William Azariah Casto, I

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William Azariah Casto, I

Also Known As: "Azariah"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wales, UK
Death: 1720 (64-65)
Egg Harbor City, Atlantic, New Jersey, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of James Casto
Husband of Hannah Casto
Father of William Henry Casto, II; William Castelow Casto and David Casto

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William Azariah Casto, I

Came to America in 1696 from Wales, settled at Egg Harbor NJ

CASTO FAMILY with Bostic(k), Shamblin, Groves, Barnett(e), Kessel(l), Lane, Bennett, Adkins and Parker Surnames by Debi (Casto) Sanders

Jump within this document here: 1. BOSTICK 2. SHAMBLIN 3. GROVES 4. BARNETT(E) 5. KESSELL 6. LANE 7.BENNETT 8.ADKINS 9.PARKER 10.Casto Historical Information 11. The Casto Hole This story of the Casto family, like all good stories, starts out with a mystery. The origin of the Casto name. Some say that it was Casto from the beginning. Others believe that it was changed between 1718 and 1733 (reason unknown) from Casteaux, Castillo, Caustlo,Castro, DeCastro, Casteau, Castau, Castalo, Costello, Cast, Castleto, Castoe, Custo, or Castabow.

It has even been suggested that Casto comes from the Latin word 'castra', meaning camps. One possible reason for the change is that as late as 1850 the majority of the people could not read or write. They tried to spell names as they sounded. Casteaux would translate to Casto in this instance.

Casto is a name that in Italian means chaste or purity. There are several families in Northern Italy with the Casto surname as well as certain sections of Germany. I have been told that Casto in Portugal is as common as Smith or Jones in the US. Casto, Italy is a town dating as far back as 1208. On the homepage for the city they give this as the Origin of the name: "It could derive from the local last name, that Roman appears on one lapide. "Casticus", but also from the Latin "castenus". Malpaga can derive from "Malus pagus" (bad campaign) or also from satisfied persons "malle", com' they were indicated in ' the 400 fiscal evasori."

I will just state the facts here as I know them and let you draw your own conclusions.

I want to say from the beginning that this record will be a continual work in process. I in no way want to proclaim that every entry is "written in stone". I would appreciate being notified of any errors that you find. In some instances family records may have a date of 1866 but county census, marriage, etc. records will show 1864. In this instance I will defer to the county record. That is not to say that the county records are infallible. In any case I would appreciate your input.

As to the beginnings of the Casto line in America. A favorite family story is that the Castos descend from 2 boy's age 5 and 7 who stowed away on a ship in a French wharf. Their parents had been killed and their home burned. The ship soon set sail to sea. After 3 days of hunger, the boys came out of hiding. They found that they were on the pirate vessel of Captain William Kidd who required them to work for about 10 years, then delivered one in New Jersey and the other in Rode Island giving them funds to start a business. The New Jersey boy changed his name to Casto and the other one said his name was Castalow. Each boy insisted on keeping his own name. (James LeSeuer)

Different versions of this story has been passed down through several Casto lines.

Recently I received information from another Casto line: "There is evidence that one of our Ancestors either jumped ship or was "thrown overboard" off the coast of New Jersey during the 1700's" (Willis Casto)

Also from another line: "Twin boys emigrating to America from Europe, jumped ship at the sight of land and swam ashore to escape the 7 years of indentured servitude" (Jim Casto)

"The two boys were survivors of a pirate raid, supposedly on a merchant ship, and it is believed that the father of the boys was a merchant ship owner or a trader carrying on business with the Old World and the New World. The father was either killed during the engagement with the pirates or was thrown overboard by the pirates after the engagement. The Castos of the United States are descended from the younger of the two boys, who was about five years of age at the time. The younger boy landed by the pirates on the New Jersey coast and the older boy was landed farther down the coast. The settlers called the younger boy Azariah Casto, which was not his name according to the older brother, who returned to the New Jersey landing after reaching manhood. The older brother claimed that their surname was DeCasto and that they were born in France. The story goes on that some searching and digging was carried on by Azariah and his sons in an attempt to find and recover the pirates cashe that was supposed to have been made in the locality of the New Jersey landing. Supposedly some of the cashe was found but was of little value. The story also relates that the Castos lived on an island but no one knew where." (William Casto of Utah)

"A Spanish merchant or a captain of a Spanish ship had taken his two little boys on a voyage to the New World. Captain Kidd captured the ship and made everyone except the two boys walk the plank'. He put them ashore in Rhode Island where it was reported he buried his gold. The boys afterward were reunited but one claimed his name was Casto, the other Castello. Both were stubborn and each kept the name he thought correct. A William Casto embarrassed his daughter by digging for his ancestors gold all over Rhode Island." (Martha Dorothy Harris)

"At a very early period in the settlement of the colonies, perhaps early in the 15th century, a ship was wrecked on the coast of New Jersey, near Cape May and the crew and passengers rescued were two young lads who claimed the name Casto. These youths spoke the Spanish language and it was supposed the lost ship sailed from some Spanish port. But little more is known of the two boys, but from the neighborhood of Cape May, the entire Casto family who are scattered over many of the states, can be traced." (Joseph Scinton Casto) m "The first Castos came from England in the 16th Century, were French, spelling their name Casteau in France (Casteu), later to Casto, two brothers stolen from their parents in England, brought to America and abandoned in Virginia. Others came later on account of religious persecutions in England." (The Bothwell Family)

"There is a tradition that 2 brothers came to the then colony of Virginia from the south of France. That after a long separation upon meeting again, they found they spelled their names differently. One Casto, the other Castello." (Timothy Casto written 1900)

Captain Kidd was born in 1645 in Greenock Scotland. About 1690 he settled in England. One April 23, 1696 he sailed from Plymouth, England in the Adventure Galley, a ship of 34 guns. The original venture was a private one. He was hired to find French or pirate vessels. Almost from the beginning the voyage was plagued with bad luck. Illness and a leaking ship and a near mutiny by the crew were probably the reason Kidd turned to piracy. In 1699 Kidd arrived in the West Indies. There he discovered that he was charged with piracy. Protesting his innocence, he gave himself up and was sent to England for trial. He was found guilty and on May 23, 1701, he was hanged. Family researchers are trying to find the log book of this voyage. Perhaps mention of the 2 boys in the log could confirm the family "pirate" story.

A certain Gladys Marie Chase of St. Petersburg Florida claims to have found "absolute proof" that the Casto boys were put ashore at Lewes Delaware Mid May 1699. She uses as a reference the "Harley Papers" Vo. 36 F104 (Kidd's own narrative at his trial British Museum, London, England.) I have been unable to find this narrative.

Another theory is that William 1717 was the son of William Caustlo or Costello and Elizabeth Abbott. These people did exist and there are records to that effect in Salem County . But researchers have failed to prove they are William's parents

The first sighting of a Casto in America is Azariah Casto 1696 from Wales, this comes from the charred remains of the Hare Bible. Nothing legible exists since this Bible was burned twice and the interpretations are largely based on memory after the second burning. This Bible was originally owned by Azariah Casto 1750 and handed down through his family until it ended up in the possession of Eleanor Grace Bothwell Hare, who dozed by the fireplace and let the Bible fall into the fire and was very badly burned.

Now if Azariah 1696 did exist and William 1717 was his son, Azariah would have been 21 at the time of William's birth

The oldest boy on Captain Kidds ship would have been 28 and the youngest 21 at the time of William's birth.

Any one of these scenarios could be possible.

Where ever the original Casto's (or Casteaux, Castillo, Caustlo etc.) came from we know that in 1745 there were only two Casto males in America, living 5 miles apart in what is now Cumberland County, N.J. William 1717 and David 1720/1725. Many assume they were brothers, they may have been uncle and nephew.

If you are interested in theWilliam 1717 line visit Julie Casto's page, Casto Story and Collections 1990 by Jim Casto

Considerable confusion exists regarding the descending Casto lines from these two men. One of the reasons for this is that they both had children by the name of John, David, William and Elizabeth. Also according to Ina H Tuft in her tribute to the foremost Casto family researcher, David Leroy Casto "The Castos were so numerous in West Virginia that Castos married Castos and if they weren't Castos, they were children of Casto women who had married someone else."

For the purpose of this report which I am making for my son and my family I am going to list the Castos I consider "our" direct line. They will be highlighted in red. I have listed both William 1717 and David 1720/1725 in red above. Because it is possible we come from either line. But after research I am of the opinion that our line stems from David 1720/1725.

The Coat of Arms of the Casto family according to the "Surname Book and Racial History"

---Scottish and Irish Surnames is described as follows:

ARMS ---- Azure a chevorn or, between three swans' heads erased proper. CREST ---- A Swan's head erased proper between two ostrich feathers or. MOTTO ---- Ferro non gladio "Bear not the sword"

Absolutely nothing is known of the parents of David from whom it is said "all" West Virginia Castos descend.

David 1720/1725 died 1770 wife Phebe Gandy born 1736 died 1770 Married at a Baptist Church in the town of Cape May Court House, New Jersey 8-17-1752 by Jr Minister Nathaniel Jenkins. Lived in Turkey Point until 1765 They both died of illness while traveling in 1770 Phebe's Lineage

Children of David and Phebe

the rest of the story http://members.aol.com/BandFan283/Casto1.html Attachments:

casto coat of arms casto coat of arms


Read what others had to say: kathy Jenema - May 16, 2007 Edit | Delete | Viewers | Reply to this item

   	  CASTO FAMILY http://www.webroots.org/library/usahist/pojc0003.html
 Old family traditions say that two boys were on a Spanish ship
 captured by the English years ago. All the crew were killed but the
 two boys, who, so versions say, were brothers. These boys were brought
 to America and sold as slaves or servants in the colony of New Jersey.
 The name of one was Casto, and that of the other Castro, or says one
 account, when set free at twenty one, one assumed the others name of
 Casto. If not brothers, the boys had a brothers regard for each other.
 They became somehow separated and the descendants of the real Casto
 are next heard of on the Buckhannon River, where David Casto was a
 pupil in the first school taught in Upshur County.
 There was a large colony of the name in the Buckhannon Settlement, and
 several of them were soldiers in the War of 1812.
 Soon after that, some of them emigrated to Jackson County, settling in
 the valley of Big Mill Creek, above the mouth of Sycamore.
 There were three lines, headed by John, William and George,
 respectively.
 Between the mill and the mouth of Tug Fork, on the right side of Mill
 Creek, George Casto settled in 1816, or near that date. He was sheriff
 of Jackson County in 1834, and helped to locate the county seat in
 1831. He was a Justice of the Peace when Jackson County was organized
 and for many years after. He was a Methodist, and sometimes preached,
 was a Whig in politics. He was born in 1781 and died in 1845.
 He was a soldier in the second war of Independence (1812) and came to
 Jackson County from the Buckhannon River, where he was born and
 raised, after the close of the war.
 His first wife was a sister of Stephen Westfall. She dying, he married
 Sarah, daughter of Godfrey Auers.
 There was a Peggy Casto who married Thomas Cunningham, a brother of
 Joel Cunningham, who was a child of the first marriage.
 George Casto, the second son of the last marriage, was a man of
 porminence in county affairs. He was in the Union Army. He married a
 daughter of Robert Raines.
 Nicholas Casto married Lilletha Casto, daughter of William Casto. The
 two families were in some way connected, and both came from the valley
 of the Buckhannon River.
 The schoolhouse where Nicholas Casto attended was of poles about
 twelve by fourteen, without joists, and about as high to the square as
 a mans head.
 Nicholas was a man of intelligence and progress, and lived on Tug
 Fork. He was captain of Home Guards, member of Legislature, Justice of
 the Peace, and three times President of Board of Supervisors, also
 publisher of "Social Songster" Hymn Book.
 His son, George N. Casto, long a school teacher and four years a
 Justice of Washington District, is now serving as deputy sheriff.
 Mary Casto married Joel Cunningham, and was living in 1904 with her
 son Robert, at Clendenin, on the Elk River, at the age of ninety
 years.
 Pheobe Casto married John Greathouse (commonly called Prophet John)
 and lived on Spring Creek.
 George Casto moved from the farm near Thomass Mill, up on Tug Fork,
 about one and a quarter miles from Mill Creek, probably about 1831 or
 1832, and later to a farm one mile above Staats Mill, where he was
 residing a the time of his death.
 His brother, John, married Susie McDade. They lived on the Windon farm
 opposite the mouth of Tug Fork. A brother, David, never came to
 Jackson County.
 John Casto and William Casto are said to be brothers of each other,
 and perhaps cousins of George Casto.
 John lived "on Mill Creek not far above Ripley", just where does not
 appear.
 He was married and his children grown when he came to Jackson County.
 His children were William, John J. and Daniel.
 William Casto married Susie Rollins, a daughter of Elijah J. Rollins.
 He lived a the first place up Tug Fork. William Casto was found dead
 in the woods, having been shot.
 The body was lying by a log, and the supposition was that he had been
 sitting on the log imitating the call of the wild turkey, to attract
 the attention of those birds, when some other hunter, hearing him, and
 not fairly seeing him, mistook him for a turkey and shot him. He lived
 where Holly Staats does now.
 He probably moved out to Mill Creek not long after 1816, and was from
 Buckhannon River settlement.
 He left five children, one of whom, John Casto, married Elizabeth
 Reynolds, and lived at the mouth of Bear Tree Run, in 1839. He died
 leaving only one child. It is said he was killed by a handspike at a
 logrolling.
 John J. Casto (known as Big John) married Gracey McDade, a daughter
 (It is said) of Samuel McDade, who was one of Mill Creeks pioneers.
 [James McDade, not Samuel. . .bb]
 He lived at the Elijah Rollins place at the mouth of Tug Fork.
 Daniel Casto married Polly, sister of Jesse Shamblin, and settled
 first on Grass Lick above the mouth of Stone Lick, and later on Bear
 Fork.
 William Casto was the founder of the largest of the Casto families.
 He came from Buckhannon about 1816 or 1817, and lived in the bend
 north of Mount Calvary Church.
 Some of his children were married before he came to Mill Creek.
 One of the oldest of his family was Lucretia, a daughter who married
 Elijah J. Rollins.
 Jonathan married Magdalene Wetherholt, was in the War of 1812, and
 came to Jackson County about 1816. He lived at Fairplain, on Grass
 Lick, and died about 1850.
 His widow was yet living in 1885.
 Benjamin Casto, married a sister of Sam Shinn. He lived in Mason
 County, and it is said afterward went west. His son Joseph was living
 in 1898 at the ripe old age of four score years.
 James Casto was a highly reputable citizen of the Grass Lick country,
 who lived on the flats at Fairplain.
 He was born about 1786 and died in 1866. He was in the War of 1812.
 He married Sydney Kessel, daughter of Jonathan Kessel, who lived on
 the divide between Mill Creek and Grass Lick. She died in 1883 or
 1884. They had one son, who lived a the head of Parchment and was
 eighty eight years old in 1906.
 Levi Casto, another son of William, was born April 2nd, 1808, and died
 January 27th, 1880. He first married Sarah Wright, widow of Daniel
 Wright, who was a son of the founder of the Cottageville mills. Her
 maiden name was Woodruff, probably she was a sister of the Mill Creek
 pioneer, David Woodruff.
 He then married Hannah Carney.
 John Casto, who married Nancy Parsons, was a son of William. He had
 but one child, Anna Casto, who married "Jim" Rhodes, and lived at one
 time on Frozen Camp.
 J. C. M. Rhodes was a son of Chris Rhodes of near Gay, and lived at
 the Dave Knopp farm.
 The widow married John Bord, after John Casto died.
 David Casto, who died at Buckhannon, may have been the pupil of Mr.
 Maddoxs school, mentioned formerly.
 Isaac Casto lived at the mouth of Buffalo Lick, on Tug Fork, after
 Andrew Westfall had moved to Elk. Through him, A. A. Skidmore, who
 married his daughter, acquired the farm.
 William Casto, usually spoken of as "Devil Bill", was a son of William
 Casto, and lived on Tug Fork at the mouth of Grass Run, one mile below
 Staats Mill.
 His wife was Martha Parsons, a sister of Captain Billy Parsons, the
 pioneer of Ripley. He had eight sons and four daughters. Three sons,
 David, Jacob and Augustus were in the Union Army.
 One of the daughters married Nicholas Casto.
 William Casto lived to be one hundred and three years old. Many are
 the droll storied told of his mischievous humor.
 A daughter of George Casto, Elizabeth (says Harold Staats), married
 Elias, a son of William and brother of Lillitha.
 William Casto, Jr., was usually spoken of as "Devil Bill", because of
 his mischievous disposition and habits of playing pranks.
 The Castos being a large family and the same names appearing often in
 the different families had a descriptive name attached to distinguish
 them, as did many other families, such as "Turkey Bill", "Devil Bill",
 "Big John", etc.
 An outline of the Castos of Jackson County shows that the family in
 this county descended from three men by the name of Casto who came
 from about the same place in Lewis or Upshur Counties. They were John
 and William, who are generally supposed to be brothers, and George, a
 cousin. At least there can be no doubt the families are connected.
 George married a Westfall. By this marriage, they had one daughter.
 Peggy Casto married Thomas Cunningham.
 Later George married Sarah Auers (a German name). Their children were:
 John O. Casto married Catherine, daughter of Andrew Westfall.
 George Casto married Nancy, daughter of Robert Raines.
 David O. Casto married Sarah, daughter of Robert Raines.
 James L. Casto married Sarah, daughter of James Bradley.
 Joel Casto married Mary Magdalene, daughter of James Bradley.
 Nicholas married a daughter of "Devil Bill" Casto.
 Mary Casto married Joel Cunningham.
 Phebe Casto married Prophet John Greathouse.
 Sarah Casto married a Rollins.
 Elizabeth Casto married Elias, son of William (Devil Bill) Casto.
 Louisa Casto married Dave L. Casto, son of John Casto.
 Matilda Casto married Joe Skeen.
 John Casto, wifes name not learned. His children were: William Casto,
 married Susy Rollins, Their children were Elijah, Barney, George,
 Grace, G. R., and John, who married Elizabeth Reynolds.
 John J. Casto married Gracey McDade. Their children were Jacob H.,
 Edward, Jesse, Jonathan, James M. who married a Tolley, and David L.,
 who married Louise Casto.
 Daniel Casto married Polly Shamblin. He had two sons and several
 daughters.
 William Casto (wifes name not learned). His children were:
 James Casto, born about 1786, died about 1866, married Sydney Kessel,
 daughter of Jonathan Kessel. Their children were:
 Elmore, married Phebe, daughter of William Cunningham.
 Nathan, married Margaret Parsons.
 George, married Minerva Davisson.
 John Riley, married Ruth Boles.
 L. Dow.
 Nick L., married Margaret Koontz.
 Charles C., married Martha, daughter of George Shaw.
 Minerva, married Thomas Stout, son of Joe Stout.
 Mary, married a Foglesong.
 Jonathan Casto, son of William Casto, married Magdalene Wetherholt.
 Their children were:
 Benjamin Franklin, married Matilda Craig.
 Isaac, never married.
 Barbara, married Billy Goodwin.
 Jacob, married a daughter of James Winters.
 Elizabeth, married a Barnett.
 Abraham, married Becca Crites.
 Isaac Casto, son of William Casto, wifes name not learned. His
 children were:
 Earl, married a widow Sheppard.
 Absalom was a preacher.
 Staats.
 Modlin, married Al Skidmore.
 Ben Casto, son of William Casto, had a son Joseph.
 David Casto, son of William Casto, lived in Buckhannon.
 Delila Casto, daughter of William Casto, married George Kessel.
 Phebe Casto, daughter of William Casto, married John Harpold.
 Rhoda Casto, daughter of William, married Johnny Pringle.
 Lucretia Casto, daughter of William Casto, married Elijah Rollins.
 Nancy Casto, daughter of William Casto, married Nicholas Ours.
 John Casto, son of William Casto, married Nancy Parsons. Their
 daughter, Anna, married Jim Rhodes.
 Levi Casto, son of William Casto, married first Sarah Woodruff,
 daughter of the pioneer Woodruff who had formerly been married to a
 Daniel Wright. After the death of his first wife, Levi married Hannah
 Carney. His children were Daniel W., George, Charles G, Clayton, Than,
 who married Tennessee Crow, James who married a Powers, and Francis
 Asbury, who married Anna Staats.
 Abraham Casto, son of William Casto, married Rebecca Crites, daughter
 of John Crites.
 William ("Devil Bill") Casto, son of William Casto, married Martha
 Parsons. Their children were Elias, Charley, Martin, Wiley, David,
 Augustus, Jacob, Mary, John, Anna, and Lillillia, who married Nick
 Casto. [Telitha. . . bb]
 Information given me by one member of the Casto family gave Levi Casto
 as a son of Thomas Casto. If so, he was a descendant of still another
 Casto line, as the name does not appear in any of the other families
 as given me.
 The Sarah Casto who married Benjamin Wright was of some family
 connection.
 The Joe Skeen who married Matilda Casto came from the eastern part of
 the state, and was an early day hunter and pioneer of Kentuck. 	   	 


Came to America in 1696 from Wales, settled at Egg Harbor NJ

CASTO FAMILY with Bostic(k), Shamblin, Groves, Barnett(e), Kessel(l), Lane, Bennett, Adkins and Parker Surnames by Debi (Casto) Sanders

Jump within this document here: 1. BOSTICK 2. SHAMBLIN 3. GROVES 4. BARNETT(E) 5. KESSELL 6. LANE 7.BENNETT 8.ADKINS 9.PARKER 10.Casto Historical Information 11. The Casto Hole This story of the Casto family, like all good stories, starts out with a mystery. The origin of the Casto name. Some say that it was Casto from the beginning. Others believe that it was changed between 1718 and 1733 (reason unknown) from Casteaux, Castillo, Caustlo,Castro, DeCastro, Casteau, Castau, Castalo, Costello, Cast, Castleto, Castoe, Custo, or Castabow.

It has even been suggested that Casto comes from the Latin word 'castra', meaning camps. One possible reason for the change is that as late as 1850 the majority of the people could not read or write. They tried to spell names as they sounded. Casteaux would translate to Casto in this instance.

Casto is a name that in Italian means chaste or purity. There are several families in Northern Italy with the Casto surname as well as certain sections of Germany. I have been told that Casto in Portugal is as common as Smith or Jones in the US. Casto, Italy is a town dating as far back as 1208. On the homepage for the city they give this as the Origin of the name: "It could derive from the local last name, that Roman appears on one lapide. "Casticus", but also from the Latin "castenus". Malpaga can derive from "Malus pagus" (bad campaign) or also from satisfied persons "malle", com' they were indicated in ' the 400 fiscal evasori."

I will just state the facts here as I know them and let you draw your own conclusions.

I want to say from the beginning that this record will be a continual work in process. I in no way want to proclaim that every entry is "written in stone". I would appreciate being notified of any errors that you find. In some instances family records may have a date of 1866 but county census, marriage, etc. records will show 1864. In this instance I will defer to the county record. That is not to say that the county records are infallible. In any case I would appreciate your input.

As to the beginnings of the Casto line in America. A favorite family story is that the Castos descend from 2 boy's age 5 and 7 who stowed away on a ship in a French wharf. Their parents had been killed and their home burned. The ship soon set sail to sea. After 3 days of hunger, the boys came out of hiding. They found that they were on the pirate vessel of Captain William Kidd who required them to work for about 10 years, then delivered one in New Jersey and the other in Rode Island giving them funds to start a business. The New Jersey boy changed his name to Casto and the other one said his name was Castalow. Each boy insisted on keeping his own name. (James LeSeuer)

Different versions of this story has been passed down through several Casto lines.

Recently I received information from another Casto line: "There is evidence that one of our Ancestors either jumped ship or was "thrown overboard" off the coast of New Jersey during the 1700's" (Willis Casto)

Also from another line: "Twin boys emigrating to America from Europe, jumped ship at the sight of land and swam ashore to escape the 7 years of indentured servitude" (Jim Casto)

"The two boys were survivors of a pirate raid, supposedly on a merchant ship, and it is believed that the father of the boys was a merchant ship owner or a trader carrying on business with the Old World and the New World. The father was either killed during the engagement with the pirates or was thrown overboard by the pirates after the engagement. The Castos of the United States are descended from the younger of the two boys, who was about five years of age at the time. The younger boy landed by the pirates on the New Jersey coast and the older boy was landed farther down the coast. The settlers called the younger boy Azariah Casto, which was not his name according to the older brother, who returned to the New Jersey landing after reaching manhood. The older brother claimed that their surname was DeCasto and that they were born in France. The story goes on that some searching and digging was carried on by Azariah and his sons in an attempt to find and recover the pirates cashe that was supposed to have been made in the locality of the New Jersey landing. Supposedly some of the cashe was found but was of little value. The story also relates that the Castos lived on an island but no one knew where." (William Casto of Utah)

"A Spanish merchant or a captain of a Spanish ship had taken his two little boys on a voyage to the New World. Captain Kidd captured the ship and made everyone except the two boys walk the plank'. He put them ashore in Rhode Island where it was reported he buried his gold. The boys afterward were reunited but one claimed his name was Casto, the other Castello. Both were stubborn and each kept the name he thought correct. A William Casto embarrassed his daughter by digging for his ancestors gold all over Rhode Island." (Martha Dorothy Harris)

"At a very early period in the settlement of the colonies, perhaps early in the 15th century, a ship was wrecked on the coast of New Jersey, near Cape May and the crew and passengers rescued were two young lads who claimed the name Casto. These youths spoke the Spanish language and it was supposed the lost ship sailed from some Spanish port. But little more is known of the two boys, but from the neighborhood of Cape May, the entire Casto family who are scattered over many of the states, can be traced." (Joseph Scinton Casto) m "The first Castos came from England in the 16th Century, were French, spelling their name Casteau in France (Casteu), later to Casto, two brothers stolen from their parents in England, brought to America and abandoned in Virginia. Others came later on account of religious persecutions in England." (The Bothwell Family)

"There is a tradition that 2 brothers came to the then colony of Virginia from the south of France. That after a long separation upon meeting again, they found they spelled their names differently. One Casto, the other Castello." (Timothy Casto written 1900)

Captain Kidd was born in 1645 in Greenock Scotland. About 1690 he settled in England. One April 23, 1696 he sailed from Plymouth, England in the Adventure Galley, a ship of 34 guns. The original venture was a private one. He was hired to find French or pirate vessels. Almost from the beginning the voyage was plagued with bad luck. Illness and a leaking ship and a near mutiny by the crew were probably the reason Kidd turned to piracy. In 1699 Kidd arrived in the West Indies. There he discovered that he was charged with piracy. Protesting his innocence, he gave himself up and was sent to England for trial. He was found guilty and on May 23, 1701, he was hanged. Family researchers are trying to find the log book of this voyage. Perhaps mention of the 2 boys in the log could confirm the family "pirate" story.

A certain Gladys Marie Chase of St. Petersburg Florida claims to have found "absolute proof" that the Casto boys were put ashore at Lewes Delaware Mid May 1699. She uses as a reference the "Harley Papers" Vo. 36 F104 (Kidd's own narrative at his trial British Museum, London, England.) I have been unable to find this narrative.

Another theory is that William 1717 was the son of William Caustlo or Costello and Elizabeth Abbott. These people did exist and there are records to that effect in Salem County . But researchers have failed to prove they are William's parents

The first sighting of a Casto in America is Azariah Casto 1696 from Wales, this comes from the charred remains of the Hare Bible. Nothing legible exists since this Bible was burned twice and the interpretations are largely based on memory after the second burning. This Bible was originally owned by Azariah Casto 1750 and handed down through his family until it ended up in the possession of Eleanor Grace Bothwell Hare, who dozed by the fireplace and let the Bible fall into the fire and was very badly burned.

Now if Azariah 1696 did exist and William 1717 was his son, Azariah would have been 21 at the time of William's birth

The oldest boy on Captain Kidds ship would have been 28 and the youngest 21 at the time of William's birth.

Any one of these scenarios could be possible.

Where ever the original Casto's (or Casteaux, Castillo, Caustlo etc.) came from we know that in 1745 there were only two Casto males in America, living 5 miles apart in what is now Cumberland County, N.J. William 1717 and David 1720/1725. Many assume they were brothers, they may have been uncle and nephew.

If you are interested in theWilliam 1717 line visit Julie Casto's page, Casto Story and Collections 1990 by Jim Casto

Considerable confusion exists regarding the descending Casto lines from these two men. One of the reasons for this is that they both had children by the name of John, David, William and Elizabeth. Also according to Ina H Tuft in her tribute to the foremost Casto family researcher, David Leroy Casto "The Castos were so numerous in West Virginia that Castos married Castos and if they weren't Castos, they were children of Casto women who had married someone else."

For the purpose of this report which I am making for my son and my family I am going to list the Castos I consider "our" direct line. They will be highlighted in red. I have listed both William 1717 and David 1720/1725 in red above. Because it is possible we come from either line. But after research I am of the opinion that our line stems from David 1720/1725.

The Coat of Arms of the Casto family according to the "Surname Book and Racial History"

---Scottish and Irish Surnames is described as follows:

ARMS


Azure a chevorn or, between three swans' heads erased proper. CREST
A Swan's head erased proper between two ostrich feathers or. MOTTO
Ferro non gladio "Bear not the sword"

Absolutely nothing is known of the parents of David from whom it is said "all" West Virginia Castos descend.

David 1720/1725 died 1770 wife Phebe Gandy born 1736 died 1770 Married at a Baptist Church in the town of Cape May Court House, New Jersey 8-17-1752 by Jr Minister Nathaniel Jenkins. Lived in Turkey Point until 1765 They both died of illness while traveling in 1770 Phebe's Lineage

Children of David and Phebe

the rest of the story http://members.aol.com/BandFan283/Casto1.html Attachments:

casto coat of arms casto coat of arms Read what others had to say: kathy Jenema - May 16, 2007 Edit | Delete | Viewers | Reply to this item

CASTO FAMILY http://www.webroots.org/library/usahist/pojc0003.html

Old family traditions say that two boys were on a Spanish ship captured by the English years ago. All the crew were killed but the two boys, who, so versions say, were brothers. These boys were brought to America and sold as slaves or servants in the colony of New Jersey. The name of one was Casto, and that of the other Castro, or says one account, when set free at twenty one, one assumed the others name of Casto. If not brothers, the boys had a brothers regard for each other. They became somehow separated and the descendants of the real Casto are next heard of on the Buckhannon River, where David Casto was a pupil in the first school taught in Upshur County. There was a large colony of the name in the Buckhannon Settlement, and several of them were soldiers in the War of 1812. Soon after that, some of them emigrated to Jackson County, settling in the valley of Big Mill Creek, above the mouth of Sycamore. There were three lines, headed by John, William and George, respectively. Between the mill and the mouth of Tug Fork, on the right side of Mill Creek, George Casto settled in 1816, or near that date. He was sheriff of Jackson County in 1834, and helped to locate the county seat in 1831. He was a Justice of the Peace when Jackson County was organized and for many years after. He was a Methodist, and sometimes preached, was a Whig in politics. He was born in 1781 and died in 1845. He was a soldier in the second war of Independence (1812) and came to Jackson County from the Buckhannon River, where he was born and raised, after the close of the war. His first wife was a sister of Stephen Westfall. She dying, he married Sarah, daughter of Godfrey Auers. There was a Peggy Casto who married Thomas Cunningham, a brother of Joel Cunningham, who was a child of the first marriage. George Casto, the second son of the last marriage, was a man of porminence in county affairs. He was in the Union Army. He married a daughter of Robert Raines. Nicholas Casto married Lilletha Casto, daughter of William Casto. The two families were in some way connected, and both came from the valley of the Buckhannon River. The schoolhouse where Nicholas Casto attended was of poles about twelve by fourteen, without joists, and about as high to the square as a mans head. Nicholas was a man of intelligence and progress, and lived on Tug Fork. He was captain of Home Guards, member of Legislature, Justice of the Peace, and three times President of Board of Supervisors, also publisher of "Social Songster" Hymn Book. His son, George N. Casto, long a school teacher and four years a Justice of Washington District, is now serving as deputy sheriff. Mary Casto married Joel Cunningham, and was living in 1904 with her son Robert, at Clendenin, on the Elk River, at the age of ninety years. Pheobe Casto married John Greathouse (commonly called Prophet John) and lived on Spring Creek. George Casto moved from the farm near Thomass Mill, up on Tug Fork, about one and a quarter miles from Mill Creek, probably about 1831 or 1832, and later to a farm one mile above Staats Mill, where he was residing a the time of his death. His brother, John, married Susie McDade. They lived on the Windon farm opposite the mouth of Tug Fork. A brother, David, never came to Jackson County. John Casto and William Casto are said to be brothers of each other, and perhaps cousins of George Casto. John lived "on Mill Creek not far above Ripley", just where does not appear. He was married and his children grown when he came to Jackson County. His children were William, John J. and Daniel. William Casto married Susie Rollins, a daughter of Elijah J. Rollins. He lived a the first place up Tug Fork. William Casto was found dead in the woods, having been shot. The body was lying by a log, and the supposition was that he had been sitting on the log imitating the call of the wild turkey, to attract the attention of those birds, when some other hunter, hearing him, and not fairly seeing him, mistook him for a turkey and shot him. He lived where Holly Staats does now. He probably moved out to Mill Creek not long after 1816, and was from Buckhannon River settlement. He left five children, one of whom, John Casto, married Elizabeth Reynolds, and lived at the mouth of Bear Tree Run, in 1839. He died leaving only one child. It is said he was killed by a handspike at a logrolling. John J. Casto (known as Big John) married Gracey McDade, a daughter (It is said) of Samuel McDade, who was one of Mill Creeks pioneers. [James McDade, not Samuel. . .bb] He lived at the Elijah Rollins place at the mouth of Tug Fork. Daniel Casto married Polly, sister of Jesse Shamblin, and settled first on Grass Lick above the mouth of Stone Lick, and later on Bear Fork. William Casto was the founder of the largest of the Casto families. He came from Buckhannon about 1816 or 1817, and lived in the bend north of Mount Calvary Church. Some of his children were married before he came to Mill Creek. One of the oldest of his family was Lucretia, a daughter who married Elijah J. Rollins. Jonathan married Magdalene Wetherholt, was in the War of 1812, and came to Jackson County about 1816. He lived at Fairplain, on Grass Lick, and died about 1850. His widow was yet living in 1885. Benjamin Casto, married a sister of Sam Shinn. He lived in Mason County, and it is said afterward went west. His son Joseph was living in 1898 at the ripe old age of four score years. James Casto was a highly reputable citizen of the Grass Lick country, who lived on the flats at Fairplain. He was born about 1786 and died in 1866. He was in the War of 1812. He married Sydney Kessel, daughter of Jonathan Kessel, who lived on the divide between Mill Creek and Grass Lick. She died in 1883 or 1884. They had one son, who lived a the head of Parchment and was eighty eight years old in 1906. Levi Casto, another son of William, was born April 2nd, 1808, and died January 27th, 1880. He first married Sarah Wright, widow of Daniel Wright, who was a son of the founder of the Cottageville mills. Her maiden name was Woodruff, probably she was a sister of the Mill Creek pioneer, David Woodruff. He then married Hannah Carney. John Casto, who married Nancy Parsons, was a son of William. He had but one child, Anna Casto, who married "Jim" Rhodes, and lived at one time on Frozen Camp. J. C. M. Rhodes was a son of Chris Rhodes of near Gay, and lived at the Dave Knopp farm. The widow married John Bord, after John Casto died. David Casto, who died at Buckhannon, may have been the pupil of Mr. Maddoxs school, mentioned formerly. Isaac Casto lived at the mouth of Buffalo Lick, on Tug Fork, after Andrew Westfall had moved to Elk. Through him, A. A. Skidmore, who married his daughter, acquired the farm. William Casto, usually spoken of as "Devil Bill", was a son of William Casto, and lived on Tug Fork at the mouth of Grass Run, one mile below Staats Mill. His wife was Martha Parsons, a sister of Captain Billy Parsons, the pioneer of Ripley. He had eight sons and four daughters. Three sons, David, Jacob and Augustus were in the Union Army. One of the daughters married Nicholas Casto. William Casto lived to be one hundred and three years old. Many are the droll storied told of his mischievous humor. A daughter of George Casto, Elizabeth (says Harold Staats), married Elias, a son of William and brother of Lillitha. William Casto, Jr., was usually spoken of as "Devil Bill", because of his mischievous disposition and habits of playing pranks. The Castos being a large family and the same names appearing often in the different families had a descriptive name attached to distinguish them, as did many other families, such as "Turkey Bill", "Devil Bill", "Big John", etc. An outline of the Castos of Jackson County shows that the family in this county descended from three men by the name of Casto who came from about the same place in Lewis or Upshur Counties. They were John and William, who are generally supposed to be brothers, and George, a cousin. At least there can be no doubt the families are connected. George married a Westfall. By this marriage, they had one daughter. Peggy Casto married Thomas Cunningham. Later George married Sarah Auers (a German name). Their children were: John O. Casto married Catherine, daughter of Andrew Westfall. George Casto married Nancy, daughter of Robert Raines. David O. Casto married Sarah, daughter of Robert Raines. James L. Casto married Sarah, daughter of James Bradley. Joel Casto married Mary Magdalene, daughter of James Bradley. Nicholas married a daughter of "Devil Bill" Casto. Mary Casto married Joel Cunningham. Phebe Casto married Prophet John Greathouse. Sarah Casto married a Rollins. Elizabeth Casto married Elias, son of William (Devil Bill) Casto. Louisa Casto married Dave L. Casto, son of John Casto. Matilda Casto married Joe Skeen. John Casto, wifes name not learned. His children were: William Casto, married Susy Rollins, Their children were Elijah, Barney, George, Grace, G. R., and John, who married Elizabeth Reynolds. John J. Casto married Gracey McDade. Their children were Jacob H., Edward, Jesse, Jonathan, James M. who married a Tolley, and David L., who married Louise Casto. Daniel Casto married Polly Shamblin. He had two sons and several daughters. William Casto (wifes name not learned). His children were: James Casto, born about 1786, died about 1866, married Sydney Kessel, daughter of Jonathan Kessel. Their children were: Elmore, married Phebe, daughter of William Cunningham. Nathan, married Margaret Parsons. George, married Minerva Davisson. John Riley, married Ruth Boles. L. Dow. Nick L., married Margaret Koontz. Charles C., married Martha, daughter of George Shaw. Minerva, married Thomas Stout, son of Joe Stout. Mary, married a Foglesong. Jonathan Casto, son of William Casto, married Magdalene Wetherholt. Their children were: Benjamin Franklin, married Matilda Craig. Isaac, never married. Barbara, married Billy Goodwin. Jacob, married a daughter of James Winters. Elizabeth, married a Barnett. Abraham, married Becca Crites. Isaac Casto, son of William Casto, wifes name not learned. His children were: Earl, married a widow Sheppard. Absalom was a preacher. Staats. Modlin, married Al Skidmore. Ben Casto, son of William Casto, had a son Joseph. David Casto, son of William Casto, lived in Buckhannon. Delila Casto, daughter of William Casto, married George Kessel. Phebe Casto, daughter of William Casto, married John Harpold. Rhoda Casto, daughter of William, married Johnny Pringle. Lucretia Casto, daughter of William Casto, married Elijah Rollins. Nancy Casto, daughter of William Casto, married Nicholas Ours. John Casto, son of William Casto, married Nancy Parsons. Their daughter, Anna, married Jim Rhodes. Levi Casto, son of William Casto, married first Sarah Woodruff, daughter of the pioneer Woodruff who had formerly been married to a Daniel Wright. After the death of his first wife, Levi married Hannah Carney. His children were Daniel W., George, Charles G, Clayton, Than, who married Tennessee Crow, James who married a Powers, and Francis Asbury, who married Anna Staats. Abraham Casto, son of William Casto, married Rebecca Crites, daughter of John Crites. William ("Devil Bill") Casto, son of William Casto, married Martha Parsons. Their children were Elias, Charley, Martin, Wiley, David, Augustus, Jacob, Mary, John, Anna, and Lillillia, who married Nick Casto. [Telitha. . . bb] Information given me by one member of the Casto family gave Levi Casto as a son of Thomas Casto. If so, he was a descendant of still another Casto line, as the name does not appear in any of the other families as given me. The Sarah Casto who married Benjamin Wright was of some family connection. The Joe Skeen who married Matilda Casto came from the eastern part of the state, and was an early day hunter and pioneer of Kentuck.

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William Azariah Casto, I's Timeline

1655
1655
Wales, UK
1690
1690
Salem, NJ, United States
1699
1699
1705
1705
Egg Harbor Township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States
1720
1720
Age 65
Egg Harbor City, Atlantic, New Jersey, United States