William Alexander McClintock

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William Alexander McClintock (McClintic)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Trinta, Down, Tyrone Co., Ireland
Death: Died in Warm Springs, Bath County, VA, USA
Place of Burial: McClintic Family Cemetery, Warm Springs, Bath County, Virginia
Immediate Family:

Son of Alexander McClintock and Agnes McClintock
Husband of Mary Nancy McClintic
Father of Joseph McClintock; Margaret Morris; Jane Milhollen; Nancy Milhollen; William Alexander McClintic, II and 3 others
Brother of John Robert McClintock and Joseph McClintock

Managed by: Angela Susan Smith
Last Updated:

About William Alexander McClintock

For more information concerning this portion of the family tree and its descendants http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/p/e/t/Virginia-E-Pettett/GENE1-0001.html

McClintock / McClintic History The Migration of William McClintock from Northern Ireland to America McClintic Saga

There are several conflicting stories about the year William Alexander MCCLINTOCK came to America, as we are seeing. Moses Hamilton MCCLINTIC from Hot Springs, Virginia, his great grandson (b.1848-D.1929) tried to discover the exact date for many years. A personal correspondence between Moses and Lottie M. Bausman, who researched the public records in Lancaster County, PA in 1913 and 1914 show no discoveries of records relating to William Alexander MCCLINTOCK.

Moses MCCLINTIC discovered a traditional story concerning WILLIAM ALEXANDER MCCLINTOCK as being the son of ALEXANDER MCCLINTIC who came to Lancaster, PA. in 1725 from Northern Ireland. However, this story seems suspect in light of the info shown in the Revolutionary War Pension Application of Joseph MCCLINTICk (spelling error on the original document) who was William's oldest son and dated January 24, 1835 and other info described later.

From the documentary evidence of the pension record and the 1880 census record, it seems almost certain that William A. MCCLINTOCK and his family came to America in 1763 from County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. The family is believed to have settled in what was then Lancaster County, in William Penn's colony of PA. (Pennsylvania means Penn's Forest). Other members of the MCCLINTOCK FAMILY had come to America several years before and were living in this part of PA. It is reasonable that this immigrant farmer settled among his relatives and friends. the Cumberland Valley of Pennsylvania had a large number of Scottish-Irish immigrants in the 1700's due to the liberal policies of William Penn regarding religious freedom. More than 6,000 Scotch-Irish are known to have entered Pennsylvania in the year 1729 alone. This family, as many others in the province of Ulster where County Tyrone is located, found it difficult to live with the trade restrictions of England and the bitter resentment caused by the special privileges and powers of the Church of Ireland which was controlled by the British Crown. The Ulster Presbyterians were descendants of the Scots who settled in Northern Ireland in the late 1500's by the Protestant Queen, Elizabeth I, to control the Irish rebellion against the Crown. The Scots were loyal to Elizabeth I. The settling of the Scots in that area was known as "The Plantation System". Grants and leases of land that had been taken from the Irish Tribal Chieftains was granted to the Scots. This policy was continued by King James I, their countryman, who was also King James VI of Scotland. This same King James had the Christian Bible translated into English. It is still in use in Christian churches today and is known as the KING JAMES VERSION. The firs permanent settlement in America in 1607 in Virginia was named Jamestown in honor of this same king. This was his attempt to duplicate the same system he promoted in Northern Ireland which was known, again, as "The Plantation System".

In 1689, the economy of Belfast, Ireland was destroyed by a law that forbade the English to purchase any cloth produced in Ireland. In 1704, all civil rights of the Irish were revoked and in 1714 Queen Ann had all Presbyterian Church doors nailed shut. The Presbyterians could not hold civil and military office, and their ministers could not perform the marriage ceremony. They were in constant conflict, even guerrilla warfare, with the native Irish over their occupation of the Ulster Lands.

These people had bent their knee to no man when they came from Scotland to Northern Ireland. This oppression from the British Crown about 100 years later was more than they could live with so they up and left. Between 1718 and 1775 entire congregations of Presbyterians took to the ships and sailed to the American Colonies. As many as 200,000 are believed to have left Northern Ireland. Many of them wound up on the Appalachian Frontier of America where they battled with American Indians instead of Irish Rebels. They were a strong and hardy people. Four signers of the Declaration of Independence were of Ulster Scots, because the native Irish never accepted them as Irish. During the five years preceding the Revolutionary War more than 30,000 Scotch-Irish arrived in America. George Bancroft, one of American's first historians, said that "The cry for independence came from the Scotch-Irish Presbyterians." In Northern Ireland they were the first to demand the separation of the church from the state. Teddy Roosevelt's mother described the Scotch-Irish: "They were evil. . . relentless, they were, of all men, best fitted to conquer the wilderness and hold it against all comers."

During those days sailing ships took several weeks to carry their cargo of immigrants to the British Colonies. The ship captains kept a list of passengers to collect their fares for the trip and to report anyone that may have been lost at sea. Some passenger records of these ships sailing from Irish Ports have survived to the present day. However, no listing of Irish passengers by the name of WILLIAM MCCLINTOCK and family sailing in 1763 have been discovered. Since the family is believed to have settled in Pennsylvania perhaps they entered the country through the Port of Philadelphia or Baltimore.

There were no immigration procedures or naturalization laws in 1763. During the colonial period citizenship was a natural thing for British subjects. The colonial government required allegiance to the British Crown but individuals were citizens of a particular colony. Only non-English people took the oath of allegiance to a colony so they might buy land from the Indians. In 1740 the British Parliament passed a law requiring a seven year residence period in a colony before renouncing a previous sovereign.

The first naturalization procedure was passed by the government of the United States in 1790. It made white males citizens of every state. The federal regulation of immigrants did not begin until 1875. So, there are no immigration or naturalization records to verify the date of the MCCLINTOCK family's entrance into America.

The only written record, so far, discovered to establish the date of the MCCLINTOCK family's migration is the Revolutionary War record of JOSEPH MCCLINTICK (variations of spellings are frequent in early records.) Joseph is the oldest son of WILLAM. He states in his application for a pension for service as a soldier in the War of the Revolution (Revolutionary War) that he was born in Ireland and came to this country in 1763. This pension application is dated January 24.1835 when Joseph was 83 years old. It seems probable that the entire family came to America that same year, as most immigrants traveled in family groups.

In the year 1763, WILLIAM MCCLINTOCK would have been 46 years old, his wife NANCY SHANKLIN, 40, his son JOSEPH 11, ROBERT 6, AND WILLIAM II was 4. There is no record of the dates of birth of the three daughters: Nancy, Jane and Margaret. The youngest child F. ALEXANDER, was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania on February 12, 1765.

http://www.dfamily.com/history/mcclintic/mcclintichist.html


William McClintic Posted 18 Jan 2015 by kmcxintee44 McCLINTIC FAMILY ORIGIN

The first record of the McClintock family originated in Argleshire Scotland near the shores of Loch Lomond about 40 miles north of Glasgow. A scotch bard sang the praise of a young stripling archer, Maclintock, shot the arrow that killed the chieftain, Black John McGregor, at the battle of Glenfruin in 1603. (See Sir Walter Scott's introductory chapter of his book "Rob Roy" for full details of this battle. The name MacClintock is an English version of the Gaelic name "Mac Giolla Fhintog". The word Lindsay was substituted for the unpronounceable word and the Scottish suffix "Mac" (means son of) was hooked on the front. To keep such a name from being confused with the English Lindsays, of Northern England, some letters were changed and others added to make it sound Scottish.

During the reign of King James I (1603-1625) of England, many Scott immigrants settled in Northern part of Ireland, known as Ulster. William Alexander McClintock was descended from the ancient Scottish family which was established in Northern Ireland when his ancestor Alexander McClintock emigrated from Argyleshire, Scotland about 1597 and settled on the estate of the Duke of Lennox, Ludovic Stewart who owned land in Northern Ireland and in Argyleshire, Scotland. Alexander II acquired title to the Rathdonnel Estate of 10,000 acres near Trinta County Donegal, Northern Ireland, which contained 4,000 acres of arable land, about 1650. This estate was devised at his death to his eldest son John. The main residence was Rothenstal Castle.

William Alexander McClintock and his wife Nancy Shanklin McClintock came to America in 1763, according to the Revolutionary War record of their son, Joseph. The family lived in what was then Lancaster County Pennsylvania until 1773. All of the children except Alexander McClintock were born in Ireland. In 1773 the family moved south to Virginia. In 1774 William purchased land on the east bank of the Jackson River in Botetourt County, Virginia (which became Bath County in 1779)

The population growth of the Jackson River Area

By 1774, the first of the families that would dominate the 19th century Jackson River Valley community had obtained land in the area. The family head was William McClintic I (1717-1801), an immigrant from Ireland. He started the family landholdings with 175 acres which he purchased from Andrew Borland for 154 pounds in Virginia currency on 8 February 1774 (McClintic Papers). Borland was the son-in-law of William Jackson who was the recipient of one of the two royal grants in 1750. Although William McClintic I and his family prospered in their new location in Virginia, they knew adversity as well. William McClintic II (1759-1786) had joined the army during the American Revolution and fought under General Nathaniel Greene at the Battle of Guilford courthouse in1781. He was wounded there, and died of complication from his wounds five years later. It was his son, William McClintic III, who became very influential and acquired much property in the Jackson River Valley. In 1801, William McClintic I left farms to his son Alexander and to his grandson, William III, both of whom were already building estates of their own. Within four decades, McClintic holdings were so extensive the members of the extended family paid taxes on the following property: William McClintic III, nine slaves and 2220.5 acres of land; his brother, Moses McClintic, seven slaves and 2102.5 acres of land; their mother, Alice Mann McClintic Cavendish, nine slaves and 1120 acres of land; and Alexander McClintic, son of William McClintic I, eight slaves and 525.5 acres of land. Source: (Iroquios Research Institute 1979) ---------------------------------------------- When his father emigrated from Tyrone Co., Ireland in 1725, William had smallbox and was unable to travel. He did not come to America until 1733. When William and Nancy moved their family to Botetourt Co., (later to be called Bath Co.), VA, in 1774, and William bought 175 acres along Jackson's River for 154 pounds in Virginia currency. He was a hearty frontiersman, raised seven children and was considered a man of moderate means when he died. At the time of his death, the children changed the spelling of the last name to McClintic.

In 1801, William McClintic I left acreage to his son Alexander and to his grandson, William III.

Please note that the Revolutionary War record for his son Joseph indicated that William and Nancy immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1763. This would place the birth location for all children except Alexander in Ireland, rather than in Pennsylvania.

William signed his will with his mark. He requested his wife Nancy live on the plantation where they now lived, specifying that she had requested he not leave her any more property, as it would be an incumbrance to her. He left her two cows that she should choose, her bed and furniture that she should choose, her saddle and one horse of her choosing, which she should decide how to dispose of when she died. he left his son Alexander McClintic the plantation where he and Nancy lived, and his mother was to live with them.

He left his grandson, William McClintic, son of his deceased son William McClintic, the plantation whereon his mother now lived. IF William should die before 21 or died without children, the plantation would go to William's brother Moses and, if Moses also died without children or before age 21, the property was left to his son Alexander. He then specified that anything that Nancy did not take that would include moveable property, negroes and stock, should be sold and the money to be divided equally among his sons, Joseph, Robert, Alexander, daughter Margaret, Nancy (less 40 pounds which she had borrowed from him) and one part of the children of Thomas Milhollen (children of his deceased daughter Jane). The children were to receive their inheritance to be paid by the Executor after they were married or had reached the age of 21.

He last request was a statement that because his wife Nancy desired that their Negro woman Bet not be parted from her chidren, that they be all sold together. His son-in-law, William Morris, was executor of the will.

Land records show William McClintic owned 175 acres.

By 1774, the first of the families that would dominate the 19th century Jackson River Valley community had obtained land in the area. The family head was William McClintic I (1717-1801), an immigrant from Ireland. He started the family landholdings with 175 acres that he purchased from Andrew Borland for 154 pounds in Virginia currency on February 8, 1774 (McClintic papers). Borland was the son-in-law of William Jackson who was the recipient of one of the two royal grants in 1750.

Although William McClintic I and his family prospered in their new location in VA, they knew adversity well. William McClintic II (1759-1786) had joined the army during the American Revolution and fought unter General Nathaniel Greene at the Battle of Guilford courthouse in 1781. He was wounded there and died of complications from his wounds five years later. It was his son, William McClintic III, who became very influential and acquired much property in the Jackson River Valley.

IN 1801, William McClintic I, left farms to his son Alexanderand to his grandson, William III, both of whom were already building estates of their own. Within four decades, McClintic holdings were so extensive the members of the extended family paid taxes on the following property: William McClintic III, nine slaves and 2220.5 acres of land; his brother Moses McClintic, seven slaves and 2102.5 acres of land; their mother, Alice Mann McClintic Cavendish, nine slaves and 1120 acres of land; and Alexander McClinic, son of William McClintic I, eight slaves and 525.5 acres of land. (Source: Iroquios Research Institute).

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William Alexander McClintock's Timeline

1717
1717
Trinta, Down, Tyrone Co., Ireland
1746
1746
Age 29
Augusta, Virginia, United States
1752
1752
Age 35
Ireland
1753
1753
Age 36
Ireland
1754
1754
Age 37
Ireland
1756
1756
Age 39
Ireland
1759
June 30, 1759
Age 42
Ireland
1760
1760
Age 43
Ireland
1765
February 12, 1765
Age 48
Lancaster County, PA, USA