Wyandanch, Grand Sachem of Montaukett

Montauk, Suffolk County, NY, United States

Wyandanch, Grand Sachem of Montaukett's Geni Profile

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Wyandanch, Grand Sachem of Montaukett

Also Known As: "Wyandance", "Speaks with Wisdom", "Chief "Ihayannough"", "Chief "Thyannough""
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Montauk Point, Suffolk, New York, United States
Death: 1659 (34-43)
Montauk Point, Suffolk, New York, United States
Place of Burial: Montauk, Suffolk County, NY, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Mongotucksee, Sachem of Montaukett and Quashawan
Husband of Wuch-I-Kit-Tau-But
Father of Wyancombone and Quashawam, Sunksquaw of Shinnecock
Brother of Poggaticutt, Grand Sachem of Manhasset; Momometou, Sachem of Corchaug; Nowedonah, Sachem of Shinnecock and Awansamwge

Occupation: Sachem of the Montauk Indians on Long Island, NY, Sachem-Mohegans & Montauks, Chief Grand Sachem, Sachem of the Mattachee of the Wampanoag Nation, Algonquian Confedercy, Sachem of Cummaquid Tribe, Sagamore Tribal Member at Cummaquid, Massachusetts
Birth: Wyandanch (Wyandice, Wyandance), was born , probably near Eaton's Neck, Long Island, died 1659, was a Montauk Indian sachem, His name translates as "wise speaker".
INFO: He was the most distinguished of the Montauk sachems who had authority over a confederacy of thirteen distinct tribes on what is now Long Island, New York.
Label -A: https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/LY4Y-JHL
Label -B: Alternate Name • Birth Name Wyandance Grand Sachem Montauk Long
Label -C: Alternate Name • Also Known As Wyantanch, "The Wise Speaker"
Label -D: Alternate Name • Also Known As Mohawk Sachem Caniachkoo
Label -E: Tribe • Known as Medicine Person of Kanienkeha Ka Tock Also as Sachen of Turtle Clan
Label -F: Death Record Smallpox Reason This Information Is Correct: Some people believe he was poisioned and did not die of smallpox.
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Wyandanch, Grand Sachem of Montaukett

An early genealogy of the Van Tassel family advanced the theory Wyandanch was the father of Catoneras, the Indian wife of Cornelis van Tassel. The theory is impossible on chronological grounds.

Wyandanch (Wyandice, Wyandance), born about 1620, probably near Eaton's Neck, Long Island, died 1659, was a Montauk Indian sachem, His name translates as "wise speaker". He was the most distinguished of the Montauk sachems who had authority over a confederacy of thirteen distinct tribes on what is now Long Island, New York.

Before the arrival of the Europeans the Montauks (or Montauketts, the seventeenth-century spelling revived by tribal members in the 1990s) located their villages along the banks of freshwater streams and tidal bays in the coastal areas on the southern fork of eastern Long Island in what is now the state of New York.

Wynandanch was friendly to the white settlers. Following the English destruction of the Pequot villages in Connecticut in 1637, he negotiated an alliance with the victors and encouraged the English to establish settlements on eastern Long Island. The English support enabled Wyandanch to become one of the most influential sachems on Long Island. By 1700, however, the English had taken possession of the Montauks' lands, leaving the Indians with only residence rights to a small area near the present-day village of Montauk.


Wyandance was chief and Grand Sachem of the thirteen tribes of Long Island. He figured as a great leader of his people against their enemies, while remaining a friend to white settlers. He sold land to both the Dutch and the English during the establishment of New Amsterdam and later New York. The thirteen tribes of Long Island were as follows: the Montauks, Manhassets, Shinnecocks, Corchaugs, Unkechaugs, Setauketts, Secktaugs, Nissaquogues, ,Merricokes, Marsapeagues, Matinecocks, Rockaways, and Canarsies. All were of the great Algonquin stock. >>>>>>>Each tribe had a Sachem or chief. Those of the four eastern tribes were brothers. The Over-lordship of these brothers and all the other tribes was given to Wyandance the Sachem of the Montauks, the most fierce of all the other tribes of Long Island. Wyandance the most noted of the Grand Sachems by the white race, did not hold that position at the first coming of the whites. He succeeded to it on the death of his brother Poggatacut, sachem of the Manhansetts in 1652. >>>>>>>Wyandance and the Montauks lived east of the South Hampton and East Hampton boundary line, the Shinnecocks, lived on the land westward from the Montauks to West Hampton. >>>>>>>Wyandance died in 1659. His alliance with the whites gave his people independence from his enemies on the main land, during his life time. but in the long run destroyed them through disease and being disinherited by the whites from their lands. By the year 1900, their language and culture had nearly been completely destroyed. >>>>>>>Cantoneras, the daughter of Wyandance,and his wife married Cornelius Jensen VAN TEXEL abt.1624. Cantoneras claimed the ownership of that portion of Long Island, situated along the North Shore, or sound, abt. Eatons" Neck in Suffolk County. She died shorly after her father in 1659 or 1660.

VAN TASSEL FAMILY Cornelius Jensen VAN TEXEL b. abt. 1600, Isle of Texel, North Holland; prob. arrived New Netherlands abt. 1624; lived Long Island; married Cantoneras (dau. of Wyandance); child: 1. Jan Cornelius VAN TEXEL b. 1625 d. 1704; md. Annetje (dau. of Albert and Grietje (STEVENKONIN)) ALBERTS. He was selected to represent the Long Island Indians before Commissioners appointed to settle the wars between the Pequots, Narragansetts and other tribes.

Catoneras, the dau. of Wyandance (the Sachem or Chief) of the tribe - claimed the ownership of that portion of Long Island, situated along the North Shore, or sound, abt. Eatons' Neck in Suffolk Co.; her father d. in 1659 and she shortly thereafter.

__________________________________________________________________

That Cockenoe took an active part in marking the bounds of the tract of land between Huntington and Setauket, now comprised in the town of Smithtown, presented to Lion Gardiner by Wyandanch on July 14, i659, 45 as a token of love and esteem in ransoming his captive daughter and friends from the Narragan setts, 45 Book of Deeds, vol. ii. pp. 118-19, Office of the Secretary of State, Albany. The original is now in the possession of the Long Island Historical Society :

"Bee it knowne unto all men, both English and Indians, especially the inhabitants of Long Island : that I Wyandance Sachame, of Pamanack, with my wife and son Wiancombone, my only sonn and heire, haveinge delyberately considered how this twenty-foure years wee have bene not only acquainted with Lion : Gardiner, but from time to time have reseived much kindness of him and from him, not onely by counsell and advise in our prosperitie, but in our great extremytie, when wee were almost swallowed upp of our enemies, then wee say he apeared to us not onely as a friend, but as a father, in giveinge us his monie and goods, wherby wee defended ourselves, and ransomd my daughter and friends, and wee say and know that by his meanes we had great comfort Cockenoe-de-Long Island. 39 is worthy of note, for it is evident that the Sachem had no one else so capable. In confirmation of this surmise and my belief that he had a prominent part in all the land transactions of Wyandanch, my friend William S. Pelletreau, who is preparing the early records of the town of Smithtown for publication, has lately found recorded, in a dispute over the lands of Smithtown, a deposition taken down by John Mulford of East Hampton, dated October 18, 1667, which reads: " Pauquatoun, formerly Chiefe Councellor to the Old Sachem Wyandance testifieth that the Old Sachem Wyandance appointed Sakkatakka and and reliefe from the most honarable of the English nation heare about us ; soe that seinge wee yet live, and both of us beinge now ould, and not that wee at any time have given him any thinge to gratifie his fatherly love, care and charge, we haveinge nothing left that is worth his acceptance but a small tract of land which we desire him to Accept of for himselfe, his heires, executors and assignes forever ; now that it may bee knowne how and where that land lieth on Long Island, we say it lieth betwene Huntington and Seatacut, the westerne bounds being Cowharbor, easterly Arhata-a-munt, and southerly crosse the Island to the end of the great hollow or valley, or more, then half through the Island southerly, and that this gift is our free act and deede, doth appeare by our hand martcs under writ." Wayandance's mark represents an Indian and a white shaking hands.



Birth: 1571 Montauk Suffolk County New York, USA Death: 1659 Montauk Suffolk County New York, USA

Under the government of Wyandanch,if not previously,this tribe acquired by their martial virtues andthe skill of their chieftain,a powerful ascendency over the other tribes of the Island,who by tribute,deference,or otherwise,acknowledged their superiority.At this time they appear to have been numerous."In the year 1658 Wyandanch,sachem of Montaukett,Plaintiff,prosecuted Jeremy Daily,Defendant,for an injury done to his"great cannow."The case was tried by the"three men,and the Jury in the cause rendered a verdict of ten shillings as damages for the plaintiff.(history of east Hampton,New York,p-54)WYANDANK'S DEED TO LION GARDINER,OF SMITHTOWN. East Hampton,july 14,1659 Bee it Knowne unto all men,both English and Indians especially the Inhabitants of Long Island that I Wyandance Sachem of Pamanack,with my wife and sonn Wiankanbonem,my only sonn and heir,havinge delyberately considered how this twentie-four years wee have bene not only acquaited with Lion Gardiner,but from time to time have recived much kindnes of him and from him,not onely by counsell and advice in our prosperitie,but in our great extremytie,when wee were almost swallowed upp of our enemies,then wee say he apeared to us not only as a friend,but as a father,in givinge us his monie and goods, whereby wee defended ourselves,and ransomed my daughter and friends, and weesay and know that by his manes we had great comfort and reliefe from the most honorable of the English nation here about us: soe that seigne wee yet live,and both of us being now ould,and not that wee at any time have given him anythige to gratifie his fatherly love,care and charge,we havinge noting left that is worth his acceptance but asmall tract of land which wee desire him to Accept of for himself,his heirs,executors and assignes forever,now that it may be knowne how and where that land beinge Cowharbor,easterly Arhata a munt,and southerly ercrosse the Island to the end of the great hollow or valley,or more than helf through the Island southerly;and that this gaft is our free act and deede:sealed and delivered in the presence of Witnes:Richard Smith,Thomas Chatfield,Thomas Tallmmage,Wayandance his(88)mark,Wiankombone his(M)mark,The Sachems Wife her(Swq)mark The original deed is in the possession of the Long Island Historical Society,Brooklyn,NY.see Woods history,L.I.p-198 The children are 1).Weincombone(b.1598-d.1663) 2).Catoneras(b.1603-m.Cornelius Jensen van Texel 1624 NY.)3).Also Wyandanch & Wuch-I-kit-tau-but had a daughter Quashawam she married the Pequot Sachem Mau-gau-wan-met see Uncas geneology,in which he mentions that Maugauwanmet has married only remaining royal blood of long Island.

Family links:

Spouse:
  Wuch-i-ki-tau-but (1575 - 1660)*
Children:
 Quashawam (____ - 1658)*
  Weincombone (1598 - 1663)*
  Catoneras (1603 - 1659)*
  • Point here for explanation

Burial: Montauk Indian Burial Ground Montauk Suffolk County New York, USA

Created by: nelson carey Record added: Jan 16, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 32959012



Long Knife per Montauckett Nation Historian. https://www.mptn-nsn.gov/government.aspx


The parents of Rebecca Bell who married Francis Bell of Stamford are not known.



Under the government of Wyandanch,if not previously,this tribe acquired by their martial virtues andthe skill of their chieftain,a powerful ascendency over the other tribes of the Island,who by tribute,deference,or otherwise,acknowledged their superiority.At this time they appear to have been numerous."In the year 1658 Wyandanch,sachem of Montaukett,Plaintiff,prosecuted Jeremy Daily,Defendant,for an injury done to his"great cannow."The case was tried by the"three men,and the Jury in the cause rendered a verdict of ten shillings as damages for the plaintiff.(history of east Hampton,New York,p-54)WYANDANK'S DEED TO LION GARDINER,OF SMITHTOWN. East Hampton,july 14,1659 Bee it Knowne unto all men,both English and Indians especially the Inhabitants of Long Island that I Wyandance Sachem of Pamanack,with my wife and sonn Wiankanbonem,my only sonn and heir,havinge delyberately considered how this twentie-four years wee have bene not only acquaited with Lion Gardiner,but from time to time have recived much kindnes of him and from him,not onely by counsell and advice in our prosperitie,but in our great extremytie,when wee were almost swallowed upp of our enemies,then wee say he apeared to us not only as a friend,but as a father,in givinge us his monie and goods, whereby wee defended ourselves,and ransomed my daughter and friends, and weesay and know that by his manes we had great comfort and reliefe from the most honorable of the English nation here about us: soe that seigne wee yet live,and both of us being now ould,and not that wee at any time have given him anythige to gratifie his fatherly love,care and charge,we havinge noting left that is worth his acceptance but asmall tract of land which wee desire him to Accept of for himself,his heirs,executors and assignes forever,now that it may be knowne how and where that land beinge Cowharbor,easterly Arhata a munt,and southerly ercrosse the Island to the end of the great hollow or valley,or more than helf through the Island southerly;and that this gaft is our free act and deede:sealed and delivered in the presence of Witnes:Richard Smith,Thomas Chatfield,Thomas Tallmmage,Wayandance his(88)mark,Wiankombone his(M)mark,The Sachems Wife her(Swq)mark The original deed is in the possession of the Long Island Historical Society,Brooklyn,NY.see Woods history,L.I.p-198 The children are 1).Weincombone(b.1640-d.1663) 2).Catoneras(b.1603-m.Cornelius Jensen van Texel 1624 NY.)3).Also Wyandanch & Wuch-I-kit-tau-but had a daughter Quashawam she married the Pequot Sachem Mau-gau-wan-met see Uncas geneology,in which he mentions that Maugauwanmet has married only remaining royal blood of long Island.

References

Under the government of Wyandanch,if not previously,this tribe acquired by their martial virtues andthe skill of their chieftain,a powerful ascendency over the other tribes of the Island,who by tribute,deference,or otherwise,acknowledged their superiority.At this time they appear to have been numerous."In the year 1658 Wyandanch,sachem of Montaukett,Plaintiff,prosecuted Jeremy Daily,Defendant,for an injury done to his"great cannow."The case was tried by the"three men,and the Jury in the cause rendered a verdict of ten shillings as damages for the plaintiff.(history of east Hampton,New York,p-54)WYANDANK'S DEED TO LION GARDINER,OF SMITHTOWN. East Hampton,july 14,1659 Bee it Knowne unto all men,both English and Indians especially the Inhabitants of Long Island that I Wyandance Sachem of Pamanack,with my wife and sonn Wiankanbonem,my only sonn and heir,havinge delyberately considered how this twentie-four years wee have bene not only acquaited with Lion Gardiner,but from time to time have recived much kindnes of him and from him,not onely by counsell and advice in our prosperitie,but in our great extremytie,when wee were almost swallowed upp of our enemies,then wee say he apeared to us not only as a friend,but as a father,in givinge us his monie and goods, whereby wee defended ourselves,and ransomed my daughter and friends, and weesay and know that by his manes we had great comfort and reliefe from the most honorable of the English nation here about us: soe that seigne wee yet live,and both of us being now ould,and not that wee at any time have given him anythige to gratifie his fatherly love,care and charge,we havinge noting left that is worth his acceptance but asmall tract of land which wee desire him to Accept of for himself,his heirs,executors and assignes forever,now that it may be knowne how and where that land beinge Cowharbor,easterly Arhata a munt,and southerly ercrosse the Island to the end of the great hollow or valley,or more than helf through the Island southerly;and that this gaft is our free act and deede:sealed and delivered in the presence of Witnes:Richard Smith,Thomas Chatfield,Thomas Tallmmage,Wayandance his(88)mark,Wiankombone his(M)mark,The Sachems Wife her(Swq)mark The original deed is in the possession of the Long Island Historical Society,Brooklyn,NY.see Woods history,L.I.p-198 The children are 1).Weincombone(b.1640-d.1663) 2).Catoneras(b.1603-m.Cornelius Jensen van Texel 1624 NY.)3).Also Wyandanch & Wuch-I-kit-tau-but had a daughter Quashawam she married the Pequot Sachem Mau-gau-wan-met see Uncas geneology,in which he mentions that Maugauwanmet has married only remaining royal blood of long Island.


Iyannough (also Iyanough) was a Native American sachem and leader of the Mattachiest (Mattakeese) tribe of Cummaquid in the area of what is now Barnstable, Massachusetts. The town of Hyannis, the Wianno section of Osterville, and Iyanough Road (Route 132) are all named after him.

Historic records mention the assistance and entertainment offered by him and his tribe towards the Pilgrims and later colonists. When the son of Mayflower passenger John Billington wandered away from the new settlement at Plymouth in January 1621, Iyannough assisted William Bradford and his party in finding the boy [1]. The sachem impressed the Pilgrims as being personable, gentle, courteous, and fair-conditioned [2].

He died in 1623 when he was only in his mid-twenties. Following a surprise attack by the Pilgrims on the Massachusett tribe that winter, many Native Americans in the region including Iyannough grew fearful of the colonists and fled to hide in the area's swamps and remote islands [3]. It is believed that Iyannough himself died of exposure during this time. Upon his early death his lands went to his eldest son Yanno [4] (aka John Hyanno). Yanno is mentioned in several land deeds on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard and appears to have been a prominent figure in the early settlement of the communities.

In the mid 19th century, a farmer plowing his field discovered what is believed to be Iyannough's grave [5]. The gravesite is just north of Route 6A in the Cummaquid section of Barnstable and is maintained by a non-profit organization called "Tales of Cape Cod." A sign along Route 6A marks the spot.

A statue of Iyannough can be found today on the village green in downtown Hyannis.

Iyanough

Alive in Jun 1621.(56) Iyanough was sachem of Cummaquid, according to Mourt. Drake cites Mourt in the following. He then appeared about 26 years of age," but very personable, gentle, courteous and fair-conditioned, indeed, not like a savage, save for his attire. His entertainment was answerable to his parts, and his cheer plentiful and various."

The English were once again entertained by Iyanough upon their return to Plymouth when weather forced them to touch again at Cummaquid.

He was among those who came to have such dread of the English that they "forsook their wonted habitations, fled into the swamps, and lived in unhealthy places, in a state of starvation, until many died with diseases which they had thus contracted." [Drake, 78]


A journal titled “Mourt’s Relation” was written primarily by Edward Winslow, although William Bradford appears to have written most of the first section. Written between November 1620 and November 1621, it describes in detail what happened from the landing of the Pilgrims at Cape Cod, though their exploring and eventual settling at Plymouth, to their relations with the surrounding Indians, up to the First Thanksgiving and the arrival of the ship Fortune. Iyannough is described as 'a man not exceeding twenty-six years of age, but very personable, gentle, courteous, and fair conditioned, indeed not like the savage, save for his attire; his entertainment was answerable to his parts, and his cheer plentiful and various.'


Iyannough was the sachem of the Mattachee village of the Wampanoag. Iyanough, Sachem of the eastern part of Sandy neck and Barnstable, Mass. Iyanough helped a 10 man search party from Plymouth including WIlliam Bradford recover a boy named John Billington and son of Mayflower passenger from no fewer than 100 Nawsett Indians who could have sought retribution for several members of their tribe sold earlier by an English captain into slavery. Billington was later executed for murder. The sachem impressed the Pilgrims as being personable, gentle, courteous, and fair-conditioned

He died in 1623 when he was only in his mid-twenties. Following a surprise attack by the Pilgrims on the Massachusett tribe that winter, many Native Americans in the region including Iyannough grew fearful of the colonists including Miles Standish and fled to hide in the area's swamps and remote islands . It is believed that Iyannough himself died of exposure during this time. Upon his early death his lands went to his eldest son Yanno (aka John Hyanno). Yanno is mentioned in several land deeds on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard and appears to have been a prominent figure in the early settlement of the communities.

There is a statue, located in Hyannis, by David Lewis, a local sculpture. Iyannough's grave was allegedly unearthed by Daniel Davis in Cummaquid and a plaque has been erected on Route 6A east of Bone Hill Road. Iyanough gives his name to Hyannis and the Wiano section of Osterville

Edward O. Handy, Barnstable Village and Wikipedia article on Iyannough. Willison, George F. (1945). Saints and Strangers. New York: Reynal & Hitchcock, pp 228-229.


http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bevangene...

•ID: I14065

•Name: Chief Sachem IHYANNOUGH (THYANNOUGH)

•Given Name: Chief Sachem

•Surname: IHYANNOUGH (THYANNOUGH)

•Sex: M

•Change Date: 13 MAY 2009

•Note:

Iyanough was the chief sachem of the the Cummaquid tribe. The Pilgrims had landed in his area when they were searching for the Nausets. He told them that young John Billington, whom the Nausets had found lost in the woods and taken, was just fine. He gave the Pilgrims a big dinner with entertainment. He then came aboard the shallop and sailed with the Pilgrims leading them to the Nausets. When they arrived, the tide was out and they could not come ashore, but Iyanough swam ashore to inform Aspinet--the chief sachem of the Nausets--of the Pilgrims arrival.

After the Pilgrims left the Nausets, the wind did not allow them to get home directly, and so they ended up back with Iyanough again. The Pilgrims being very thirsty, Iyanough led an expedition in search of some fresh water for them to drink. The Cummaquid tribe held another celebration of singing and dancing. The next day Iyanough gave them the water they needed, and the Pilgrims made their way back to Plymouth.

The Pilgrims described Iyanough as follows: Iyanough, a man not exceeding twenty-six years of age, but very personable, gentle, courteous, and fair conditioned, indeed not like a savage, save for his attire. His entertainment was answerable to his parts, and his cheer plentiful and various.

Iyanough died before March 1623 of a disease which swept Cape Cod early that year.

1

•Birth: 1565 in Cape Cod, Barnstable, Massachusetts, USA

•Death: 1622 in Of Barnstable, Massachusetts, USA

Marriage 1 Princess Of The Narragansitts CANONICUS b: ABT 1569 in Of Cape Cod, Barnstable, Massachusetts, USA

•Married: 1590 in Of Cape Cod, Barnstable, Massachusetts, USA



Hyannis, MA. named after him. Sachem of the Mattachee Village of Wampanoags of Cape Cod. From him Hyannie & Wianno derived their names. Historic site marker on Rte. 6A in Cummaquid, MA., the ancestral home of the Cummaquid Wampanoags states: 'North of here a table marks the grave of Iyahnough Indian Sachem who aided the Pilgrims in 1621.'

Source: 'The Middler' (Newsletter of the Society of Middletown First Settler Descendants,

           CT. U.S.A.)


Dear Friends:

I have been asked to post what I believe to be the line of the Sachim Iyannough based on what I have been taught by oral tradition and family genealogies. This information may not be entirely correct but should be viewed as oral history and open to your judgments. I do not propose to be the best authority, but please bare with me as I explain what I believe to be true.

The Wampanoag people were a confederation of southern New England tribal groups, separate from each other, but with a common language and cultural base. At the time of the first English in the early 1600's there were over 60 different tribal groups within the confederation. Mary Hyanno was Mattachee also sometimes called Cummaquids, Chawmun or Shaumes.

The word Mattachee translates to "place of worn planting fields." The area around Barnstable was called Mattachee/Mattachiest, with the Yarmouth area known as Mattakeeset. The Mattachee were under authority of a local leader (Iyannough) but also pledged themselves to Ousamequin, the Massasoyt at Pokenoket who was in power over much of the area. The Mattachee were closely related to the Nauset people who were located further up the Cape and who often did not join in the Wampanoag confederation. My oral tradition:

1. Highyannough: Old Cape Sachim, father of Iyannough, said to have married daughter of Canonicus, Narragansett Sachim.

2. Iyannough: Young Sagamore at Cummaquid, father of John Hyanno and Mary Hyanno. Said to have married Mary, aka Mary Nopee who was daughter of Martha's Vineyard Sachim. He was accused of being a conspirator with Massachusett people to overthrow the English. He went into hiding in swamps on the Cape and died of sickness the year of his daughters birth, along with the Sagamores Coneconam of Manamet and Aspinet of Nauset.

3. John Hyanno: Brother of Mary Hyanno and Sachim at Cummaquid and also on Martha's Vineyard, (mother's connection).

4. Mary Hyanno, daughter of Iyannough, granddaughter of Highyannough, brother of John Hyanno.

My belief is: Highyannough born 1554 to 1641 died at 87 yrs.

Iyannough born 1565 to 1623 died at 58 yrs.

John Hyanno born1620 to 1680 died at 60 yrs.

Highyannough, Iyannough, and John Hyanno are sometimes confused and combined with each other. Iyannough died in the swamps at a very young age of 28 or so, the same year of his daughters birth. Mary was raised by her grandfather and later her brother until taken in marriage by Austin Bearce in 1639 at about 15 or 16 years of age.

In the early days of the English 1621 to his death in 1623 Iyannough would have not been given the Christian name of John as some say, as there was no missionary contact on the Cape in those early times. His son and daughter were most likely given Christian names of John and Mary after his death when the English became more established on the Cape.

The grandfather who died in his late 80's is the most likely source of the land given to Austin. The grandson, John Hyanno with other variations of his name, became the leader in the area and also is shown on deeds of land on the Cape as well as on Martha's Vineyard where he died in 1680. Historical birth and death dates do not indicate that the three men could have been one in the same.

Thank you for your kindness,

"Nunocksuk Matannash" (My name means: "There are many stars") iootash [:ITAL] --courtesy of Alice Raven

GEDCOM Source ===

Ancestry Family Tree http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=113334805&pi...

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Wyandanch, Grand Sachem of Montaukett's Timeline

1565
1565
1620
1620
Montauk Point, Suffolk, New York, United States
1641
1641
Islank Nasamo, Montauk, Suffolk Co., NY, United States
1643
1643
Eatons Neck, Suffolk, New York, USA
1659
1659
Age 39
Montauk Point, Suffolk, New York, United States

Chased into a swamp area by Miles Stanish where Iyanough died.

????
Dutch Reformed Church, New York, Dutch Royal Colony
????
Mattachee village, Cape Cod, Massachusetts
????
USA