William Sr Compton, of Woodbridge

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William Sr Compton, of Woodbridge

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
Death: September 21, 1694 (62-63)
Woodbridge, Monmouth, New Jersey
Place of Burial: Woodbridge, Middlesex, New Jersy, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Compton, of Kent & Roxbury and Susannah "Ann Elizabeth" Freeman
Husband of Mary Brown and Mary Compton
Father of Jacob Compton; Sara Compton; David Compton; Sarah Drake; Jonathan Compton, Sr. and 4 others
Brother of Abigail Briscoe - Busby; Samuel Compton; Benjamin Compton and Sir John F Compton, II

Occupation: Sheriff
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About William Sr Compton, of Woodbridge

William Compton

  • Birth: 1631 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts or Wiltshire, England
  • Death: 21 SEP 1694 in Woodbridge, Middlesex, New Jersey
  • Parents: John Compton of Roxbury & Susannah "Freeman"
  • Married: BEF 1642 in New Amsterdam (now New York City, NY) to Mary Wilmot

Children

caution

From https://www.geni.com/discussions/156905?msg=1089390

First, the is William Compton of Woodbridge, Middlesex County, who was married to Mary Wilmot and was probably the son of John Compton of Roxbury, coming to Woodbridge, NJ from NH/MA with the Freemans and several other allied families.

This branch of Comptons is entirely distinct from that of William Compton, one of the patent founders of Middletown, Monmouth County, NJ. William of Monmouth is the son of William "Weilleum" Compton of Gravesend, NY. He was married to Mary Bowne, daughter of Captain Bowne, coming from Gravesend with Captain Bowne. Comptonology deals with these distinctions extensively throughout the course of its volumes.

Old Notes

- MFL note: Some researchers say he died 21 SEP 1694: however, this death date applies to another William Compton, "William of Ipswich" (s/o John Compton and Susannah ___; b. ca. 1631 Ipswich, Essex Co.,

BUT

WILLIAM COMPTON OF IPSWICH It has been accepted by the Compton family genealogists that a son of the previous JOHN COMPTON of Roxbury and Boston, was that WILLIAM COMPTON, located at Ipswich, Mass., who bought land there of Daniel Ladd in 1662. (Savage, Vol. I, p. 439) (See N. E. Hist. Gen. Reg., Vol. VI, 1852, p. 248 and 346.) SALTER, (1890, p. XIX, of Gen. Rec.), where the author makes it appear that there were two William Comptons in New Jersey who were contemporaneous. This is not correct.

WILLIAM COMPTON was in Gravesend, L. I., in 1656, (vide, ante, PART TWO, p. 162, and in Monmouth Co., a First Settler, 1667, (idem, p. 172.)

He was called "planter," and as early as 1669 his name appears in the deed records relating to Woodbridge. (Arch., Vol. XXI, pp. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 15.)

The following entry of 1675, "Here begins the Rights of Land due according to the Concessions." (N. J. Arch., Vol. XXI, p. 18.)

"William Compton and wife."

This wife was Mary Wilmot, (1635-1713) (Nat. Soc. Daus. Amer. Col., Vol. I, p. 316) whom he m. in 1666. The dates of WILLIAM COMPTON, 1631-1709(?).

According to the Vital Records of Woodbridge, William Compton, Senior, died there, Friday night, Sept. 21, 1694. His estate and will are disclosed by the following:

"1694 Oct. 2. Testimony of Edward Watson and Richard Smith and wife, Ellener, Concerning the intentions expressed by William Compton of Woodbridge, who died Friday night, Sept. 21, 1694. Mentions a wife, sons--Jonathan, John, William, David.

1694, Oct. 2. Letters testimonial with the will of William Compton annexed, issued to his widow Mary and to Jonathan Compton." (Arch, Vol. XXI, pp. 215.)

1694 Oct. 1. Inventory of the estate; made by John Langstaff and Jabish Hendrick." (Arch., Vol. XXIII, p. 104.)

From other deed and will records, the following children [of William ll] are certainly identified.

Sources:

  1. Repository:
           Name: California State Library - Sutro
           San Francisco, CA (94132)
     Title: Martin Family of America
     Author: Louise Martin Mohler and Esther Roberts
     Publication: Washington, Pennsylvania - 1987
     Note:
     Descendants of John Martin & Esther Roberts
     Page: Page 56 

William and Mary Compton moved from Ipswich, Massachusetts to Gravesend, New York in 1666. They lived with the Dutch and William was referred to as Weilleum.

Gravesend is in modern Brooklyn and is near Coney Island.It was an English colony originating with 39 people of which William was one. Between 1650 and 1670 the Dutch and English entered into conflict, with, among other things, conflicting land patents being granted.

Eventually the family moved to Monmouth County, New Jersey. William became a leading citizen and was appointed constable in 1677.Ancestral File Number: 2ZBQ-L7

Page: 558

Name: William Compton

Date: 02 Oct 1694

Location: Woodbridge

Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Vol. II 1730-1750. Part II

Appendix

Int. Testimony of Edward Watson and Richard Smith and wife Ellener

concerning the intentions expressed by William Compton of Woodbridge, who

died Friday night, Sept. 21, 1694. Mentions a wife and sons--Jonathan,

John, William, David.

Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Vol. II 1730-1750. Part II

Appendix

1694, Oct. 2. Letters issued to his widow, Mary, and to Jonathan

Compton.

Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Vol. II 1730-1750. Part II

Appendix

E. J. D., Lib. E, p. 143.

Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Vol. II 1730-1750. Part II

Appendix The Gravesend, New York, William lived with the Dutch and was referred to as Weilleum. Gravesend was an early English settlement in an area in modern Brooklyn adjacent to Coney Island. It is a mere hop, skip and a jump to Sandy Hook, New Jersey and Monmouth County. (Sandy Hook is also known as one of the haunts of Captain Kidd.) William was one of the 39 original settlers of Gravesend, became a leading citizen and was appointed constable in 1677. Both the elder and the son William, who migrated to New Jersey appear in the early records (See inter alia, Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, New York and New Jersey, 1930, Blalock, Comptonology, V. 1, No. 1, p. 1; see also History of Monmouth County 1664-1920, Lewis Hist. Publ. Co., pp. 321 et seq.; Mandeville, The Story of Middletown, Christ Church (pub.), 1927, pp. 36 et seq., and others. Comptonology and Blalock, among others, then opine that his son, William, married Mary Bowne, daughter of Captain John Bowne and Mary Haverland [whose descendants also reportedly include Daniel Boone], and went with a number of others in 1666 to Monmouth County, New Jersey, and were among the founders of Middletown. In December 1667, the records indicate William was was identified with lot 15 in the town itself, and lot 14 in the "Poplar field [sic]". (Aside: Mary's sister Sarah's descendants include Abraham Lincoln, see Blalock, also Comptonology, V. 1, No. 4, p. 17). It is reported both Comptons and Bownes were Baptists and left to escape religious persecution, but the political and land patent conflicts between the Dutch and British between 1650-1670, which ultimately resulted in New Netherlands being titled to the British and becoming New York around 1670, were undoubtedly the principal cause for this particular migration. We do know they founded a church. It is reported that there was an earlier migration of the Bownes and Comptons from Massachusetts, probably for religious reasons (as "accursed Baptists"), but the documentation is scant. William and Mary had ten children. William died ca. 1709 (Comptonology, V. 2, No. 6, pp. 28-29). One of his sons, Richard, married Prudence (Providence) Isselstyne [or Usselton] (of Dutch extraction), and had a son (among other children, Isselstyne, the father of John I, who in turn married a Lydia Carhart and after her death Margaret Raemer, a German lady. Richard was born December 1673. He and Prudence had seven children. It is from this theory that this genealogy is based. In Whitehead (ed.), New Jersey Colonial Documents, v. 2, 1687-1703, p. 397, Comptonology, Blalock (pp. 2-3), Richard signed a petition to the King to appoint a suitable person as Governor, 17 July 1701. It is relevant to note that the next signature on the document is that of William Bowne, thus reinforcing the Dutch (and New York) circumstantial evidence supporting the New York identity of William. (See also Comptonology, V. 1, No. 1, p. 1; Comptonology, V. 2, No. 7, p. 31; Comptonology, V. 3, No. 9, p. 121; Comptonology, V. 4, No. 3, p. 161). Richard died prior to 1711 (Comptonology, V. 2, No. 9, p. 42.)


Name: William COMPTON I • Surname: COMPTON • Given Name: William • NSFX: i Marriage 1 UNKNOWN. Married: ABT 1644 in New Amsterdam Marriage 2 Elizabeth TOLLEMACHE b: ABT 1610 in of Helmingham, Suff Married: ABT 1651 in ?? • Sex: M • Birth: from Oct 1621 to Dec 1621 in England of,Gravesend,Long Island,NY • Christening: Sheriff Age 30 on 30 Sep 1652 • Death: AFT 1683 in Gravesend, Long Island, NY • Burial: comptonology pg,3,bottom


Includes Notes for William (Weilleum) Compton: William Compton was a sheriff (a position of much more importance at that time than now).

Migrated to Gravesend NY before 1645. Gravesend is now part of Brooklyn, but is often referred to as being on Long Island.

He was listed on the original list of 39 original English patentees (a person who has been granted a patent) in 1645.{This was New Netherlands at the time}

Per Gravesend town records on November 24, 1657, Nicholas Stillwell sold lot 29, with house and barn, to William Compton for 400 pounds of good tobacco to be delivered next April 1.

In 1652, he stated in a desposition that he was 30 years old. He was sworn in as Constable on June 29, 1677.

WILLIAM COMPTON was in Gravesend, L. I., in 1656, (vide, ante, PART TWO, p. 162, and in Monmouth Co., a First Settler, 1667, (idem, p. 172.)
He was called "planter," and as early as 1669 his name appears in the deed records relating to Woodbridge. (Arch., Vol. XXI, pp. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 15.)
The following entry of 1675, "Here begins the Rights of Land due according to the Concessions." (N. J. Arch., Vol. XXI, p. 18.)
"William Compton and wife."
This wife was Mary Wilmot, (1635-1713) (Nat. Soc. Daus. Amer. Col., Vol. I, p. 316) whom he m. in 1666. The dates of WILLIAM COMPTON, 1631-1709(?).
According to the Vital Records of Woodbridge, William Compton, Senior, died there, Friday night, Sept. 21, 1694. His estate and will are disclosed by the following:
"1694 Oct. 2. Testimony of Edward Watson and Richard Smith and wife, Ellener, Concerning the intentions expressed by William Compton of Woodbridge, who died Friday night, Sept. 21, 1694. Mentions a wife, sons--Jonathan, John, William, David.
1694, Oct. 2. Letters testimonial with the will of William Compton annexed, issued to his widow Mary and to Jonathan Compton." (Arch, Vol. XXI, pp. 215.)
1694 Oct. 1. Inventory of the estate; made by John Langstaff and Jabish Hendrick." (Arch., Vol. XXIII, p. 104.)
From other deed and will records, the following children are certainly identified.
I. Mary, born, the first white child in Woodbridge, Nov. 1667-8, who married, Jan. 1, 1695-6, Caleb Campbell. (Vide, ante, this PART, p. 515.) (Also, PART THREE, p. 373.)
II. John, born Jan. 2, 1669.
III. Sarah, born July 25, 1670; d. Sept. 16, 1670.
IV. David, born, July 21 (26) 1671.
V. Sarah, born, June 1, 1673; m. Dec. 9, 1697, John Drake of Piscataway.
VI. Jonathan, born Dec. 18, 1674. The foregoing from the Woodbridge Vital Records.
VII. William, Junior, b. (???).
VIII. Cornelius, b. (???).
IX. Richard, b. (???).
Gravesend was an early English settlement in an area in modern Brooklyn adjacent to Coney Island. 

It is real close to Sandy Hook, New Jersey (known as one of the haunts of Captain Kidd.)

He made an affadavit in a lawsuit, in his sworn statement he said he was born in 1622 in England.In July 1643, the Church of England was over thrown and Presbyterianism was the only religion tolerated in England. It is quite apparent that William Compton left there because of religion, as Baptists and Quakers were in great disfavour.Legend has it that William went into exile in Holland, as many did at that time, then emigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the United States where the same religious situation developed.

He then moved with other Baptists to LongIsland, New York (at that time a part of Connecticutt). William was often called Weillum, because he lived among the Dutch, and it is believed he married a Dutch woman. It is not known if William died in Long Island or moved with his son William to New Jersey about the time Indian difficulties reached a climax in the mid 1660's.

  • With research it has been proven that William Compton / Crumpton / Cramphin is not the son of Spencer Compton. Simple research of family Pedigrees state this.
  • Research The History of the Compton of Compton Wynyates by William Bingham Compton. Nor was he part of the Bisterne family line pedigrees prove that too. or the Grendon Family line.

It is believed he left during the English civil war in 1640 after he had been captured by the English and imprisoned and was given notice to leave England. Reason was for treason to the Crown but due to family influence he was given this chance to leave.

Upon reaching the Netherlands Islands he had to register and he said his was name Cumin and Him being from England they registered him as Cumton which he used to his advantage to escape the English when asked why he left he said it was for religious reason being Catholic it wasn't until later while in Netherland he became Baptist.

His goal was to return to England and go home but with the English keeping close eye on who was coming and going he fled to the Colonies. Where upon once more he made a name change and used Comton this is the reason why he kept changing his name. But this is not know for a fact. But it would explain the reason the family settled later in Scottish and Irish settlements and married Scottish and Welch and Irish.

Much of our culture and dance and music and fork lore is very similar to these ethnic groups.


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William Sr Compton, of Woodbridge's Timeline

1631
1631
Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
1669
January 2, 1669
Woodbridge Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States
1670
July 25, 1670
Woodbridge, Middlesex, NJ
1671
July 21, 1671
Woodbridge Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States
1673
June 1, 1673
Piscataway Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States
1674
December 18, 1674
Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey, USA
1679
1679
Woodbridge, Middlesex, NJ
1680
1680
Monmouth County, NJ, United States