive yesterday morning about 10 o'clock.

Later in the day, when he did not return home, inquiries were made for him and when he still did not appear last night, search was instituted for him but he could not be found. Every place it was thought he could be, was visited and finally this morning his brother went into the second story over the office of the deceased, and there found him dead.

The inquest was held at Effinger's this afternoon at 1:30 o'clock by Coroner Peal. It had been persistently reported that Mr. Levy committed suicide, but there was nothing developed at the inquest to sustain such a theory.

Only three witnesses were head, Dr. J. T. Reddick, Mr. Alfred Levy, brother of the deceased and Mr. Abe Livingston, who was called by Mr. Levy immediately following the discovery of the body. Mr. Levy detailed the facts relative to the finding of the body. A colored boy was with him and went up stairs first. There was nothing found anywhere to indicate self destruction, Mr. Levy said. He found no bottle or anything else that might have contained poison and there was not mark on the body.

Dr Reddick stated that he made an examination and found no indications of poisons. There was no discoloration, and none of the effects of various kinds of poison were visible. Dr. Reddick explained the effects of various poisons visible when they produce death, and said that there were no evidence of any form of poisoning. It looked to him, he said, as if Mr. Levy had simply gone into the second story, sat in the buggy and gone to sleep, and while there suddenly died from heart disease or apoplexy. He gave it as his opinion that death was due to natural causes. Mr. Livingston simply testified to the position of the body, etc., when he was called.

The verdict of the jury was as follows: "We, the jury, impaneled by the coroner of McCracken county at the undertaking rooms of Mattil, Effinger & Co., having viewed the body and found it to be William I. Levy, after hearing the evidence report that he came to his death from unknown natural causes. (signed) W. H. Patterson, Gus G. Singleton, J. R. Smith, Cook Husbands, R. G. Terrell, I. Nauheim.

It was reported this morning that sealed letters to his wife and a friend were found in Mr. Levy's pocket, but there was not evidence to this effect before the coroner.

Mr. Levy, it is understood, left somewhere between, $12,000 and $25,000 life insurance, it is not known exactly how much. His death has aroused much sorrow today throughout the city, as there was not a better like man in business circles.

Mr. Levy was about 45 years old, and was born in Louisville and was a son of the late Mr. L. Levy, for many years a prominent merchant and a member of the firm of Julius Weil and Levy. He had resided in Paducah all his life and was a well liked and highly esteemed man.

He was a charter member of Paducah Lodge of Elks, being among the few who organized the lodge several years ago. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Hanna Friedman, and one little son, Will I. Jr. He also leaves two brothers, Messrs. Sam and Alfred Levy, who are members of the Loeb-Bloom firm and one sister, Mrs. Julius Weil.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence, 223 North Ninth street, services by Rabbi Alexander, burial at the Jewish cemetery. The Elks will officiate at the grave.

The Paducah Sun, Monday, May 16, 1904, p.1

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=97084832

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Will I Levy's Timeline

1859
February 20, 1859
Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, United States
1904
May 15, 1904
Age 45