Zemuzil-Siemomysl Piast, Duke of Pomerania

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Zemuzil-Siemomysl Piast, Duke of Pomerania

Polish: Zemuzil-Siemomysł Piast, Duke of Pomerania, Czech: Zemožil-Siemomysł Piast, vévoda pomořanský, Latin: Zemuzil dux Bomeraniorum (Piast), dux Bomeraniorum
Also Known As: "Eponym Swantiborides of Pomerania"
Birthdate:
Death: after June 29, 1046
Immediate Family:

Son of dux Lambert Mieszko Piast and NN2
Husband of Y0
Father of Swantibor I Piast, Duke of East Pomerian-Danzig

Managed by: Private User
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About Zemuzil-Siemomysl Piast, Duke of Pomerania

https://archive.vn/20120708184043/http://www.dmgh.de/de/fs2/object/display/bsb00000449_00155.html?sortIndex=030:040:0005:010:00:00

__________wikipedia______

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemomys%C5%82,_Duke_of_Pomerania

Siemomysł, Siemosił, or Zemuzil (fl. 11th century) was the first historically verifiable Duke of Pomerania, recorded in 1046 in the Annals of Niederaltaich (Annales Altahensis maiorum).

Historical record The Annals record reads: "His omnibus peractis rex inde discessit ac Mersiburc, natale sancti Iohannis celebraturus [24 June], perrexit. Illuc etiam Bratizlao dux Boemorum, Kazmir Bolaniorum, Zemuzil Bomeraniorum advenerunt atque regem donis decentibus honoraverunt. [...] Inde discedens apostolorum Petri et Pauli festa [29 June] Mihsina celebravit ubi etiam conventionem secundo habens duces praefatos inter se pacificavit." (Annales Altahensis maiorum ad a. 1046)[1]

This entry describes Zemuzil's attendance of a meeting with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor in Merseburg ("Mersiburc") on 24 June 1046, along with Bretislaus I, Duke of Bohemia ("Bratizlao dux Boemorum") and Casimir I of Poland ("Kazmir Bolaniorum").[2] The dukes "honored the emperor with decent gifts", which according to Schmidt (2009) was the payment of tribute.[2] In a second meeting on 29 June in Meißen ("Mihsin"), according to the document, the "aforementioned dukes" concluded a mutual peace agreement.[2]

Scholarly assessment Nature of the dispute Roderich Schmidt (2009) assumes that the peace referenced in the document was necessary, among other reasons, because of fights between Zemuzil and Casimir, and that Zemuzil aided Miecław of Mazovia who had fought against Casimir, previously expelled from Poland but restored with Henry's aid, and was defeated.[3] According to Edward Rymar (2005) the most likely nature of the dispute was the non payment of tribute by the Pomeranian duke to Casimir. After Henry's intermediation Zemuzil failed to pay feudal dues and Casimir invaded and took control of Pomerania in the following year (1047).[4]

Žemužilse's realm According to Schmidt it is not possible on the basis of the 1046 record to decide the location of his realm.[5] Edward Rymar, following Łowmiański, believes that Žemužilis was a ruler of a unified Pomeranian state with its center in Kołobrzeg (Kolberg) rather than a smaller duchy, which explains why he was treated by Henry as a co-equal with the rulers of Bohemia and Poland.[6] Schmidt also argues that the mention of Žemužilis along with Bretislaus and Casimir suggest that they were equal in status, and that the political organisation of his realm in 1046 resembled the Bohemian and Polish ones.[5]

On the other hand, Stabenow (1995) says that the great majority of historians regard Zemuzil as ruler of only a part of the area between Oder, Baltic Sea, Vistula, Warta and Noteć, and that the location of his realm within this area is disputed.[7] Stabenow further says that the 1046 entry constitutes the first written record of the Baltic Pomeranians.[8]

Name Historians have made several attempts to reconstruct the duke's Slavic name from the version recorded by a German chronicler, "Žemužils".[9] Before the connection between the document from 1040 and the one from 1046 was made the name was variously rendered as Ziemomysł (by Oswald Balcer), Siemosił (by Aleksander Brückner) and even Wszemysł (this particular variant has been abandoned as a hypothesis). Zygmunt Wojciechowski in consultation with Slavicists considered "Žemužilis" to correspond to the diminutive form "Siemysł", short for "Siemomysł".[9] The name appears among the members of the Piast dynasty with the Polish duke Siemomysł and the stem "-Siem", referring to "family" (hence "Siemomysł" is someone "thoughtful of their family"), is also found in the Piast name of the half-legendary Siemowit.[9]

Religion According to Rymar, Zemuzil was most likely a Christian or otherwise he would not have had Henry's support, although he might have kept this fact hidden from his still mostly pagan subjects.[10]

Proposed genealogies According to Edward Rymar, Zemuzil is often thought to have been the father or the grand father of the Pomeranian Duke Świętobor I.[6] Schmidt says it is not possible on the basis of the 1046 record to decide whether Zemuzil was an ancestor of later Pomeranian dukes, and cites similar conclusions of other German historians Martin Wehrmann and Adolf Hofmeister.[5]

The 19th century German historian Johann Ludwig Quandt believed that Zemuzil and other early Pomeranian dukes of the Griffin dynasty descended from Polish nobility of Lesser Poland, that Zemuzil was made a voivode of his duchy by the Polish king Bolesław I Chrobry, and that he was the grand father of Świętobor I.[11] The Austro-Polish historian Oswald Balzer linked the duke with the Piast dynasty through a matrilineal connection, making his mother the daughter of Bolesław I Chrobry.[10] In a similar way, Henryk Łowmiański saw Zemuzil as the son of a daughter of Mieszko I, the first historical ruler of Poland.[12]

Gerard Labuda said that Zemuzil was most likely related to the Piasts through his mother.[12] Rymar says that the 1040 document is one of the reasons why Zemuzil is sometimes thought to be related to the Polish Piast dynasty.[9] Stanisław Zakrzewski believed the duke to be a brother of the Dytryk proposed as the father of Sememizl by Labuda, and also hypothesized that Zemuzil was an ancestor of Świętobor.[13]

Sememizl A document from 1040 mentions a Sememizl.[14] This document is a record of Henry III bestowing upon the cathedral in Naumburg few villages which Sememizl previously held as fiefs from Henry III. According to Edward Rymar, Sememizl is generally identified with Zemuzil due to rarity of this name among Polish Piasts and Pomeranian dukes.[9] Gerard Labuda doubted a connection between Zemuzil and Sememizl, whom he thought to be a son of Dytryk, one of the step brothers of Chrobry who had been banished by the Polish king to Germany.[12]

References

"Annales Altahensis maiorum ad a. 1046, in: Scriptores rerum Germanicarum in usum scholarum separatim editi (SS rer. Germ.), dMGH.de, p. 41". Archived from the original on 2012-07-08.
Schmidt, Roderich (2009). Das historische Pommern. Personen, Orte, Ereignisse (in German) (2 ed.). Köln/Weimar: Böhlau Verlag. p. 55. ISBN 3-412-20436-6.
Schmidt, Roderich (2009). Das historische Pommern. Personen, Orte, Ereignisse (in German) (2 ed.). Köln/Weimar: Böhlau Verlag. pp. 55–56. ISBN 3-412-20436-6. Referring to Steindorff, Ernst (1874): Jahrbücher des Deutschen Reichs unter Heinrich III. pp. 298ff., source cited there is Chron. Polon. Lib. I c.20, c.21
Edward Rymar, Rodowód książąt pomorskich (Genealogy of Dukes of Pomerania), Książnica Pomorska, 2005, pg. 79
Schmidt, Roderich (2009). Das historische Pommern. Personen, Orte, Ereignisse (in German) (2 ed.). Köln/Weimar: Böhlau Verlag. p. 56. ISBN 3-412-20436-6.
Edward Rymar, Rodowód książąt pomorskich (Genealogy of Dukes of Pomerania), Książnica Pomorska, 2005, pg. 78
Stabenow, Ulf (1995). "Die Entstehung der Pomoranen". In Müller-Wille, Michael (ed.). Slawen und Deutsche im südlichen Ostseeraum vom 11. bis zum 16. Jahrhundert. Archäologische, historische und sprachwissenschaftliche Beispiele aus Schleswig-Holstein, Mecklenburg und Pommern. Vorträge Symposium Kiel, 18.-19. Oktober 1993. pp. 127-148 (in German). Neumünster: Wachholtz. p. 134. ISBN 3529064521.
Stabenow, Ulf (1995). "Die Entstehung der Pomoranen". In Müller-Wille, Michael (ed.). Slawen und Deutsche im südlichen Ostseeraum vom 11. bis zum 16. Jahrhundert. Archäologische, historische und sprachwissenschaftliche Beispiele aus Schleswig-Holstein, Mecklenburg und Pommern. Vorträge Symposium Kiel, 18.-19. Oktober 1993. pp. 127-148 (in German). Neumünster: Wachholtz. p. 130. ISBN 3529064521.
Rymar, pg. 77
Rymar, pgs. 40-41
Rymar, pg. 38
Rymar, pg. 46
Rymar, pg. 59
"MGH DD H III Nr. 60". Archived from the original on 2012-07-08.; Rymar (2005), p. 

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https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemomys%C5%82_pomorski

https://lubimyczytac.pl/ksiazka/208635/piesn-swantibora

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Pomeranian_duchies_and_dukes#Non-dynastic_2 https://www.academia.edu/36144807/Arch%C3%A4ologische_Zeugen_der_ersten_Missionsreise_Bischof_Ottos_in_Pommern?email_work_card=view-paperDukes of the Slavic Pomeranian tribes (All Pomerania)

The lands of Pomerania were firstly ruled by local tribes, who settled in Pomerania around the 10th and 11th centuries. Non-dynastic Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Siemomysł c.1000 or 1020 After 1000–1046 c.29 June 1046 All Pomerania Unknown First known duke of all Pomerania. His origins are unknown. Świętobor before 1046 1060–1106 1106 All Pomerania Anna Son of Siemomysl. Świętopełk I before 1106 1106–1113 1113 Pomerania-Danzig (future Pomerelia) Unknown

In 1106, Pomerania is divided by his two older sons: Wartislaw, who founded the House of Pomerania and the Duchy of Pomerania, and Świętopełk I. After Swietopelk's death, his lands were occupied by the Saxon prince Lothar of Supplinburg. In 1155, the lands regained independence under Sobieslaw I, who founded the dynasty of the Samborides, and the Duchy of Pomerelia. Duchy of Pomerania Further information: Duchy of Pomerania

The Duchy resulted from the partition of Świętobor, Duke of Pomerania, in which his son Wartislaw inherited the lands that would become in fact known as Pomerania. The Pomeranian Griffin Partitions of Pomerania First partition 1155–1264

In 1155, Pomerania was divided in Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Demmin. In 1190 the Land of Słupsk-Sławno separated itself from -Stettin.

In 1231 Emperor Frederick II granted the immediate liege lordship over Pomerania to the Margrave of Brandenburg, who enforced this claim by the Treaties of Kremmen (1236) and of Landin (1250). Thus Pomerania had become a fief of Brandenburg, thus an only mediate (indirect) subfief of the Empire, with Brandenburg itself being an immediate imperial fief.

In 1227, Stolp came to Pomerelia, Schlawe to Pomerania. In 1238–1316 both became part of Pomerelia, ruled by an autonomously acting dynasty of castellans, the Swenzones (German: Swenzonen, entering history in 1257 with Swenzo the Elder). In 1316, the area became part of the Pomerania-Wolgast, first as a pawn from Brandenburg, and definitively in 1347.

After Wartislaw III died heirless in 1264, Barnim I became sole duke of the whole duchy. After Barnim's death, the duchy was to be ruled by his sons Barnim II, Otto I and Bogislaw IV. The first years, Bogislaw, being the eldest, ruled in place of his too young brothers. Second partition 1295–1368

In 1295, the Duchy of Pomerania was divided roughly by the Peene and Ina (Ihna) rivers, with the areas north of these rivers ruled by Bogislaw IV became Pomerania-Wolgast, whereas Otto I received Pomerania-Szczecin south of these rivers. Third partition 1368–1376

In 1368, Pomerania-Wolgast was divided into a western part (German: Wolgast diesseits der Swine, including the name-giving residence in Wolgast) and an eastern part (German: Wolgast jenseits der Swine, in literature also called Pomerania-Stolp after the residence in Stolp (Słupsk)). Fourth partition 1376/1377–1478

In 1376, the western part of Pomerania-Wolgast (German: Wolgast diesseits der Swine) was subdivided in a smaller western part sometimes named Pomerania-Barth after the residence in Barth, and an eastern part which included the residence in Wolgast. In the following year, the eastern part of Pomerania-Wolgast (German: Wolgast diesseits der Swine or Pomerania-Stolp) was divided into a western part which included Stargard and an eastern part which included the residence in Stolp (Słupsk).

In 1459, the eastern partitions of Pomerania-Wolgast around Stargard and Stolp ceased to exist. In 1478, after 200 years of partition, the duchy was reunited for a short period when all her parts were inherited by Bogislaw X. Fifth and sixth partitions 1531–1625

In 1531, Pomerania was partitioned into Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Wolgast. This time however, in contrast to the earlier partitions with the same names, Pomerania-Wolgast included the western, and Pomerania-Stettin the eastern parts of the duchy. In 1569, were created the duchies of -Barth (split off from -Wolgast) and -Rügenwalde (Darłowo) (split off from -Stettin). Definitive reunification and annexation to Sweden

In 1625, Bogislaw XIV reunited all Pomerania under his rule. However, in 1637, Sweden hold western parts of Pomerania (Hither Pomerania), originally including Stettin, legalised by the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 (Swedish Pomerania, several times reduced in favour of Brandenburgian Pomerania). Between 1637 and 1657 Lauenburg-Bütow Land came to Poland, thereafter to Brandenburg. In 1648, Brandenburg prevailed in the Peace of Westphalia with its claim only for eastern parts of Pomerania (Farther Pomerania), with the Brandenburg electors officially holding simultaneously the title of dukes of Pomerania until 1806 (end of the Empire and its enfeoffments), but de facto integrating their Pomerania into Brandenburg-Prussia, making it one of the provinces of Prussia in 1815, then including former Swedish Pomerania. Dukes of Pomerania: the House of Griffins Partitions of Pomerania under Griffins rule Duchy of Pomerania (1121–1156) Demmin (1st creation) (1156–1184) Stettin (1st creation) (1156–1264) Schlawe-Stolp (1156–1238)

     

Demmin (2nd creation) (1208–1264)

     

Duchy of Pomerania (1264–1295) Wolgast (1st creation) (1295–1478) Stettin (2nd creation) (1295–1464)

      	Stolp

(1368–1459) Barth (1st creation) (1377–1393) Stargard (1377-1395)

      	      
      	      

Barth (2nd creation) (1425–1451)

      	      

Barth (3rd creation) (1457–1478)

     
     

Duchy of Pomerania (1478–1531) Wolgast (2nd creation) (1531–1625) Stettin (3rd creation) (1531–1569)

      	Barth

(4th creation) (1569–1603) Rügenwalde (1st creation) (1569–1600) (Wolgast line 1569–1600)

      	(Rügenwalde line 1600–1603)
      	(Barth line 1603–1625) 	Rügenwalde

(2nd creation) (1603–1620)

      	      

Duchy of Pomerania (1625–1637) Table of rulers

(Note: Here the numbering of the dukes is the same for all duchies, as all were titled Dukes of Pomerania, despite of the different parts of land or particular numbering of the rulers. The dukes are numbered by the year of their succession.) Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Warcislaus I Wartislaw I.jpg c.1091 1121–1135 1135 Pomerania 24 pagan wives

Heila of Saxony before 1128 one child

Ida of Denmark 1129 three children First duke of Pomerania and founder of the family. A pagan, he converted to Christianity in the beginning of the 12th century. Then, along with his son Bolesław, backed Otto of Bamberg in his successful Conversion of Pomerania. Racibor I Racibor I of Pomerania.jpg c.1124 1135–1156 1156 Pomerania Pribislava Yaroslavna of Volhynia 1136 four children Ancestor of the Ratiboriden branch of the House of Pomerania that ruled Słupsk-Sławno Casimir I Casimir I.jpg after 1130 1156–1180 fall of 1180 Pomerania-Demmin Pritolawa no children Swietopelk Before 1156 1156–c.1190 1190s Pomerania-Schlawe-Stolp Unmarried Warcislaus II c.1160 1180–1184 c.1184 Pomerania-Demmin Sophia of Poland no children Boguslaus I Bogislaw I.jpg 1127 1156-1184 18 March 1187 Pomerania-Stettin Walburga of Denmark three children

Anastasia of Greater Poland 26 April 1177 two children In 1184 after the death of his nephew Warcislaus II, reunited Stettin and Demmin. 1184–1187 Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Demmin Anastasia of Greater Poland (regent) Anastasia of Greater Poland.jpg c.1164 1187–1208 c.1240 Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Demmin Boguslaus I 26 April 1177 two children Widow of Bogislaw I. Boguslaus II Bogislaw II.jpg 1177 1208–1220 23 January 1220 Pomerania-Stettin Miroslava of Pomerelia 1210 three children Son of Bogislaw I. Casimir II Casimir II Pommern.jpg c.1180 1208–1219 1219 Pomerania-Demmin Ingard of Denmark 1210 two children Boguslaus III Bogislaw III.jpg before 1190 c.1190–1223 1223 Pomerania-Schlawe-Stolp A daughter of Mieszko III of Poland before 1223 two children Son of Boguslaus II and younger brother of Barnim I. His existence is not certain. Received the -Sławno part in 1190 by his father. Ingard of Denmark (regent) Ingard.jpg c.1190 1219–1226 1248 Pomerania-Demmin Casimir II 1210 two children Widow of Casimir II Warcislaus III Wartislaw III.jpg c.1210 1226–1264 17 May 1264 Pomerania-Demmin Sophia 1236 three children After his death in 1264, Barnim became the sole duke. Racibor II before 1223 1223–1238 1238 Pomerania-Schlawe-Stolp unmarried Son of Bogislaw III. Other historians suggest that he could be also son of Bogislaw II or Mestwin I of Pomerelia. After his death without descendants, the land returned to Pomerania. Miroslava of Pomerelia (regent) Miroslava of Pomerelia.jpg 1190 1220–1226 1237 Pomerania-Stettin Boguslaus II 1210 three children Widow of Bogislaw I. Barnim I the Good Barnim01.jpg c.1217/1219 1226–1264 13 December 1278 Pomerania-Stettin Anna Maria of Saxony between 4 September 1238 and 18 July 1242 three children

Margaret of Brunswick-Lüneburg 1252 or 1253 one child

Matilda of Brandenburg between 29 March 1263 and 20 May 1267 six children Since 1227 the dukes were again vassals of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1264 reunited all Pomerania. 1264-1278 Pomerania Boguslaus IV Bogislaw IV.jpg c.1255 1278–1295 19/24 February 1309 Pomerania Matilda of Brandenburg-Stendal between 1275 and 1278 no children

Margaret of Rügen 13 August 1284 six children Ruled jointly. Boguslaus was the eldest son of Barnim I, and ruled with his stepmother, who was regent of her own sons. From 1294 Boguslaus ruled directly with his half-brothers Barnim and Otto, who reached majority in that year. Following the death of Barnim without descendants in 1295, Boguslaus and Otto divided Pomerania between them: Boguslaus retained Wolgast and Otto received Stettin. 1295-1309 Pomerania-Wolgast Matilda of Brandenburg (regent) Matilda of Brandenburg.jpg ? 1278-1294 20 December 1316 Pomerania Barnim I the Good between 29 March 1263 and 20 May 1267 six children Barnim II Barnim II.jpg c.1277 1294-1295 28 May 1295 Pomerania unmarried Otto I OttoIPommern.jpg 1279 1294–1295 31 December 1344 Pomerania Elisabeth of Holstein April 1296 two children 1295–1344 Pomerania-Stettin Warcislaus IV Wartislaw IV.jpg before 1290 1309–1326 1 August 1326 Pomerania-Wolgast Elisabeth of Lindow-Ruppin 11 April 1316 or 1317 three children Son of Bogislaw IV. Barnim III the Great Barnim III.jpg c.1300 1344–1368 14 August 1368 Pomerania-Stettin Agnes of Brunswick-Grubenhagen 1330 five children Elisabeth of Lindow-Ruppin (regent) Elisabeth of Lindow-Ruppin.jpg 1300 1326–c.1330 Between February (or March) 1355 and 2 July 1356 Pomerania-Wolgast Warcislaus IV 11 April 1316 or 1317 three children Regent on behalf of her sons. Boguslaus V the Great Bogislaw V.jpg c.1318 c.1330–1368 23 April 1374 Pomerania-Wolgast Elisabeth of Poland 24 or 25 February 1343 three children

Adelaide of Brunswick-Grubenhagen 1362 or 1363 four children Sons of Boguslaus IV, ruled jointly. In 1368, Boguslaus, the last surviving brother, divided the land with his brother Barnim's heirs: They kept Wolgast, and Boguslaus created Stargard for himself. 1368–1374 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp Warcislaus V the Father of the People Wartislaw V.jpg c.1 November 1326 c.1330–1368 1390 Pomerania-Wolgast Anna of Mecklenburg-Stargard before 1390 no children Barnim IV the Good Barnim IV.jpg 1325 c.1330–1365 22 August 1365 Pomerania-Wolgast Sophia of Mecklenburg-Werle 1343 three children Casimir III Casimir III.jpg 1348 1368–1372 24 August 1372 Pomerania-Stettin unmarried Son of Barnim III. Boguslaus VI Bogislaw VI.jpg c.1350 1365–1393 7 March 1393 Pomerania-Wolgast Judith of Saxe-Lauenburg between 1369 and 1377 no children

Agnes of Brunswick-Lüneburg 14 or 19 September 1389 Celle two children Sons of Barnim IV, ruled jointly. In 1377, they divided the land: Boguslaus kept Wolgast and Warcislaus retained Barth. However, as Boguslaus died without heirs, Warcislaus reunited Barth with Wolgast. Warcislaus VI the One-Eyed Wartislaw VI.jpg 1345 1365–1377 13 June 1394 Pomerania-Wolgast Anne of Mecklenburg-Stargard 1 October 1363 four children 1377-1393 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth 1393-1394 Pomerania-Wolgast Swantibor I Swantibor I.jpg c.1351 1372–1413 21 June 1413 Pomerania-Stettin Anne of Nuremberg 17 September 1363 four children Brothers of Casimir III, ruled jointly. Boguslaus VII the Older Bogislaw VII.jpg before 1355 1372–1404 1404 Pomerania-Stettin Unknown before 1404 no children Casimir IV Casimir IV.jpg 1351 1374–1377 2 January 1377 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp Kenna of Lithuania 1360 no children

Margaret of Masovia 1368 or 1369 no children After his death his sons divided the land. Warcislaus VII Wartislaw VII.jpg 1363/5 1377–1394/5 1394/5 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp Maria of Mecklenburg-Schwerin 23 March 1380 one child Sons of Casimir IV. Warcislaus received Stargard, and his brothers Boguslaus and Barnim received Stolp together. The death of Warcislaus made possible the reunion of the inheritance of their father, by Boguslaus and Barnim, who reunited Stolp to Stargard. However, there was an heir to Stolp: Boguslaus, who would be brought up in Denmark and changed name to Eric. Boguslaus VIII Magnus Bogislaw VIII.jpg c.1364 1377–1394/5 11 February 1418 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp-Stargard Sophia of Holstein c.1398 two children. 1394/5-1418 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Barnim V Barnim V.jpg 1369 1377–1394/5 1402/3 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp-Stargard Hedwig of Lithuania 27 September 1396 one child 1394/5–1403 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Barnim VI Epitaph Barnim VI Büste.png c.1365 1393–1405 22 September 1405 Pomerania-Wolgast Veronica of Hohenzollern circa or before 1395 three children Sons of Warcislaus VI, ruled jointly. Warcislaus VIII Wartislaw VIII.jpg 1373 1393–1415 20/23 August 1415 Pomerania-Wolgast Agnes of Saxe-Lauenburg circa or before 1398 four children Otto II OttoII.jpg c.1380 1413–1428 27 March 1428 Pomerania-Stettin Agnes of Mecklenburg-Stargard c.1411 no children Sons of Swantibor I, ruled jointly. Casimir V Casimir V.jpg before 1380 1413–1435 13 April 1435 Pomerania-Stettin Catherine of Brunswick-Lüneburg circa or before 1420 three children

Elisabeth of Brunswick-Grubenhagen circa or before 1439 one child Agnes of Saxe-Lauenburg (regent) Agnes of Saxe-Lauenburg.jpg After 1373 1415–1425 1435 Pomerania-Wolgast Wartislaw VIII circa or before 1398 four children Regent in the name of her children, Barnim VIII and Swantibor II, and her nephews, sons of Barnim VI: Warcislaus IX and Barnim VII. Barnim VII the Older Barnim VII.jpg 1390 1425–1450 22 September 1450 Pomerania-Wolgast Unmarried Sons of the co-rulers Barnim VI and Warcislaus VIII. After the end of the regency of Agnes, the four rulers divided possessions: The sons of Barnim kept Wolgast; the sons of Warcislaus received Barth. However, as the sons of Warcislaus left no children, their possessions returned to the sons of Barnim VI. Warcislaus IX WartislawIX.1776.JPG c.1400 1425–1457 17 April 1457 Pomerania-Wolgast Sophia of Saxe-Lauenburg 1420 four children

Son of Barnim VI. Barnim VIII the Younger Barnim VIII.jpg between 1405 and 1407 1425–1451 between 15 and 19 December 1451 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth Anna of Wunstorf circa or before 1434 one child Swantibor II the Calm c.1408 1425–1432 1432 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth Unmarried Boguslaus IX Bogislaw IX.jpg 1407/1410 1418–1446 7 December 1446 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Maria of Masovia 24 June 1432 Poznań two children Council of Regency in Pomerania-Stettin:1435–1443 Joachim the Younger Joachim the Younger.jpg 1424 1443–1451 4 October 1451 Pomerania-Stettin Elisabeth of Brandenburg 29 September 1440 one child Son of Casimir V. Maria of Masovia (regent) Maria of Masovia.jpg 1408/1415 1446–1449 14 February 1454 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Bogislaw IX 24 June 1432 Poznań two children Regent in name of her husband's cousin and heir, Eric I. Eric I ErichI.1500.JPG 1381/1382 1449–1459 3 May 1459 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Philippa of England 26 October 1406 Lund one child Son of Warcislaus VII and original heir of Stolp in 1394. His absence was probably the cause of his being bypassed in the Pomeranian succession. Also King of the Union of Kalmar between Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Warcislaus X Wartislaw X.jpg 1435 1457–1478 17 December 1478 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth Elisabeth of Brandenburg 5 March 1454 two children

Magdalena of Mecklenburg-Stargard 1472 no children Otto III Otto III.jpg 29 May 1444 1460–1464 7 September 1464 Pomerania-Stettin unmarried

Son of Wartcislaus IX. Eric II ErichII.Pommern.JPG between 1418 and 1425 1457–1464 5 July 1474 Pomerania-Wolgast Anna Sophie of Pomerania-Stolp 1451 twelve children In 1464, he reunited Pomerania-Wolgast with Pomerania-Stettin 1464-1474 Pomerania-Wolgast and Pomerania-Stettin Boguslaus X the Great Bogislaw X von Pommern.JPG 3 June 1454 1474–1478 5 October 1523 Pomerania-Wolgast and Pomerania-Stettin Margaret of Brandenburg 20 September 1477 Prenzlau no children

Anna Jagiellon of Poland 2 February 1491 Szczecin eight children Son of Eric II, reunited Pomerania in 1478. 1478-1523 Pomerania George I GeorgPommern.JPG 11 April 1493 1523–1531 10 May 1531 Pomerania Amalie of the Palatinate 22 May 1513 Szczecin three children

Margaret of Brandenburg 23 January 1530 Berlin one child Sons of Boguslaus X, ruled jointly. After George's death, Barnim divided Pomerania with his younger brother Philip. After his death his possessions went to Pomerania-Wolgast. Barnim IX the Pious BarnimIX.1570.JPG 2 December 1501 1523–1531 2 November 1573 Pomerania Anna of Brunswick-Lüneburg 2 February 1525 Szczecin seven children 1531-1569 Pomerania-Stettin Philip I the Pious' Philipp I. von Pommern.png 14 July 1515 1531–1560 14 February 1560 Pomerania-Wolgast Maria of Saxony 27 February 1536 Torgau ten children Son of George I. Ernest Louis the Fair ErnstLudwig1750F.JPG 20 November 1545 1560–1592 17 June 1592 Pomerania-Wolgast Sophie Hedwig of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel 20 October 1577 Wolgast three children Sons of Philip I, ruled jointly. Divided the land in 1569: Ernest Louis kept Wolgast, John Frederick received Stettin, Boguslaus received Barth and Neuenkamp (later Franzburg), and Barnim received Rügenwalde. In 1592 Boguslaus became tutor of his nephew Philip Julius. In 1600 after the death of John Frederick without children, the land was inherited by Barnim, who reunited it with Rügenwalde. At the latter's death in 1603 also with no descendants, Boguslaus received the land and united it with Barth, but he gave Rügenwalde to one of his sons, and gave Barth and Neuenkamp to Philip Julius. John Frederick the Strong JohannFriedrichPommern.PNG 27 August 1542 1560–1569 9 February 1600 Pomerania-Wolgast Erdmuthe of Brandenburg 17 February 1577 Szczecin no children 1569-1600 Pomerania-Stettin Barnim X the Younger BarnimX.1750.JPG 15 February 1549 1560–1569 1 September 1603 Pomerania-Wolgast Anna Maria of Brandenburg 8 January 1581 Berlin no children 1569-1600 Pomerania-Stettin-Rügenwalde 1600-1603 Pomerania-Stettin (Stettin and Rügenwalde) Boguslaus XI BogislawXIII.1750.JPG 9 August 1544 1560–1569 7 March 1606 Pomerania-Wolgast Clara of Brunswick-Lüneburg 8 September 1572 eleven children

Anna of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg 31 May 1601 no children 1569-1603 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth 1603-1606 Pomerania-Stettin Philip Julius PhilippJulius1750.JPG 27 December 1584 1592–1625 6 February 1625 Pomerania-Wolgast Agnes of Brandenburg 25 June 1604 Berlin no children Son of Ernest Louis, united Barth to Wolgast in 1603 George II GeorgII.1615.JPG 30 January 1582 1603–1617 27 March 1617 Pomerania-Stettin-Rügenwalde Unmarried Son of Boguslaus XI, received Rügenwalde, inherited by his father in 1603, and given to him. Philip II the Pious PhilippII.1678.JPG 29 July 1573 1606–1618 3 February 1618 Pomerania-Stettin Sophia of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg 10 March 1607 Treptow an der Rega no children Son of Boguslaus XI. Left no descendants and the land was inherited by his brother Francis. Francis Franz1610.JPG 24 March 1577 1618–1620 27 November 1620 Pomerania-Stettin Sophie of Saxony 26 August 1610 Dresden no children Son of Boguslaus XI and brother of the predecessor. Boguslaus XII the Sociable BogislawXIV.1635.JPG 31 March 1580 1617–1620 10 March 1637 Pomerania-Stettin-Rügenwalde Elisabeth of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg 1615 no children Son of Boguslaus XI. Inherited the possessions of all his brothers and reunited Pomerania, but he also didn't have any children. At his death, Pomerania was annexed by the Kingdom of Sweden. 1620-1625 Pomerania-Stettin (Stettin and Rügenwalde) 1625-1637 Pomerania Principality of Rugia Further information: Principality of Rugia

1168–1325 feudal fief of Denmark under local rulers:

   1162–1170 Tezlaw
   1170–1217 Jaromar I
   1218–1249 Wizlaw I
   1249–1260 Jaromar II
   1260–1302 Wizlaw II
   1303–1325 Wizlaw III

From 1325 Pomerania-Wolgast or -Barth:

   1325–1326 Wartislaw IV
   1326–1368 Bogislaw V, Wartislaw V, Barnim IV
   1368–1372 Wartislaw VI, Bogislaw VI
   1372–1394 Wartislaw VI
   1394–1415 Wartislaw VIII
   1415–1432/36 Swantibor II
   1432/36–1451 Barnim VIII
   1451–1457 Wartislaw IX
   1457–1478 Wartislaw X

from 1474 part of Pomerania-Wolgast Duchy of Pomerelia

In 1155, the lands which belonged to Świętopełk I became independent under Sobieslaw I, a possible descendant, who founded the House of Sambor and the Duchy of Pomerelia.

The dukes of Pomerelia were using the Latin title dux Pomeraniae ("Duke of Pomerania") or dux Pomeranorum ("Duke of the Pomeranians"). The Pomerelian Griffin Partitions of the Duchy of Pomerelia

In 1215, the duchy was divided in other smaller duchies: Gdańsk, Białogarda, Lubiszewo and Świecie.

 Gdańsk   Białogarda   Lubiszewo   Świecie

1155-1190 Duchy of Pomerelia-Gdańsk Became independent in 1215. Duchy of Pomerelia-Białogarda Became independent in 1215. Duchy of Pomerelia-Lubiszewo Became independent in 1215. Duchy of Pomerelia-Świecie Became independent in 1215.

In 1271 the duchy is reunited and in 1296 annexed to the Kingdom of Poland Dukes of Pomerelia Non-dynastic Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Świętopełk I before 1106 1106–1113 1113 Pomerania-Gdańsk (future Pomerelia) Unknown He wasn't duke of Pomerelia, but ruled in the lands that became Pomerelia 40 years later. House of Sambor (1155–1296) Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Sobieslaw I c.1130 1155-1178 1178 Pomerelia Unknown before 1150 two children Sambor I Sambor I.JPG c.1150 1178-1205 7 February or 30 December 1205 Pomerelia Unknown before 1205 two children Mestwin I the Peaceful Mestwin I, Duke of Pomerania.PNG c.1160 1205-1220 1/2 July 1220 Pomerelia Swinisława of Poland c.1190 eight children Brother of Sambor. Świętopełk II the Great Swantopolk II, Duke of Pomerania.PNG c.1190 1220-1266 11 January 1266 Pomerelia-Gdańsk Salomea of Halych before 1220 one child

Euphrosyne of Greater Poland c.1220 two children

Hermengard of Mecklenburg-Schwerin c.1230 two children Son of Mestwin I. Ruler in Gdańsk, used the title Dux (Duke) from 1227. Wartislaw I c.1195 1220–1233 11 January 1233 Pomerelia-Białogarda-Lubiszewo-Świecie unmarried Son of Mestwin I. Ruler in Świecie, used the title Dux (Duke) from 1227. After his death his domains were divided between the younger brothers. Racibor I c.1212 1233–1262 6 June 1272 Pomerelia-Białogarda unmarried Son of Mestwin I. Joined the Teutonic Order in 1262, and -Białogarda was annexed by -Gdańsk. Sambor II Sambor II Tczewski seal 1229.PNG c.1212 1233–1270 30 December 1277 Pomerelia-Lubiszewo Matilda of Mecklenburg six children Son of Mestwin I. He initially resided at a burgh located in the later village of Lubiszewo. After the town of Tczew was founded nearby in the course of the German Ostsiedlung, the dukes shifted their residence to the town. Mestwin II Mestwin II, Duke of Pomerania.PNG 1220 1233–1270 29 December 1294 Pomerelia-Świecie Judith of Wettin before 1275 two children

Euphrosyne of Opole 1275 (div.1288) no children

Sulisława after 1288 no children Son of Swiatopelk I. In 1270, he reunited the duchy. Wartislaw II 1237 1266–1270 9 May 1271 Pomerelia-Gdańsk unmarried Son of Swietopelk II. After his death without descendants, Gdańsk was absorbed by the reunited Duchy of Pomerelia. Mestwin II Mestwin II, Duke of Pomerania.PNG 1220 1270–1294 29 December 1294 Pomerelia Judith of Wettin before 1275 two children

Euphrosyne of Opole 1275 (div.1288) no children

Sulisława after 1288 no children Reunites the duchy in 1270. In 1294, Pomerelia was annexed by the Kingdom of Poland. Later history of Pomerelia

   1296–1299 Part of Kujavia
   1299–1308 Part of Poland
   1308–1466 Part of the Teutonic Order State of Prussia
   1454–1466 13-years war of Polish-supported Prussian separatist forces against the Teutonic Order
   1466–1569 Royal Prussia, in personal union with the Crown of Poland
   1569–1772 Part of Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
   1772–1919 West Prussia (province of the Kingdom of Prussia which was part of the German Empire from 1871)
       1829–1878 Province of Prussia (a province of the Kingdom of Prussia)
       1772–1793 Gdańsk, Toruń and Elbląg remained with Poland, then annexed to West Prussia, except of the latter annexed to East Prussia
       1807–1814 Free City of Danzig a Napoleonic client state, with François Joseph Lefebvre ennobled as Duc de Dantzic (1808–1820), before returned to West Prussia
   1920–1939 Part of Poland as the Pomeranian Voivodeship, except of Danzig
   1920–1939 Free City of Danzig, a League of Nations mandate
   1939–1945 Danzig-West Prussia, province of Nazi Germany, including Polish Pomerania and Danzig
   1945–present Part of Poland again

See also

   History of Pomerania

Further reading This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (December 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

   Gerard Labuda (ed.), "Historia Pomorza", vol. 1–4, Poznan-Torun 1969–2003
   Edmund Kopicki, "Tabele dynastyczne", "Wykazy panujacych", in: "Katalog podstawowych monet i banknotow Polski oraz ziem z historycznie z Polska zwiazanych", vol. IX, part I
   Zugmunt Boras, "Ksiazeta Pomorza Zachdniego", Poznań 1969, 1978, 1996
   Casimir Kozlowski, George Podralski, "Poczet Ksiazat Pomorza Zachdniego", KAW, Szczecin 1985
   L. Badkowski, W.Samp. "Poczet ksiazat Pomorza Gdanskiego", Gdańsk 1974
   B. Sliwinski, "Poczet ksiazaat gdanskich", Gdańsk 1997
   Wojciech Myslenicki, "Pomorscy sprzymierzenscy Jagiellonczylow", Wyd. Poznanskie, Poznań 1979
   J. Spors, "Podzially administracyjne Pomorza Gdanskiego i Slawiensko-Slupksiego od XII do poczatkow XIV w", Słupsk 1983
   K. Slaski, "Podzially terytorialne Pomorza w XII–XII w.", Poznań 1960
   Edward Rymar, Krewni i powinowaci ksiazat pomorskich w zrodłach sredniowiecznych (XII–początek XVI w.), Materially Zachodniopomorskie, vol. XXXI

O Zemožil-Siemomysłovi Piast,ovi vévodovi pomořanskému (čeština)

Hipoteza według poglądów: E. Rymara, B. Śliwińskiego i J. Dobosza Siemomysł ur. IX/X w. zm. ok. 950–960 NN ur. ? zm. ?

Dytryk ur. ? zm. 985 NN ur. ? zm. ?

 	  	  	  	 
 	  	 
 	Mieszko I   ur. w okr. 922–945   zm. 25 V 992 	                                 Oda ur. w okr. 955–960 zm. 1023 

 	  	 
 	 

NN ur. ? zm. ? OO ? Świętopełk Mieszkowic (ur. w okr. 979–985, zm. przed 25 V 992 (?)) lub Mieszko Mieszkowic (ur. w okr. 978–984 zm. po 25 V 992) lub Lambert Mieszkowic (ur. w okr. 981–986 zm. po 25 V 992 (1030?))

 	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	 
 	/  	/ 	  	  	  	  	  	  	 
 	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	 

Siemomysł ur. 1000/1020 zm. po 29 VI 1046 Dytryk ur. po 992 zm. po 1032

https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemomys%C5%82_pomorski

Siemomysł, vévoda z Pomořan - Siemomysł, Duke of Pomerania Wikipedie, otevřené encyklopedie Siemomysł , Siemosił nebo Zemuzil ( fl. 11. století) byl prvním historicky ověřitelným vévodou z Pomořanska , zaznamenaný v 1046 v Annals of Niederaltaichu ( Annales Altahensis maiorum ).

historický rekord Záznam Annals zní: " Jeho studenti peractis rex inde discessit ac Mersiburc, natale Sancti Iohannis celebraturus [ze dne 24. června], perrexit Illuc Etiam Bratizlao Dux Boemorum, Kazmir Bolaniorum, Zemuzil Bomeraniorum advenerunt atque regem Donis decentibus honoraverunt [...] Inde.. discedens Apostolorum Petri a Pauli festa [29 června] Mihsina celebravit ubi Etiam conventionem Secundo habens Duces praefatos mimo se pacificavit. "( Annales Altahensis maiorum reklamní. 1046)

Tento záznam popisuje Zemuzilovu účast na setkání s Henrym III. (Jindřichem III) svatý římský císař v Merseburgu ( „Mersiburc“) dne 24. června 1046, spolu s Břetislavem I., vévoda z Čech ( „Bratizlao dux Boemorum“) a Casimir I, vévoda z Polska ( "Kazmir Bolaniorum "). Vévodové „ctí císaře se slušnými dary“, což je podle Schmidta (2009) byla platba hold . Ve druhém zasedání dne 29. června v Míšni ( „Mihsin“), podle dokumentu, „Výše uvedené vévodové“ uzavřel dohodu o vzájemném míru.

Učené posuzování:

Povahu sporu: Roderich Schmidt (2009) předpokládá, že mír odkazován v dokumentu bylo nezbytné, mimo jiné i proto, protože z bojů mezi Zemuzil a Kazimíra, a že Zemuzil pomáhal Miecław z Dolního Slezska , kteří bojovali proti Kazimíra, dříve vyloučen z Polska, ale obnoví se Henryho pomoci a byl poražen.

Podle Edwarda Rymar (2005) nejpravděpodobnější povahu sporu bylo bez placení pocta by Pomořanského vévody na Casimir. Po Henryho zprostředkování Zemuzil nezaplatil feudálních příspěvků a Casimir napadl a vzal kontrolu nad Pomořansku v následujícím roce (1047).

Žemužil - umístění své říše: Podle Schmidta, že není možné na základě tohoto záznamu 1046 rozhodnout o umístění své říše. Edward Rymar po Łowmiański, je přesvědčen, že Žemužilis byl vládce sjednocené Pomeranian státu s centrem v Kołobrzeg (Kolberg) spíše než menší vévodství, což vysvětluje, proč byl ošetřen Henry jako co-rovná se vládců Čech a Polsko. Schmidt rovněž tvrdí, že zmínka o Žemužilis spolu s Břetislavem I a Kazimírem naznačují, že byli rovni ve stavu, a že politická organizace své říše v 1046 podobala českých a polských.

Na druhou stranu, Stabenow (1995) říká, že velká většina historiků považuje Zemuzil jako vládce pouze část oblasti mezi Odrou , Baltské moře , Visla , Warta a Noteć , a že umístění jeho říše v této oblasti je sporný. Stabenow dále říká, že položka 1046 představuje první písemný záznam o pobaltských Pomeranians .

Název - rozbor jména: Historici učinili několik pokusů o rekonstrukci slovanské jméno vévody z verzi zaznamenané německý kronikář, „ Žemužils “. Před spojení mezi dokumentu z 1040 a jeden z 1046 byl vyroben názvu byla různě provedená jako Ziemomysł (Oswald Balcer), Siemosił (o Aleksander Brückner ) a dokonce i Wszemysł (tato konkrétní varianta byla opuštěna jako hypotéza). Zygmunt Wojciechowski po konzultaci s Slavicists považovaných „ Žemužilis “ tak, aby odpovídal maličká forma „ Siemyśl “, krátký pro „ Siemomysł “. Jméno se objeví mezi členy Piastovců s polským knížetem Siemomysł a dříkem „-Siem“, s odkazem na „rodiny“ (tedy „Siemomysł“ někdo „přemýšlivý jejich rodiny“), je také nalezený v názvu Piast poloviční legendární Siemovít .

Náboženství: Podle Rymar, Zemuzil byl s největší pravděpodobností křesťanem či jinak by neměl Henryho (Jindřichovu) podporu, i když by mohl udržovat tuto skutečnost skryté od svých stále převážně pohanských předků.

Navrhované rodokmeny: Podle Edwarda Rymar, Zemuzil - nabízí se často myšlenka byl-li otec nebo dědeček z Pomeranian vévody Świętobor I . Schmidt říká, že to není možné, na základě záznamu 1046 rozhodnout, zda Zemuzil byl předchůdce pozdějších pomořských vévodů, a cituje podobné závěry jiných německých historiků Martin WEHRMANN a Adolf Hofmeister .

V 19. století německý historik Johann Ludwig Quandta věřil, že Zemuzil a jiné časné Pomeranský vévodové z Griffin dynastie pocházející z polské šlechty z Malopolska , že Zemuzil byl dělán vojvoda svého vévodství polského krále Boleslava I. Chrobry , a že on byl grand otec Świętobor I. Austro-polský historik Oswald Balzer spojena vévodu s Piastovců přes matrilineal spojení, takže jeho matku, dceru Boleslava I. Chrobry. Podobným způsobem, Henryk Łowmiański viděl Zemuzil jako syn dcera Mieszko I , první historický vládce Polska.

Gerard Labuda řekl, že Zemuzil byl s největší pravděpodobností souvisí s Piastovců přes jeho matku. Rymar říká, že dokument 1040, je jedním z důvodů, proč Zemuzil je někdy myšlenka být ve vztahu k polsko Piastovců . Stanisław Zakrzewski věřil vévodu být bratr Dytryk navrhován jako otec Sememizl podle Labuda, a také předpokládal, že Zemuzil byl předchůdce Świętobor.

Sememizl: Dokument z roku 1040 zmiňuje Sememizl . Tento dokument je záznam o Henry III byly dány katedrály Naumburg několika vesnic, které Sememizl předtím držel jako léna od Jindřicha III. Podle Rymar, Sememizl je obecně označena Zemuzil vzhledem k vzácnosti tohoto jména u polských Piastovců a Pomeranian vévody. Gerard Labuda pochyboval spojení mezi Zemuzil a Sememizl, koho on myslel, že je syn Dytryk , jeden z kroků bratrů Chrobry, který byl vyhoštěn polského krále do Německa.

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                   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Pomeranian_duchies_and_dukes#Non-dynastic_2

Dukes of the Slavic Pomeranian tribes (All Pomerania)

The lands of Pomerania were firstly ruled by local tribes, who settled in Pomerania around the 10th and 11th centuries. Non-dynastic Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Siemomysł c.1000 or 1020 After 1000–1046 c.29 June 1046 All Pomerania Unknown First known duke of all Pomerania. His origins are unknown. Świętobor before 1046 1060–1106 1106 All Pomerania Anna Son of Siemomysl. Świętopełk I before 1106 1106–1113 1113 Pomerania-Danzig (future Pomerelia) Unknown

In 1106, Pomerania is divided by his two older sons: Wartislaw, who founded the House of Pomerania and the Duchy of Pomerania, and Świętopełk I. After Swietopelk's death, his lands were occupied by the Saxon prince Lothar of Supplinburg. In 1155, the lands regained independence under Sobieslaw I, who founded the dynasty of the Samborides, and the Duchy of Pomerelia. Duchy of Pomerania Further information: Duchy of Pomerania

The Duchy resulted from the partition of Świętobor, Duke of Pomerania, in which his son Wartislaw inherited the lands that would become in fact known as Pomerania. The Pomeranian Griffin Partitions of Pomerania First partition 1155–1264

In 1155, Pomerania was divided in Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Demmin. In 1190 the Land of Słupsk-Sławno separated itself from -Stettin.

In 1231 Emperor Frederick II granted the immediate liege lordship over Pomerania to the Margrave of Brandenburg, who enforced this claim by the Treaties of Kremmen (1236) and of Landin (1250). Thus Pomerania had become a fief of Brandenburg, thus an only mediate (indirect) subfief of the Empire, with Brandenburg itself being an immediate imperial fief.

In 1227, Stolp came to Pomerelia, Schlawe to Pomerania. In 1238–1316 both became part of Pomerelia, ruled by an autonomously acting dynasty of castellans, the Swenzones (German: Swenzonen, entering history in 1257 with Swenzo the Elder). In 1316, the area became part of the Pomerania-Wolgast, first as a pawn from Brandenburg, and definitively in 1347.

After Wartislaw III died heirless in 1264, Barnim I became sole duke of the whole duchy. After Barnim's death, the duchy was to be ruled by his sons Barnim II, Otto I and Bogislaw IV. The first years, Bogislaw, being the eldest, ruled in place of his too young brothers. Second partition 1295–1368

In 1295, the Duchy of Pomerania was divided roughly by the Peene and Ina (Ihna) rivers, with the areas north of these rivers ruled by Bogislaw IV became Pomerania-Wolgast, whereas Otto I received Pomerania-Szczecin south of these rivers. Third partition 1368–1376

In 1368, Pomerania-Wolgast was divided into a western part (German: Wolgast diesseits der Swine, including the name-giving residence in Wolgast) and an eastern part (German: Wolgast jenseits der Swine, in literature also called Pomerania-Stolp after the residence in Stolp (Słupsk)). Fourth partition 1376/1377–1478

In 1376, the western part of Pomerania-Wolgast (German: Wolgast diesseits der Swine) was subdivided in a smaller western part sometimes named Pomerania-Barth after the residence in Barth, and an eastern part which included the residence in Wolgast. In the following year, the eastern part of Pomerania-Wolgast (German: Wolgast diesseits der Swine or Pomerania-Stolp) was divided into a western part which included Stargard and an eastern part which included the residence in Stolp (Słupsk).

In 1459, the eastern partitions of Pomerania-Wolgast around Stargard and Stolp ceased to exist. In 1478, after 200 years of partition, the duchy was reunited for a short period when all her parts were inherited by Bogislaw X. Fifth and sixth partitions 1531–1625

In 1531, Pomerania was partitioned into Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Wolgast. This time however, in contrast to the earlier partitions with the same names, Pomerania-Wolgast included the western, and Pomerania-Stettin the eastern parts of the duchy. In 1569, were created the duchies of -Barth (split off from -Wolgast) and -Rügenwalde (Darłowo) (split off from -Stettin). Definitive reunification and annexation to Sweden

In 1625, Bogislaw XIV reunited all Pomerania under his rule. However, in 1637, Sweden hold western parts of Pomerania (Hither Pomerania), originally including Stettin, legalised by the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 (Swedish Pomerania, several times reduced in favour of Brandenburgian Pomerania). Between 1637 and 1657 Lauenburg-Bütow Land came to Poland, thereafter to Brandenburg. In 1648, Brandenburg prevailed in the Peace of Westphalia with its claim only for eastern parts of Pomerania (Farther Pomerania), with the Brandenburg electors officially holding simultaneously the title of dukes of Pomerania until 1806 (end of the Empire and its enfeoffments), but de facto integrating their Pomerania into Brandenburg-Prussia, making it one of the provinces of Prussia in 1815, then including former Swedish Pomerania. Dukes of Pomerania: the House of Griffins Partitions of Pomerania under Griffins rule Duchy of Pomerania (1121–1156) Demmin (1st creation) (1156–1184) Stettin (1st creation) (1156–1264) Schlawe-Stolp (1156–1238)

     

Demmin (2nd creation) (1208–1264)

     

Duchy of Pomerania (1264–1295) Wolgast (1st creation) (1295–1478) Stettin (2nd creation) (1295–1464)

      	Stolp

(1368–1459) Barth (1st creation) (1377–1393) Stargard (1377-1395)

      	      
      	      

Barth (2nd creation) (1425–1451)

      	      

Barth (3rd creation) (1457–1478)

     
     

Duchy of Pomerania (1478–1531) Wolgast (2nd creation) (1531–1625) Stettin (3rd creation) (1531–1569)

      	Barth

(4th creation) (1569–1603) Rügenwalde (1st creation) (1569–1600) (Wolgast line 1569–1600)

      	(Rügenwalde line 1600–1603)
      	(Barth line 1603–1625) 	Rügenwalde

(2nd creation) (1603–1620)

      	      

Duchy of Pomerania (1625–1637) Table of rulers

(Note: Here the numbering of the dukes is the same for all duchies, as all were titled Dukes of Pomerania, despite of the different parts of land or particular numbering of the rulers. The dukes are numbered by the year of their succession.) Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Warcislaus I Wartislaw I.jpg c.1091 1121–1135 1135 Pomerania 24 pagan wives

Heila of Saxony before 1128 one child

Ida of Denmark 1129 three children First duke of Pomerania and founder of the family. A pagan, he converted to Christianity in the beginning of the 12th century. Then, along with his son Bolesław, backed Otto of Bamberg in his successful Conversion of Pomerania. Racibor I Racibor I of Pomerania.jpg c.1124 1135–1156 1156 Pomerania Pribislava Yaroslavna of Volhynia 1136 four children Ancestor of the Ratiboriden branch of the House of Pomerania that ruled Słupsk-Sławno Casimir I Casimir I.jpg after 1130 1156–1180 fall of 1180 Pomerania-Demmin Pritolawa no children Swietopelk Before 1156 1156–c.1190 1190s Pomerania-Schlawe-Stolp Unmarried Warcislaus II c.1160 1180–1184 c.1184 Pomerania-Demmin Sophia of Poland no children Boguslaus I Bogislaw I.jpg 1127 1156-1184 18 March 1187 Pomerania-Stettin Walburga of Denmark three children

Anastasia of Greater Poland 26 April 1177 two children In 1184 after the death of his nephew Warcislaus II, reunited Stettin and Demmin. 1184–1187 Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Demmin Anastasia of Greater Poland (regent) Anastasia of Greater Poland.jpg c.1164 1187–1208 c.1240 Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Demmin Boguslaus I 26 April 1177 two children Widow of Bogislaw I. Boguslaus II Bogislaw II.jpg 1177 1208–1220 23 January 1220 Pomerania-Stettin Miroslava of Pomerelia 1210 three children Son of Bogislaw I. Casimir II Casimir II Pommern.jpg c.1180 1208–1219 1219 Pomerania-Demmin Ingard of Denmark 1210 two children Boguslaus III Bogislaw III.jpg before 1190 c.1190–1223 1223 Pomerania-Schlawe-Stolp A daughter of Mieszko III of Poland before 1223 two children Son of Boguslaus II and younger brother of Barnim I. His existence is not certain. Received the -Sławno part in 1190 by his father. Ingard of Denmark (regent) Ingard.jpg c.1190 1219–1226 1248 Pomerania-Demmin Casimir II 1210 two children Widow of Casimir II Warcislaus III Wartislaw III.jpg c.1210 1226–1264 17 May 1264 Pomerania-Demmin Sophia 1236 three children After his death in 1264, Barnim became the sole duke. Racibor II before 1223 1223–1238 1238 Pomerania-Schlawe-Stolp unmarried Son of Bogislaw III. Other historians suggest that he could be also son of Bogislaw II or Mestwin I of Pomerelia. After his death without descendants, the land returned to Pomerania. Miroslava of Pomerelia (regent) Miroslava of Pomerelia.jpg 1190 1220–1226 1237 Pomerania-Stettin Boguslaus II 1210 three children Widow of Bogislaw I. Barnim I the Good Barnim01.jpg c.1217/1219 1226–1264 13 December 1278 Pomerania-Stettin Anna Maria of Saxony between 4 September 1238 and 18 July 1242 three children

Margaret of Brunswick-Lüneburg 1252 or 1253 one child

Matilda of Brandenburg between 29 March 1263 and 20 May 1267 six children Since 1227 the dukes were again vassals of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1264 reunited all Pomerania. 1264-1278 Pomerania Boguslaus IV Bogislaw IV.jpg c.1255 1278–1295 19/24 February 1309 Pomerania Matilda of Brandenburg-Stendal between 1275 and 1278 no children

Margaret of Rügen 13 August 1284 six children Ruled jointly. Boguslaus was the eldest son of Barnim I, and ruled with his stepmother, who was regent of her own sons. From 1294 Boguslaus ruled directly with his half-brothers Barnim and Otto, who reached majority in that year. Following the death of Barnim without descendants in 1295, Boguslaus and Otto divided Pomerania between them: Boguslaus retained Wolgast and Otto received Stettin. 1295-1309 Pomerania-Wolgast Matilda of Brandenburg (regent) Matilda of Brandenburg.jpg ? 1278-1294 20 December 1316 Pomerania Barnim I the Good between 29 March 1263 and 20 May 1267 six children Barnim II Barnim II.jpg c.1277 1294-1295 28 May 1295 Pomerania unmarried Otto I OttoIPommern.jpg 1279 1294–1295 31 December 1344 Pomerania Elisabeth of Holstein April 1296 two children 1295–1344 Pomerania-Stettin Warcislaus IV Wartislaw IV.jpg before 1290 1309–1326 1 August 1326 Pomerania-Wolgast Elisabeth of Lindow-Ruppin 11 April 1316 or 1317 three children Son of Bogislaw IV. Barnim III the Great Barnim III.jpg c.1300 1344–1368 14 August 1368 Pomerania-Stettin Agnes of Brunswick-Grubenhagen 1330 five children Elisabeth of Lindow-Ruppin (regent) Elisabeth of Lindow-Ruppin.jpg 1300 1326–c.1330 Between February (or March) 1355 and 2 July 1356 Pomerania-Wolgast Warcislaus IV 11 April 1316 or 1317 three children Regent on behalf of her sons. Boguslaus V the Great Bogislaw V.jpg c.1318 c.1330–1368 23 April 1374 Pomerania-Wolgast Elisabeth of Poland 24 or 25 February 1343 three children

Adelaide of Brunswick-Grubenhagen 1362 or 1363 four children Sons of Boguslaus IV, ruled jointly. In 1368, Boguslaus, the last surviving brother, divided the land with his brother Barnim's heirs: They kept Wolgast, and Boguslaus created Stargard for himself. 1368–1374 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp Warcislaus V the Father of the People Wartislaw V.jpg c.1 November 1326 c.1330–1368 1390 Pomerania-Wolgast Anna of Mecklenburg-Stargard before 1390 no children Barnim IV the Good Barnim IV.jpg 1325 c.1330–1365 22 August 1365 Pomerania-Wolgast Sophia of Mecklenburg-Werle 1343 three children Casimir III Casimir III.jpg 1348 1368–1372 24 August 1372 Pomerania-Stettin unmarried Son of Barnim III. Boguslaus VI Bogislaw VI.jpg c.1350 1365–1393 7 March 1393 Pomerania-Wolgast Judith of Saxe-Lauenburg between 1369 and 1377 no children

Agnes of Brunswick-Lüneburg 14 or 19 September 1389 Celle two children Sons of Barnim IV, ruled jointly. In 1377, they divided the land: Boguslaus kept Wolgast and Warcislaus retained Barth. However, as Boguslaus died without heirs, Warcislaus reunited Barth with Wolgast. Warcislaus VI the One-Eyed Wartislaw VI.jpg 1345 1365–1377 13 June 1394 Pomerania-Wolgast Anne of Mecklenburg-Stargard 1 October 1363 four children 1377-1393 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth 1393-1394 Pomerania-Wolgast Swantibor I Swantibor I.jpg c.1351 1372–1413 21 June 1413 Pomerania-Stettin Anne of Nuremberg 17 September 1363 four children Brothers of Casimir III, ruled jointly. Boguslaus VII the Older Bogislaw VII.jpg before 1355 1372–1404 1404 Pomerania-Stettin Unknown before 1404 no children Casimir IV Casimir IV.jpg 1351 1374–1377 2 January 1377 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp Kenna of Lithuania 1360 no children

Margaret of Masovia 1368 or 1369 no children After his death his sons divided the land. Warcislaus VII Wartislaw VII.jpg 1363/5 1377–1394/5 1394/5 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp Maria of Mecklenburg-Schwerin 23 March 1380 one child Sons of Casimir IV. Warcislaus received Stargard, and his brothers Boguslaus and Barnim received Stolp together. The death of Warcislaus made possible the reunion of the inheritance of their father, by Boguslaus and Barnim, who reunited Stolp to Stargard. However, there was an heir to Stolp: Boguslaus, who would be brought up in Denmark and changed name to Eric. Boguslaus VIII Magnus Bogislaw VIII.jpg c.1364 1377–1394/5 11 February 1418 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp-Stargard Sophia of Holstein c.1398 two children. 1394/5-1418 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Barnim V Barnim V.jpg 1369 1377–1394/5 1402/3 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp-Stargard Hedwig of Lithuania 27 September 1396 one child 1394/5–1403 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Barnim VI Epitaph Barnim VI Büste.png c.1365 1393–1405 22 September 1405 Pomerania-Wolgast Veronica of Hohenzollern circa or before 1395 three children Sons of Warcislaus VI, ruled jointly. Warcislaus VIII Wartislaw VIII.jpg 1373 1393–1415 20/23 August 1415 Pomerania-Wolgast Agnes of Saxe-Lauenburg circa or before 1398 four children Otto II OttoII.jpg c.1380 1413–1428 27 March 1428 Pomerania-Stettin Agnes of Mecklenburg-Stargard c.1411 no children Sons of Swantibor I, ruled jointly. Casimir V Casimir V.jpg before 1380 1413–1435 13 April 1435 Pomerania-Stettin Catherine of Brunswick-Lüneburg circa or before 1420 three children

Elisabeth of Brunswick-Grubenhagen circa or before 1439 one child Agnes of Saxe-Lauenburg (regent) Agnes of Saxe-Lauenburg.jpg After 1373 1415–1425 1435 Pomerania-Wolgast Wartislaw VIII circa or before 1398 four children Regent in the name of her children, Barnim VIII and Swantibor II, and her nephews, sons of Barnim VI: Warcislaus IX and Barnim VII. Barnim VII the Older Barnim VII.jpg 1390 1425–1450 22 September 1450 Pomerania-Wolgast Unmarried Sons of the co-rulers Barnim VI and Warcislaus VIII. After the end of the regency of Agnes, the four rulers divided possessions: The sons of Barnim kept Wolgast; the sons of Warcislaus received Barth. However, as the sons of Warcislaus left no children, their possessions returned to the sons of Barnim VI. Warcislaus IX WartislawIX.1776.JPG c.1400 1425–1457 17 April 1457 Pomerania-Wolgast Sophia of Saxe-Lauenburg 1420 four children

Son of Barnim VI. Barnim VIII the Younger Barnim VIII.jpg between 1405 and 1407 1425–1451 between 15 and 19 December 1451 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth Anna of Wunstorf circa or before 1434 one child Swantibor II the Calm c.1408 1425–1432 1432 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth Unmarried Boguslaus IX Bogislaw IX.jpg 1407/1410 1418–1446 7 December 1446 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Maria of Masovia 24 June 1432 Poznań two children Council of Regency in Pomerania-Stettin:1435–1443 Joachim the Younger Joachim the Younger.jpg 1424 1443–1451 4 October 1451 Pomerania-Stettin Elisabeth of Brandenburg 29 September 1440 one child Son of Casimir V. Maria of Masovia (regent) Maria of Masovia.jpg 1408/1415 1446–1449 14 February 1454 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Bogislaw IX 24 June 1432 Poznań two children Regent in name of her husband's cousin and heir, Eric I. Eric I ErichI.1500.JPG 1381/1382 1449–1459 3 May 1459 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Philippa of England 26 October 1406 Lund one child Son of Warcislaus VII and original heir of Stolp in 1394. His absence was probably the cause of his being bypassed in the Pomeranian succession. Also King of the Union of Kalmar between Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Warcislaus X Wartislaw X.jpg 1435 1457–1478 17 December 1478 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth Elisabeth of Brandenburg 5 March 1454 two children

Magdalena of Mecklenburg-Stargard 1472 no children Otto III Otto III.jpg 29 May 1444 1460–1464 7 September 1464 Pomerania-Stettin unmarried

Son of Wartcislaus IX. Eric II ErichII.Pommern.JPG between 1418 and 1425 1457–1464 5 July 1474 Pomerania-Wolgast Anna Sophie of Pomerania-Stolp 1451 twelve children In 1464, he reunited Pomerania-Wolgast with Pomerania-Stettin 1464-1474 Pomerania-Wolgast and Pomerania-Stettin Boguslaus X the Great Bogislaw X von Pommern.JPG 3 June 1454 1474–1478 5 October 1523 Pomerania-Wolgast and Pomerania-Stettin Margaret of Brandenburg 20 September 1477 Prenzlau no children

Anna Jagiellon of Poland 2 February 1491 Szczecin eight children Son of Eric II, reunited Pomerania in 1478. 1478-1523 Pomerania George I GeorgPommern.JPG 11 April 1493 1523–1531 10 May 1531 Pomerania Amalie of the Palatinate 22 May 1513 Szczecin three children

Margaret of Brandenburg 23 January 1530 Berlin one child Sons of Boguslaus X, ruled jointly. After George's death, Barnim divided Pomerania with his younger brother Philip. After his death his possessions went to Pomerania-Wolgast. Barnim IX the Pious BarnimIX.1570.JPG 2 December 1501 1523–1531 2 November 1573 Pomerania Anna of Brunswick-Lüneburg 2 February 1525 Szczecin seven children 1531-1569 Pomerania-Stettin Philip I the Pious' Philipp I. von Pommern.png 14 July 1515 1531–1560 14 February 1560 Pomerania-Wolgast Maria of Saxony 27 February 1536 Torgau ten children Son of George I. Ernest Louis the Fair ErnstLudwig1750F.JPG 20 November 1545 1560–1592 17 June 1592 Pomerania-Wolgast Sophie Hedwig of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel 20 October 1577 Wolgast three children Sons of Philip I, ruled jointly. Divided the land in 1569: Ernest Louis kept Wolgast, John Frederick received Stettin, Boguslaus received Barth and Neuenkamp (later Franzburg), and Barnim received Rügenwalde. In 1592 Boguslaus became tutor of his nephew Philip Julius. In 1600 after the death of John Frederick without children, the land was inherited by Barnim, who reunited it with Rügenwalde. At the latter's death in 1603 also with no descendants, Boguslaus received the land and united it with Barth, but he gave Rügenwalde to one of his sons, and gave Barth and Neuenkamp to Philip Julius. John Frederick the Strong JohannFriedrichPommern.PNG 27 August 1542 1560–1569 9 February 1600 Pomerania-Wolgast Erdmuthe of Brandenburg 17 February 1577 Szczecin no children 1569-1600 Pomerania-Stettin Barnim X the Younger BarnimX.1750.JPG 15 February 1549 1560–1569 1 September 1603 Pomerania-Wolgast Anna Maria of Brandenburg 8 January 1581 Berlin no children 1569-1600 Pomerania-Stettin-Rügenwalde 1600-1603 Pomerania-Stettin (Stettin and Rügenwalde) Boguslaus XI BogislawXIII.1750.JPG 9 August 1544 1560–1569 7 March 1606 Pomerania-Wolgast Clara of Brunswick-Lüneburg 8 September 1572 eleven children

Anna of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg 31 May 1601 no children 1569-1603 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth 1603-1606 Pomerania-Stettin Philip Julius PhilippJulius1750.JPG 27 December 1584 1592–1625 6 February 1625 Pomerania-Wolgast Agnes of Brandenburg 25 June 1604 Berlin no children Son of Ernest Louis, united Barth to Wolgast in 1603 George II GeorgII.1615.JPG 30 January 1582 1603–1617 27 March 1617 Pomerania-Stettin-Rügenwalde Unmarried Son of Boguslaus XI, received Rügenwalde, inherited by his father in 1603, and given to him. Philip II the Pious PhilippII.1678.JPG 29 July 1573 1606–1618 3 February 1618 Pomerania-Stettin Sophia of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg 10 March 1607 Treptow an der Rega no children Son of Boguslaus XI. Left no descendants and the land was inherited by his brother Francis. Francis Franz1610.JPG 24 March 1577 1618–1620 27 November 1620 Pomerania-Stettin Sophie of Saxony 26 August 1610 Dresden no children Son of Boguslaus XI and brother of the predecessor. Boguslaus XII the Sociable BogislawXIV.1635.JPG 31 March 1580 1617–1620 10 March 1637 Pomerania-Stettin-Rügenwalde Elisabeth of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg 1615 no children Son of Boguslaus XI. Inherited the possessions of all his brothers and reunited Pomerania, but he also didn't have any children. At his death, Pomerania was annexed by the Kingdom of Sweden. 1620-1625 Pomerania-Stettin (Stettin and Rügenwalde) 1625-1637 Pomerania Principality of Rugia Further information: Principality of Rugia

1168–1325 feudal fief of Denmark under local rulers:

   1162–1170 Tezlaw
   1170–1217 Jaromar I
   1218–1249 Wizlaw I
   1249–1260 Jaromar II
   1260–1302 Wizlaw II
   1303–1325 Wizlaw III

From 1325 Pomerania-Wolgast or -Barth:

   1325–1326 Wartislaw IV
   1326–1368 Bogislaw V, Wartislaw V, Barnim IV
   1368–1372 Wartislaw VI, Bogislaw VI
   1372–1394 Wartislaw VI
   1394–1415 Wartislaw VIII
   1415–1432/36 Swantibor II
   1432/36–1451 Barnim VIII
   1451–1457 Wartislaw IX
   1457–1478 Wartislaw X

from 1474 part of Pomerania-Wolgast Duchy of Pomerelia

In 1155, the lands which belonged to Świętopełk I became independent under Sobieslaw I, a possible descendant, who founded the House of Sambor and the Duchy of Pomerelia.

The dukes of Pomerelia were using the Latin title dux Pomeraniae ("Duke of Pomerania") or dux Pomeranorum ("Duke of the Pomeranians"). The Pomerelian Griffin Partitions of the Duchy of Pomerelia

In 1215, the duchy was divided in other smaller duchies: Gdańsk, Białogarda, Lubiszewo and Świecie.

 Gdańsk   Białogarda   Lubiszewo   Świecie

1155-1190 Duchy of Pomerelia-Gdańsk Became independent in 1215. Duchy of Pomerelia-Białogarda Became independent in 1215. Duchy of Pomerelia-Lubiszewo Became independent in 1215. Duchy of Pomerelia-Świecie Became independent in 1215.

In 1271 the duchy is reunited and in 1296 annexed to the Kingdom of Poland Dukes of Pomerelia

Non-dynastic: Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Świętopełk I before 1106 1106–1113 1113 Pomerania-Gdańsk (future Pomerelia) Unknown He wasn't duke of Pomerelia, but ruled in the lands that became Pomerelia 40 years later. House of Sambor (1155–1296) Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Sobieslaw I c.1130 1155-1178 1178 Pomerelia Unknown before 1150 two children Sambor I Sambor I.JPG c.1150 1178-1205 7 February or 30 December 1205 Pomerelia Unknown before 1205 two children Mestwin I the Peaceful Mestwin I, Duke of Pomerania.PNG c.1160 1205-1220 1/2 July 1220 Pomerelia Swinisława of Poland c.1190 eight children Brother of Sambor. Świętopełk II the Great Swantopolk II, Duke of Pomerania.PNG c.1190 1220-1266 11 January 1266 Pomerelia-Gdańsk Salomea of Halych before 1220 one child

Euphrosyne of Greater Poland c.1220 two children

Hermengard of Mecklenburg-Schwerin c.1230 two children Son of Mestwin I. Ruler in Gdańsk, used the title Dux (Duke) from 1227. Wartislaw I c.1195 1220–1233 11 January 1233 Pomerelia-Białogarda-Lubiszewo-Świecie unmarried Son of Mestwin I. Ruler in Świecie, used the title Dux (Duke) from 1227. After his death his domains were divided between the younger brothers. Racibor I c.1212 1233–1262 6 June 1272 Pomerelia-Białogarda unmarried Son of Mestwin I. Joined the Teutonic Order in 1262, and -Białogarda was annexed by -Gdańsk. Sambor II Sambor II Tczewski seal 1229.PNG c.1212 1233–1270 30 December 1277 Pomerelia-Lubiszewo Matilda of Mecklenburg six children Son of Mestwin I. He initially resided at a burgh located in the later village of Lubiszewo. After the town of Tczew was founded nearby in the course of the German Ostsiedlung, the dukes shifted their residence to the town. Mestwin II Mestwin II, Duke of Pomerania.PNG 1220 1233–1270 29 December 1294 Pomerelia-Świecie Judith of Wettin before 1275 two children

Euphrosyne of Opole 1275 (div.1288) no children

Sulisława after 1288 no children Son of Swiatopelk I. In 1270, he reunited the duchy. Wartislaw II 1237 1266–1270 9 May 1271 Pomerelia-Gdańsk unmarried Son of Swietopelk II. After his death without descendants, Gdańsk was absorbed by the reunited Duchy of Pomerelia. Mestwin II Mestwin II, Duke of Pomerania.PNG 1220 1270–1294 29 December 1294 Pomerelia Judith of Wettin before 1275 two children

Euphrosyne of Opole 1275 (div.1288) no children

Sulisława after 1288 no children Reunites the duchy in 1270. In 1294, Pomerelia was annexed by the Kingdom of Poland. Later history of Pomerelia

   1296–1299 Part of Kujavia
   1299–1308 Part of Poland
   1308–1466 Part of the Teutonic Order State of Prussia
   1454–1466 13-years war of Polish-supported Prussian separatist forces against the Teutonic Order
   1466–1569 Royal Prussia, in personal union with the Crown of Poland
   1569–1772 Part of Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
   1772–1919 West Prussia (province of the Kingdom of Prussia which was part of the German Empire from 1871)
       1829–1878 Province of Prussia (a province of the Kingdom of Prussia)
       1772–1793 Gdańsk, Toruń and Elbląg remained with Poland, then annexed to West Prussia, except of the latter annexed to East Prussia
       1807–1814 Free City of Danzig a Napoleonic client state, with François Joseph Lefebvre ennobled as Duc de Dantzic (1808–1820), before returned to West Prussia
   1920–1939 Part of Poland as the Pomeranian Voivodeship, except of Danzig
   1920–1939 Free City of Danzig, a League of Nations mandate
   1939–1945 Danzig-West Prussia, province of Nazi Germany, including Polish Pomerania and Danzig
   1945–present Part of Poland again

See also

   History of Pomerania

Further reading This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (December 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

   Gerard Labuda (ed.), "Historia Pomorza", vol. 1–4, Poznan-Torun 1969–2003
   Edmund Kopicki, "Tabele dynastyczne", "Wykazy panujacych", in: "Katalog podstawowych monet i banknotow Polski oraz ziem z historycznie z Polska zwiazanych", vol. IX, part I
   Zugmunt Boras, "Ksiazeta Pomorza Zachdniego", Poznań 1969, 1978, 1996
   Casimir Kozlowski, George Podralski, "Poczet Ksiazat Pomorza Zachdniego", KAW, Szczecin 1985
   L. Badkowski, W.Samp. "Poczet ksiazat Pomorza Gdanskiego", Gdańsk 1974
   B. Sliwinski, "Poczet ksiazaat gdanskich", Gdańsk 1997
   Wojciech Myslenicki, "Pomorscy sprzymierzenscy Jagiellonczylow", Wyd. Poznanskie, Poznań 1979
   J. Spors, "Podzially administracyjne Pomorza Gdanskiego i Slawiensko-Slupksiego od XII do poczatkow XIV w", Słupsk 1983
   K. Slaski, "Podzially terytorialne Pomorza w XII–XII w.", Poznań 1960
   Edward Rymar, Krewni i powinowaci ksiazat pomorskich w zrodłach sredniowiecznych (XII–początek XVI w.), Materially Zachodniopomorskie, vol. XXXI

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Hipoteza według poglądów: E. Rymara, B. Śliwińskiego i J. Dobosza Siemomysł ur. IX/X w. zm. ok. 950–960 NN ur. ? zm. ? Dytryk ur. ? zm. 985 NN ur. ? zm. ?


Władcy Pomorza Gdańskiego==

Książęta gdańscy

   Siemomysł (ok. 1046) Świętobor I (ok. 1060–1106) Świętopełk I (1106 – ok. 1113)

POL województwo pomorskie COA.svg Zależni od książąt Polski Sobiesławice

   Sobiesław I gdański (ok. 1113 – ok. 1178) Sambor I gdański (ok. 1178–1205/1207) Grzymisław (? – 1200/1207) Mściwoj I gdański (ok. 1178–1213/1220) Świętopełk II Wielki (1213/1220 1266) Warcisław I świecki (1219/1220–1230) Racibor białogardzki (1219/1220-ok. 1262) Sambor II tczewski (1219/1220–1271) Mściwoj II (ok. 1260–1294) Warcisław II gdański (1266–1271)

Zjednoczone Pomorze gdańskie Sobiesławice

   Mściwoj II (1271–1294)

Piastowie

   Przemysł II (1294/1296–1296) Leszek inowrocławski (1296) Władysław I Łokietek (1296–1299)

Przemyślidzi

   Wacław II (1299–1305) Wacław III (1305–1306)

Piastowie

   Władysław I Łokietek (1306–1308/1309) Przemysł inowrocławski (1306–1309) Kazimierz III gniewkowski (1306–1309)
 	  	  	  	 
 	  	 
 	Mieszko I

ur. w okr. 922–945 zm. 25 V 992 Oda ur. w okr. 955–960 zm. 1023

 	  	 
 	 

NN ur. ? zm. ? OO ? Świętopełk Mieszkowic (ur. w okr. 979–985, zm. przed 25 V 992 (?))

lub Mieszko Mieszkowic (ur. w okr. 978–984 zm. po 25 V 992)

lub Lambert Mieszkowic (ur. w okr. 981–986 zm. po 25 V 992 (1030?))

 	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	 
 	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	 
 	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	 

Siemomysł ur. 1000/1020 zm. po 29 VI 1046

Dytryk ur. po 992 zm. po 1032

_______

all indications support the claim that Mieszko I Piast (* 930 Poznan - + 25.may 992 Poznan) and his second wife Oda Von Haldesleben (* 955 Haldesleben - + 1023 Pomerania) had the youngest son Lambert (* 981 Poznan - + cca1030 Pomerania) . His son Zemuzil (Siemomysl) Piast, Duke of Pomerania (1005 -after 29.June 1046). And his son was Swantibor I Piast, Duke of Pomerania (* 1040 East Pomerania Danzig - +1107 Stettin). He and his wife Anna had three known children - Swantopolk, Anna and Siemomysl.

Oda Von Haldesleben (* 955 Haldesleben - + 1023 Pomerania) was the eldest daughter of Duke Dietrich Von Saxon Nordmark (930 - 985)

@@@@@@@@ 1046 - historické souvislosti Pomořansko -Polsko-Bohemia: https://cs.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C5%99etislav_I.

Břetislav I., přezdívaný kronikářem Kosmou „český Achilles“, (mezi 1002 až 1005 – 10. ledna 1055 Chrudim) byl český kníže z dynastie Přemyslovců, který vládl na Moravě asi od roku 1029, v Čechách v letech 1034–1055.

Narodil se kolem roku 1002 jako nemanželský syn knížete Oldřicha a jeho družky (a později snad druhé ženy) Boženy. Břetislavův otec Oldřich zřejmě roku 1029 dobyl Moravu, když porazil polsko-moravské posádky. Břetislav, nemanželský Oldřichův syn, pak unesl z kláštera ve Schweinfurtu dceru bavorského velmože, markraběte z Nordgau Jindřicha, Jitku ze Schweinfurtu (též Juditu, Gutu), se kterou se oženil. Krátce poté odjeli spolu na Moravu, kde byl Břetislav z Oldřichovy vůle údělným knížetem.[1]

„ Tedy Břetislav, z jinochů nejkrásnější a hrdina nejudatnější, slyše z mnohých vyprávění o neobyčejné kráse, ušlechtilosti a urozeném původu řečené dívky, nedovedl ovládnouti svého ducha a jal se v srdci přemýšleti, má-li se pokusiti unést ji mocí, či se o ni řádně ucházeti. Ale rozhodl se raději mužně jednati než schýliti k pokorné prosbě šíji. “ — Kosmas Břetislav s Jitkou žili v této době v Olomouci, kde se také roku 1031 narodil jejich první syn Spytihněv.

Císař Konrád II. si roku 1033 knížete Oldřicha předvolal (důvodem byla jeho neochota podporovat Konráda proti Polsku), obvinil jej z úkladů, sesadil a odsoudil do vyhnanství v Bavorsku. Českým knížetem se stal opět Oldřichův bratr a Břetislavův strýc Jaromír. Na jaře 1034 však císař Oldřicha propustil a vrátil mu vládu v knížectví s tím, že Jaromír získá v Čechách úděl a Břetislav Moravu. Jaromíra dal ale jeho bratr zajmout a oslepit a Břetislav utekl do ciziny. Spor mezi otcem a synem snad přiostřilo to, že Břetislav zřejmě Jaromíra podporoval.

Po smrti svého otce Oldřicha na podzim 1034 byl Břetislav kromě svého strýce Jaromíra jediným žijícím mužským Přemyslovcem. Na knížecí trůn usedl Jaromír, ale vzápětí na to odstoupil v Břetislavův prospěch. Život mu to ovšem nezachránilo, o rok později byl, zřejmě Vršovci, zavražděn.

Břetislav se brzy ukázal jako velice silný a sebevědomý panovník a poté, kdy si upevnil a pojistil svoji domácí pozici a získal prvního následníka, zahájil rozšiřování své moci směrem na polské území. V letech 1038–1039 obsadil Hnězdno, v hnězdenské katedrále nad hrobem sv. Vojtěcha vyhlásil vydání prvního známého českého zákoníku (tzv. Břetislavova dekreta). Vojtěchovy ostatky (i ostatky Svatého Radima a svatých Pěti bratří) následně odvezl do Čech. Doufal zřejmě, že když pomohly zajistit arcibiskupství v Hnězdně, prokážou stejnou službu i Praze.

Jenže jeho protipolské tažení vzbudilo pozornost římského krále (a později císaře) Jindřicha III. Vzestup moci sousedního panovníka, navíc svého vazala, nemohl mladý Jindřich III. připustit stejně jako povznesení Čech zřízením arcibiskupství nebo dokonce povýšením na království.

Poslal do Polska vyhnaného piastovského knížete Kazimíra I. s oddílem svých bojovníků a zároveň žádal na Břetislavovi, aby vrátil polskou kořist a aby se jeho vojáci stáhli ze Slezska, které český kníže předtím téměř bez odporu dobyl. Tímto ultimátem se snažil vyprovokovat knížete k boji, na nějž se dobře připravil. Břetislav se snažil konflikt odvrátit a poslal jako rukojmí svého syna Spytihněva.

Roku 1040 vytáhl Jindřich III. s říšským vojskem do Čech. Byla to již jeho druhá česká výprava (poprvé sem přitáhl z vůle svého otce roku 1033 a porazil knížete Oldřicha). Nyní postupovala Jindřichova vojska ve dvou proudech, ale jejich vpád byl odražen v bitvách u Brůdku na Šumavě a Chlumce pod Krušnými horami. Jindřich musel uznat daný stav. Břetislavovým spojencem byl uherský král Petr Orseolo, který obsadil jižní pomezí českého souseda a dovolil mu tak vyslat moravskou vojenskou hotovost k obraně Čech.[2] Spytihněv byl propuštěn. Břetislav nabídl Jindřichovi, že s ním bude jednat osobně, ale král se toužil pomstít za vojenskou porážku. V následujícím roce se vyhnul pohraničním zásekům, pronikl celkem bez problémů do nitra země a oblehl Břetislava na Pražském hradě.

Když se ukázalo, že biskup Šebíř i mnozí velmoži jsou přístupni kompromisům, kníže se Jindřichovi III. podrobil, aby zabránil dalšímu pustošení své země. Poté se Břetislav I. dostavil na říšský sněm do Řezna, kde byla přítomna přední knížata. 15. října v Řezně musel Břetislav bosý a v rouše kajícníka padnout Jindřichovi k nohám, vzdát se vlády a žádat o odpuštění. Musel se také zříct moravského území jižně od Dyje, jež se následně stalo součástí Východní marky. Byla mu udělena milost, složil lenní hold a přísahu věrnosti.[3] Údajně přijal Čechy a další dvě území (soudí se, že šlo o slezské Vratislavsko a Hlohovsko) v léno. Jednalo se ovšem hlavně o formální podrobení. Jindřich III. potřeboval Břetislava jako významného spojence. V následujících letech byl Břetislav již pevným a vysoce ceněným spojencem Jindřicha, kterého podporoval zejména při tažení do Uher.

Císař roku 1042 vytáhl spolu s Břetislavem do Uher, kde měli v úmyslu sesadit z trůnu Samuela Abu a dosadit zpět Petra Orseola pobývajícího od roku 1041 v bavorském exilu. Výprava byla neúspěšná.[4] Stejně tak výprava roku 1043 nepřinesla změnu na uherském trůně. Až 5. července 1044 v bitvě u Menfö Samuela Abu porazili na hlavu a uherští velmoži začali opět masivně přebíhat k Petrovi Benátčanovi. Petr Orseolo byl v Székesfehérváru znovu uveden na uherský trůn. Samuel Aba byl uvězněn a posléze popraven.[4]

V roce 1054 vyřešil Břetislav komplikovanou otázku nástupnictví na knížecí stolec prosazením seniorátu (stařešinského řádu), zavázal svých pět synů a zemské předáky, aby

„ ...vždy nejstarší držel moc a stolec v knížectví a aby všichni jeho bratři nebo ti, kteří pocházejí z knížecího rodu, byli pod jeho panstvím. “ — Kosmas[5] Dalším členům dynastie pak měly náležet menší úděly na Moravě. Krátce poté Břetislav zemřel na hradě Chrudim na začátku nového tažení do Uher.

Kazimír I Piast: https://cs.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazim%C3%ADr_I._Obnovitel

Kazimír I. Karel Obnovitel (25. července 1016 – 28. listopadu 1058 Poznaň) byl kníže z dynastie Piastovců, vládce Polska v letech 1039–1058, syn Měška II. a jeho manželky Richenzy.

Narození 25. července 1016 Krakov Úmrtí 19. března 1058 (ve věku 41 let) Poznaň Pohřben Bazilika svatého Petra a Pavla v Poznani Potomci Boleslav II. Smělý, Vladislav I. Herman, Mieszko Kazimierzowic a Svatava Polská Otec Měšek II. Lambert Matka Richenza Lotrinská


Roku 1026 pobýval v některém z polských klášterů. Hypotéza, že se vzdal světské úlohy a stal se opatem, a roku 1034 dostal dispensi a vystoupil z řádu, se mezi historiky ani publicisty netěší valné popularitě. V letech 1034–1039 se mu pravděpodobně nepodařilo ujmout se vlády, byl vyhnán, a země se ocitla v krizi.

Po smrti Měška se vlády chtěla ujmout Richenza, možná již dříve před jeho smrtí společně s manželem. Kazimír značně podléhal vůli své ambiciózní matky. Ona sama s největší pravděpodobností vyvezla ze země královskou korunu Měška II. (pod ochranou řádu Bezpryma), což je obecně považováno za projev ochrany práva svého syna na trůn.

Kazimír se nenechal korunovat z důvodu vnitřních (šlechta nepřála jeho korunovaci) i vnějších neshod (se Svatou říší římskou).

Manželství a potomci Editovat Kazimírovou manželkou byla Dobroněga Kyjevská, dcera Vladimíra Kyjevského. Ke svatbě došlo kolem roku 1041 a během manželství se narodilo pět dětí:

Boleslav II. Smělý, polský kníže a král Vladislav I. Heřman, polský kníže Svatava Polská, česká kněžna a královna Měšek, Ota (1047/1048–1048): někdy býval mylně zaměňován s Otou Sličným, moravským knížetem.

Byl synem polského krále

Měšek II. Lambert (990 – 10. května 1034) byl polský panovník z rodu Piastovců, v letech 1025–1031 polský král, v letech 1032–1034 kníže, syn Boleslava I. Chrabrého a jeho třetí ženy Emnildy. Pod dojmem konce jeho vlády, kdy došlo k takřka úplnému rozkladu polského státu, dostal neoprávněně přízvisko Gnuśny („lenivý“), ale na začátku se projevoval jako schopný panovník a ani v období krize nehrál pasívní roli.

A byl vnukem

Boleslav Chrabrý polský kníže a král (992–1025)

Boleslav I. Chrabrý (polsky Bolesław I Chrobry, 967 – 17. června 1025) byl polským knížetem v letech 992 až 1025. Dva měsíce před svou smrtí se se souhlasem papeže stal prvním polským králem. Dočasně byl také vládcem Čech (1003–1004).

About Zemuzil-Siemomysł Piast, Duke of Pomerania (Polski)

--------------------------

Siemomysł (łac. Zemuzil) (ur. 1000/1020, zm. po 29 czerwca 1046) – książę pomorski, znany jedynie ze wzmianki w Rocznikach z Niederalteich i dokumentu króla niemieckiego Henryka III z 1040.

Był prawdopodobnie potężnym władcą chrześcijańskim, którego zasięg władzy mógł obejmować nawet całe Pomorze. Przypuszcza się, że był bliżej spokrewniony z dynastią Piastów, po mieczu lub po kądzieli. Pojawiły się również teorie, jakoby pokrewieństwo z Piastami wynikało z małżeństwa Siemomysła z przedstawicielką dynastii Rurykowiczów. Książę żył w konflikcie z księciem polskim Kazimierzem Odnowicielem. Pomimo złagodzenia sporu z polskim władcą, Siemomysł wsparł wyprawę możnego Miecława na Mazowsze.

Życiorys​ Siemomysł w dokumencie Henryka III​ W 1040 cesarz Henryk III wystawił dla katedry w Naumburg (Saale) dokument, w którym pojawia się informacja o nadaniu jej beneficjum w ziemi Weita, które posiadał niejaki (łac.) Sememizl. Badacze identyfikują tego ostatniego z Siemomysłem księciem pomorskim wspomnianym w dokumencie z 1046[1]. Przed 1040 Siemomysł mieszkał w Niemczech, skąd udał się na Pomorze. Data przybycia księcia na Pomorze nie jest znana. Przypuszcza się, że doszło do niego w czasie zbliżonym do terminu najazdu księcia czeskiego Brzetysława I na Śląsk i Wielkopolskę[2]. Pojawił się również domysł, jakoby był identyczny z księciem pokonanym przez księcia węgierskiego Belę I około 1043[2].

Siemomysł w relacji Roczników altajskich​ 24 czerwca 1046 Siemomysł wziął udział w zjeździe w Merseburgu z królem niemieckim Henrykiem III, księciem czeskim Brzetysławem I i Kazimierzem I Odnowicielem. Był władcą potężnym i chrześcijańskim, gdyż był traktowany równorzędnie z innymi władcami słowiańskimi[3]. 29 czerwca tegoż roku w Miśni doszło do złagodzenia sporów pomiędzy książętami przez niemieckiego władcę[4]. Siemomysł nie poddał się wyrokowi z Miśni, gdyż już w 1047 książę wsparł najazd możnego Miecława na Mazowsze[2].

Pokrewieństwo z Piastami Ze względu na fakt, że imię Siemomysł nosił jeden z książąt Polan z dynastii Piastów, sądzi się, że Siemomysł książę pomorski był jego potomkiem. Teorię tę uzupełnia pochodzący z przełomu XII i XIII wieku żywot św. Wojciecha zwany (łac.) Tempore illo, który przekazał informację, że praski biskup w Gdańsku miał udzielić ślubu niewymienionemu z imienia księciu pomorskiemu i córce Bolesława I Chrobrego. Wiarygodność tego źródła jest jednak kwestionowana[5].

Siemomysł jako potomek Piastów po kądzieli​

Istnieje kilka koncepcji dotyczących powiązań genealogicznych między Siemomysłem księciem pomorskim a Piastami. 1.Nieznany książę pomorski miał w 996 lub 997 poślubić córkę Bolesława I Chrobrego - zwolennikiem tego poglądu był Oswald Balzer, opierający się na przekazie (łac.) Tempore illo[6]. Pogląd ten został odrzucony przez nowszą literaturę historyczną. 2.Nieznany książę pomorski poślubił córkę Mieszka I - do ślubu doszło albo w latach 80. X wieku, albo zgodnie z relacją (łac.) Tempore illo w 996 lub na początku 997[7]. 3.Nieznany książę pomorski poślubił córkę Siemomysła, księcia Polan - zwolennikiem tego poglądu był Henryk Łowmiański[8]. Jeden z najwybitniejszych znawców genealogii Piastów, Kazimierz Jasiński, uważał poglądy nr 2 i 3 za równie prawdopodobne.

Na poparcie poglądu o pokrewieństwie Siemomysła z Piastami przywołuje się przekaz Galla Anonima, który nazywa Świętobora, księcia pomorskiego z przełomu XI i XII wieku, i jego syna Świętopełka krewnymi Bolesława III Krzywoustego[9]. Pojawiły się jednak hipotezy, wyjaśniające pokrewieństwo między Świętoborem i Świętopełkiem a Piastami z pominięciem Siemomysła - przypuszczano, że nieznana źródłom córka Bolesława II Szczodrego została wydana za księcia pomorskiego, ojca Świętobora[10]. Pojawiła się też teoria, że książęta pomorscy spokrewnili się z Piastami za ruskim pośrednictwem - księżną pomorską miała zostać nieznana źródłom córka Światopełka I, księcia kijowskiego, i jego żony, nieznanej z imienia córki Bolesława I Chrobrego[11].

Historycy, uważający Siemomysła za potomka polskiej księżniczki wzmiankowanej w (łac.) Tempore illo, twierdzą, że panował na Pomorzu Gdańskim[12].

Siemomysł jako potomek Piastów po kądzieli (koncepcja nr 1)​

Siemomysł jako potomek Piastów po kądzieli (koncepcja nr 2)​

Siemomysł jako potomek Piastów po kądzieli (koncepcja nr 3)​

Siemomysł jako przedstawiciel dynastii Piastów

W literaturze historycznej istnieje też mniejszościowa hipoteza (ostatnio coraz popularniejsza), uznająca książąt pomorskich za boczną linię Piastów, wywodzącą się od jednego z synów Mieszka I i Ody (Świętopełka[2], Mieszka[13] lub Lamberta[14]). W jej myśl Siemomysł książę pomorski był synem Dytryka[15] lub jego bratem[2].

Badacze, uznający Siemomysła za potomka Piastów po mieczu, lokują jego księstwo na terenie Pomorza Zachodniego[12] lub całego Pomorza[16].

Hipotetyczny wywód Siemomysła księcia pomorskiego od Świętopełka Mieszkowica​

Hipotetyczny wywód Siemomysła księcia pomorskiego od Mieszka Mieszkowica​

Hipotetyczny wywód Siemomysła księcia pomorskiego od Lamberta Mieszkowica​

Hipoteza według poglądów: E. Rymara, B. Śliwińskiego i J. Dobosza​

Imię​

Roczniki altajskie zapisały jego imię (łac.) Zemuzil. Odczytuje się je jako Siemysł albo Siemomysł; sądzi się, że pierwsza wersja mogła powstać w wyniku haplologii (zaniku zgłoski om)[17]. Istniały hipotezy, że (łac.) Zemuzil należy odczytywać jako Wszemysł (pogląd Aleksandra Brücknera) bądź Siemosił (pogląd Jerzego Dowiata); obecnie są one odrzucane w literaturze historycznej[18].

Przypisy

1.↑ Pogląd H. Łowmiańskiego; zob. G. Labuda, Siemomysł, ks. pomorski, s. 169. Za H. Łowmiańskim identyfikację tą przyjął E. Rymar, Rodowód książąt pomorskich, s. 77. 2.↑ Skocz do: a b c d e E. Rymar, Rodowód książąt pomorskich, s. 72,79. 3.↑ J. Sochacki, Relacja roczników altajskich o księciu pomorskim Zemuzile, ss. 83–84. 4.↑ E. Rymar, Rodowód książąt pomorskich, s. 77. 5.↑ H. Łowmiański, Początki Polski, T. 5, s. 416; E. Rymar, Rodowód książąt pomorskich, ss. 67-72. 6.↑ O. Balzer, Genealogia Piastów, s. 60. 7.↑ G. Labuda, Wpływ powstania państwa polskiego na rozwój dziejowy Pomorza, [w]: Tymieniecki K. (pod red.), Początki państwa polskiego, T. 2, s. 273. 8.↑ H. Łowmiański, Początki Polski, T. 5, s. 418, przyp. 1348. 9.↑ Gall Anonim, Kronika polska, lib. III, c. 26. 10.↑ H. Łowmiański, Początki Polski, T. 5, s. 418, przyp. 1248. 11.↑ J. Tęgowski, Spokrewnienie Bolesława Krzywoustego ze Świętoborem i Świętopełkiem, książętami pomorskimi z początku XII wieku, [w]: Genealogia. Studia i materiały historyczne, T. 12, ss. 7-21. 12.↑ Skocz do: a b Zob. G. Labuda, Siemomysł, ks. pomorski, s. 168. 13.↑ B. Śliwiński, Pomorze w polityce i strukturze państwa wczesnopiastowskiego (X-XII w.), [w]: "Kwartalnik Historyczny", nr 107/2. 14.↑ E. Rymar, Rodowód książąt pomorskich, s. 73. 15.↑ S. Zakrzewski, Bolesław Chrobry Wielki, s. 173. 16.↑ E. Rymar, Rodowód książąt pomorskich, ss. 79–80. 17.↑ M. Rudnicki, Odra i jej ujścia, Slavia Occidentalis, R. 15, 1936, ss. 99-100. 18.↑ G. Labuda, Siemomysł, ks. pomorski, s. 169.

Bibliografia​ Balzer O., Genealogia Piastów, Kraków 1895. Labuda G., Siemomysł, ks. pomorski [w]: Słownik starożytności słowiańskich, T. 5, 1975. Rymar E., Rodowód książąt pomorskich, Szczecin: Książnica Pomorska, 2005, ISBN 83-87879-50-9, OCLC 69296056. Sochacki J., Relacja roczników altajskich o księciu pomorskim Zemuzile [w:] Panic I., Sperka J. (red.) Średniowiecze polskie i powszechne, Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego, T. 4, Katowice 2007, ​ISBN 978-83-226-1590-4​. Śliwiński B., Pomorze w polityce i strukturze państwa wczesnopiastowskiego (X-XII w.) [w]: "Kwartalnik Historyczny", nr 107/2, 2000. Zakrzewski S., Bolesław Chrobry Wielki, wyd. 2, Kraków 2000.

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https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemomys%C5%82_pomorski

https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemomys%C5%82_pomorski

https://lubimyczytac.pl/ksiazka/208635/piesn-swantibora                          

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Pomeranian_duchies_and_dukes#Non-dynastic_2 https://www.academia.edu/36144807/Arch%C3%A4ologische_Zeugen_der_ersten_Missionsreise_Bischof_Ottos_in_Pommern?email_work_card=view-paperDukes of the Slavic Pomeranian tribes (All Pomerania)

https://www.szkolnictwo.pl/szukaj,Dytryk

The lands of Pomerania were firstly ruled by local tribes, who settled in Pomerania around the 10th and 11th centuries. Non-dynastic Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Siemomysł c.1000 or 1020 After 1000–1046 c.29 June 1046 All Pomerania Unknown First known duke of all Pomerania. His origins are unknown. Świętobor before 1046 1060–1106 1106 All Pomerania Anna Son of Siemomysl. Świętopełk I before 1106 1106–1113 1113 Pomerania-Danzig (future Pomerelia) Unknown

In 1106, Pomerania is divided by his two older sons: Wartislaw, who founded the House of Pomerania and the Duchy of Pomerania, and Świętopełk I. After Swietopelk's death, his lands were occupied by the Saxon prince Lothar of Supplinburg. In 1155, the lands regained independence under Sobieslaw I, who founded the dynasty of the Samborides, and the Duchy of Pomerelia. Duchy of Pomerania Further information: Duchy of Pomerania

The Duchy resulted from the partition of Świętobor, Duke of Pomerania, in which his son Wartislaw inherited the lands that would become in fact known as Pomerania. The Pomeranian Griffin Partitions of Pomerania First partition 1155–1264

In 1155, Pomerania was divided in Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Demmin. In 1190 the Land of Słupsk-Sławno separated itself from -Stettin.

In 1231 Emperor Frederick II granted the immediate liege lordship over Pomerania to the Margrave of Brandenburg, who enforced this claim by the Treaties of Kremmen (1236) and of Landin (1250). Thus Pomerania had become a fief of Brandenburg, thus an only mediate (indirect) subfief of the Empire, with Brandenburg itself being an immediate imperial fief.

In 1227, Stolp came to Pomerelia, Schlawe to Pomerania. In 1238–1316 both became part of Pomerelia, ruled by an autonomously acting dynasty of castellans, the Swenzones (German: Swenzonen, entering history in 1257 with Swenzo the Elder). In 1316, the area became part of the Pomerania-Wolgast, first as a pawn from Brandenburg, and definitively in 1347.

After Wartislaw III died heirless in 1264, Barnim I became sole duke of the whole duchy. After Barnim's death, the duchy was to be ruled by his sons Barnim II, Otto I and Bogislaw IV. The first years, Bogislaw, being the eldest, ruled in place of his too young brothers. Second partition 1295–1368

In 1295, the Duchy of Pomerania was divided roughly by the Peene and Ina (Ihna) rivers, with the areas north of these rivers ruled by Bogislaw IV became Pomerania-Wolgast, whereas Otto I received Pomerania-Szczecin south of these rivers. Third partition 1368–1376

In 1368, Pomerania-Wolgast was divided into a western part (German: Wolgast diesseits der Swine, including the name-giving residence in Wolgast) and an eastern part (German: Wolgast jenseits der Swine, in literature also called Pomerania-Stolp after the residence in Stolp (Słupsk)). Fourth partition 1376/1377–1478

In 1376, the western part of Pomerania-Wolgast (German: Wolgast diesseits der Swine) was subdivided in a smaller western part sometimes named Pomerania-Barth after the residence in Barth, and an eastern part which included the residence in Wolgast. In the following year, the eastern part of Pomerania-Wolgast (German: Wolgast diesseits der Swine or Pomerania-Stolp) was divided into a western part which included Stargard and an eastern part which included the residence in Stolp (Słupsk).

In 1459, the eastern partitions of Pomerania-Wolgast around Stargard and Stolp ceased to exist. In 1478, after 200 years of partition, the duchy was reunited for a short period when all her parts were inherited by Bogislaw X. Fifth and sixth partitions 1531–1625

In 1531, Pomerania was partitioned into Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Wolgast. This time however, in contrast to the earlier partitions with the same names, Pomerania-Wolgast included the western, and Pomerania-Stettin the eastern parts of the duchy. In 1569, were created the duchies of -Barth (split off from -Wolgast) and -Rügenwalde (Darłowo) (split off from -Stettin). Definitive reunification and annexation to Sweden

In 1625, Bogislaw XIV reunited all Pomerania under his rule. However, in 1637, Sweden hold western parts of Pomerania (Hither Pomerania), originally including Stettin, legalised by the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 (Swedish Pomerania, several times reduced in favour of Brandenburgian Pomerania). Between 1637 and 1657 Lauenburg-Bütow Land came to Poland, thereafter to Brandenburg. In 1648, Brandenburg prevailed in the Peace of Westphalia with its claim only for eastern parts of Pomerania (Farther Pomerania), with the Brandenburg electors officially holding simultaneously the title of dukes of Pomerania until 1806 (end of the Empire and its enfeoffments), but de facto integrating their Pomerania into Brandenburg-Prussia, making it one of the provinces of Prussia in 1815, then including former Swedish Pomerania. Dukes of Pomerania: the House of Griffins Partitions of Pomerania under Griffins rule Duchy of Pomerania (1121–1156) Demmin (1st creation) (1156–1184) Stettin (1st creation) (1156–1264) Schlawe-Stolp (1156–1238)

     

Demmin (2nd creation) (1208–1264)

     

Duchy of Pomerania (1264–1295) Wolgast (1st creation) (1295–1478) Stettin (2nd creation) (1295–1464)

      	Stolp

(1368–1459) Barth (1st creation) (1377–1393) Stargard (1377-1395)

      	      
      	      

Barth (2nd creation) (1425–1451)

      	      

Barth (3rd creation) (1457–1478)

     
     

Duchy of Pomerania (1478–1531) Wolgast (2nd creation) (1531–1625) Stettin (3rd creation) (1531–1569)

      	Barth

(4th creation) (1569–1603) Rügenwalde (1st creation) (1569–1600) (Wolgast line 1569–1600)

      	(Rügenwalde line 1600–1603)
      	(Barth line 1603–1625) 	Rügenwalde

(2nd creation) (1603–1620)

      	      

Duchy of Pomerania (1625–1637) Table of rulers

(Note: Here the numbering of the dukes is the same for all duchies, as all were titled Dukes of Pomerania, despite of the different parts of land or particular numbering of the rulers. The dukes are numbered by the year of their succession.) Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Warcislaus I Wartislaw I.jpg c.1091 1121–1135 1135 Pomerania 24 pagan wives

Heila of Saxony before 1128 one child

Ida of Denmark 1129 three children First duke of Pomerania and founder of the family. A pagan, he converted to Christianity in the beginning of the 12th century. Then, along with his son Bolesław, backed Otto of Bamberg in his successful Conversion of Pomerania. Racibor I Racibor I of Pomerania.jpg c.1124 1135–1156 1156 Pomerania Pribislava Yaroslavna of Volhynia 1136 four children Ancestor of the Ratiboriden branch of the House of Pomerania that ruled Słupsk-Sławno Casimir I Casimir I.jpg after 1130 1156–1180 fall of 1180 Pomerania-Demmin Pritolawa no children Swietopelk Before 1156 1156–c.1190 1190s Pomerania-Schlawe-Stolp Unmarried Warcislaus II c.1160 1180–1184 c.1184 Pomerania-Demmin Sophia of Poland no children Boguslaus I Bogislaw I.jpg 1127 1156-1184 18 March 1187 Pomerania-Stettin Walburga of Denmark three children

Anastasia of Greater Poland 26 April 1177 two children In 1184 after the death of his nephew Warcislaus II, reunited Stettin and Demmin. 1184–1187 Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Demmin Anastasia of Greater Poland (regent) Anastasia of Greater Poland.jpg c.1164 1187–1208 c.1240 Pomerania-Stettin and Pomerania-Demmin Boguslaus I 26 April 1177 two children Widow of Bogislaw I. Boguslaus II Bogislaw II.jpg 1177 1208–1220 23 January 1220 Pomerania-Stettin Miroslava of Pomerelia 1210 three children Son of Bogislaw I. Casimir II Casimir II Pommern.jpg c.1180 1208–1219 1219 Pomerania-Demmin Ingard of Denmark 1210 two children Boguslaus III Bogislaw III.jpg before 1190 c.1190–1223 1223 Pomerania-Schlawe-Stolp A daughter of Mieszko III of Poland before 1223 two children Son of Boguslaus II and younger brother of Barnim I. His existence is not certain. Received the -Sławno part in 1190 by his father. Ingard of Denmark (regent) Ingard.jpg c.1190 1219–1226 1248 Pomerania-Demmin Casimir II 1210 two children Widow of Casimir II Warcislaus III Wartislaw III.jpg c.1210 1226–1264 17 May 1264 Pomerania-Demmin Sophia 1236 three children After his death in 1264, Barnim became the sole duke. Racibor II before 1223 1223–1238 1238 Pomerania-Schlawe-Stolp unmarried Son of Bogislaw III. Other historians suggest that he could be also son of Bogislaw II or Mestwin I of Pomerelia. After his death without descendants, the land returned to Pomerania. Miroslava of Pomerelia (regent) Miroslava of Pomerelia.jpg 1190 1220–1226 1237 Pomerania-Stettin Boguslaus II 1210 three children Widow of Bogislaw I. Barnim I the Good Barnim01.jpg c.1217/1219 1226–1264 13 December 1278 Pomerania-Stettin Anna Maria of Saxony between 4 September 1238 and 18 July 1242 three children

Margaret of Brunswick-Lüneburg 1252 or 1253 one child

Matilda of Brandenburg between 29 March 1263 and 20 May 1267 six children Since 1227 the dukes were again vassals of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1264 reunited all Pomerania. 1264-1278 Pomerania Boguslaus IV Bogislaw IV.jpg c.1255 1278–1295 19/24 February 1309 Pomerania Matilda of Brandenburg-Stendal between 1275 and 1278 no children

Margaret of Rügen 13 August 1284 six children Ruled jointly. Boguslaus was the eldest son of Barnim I, and ruled with his stepmother, who was regent of her own sons. From 1294 Boguslaus ruled directly with his half-brothers Barnim and Otto, who reached majority in that year. Following the death of Barnim without descendants in 1295, Boguslaus and Otto divided Pomerania between them: Boguslaus retained Wolgast and Otto received Stettin. 1295-1309 Pomerania-Wolgast Matilda of Brandenburg (regent) Matilda of Brandenburg.jpg ? 1278-1294 20 December 1316 Pomerania Barnim I the Good between 29 March 1263 and 20 May 1267 six children Barnim II Barnim II.jpg c.1277 1294-1295 28 May 1295 Pomerania unmarried Otto I OttoIPommern.jpg 1279 1294–1295 31 December 1344 Pomerania Elisabeth of Holstein April 1296 two children 1295–1344 Pomerania-Stettin Warcislaus IV Wartislaw IV.jpg before 1290 1309–1326 1 August 1326 Pomerania-Wolgast Elisabeth of Lindow-Ruppin 11 April 1316 or 1317 three children Son of Bogislaw IV. Barnim III the Great Barnim III.jpg c.1300 1344–1368 14 August 1368 Pomerania-Stettin Agnes of Brunswick-Grubenhagen 1330 five children Elisabeth of Lindow-Ruppin (regent) Elisabeth of Lindow-Ruppin.jpg 1300 1326–c.1330 Between February (or March) 1355 and 2 July 1356 Pomerania-Wolgast Warcislaus IV 11 April 1316 or 1317 three children Regent on behalf of her sons. Boguslaus V the Great Bogislaw V.jpg c.1318 c.1330–1368 23 April 1374 Pomerania-Wolgast Elisabeth of Poland 24 or 25 February 1343 three children

Adelaide of Brunswick-Grubenhagen 1362 or 1363 four children Sons of Boguslaus IV, ruled jointly. In 1368, Boguslaus, the last surviving brother, divided the land with his brother Barnim's heirs: They kept Wolgast, and Boguslaus created Stargard for himself. 1368–1374 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp Warcislaus V the Father of the People Wartislaw V.jpg c.1 November 1326 c.1330–1368 1390 Pomerania-Wolgast Anna of Mecklenburg-Stargard before 1390 no children Barnim IV the Good Barnim IV.jpg 1325 c.1330–1365 22 August 1365 Pomerania-Wolgast Sophia of Mecklenburg-Werle 1343 three children Casimir III Casimir III.jpg 1348 1368–1372 24 August 1372 Pomerania-Stettin unmarried Son of Barnim III. Boguslaus VI Bogislaw VI.jpg c.1350 1365–1393 7 March 1393 Pomerania-Wolgast Judith of Saxe-Lauenburg between 1369 and 1377 no children

Agnes of Brunswick-Lüneburg 14 or 19 September 1389 Celle two children Sons of Barnim IV, ruled jointly. In 1377, they divided the land: Boguslaus kept Wolgast and Warcislaus retained Barth. However, as Boguslaus died without heirs, Warcislaus reunited Barth with Wolgast. Warcislaus VI the One-Eyed Wartislaw VI.jpg 1345 1365–1377 13 June 1394 Pomerania-Wolgast Anne of Mecklenburg-Stargard 1 October 1363 four children 1377-1393 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth 1393-1394 Pomerania-Wolgast Swantibor I Swantibor I.jpg c.1351 1372–1413 21 June 1413 Pomerania-Stettin Anne of Nuremberg 17 September 1363 four children Brothers of Casimir III, ruled jointly. Boguslaus VII the Older Bogislaw VII.jpg before 1355 1372–1404 1404 Pomerania-Stettin Unknown before 1404 no children Casimir IV Casimir IV.jpg 1351 1374–1377 2 January 1377 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp Kenna of Lithuania 1360 no children

Margaret of Masovia 1368 or 1369 no children After his death his sons divided the land. Warcislaus VII Wartislaw VII.jpg 1363/5 1377–1394/5 1394/5 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp Maria of Mecklenburg-Schwerin 23 March 1380 one child Sons of Casimir IV. Warcislaus received Stargard, and his brothers Boguslaus and Barnim received Stolp together. The death of Warcislaus made possible the reunion of the inheritance of their father, by Boguslaus and Barnim, who reunited Stolp to Stargard. However, there was an heir to Stolp: Boguslaus, who would be brought up in Denmark and changed name to Eric. Boguslaus VIII Magnus Bogislaw VIII.jpg c.1364 1377–1394/5 11 February 1418 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp-Stargard Sophia of Holstein c.1398 two children. 1394/5-1418 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Barnim V Barnim V.jpg 1369 1377–1394/5 1402/3 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp-Stargard Hedwig of Lithuania 27 September 1396 one child 1394/5–1403 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Barnim VI Epitaph Barnim VI Büste.png c.1365 1393–1405 22 September 1405 Pomerania-Wolgast Veronica of Hohenzollern circa or before 1395 three children Sons of Warcislaus VI, ruled jointly. Warcislaus VIII Wartislaw VIII.jpg 1373 1393–1415 20/23 August 1415 Pomerania-Wolgast Agnes of Saxe-Lauenburg circa or before 1398 four children Otto II OttoII.jpg c.1380 1413–1428 27 March 1428 Pomerania-Stettin Agnes of Mecklenburg-Stargard c.1411 no children Sons of Swantibor I, ruled jointly. Casimir V Casimir V.jpg before 1380 1413–1435 13 April 1435 Pomerania-Stettin Catherine of Brunswick-Lüneburg circa or before 1420 three children

Elisabeth of Brunswick-Grubenhagen circa or before 1439 one child Agnes of Saxe-Lauenburg (regent) Agnes of Saxe-Lauenburg.jpg After 1373 1415–1425 1435 Pomerania-Wolgast Wartislaw VIII circa or before 1398 four children Regent in the name of her children, Barnim VIII and Swantibor II, and her nephews, sons of Barnim VI: Warcislaus IX and Barnim VII. Barnim VII the Older Barnim VII.jpg 1390 1425–1450 22 September 1450 Pomerania-Wolgast Unmarried Sons of the co-rulers Barnim VI and Warcislaus VIII. After the end of the regency of Agnes, the four rulers divided possessions: The sons of Barnim kept Wolgast; the sons of Warcislaus received Barth. However, as the sons of Warcislaus left no children, their possessions returned to the sons of Barnim VI. Warcislaus IX WartislawIX.1776.JPG c.1400 1425–1457 17 April 1457 Pomerania-Wolgast Sophia of Saxe-Lauenburg 1420 four children

Son of Barnim VI. Barnim VIII the Younger Barnim VIII.jpg between 1405 and 1407 1425–1451 between 15 and 19 December 1451 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth Anna of Wunstorf circa or before 1434 one child Swantibor II the Calm c.1408 1425–1432 1432 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth Unmarried Boguslaus IX Bogislaw IX.jpg 1407/1410 1418–1446 7 December 1446 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Maria of Masovia 24 June 1432 Poznań two children Council of Regency in Pomerania-Stettin:1435–1443 Joachim the Younger Joachim the Younger.jpg 1424 1443–1451 4 October 1451 Pomerania-Stettin Elisabeth of Brandenburg 29 September 1440 one child Son of Casimir V. Maria of Masovia (regent) Maria of Masovia.jpg 1408/1415 1446–1449 14 February 1454 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Bogislaw IX 24 June 1432 Poznań two children Regent in name of her husband's cousin and heir, Eric I. Eric I ErichI.1500.JPG 1381/1382 1449–1459 3 May 1459 Pomerania-Wolgast-Stolp (Stolp and Stargard) Philippa of England 26 October 1406 Lund one child Son of Warcislaus VII and original heir of Stolp in 1394. His absence was probably the cause of his being bypassed in the Pomeranian succession. Also King of the Union of Kalmar between Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Warcislaus X Wartislaw X.jpg 1435 1457–1478 17 December 1478 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth Elisabeth of Brandenburg 5 March 1454 two children

Magdalena of Mecklenburg-Stargard 1472 no children Otto III Otto III.jpg 29 May 1444 1460–1464 7 September 1464 Pomerania-Stettin unmarried

Son of Wartcislaus IX. Eric II ErichII.Pommern.JPG between 1418 and 1425 1457–1464 5 July 1474 Pomerania-Wolgast Anna Sophie of Pomerania-Stolp 1451 twelve children In 1464, he reunited Pomerania-Wolgast with Pomerania-Stettin 1464-1474 Pomerania-Wolgast and Pomerania-Stettin Boguslaus X the Great Bogislaw X von Pommern.JPG 3 June 1454 1474–1478 5 October 1523 Pomerania-Wolgast and Pomerania-Stettin Margaret of Brandenburg 20 September 1477 Prenzlau no children

Anna Jagiellon of Poland 2 February 1491 Szczecin eight children Son of Eric II, reunited Pomerania in 1478. 1478-1523 Pomerania George I GeorgPommern.JPG 11 April 1493 1523–1531 10 May 1531 Pomerania Amalie of the Palatinate 22 May 1513 Szczecin three children

Margaret of Brandenburg 23 January 1530 Berlin one child Sons of Boguslaus X, ruled jointly. After George's death, Barnim divided Pomerania with his younger brother Philip. After his death his possessions went to Pomerania-Wolgast. Barnim IX the Pious BarnimIX.1570.JPG 2 December 1501 1523–1531 2 November 1573 Pomerania Anna of Brunswick-Lüneburg 2 February 1525 Szczecin seven children 1531-1569 Pomerania-Stettin Philip I the Pious' Philipp I. von Pommern.png 14 July 1515 1531–1560 14 February 1560 Pomerania-Wolgast Maria of Saxony 27 February 1536 Torgau ten children Son of George I. Ernest Louis the Fair ErnstLudwig1750F.JPG 20 November 1545 1560–1592 17 June 1592 Pomerania-Wolgast Sophie Hedwig of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel 20 October 1577 Wolgast three children Sons of Philip I, ruled jointly. Divided the land in 1569: Ernest Louis kept Wolgast, John Frederick received Stettin, Boguslaus received Barth and Neuenkamp (later Franzburg), and Barnim received Rügenwalde. In 1592 Boguslaus became tutor of his nephew Philip Julius. In 1600 after the death of John Frederick without children, the land was inherited by Barnim, who reunited it with Rügenwalde. At the latter's death in 1603 also with no descendants, Boguslaus received the land and united it with Barth, but he gave Rügenwalde to one of his sons, and gave Barth and Neuenkamp to Philip Julius. John Frederick the Strong JohannFriedrichPommern.PNG 27 August 1542 1560–1569 9 February 1600 Pomerania-Wolgast Erdmuthe of Brandenburg 17 February 1577 Szczecin no children 1569-1600 Pomerania-Stettin Barnim X the Younger BarnimX.1750.JPG 15 February 1549 1560–1569 1 September 1603 Pomerania-Wolgast Anna Maria of Brandenburg 8 January 1581 Berlin no children 1569-1600 Pomerania-Stettin-Rügenwalde 1600-1603 Pomerania-Stettin (Stettin and Rügenwalde) Boguslaus XI BogislawXIII.1750.JPG 9 August 1544 1560–1569 7 March 1606 Pomerania-Wolgast Clara of Brunswick-Lüneburg 8 September 1572 eleven children

Anna of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg 31 May 1601 no children 1569-1603 Pomerania-Wolgast-Barth 1603-1606 Pomerania-Stettin Philip Julius PhilippJulius1750.JPG 27 December 1584 1592–1625 6 February 1625 Pomerania-Wolgast Agnes of Brandenburg 25 June 1604 Berlin no children Son of Ernest Louis, united Barth to Wolgast in 1603 George II GeorgII.1615.JPG 30 January 1582 1603–1617 27 March 1617 Pomerania-Stettin-Rügenwalde Unmarried Son of Boguslaus XI, received Rügenwalde, inherited by his father in 1603, and given to him. Philip II the Pious PhilippII.1678.JPG 29 July 1573 1606–1618 3 February 1618 Pomerania-Stettin Sophia of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg 10 March 1607 Treptow an der Rega no children Son of Boguslaus XI. Left no descendants and the land was inherited by his brother Francis. Francis Franz1610.JPG 24 March 1577 1618–1620 27 November 1620 Pomerania-Stettin Sophie of Saxony 26 August 1610 Dresden no children Son of Boguslaus XI and brother of the predecessor. Boguslaus XII the Sociable BogislawXIV.1635.JPG 31 March 1580 1617–1620 10 March 1637 Pomerania-Stettin-Rügenwalde Elisabeth of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg 1615 no children Son of Boguslaus XI. Inherited the possessions of all his brothers and reunited Pomerania, but he also didn't have any children. At his death, Pomerania was annexed by the Kingdom of Sweden. 1620-1625 Pomerania-Stettin (Stettin and Rügenwalde) 1625-1637 Pomerania Principality of Rugia Further information: Principality of Rugia

1168–1325 feudal fief of Denmark under local rulers:

   1162–1170 Tezlaw
   1170–1217 Jaromar I
   1218–1249 Wizlaw I
   1249–1260 Jaromar II
   1260–1302 Wizlaw II
   1303–1325 Wizlaw III

From 1325 Pomerania-Wolgast or -Barth:

   1325–1326 Wartislaw IV
   1326–1368 Bogislaw V, Wartislaw V, Barnim IV
   1368–1372 Wartislaw VI, Bogislaw VI
   1372–1394 Wartislaw VI
   1394–1415 Wartislaw VIII
   1415–1432/36 Swantibor II
   1432/36–1451 Barnim VIII
   1451–1457 Wartislaw IX
   1457–1478 Wartislaw X

from 1474 part of Pomerania-Wolgast Duchy of Pomerelia

In 1155, the lands which belonged to Świętopełk I became independent under Sobieslaw I, a possible descendant, who founded the House of Sambor and the Duchy of Pomerelia.

The dukes of Pomerelia were using the Latin title dux Pomeraniae ("Duke of Pomerania") or dux Pomeranorum ("Duke of the Pomeranians"). The Pomerelian Griffin Partitions of the Duchy of Pomerelia

In 1215, the duchy was divided in other smaller duchies: Gdańsk, Białogarda, Lubiszewo and Świecie.

 Gdańsk   Białogarda   Lubiszewo   Świecie

1155-1190 Duchy of Pomerelia-Gdańsk Became independent in 1215. Duchy of Pomerelia-Białogarda Became independent in 1215. Duchy of Pomerelia-Lubiszewo Became independent in 1215. Duchy of Pomerelia-Świecie Became independent in 1215.

In 1271 the duchy is reunited and in 1296 annexed to the Kingdom of Poland Dukes of Pomerelia Non-dynastic Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Świętopełk I before 1106 1106–1113 1113 Pomerania-Gdańsk (future Pomerelia) Unknown He wasn't duke of Pomerelia, but ruled in the lands that became Pomerelia 40 years later. House of Sambor (1155–1296) Ruler Born Reign Death Ruling part Consort Notes Sobieslaw I c.1130 1155-1178 1178 Pomerelia Unknown before 1150 two children Sambor I Sambor I.JPG c.1150 1178-1205 7 February or 30 December 1205 Pomerelia Unknown before 1205 two children Mestwin I the Peaceful Mestwin I, Duke of Pomerania.PNG c.1160 1205-1220 1/2 July 1220 Pomerelia Swinisława of Poland c.1190 eight children Brother of Sambor. Świętopełk II the Great Swantopolk II, Duke of Pomerania.PNG c.1190 1220-1266 11 January 1266 Pomerelia-Gdańsk Salomea of Halych before 1220 one child

Euphrosyne of Greater Poland c.1220 two children

Hermengard of Mecklenburg-Schwerin c.1230 two children Son of Mestwin I. Ruler in Gdańsk, used the title Dux (Duke) from 1227. Wartislaw I c.1195 1220–1233 11 January 1233 Pomerelia-Białogarda-Lubiszewo-Świecie unmarried Son of Mestwin I. Ruler in Świecie, used the title Dux (Duke) from 1227. After his death his domains were divided between the younger brothers. Racibor I c.1212 1233–1262 6 June 1272 Pomerelia-Białogarda unmarried Son of Mestwin I. Joined the Teutonic Order in 1262, and -Białogarda was annexed by -Gdańsk. Sambor II Sambor II Tczewski seal 1229.PNG c.1212 1233–1270 30 December 1277 Pomerelia-Lubiszewo Matilda of Mecklenburg six children Son of Mestwin I. He initially resided at a burgh located in the later village of Lubiszewo. After the town of Tczew was founded nearby in the course of the German Ostsiedlung, the dukes shifted their residence to the town. Mestwin II Mestwin II, Duke of Pomerania.PNG 1220 1233–1270 29 December 1294 Pomerelia-Świecie Judith of Wettin before 1275 two children

Euphrosyne of Opole 1275 (div.1288) no children

Sulisława after 1288 no children Son of Swiatopelk I. In 1270, he reunited the duchy. Wartislaw II 1237 1266–1270 9 May 1271 Pomerelia-Gdańsk unmarried Son of Swietopelk II. After his death without descendants, Gdańsk was absorbed by the reunited Duchy of Pomerelia. Mestwin II Mestwin II, Duke of Pomerania.PNG 1220 1270–1294 29 December 1294 Pomerelia Judith of Wettin before 1275 two children

Euphrosyne of Opole 1275 (div.1288) no children

Sulisława after 1288 no children Reunites the duchy in 1270. In 1294, Pomerelia was annexed by the Kingdom of Poland. Later history of Pomerelia

   1296–1299 Part of Kujavia
   1299–1308 Part of Poland
   1308–1466 Part of the Teutonic Order State of Prussia
   1454–1466 13-years war of Polish-supported Prussian separatist forces against the Teutonic Order
   1466–1569 Royal Prussia, in personal union with the Crown of Poland
   1569–1772 Part of Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
   1772–1919 West Prussia (province of the Kingdom of Prussia which was part of the German Empire from 1871)
       1829–1878 Province of Prussia (a province of the Kingdom of Prussia)
       1772–1793 Gdańsk, Toruń and Elbląg remained with Poland, then annexed to West Prussia, except of the latter annexed to East Prussia
       1807–1814 Free City of Danzig a Napoleonic client state, with François Joseph Lefebvre ennobled as Duc de Dantzic (1808–1820), before returned to West Prussia
   1920–1939 Part of Poland as the Pomeranian Voivodeship, except of Danzig
   1920–1939 Free City of Danzig, a League of Nations mandate
   1939–1945 Danzig-West Prussia, province of Nazi Germany, including Polish Pomerania and Danzig
   1945–present Part of Poland again

See also

   History of Pomerania

Further reading This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (December 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

   Gerard Labuda (ed.), "Historia Pomorza", vol. 1–4, Poznan-Torun 1969–2003
   Edmund Kopicki, "Tabele dynastyczne", "Wykazy panujacych", in: "Katalog podstawowych monet i banknotow Polski oraz ziem z historycznie z Polska zwiazanych", vol. IX, part I
   Zugmunt Boras, "Ksiazeta Pomorza Zachdniego", Poznań 1969, 1978, 1996
   Casimir Kozlowski, George Podralski, "Poczet Ksiazat Pomorza Zachdniego", KAW, Szczecin 1985
   L. Badkowski, W.Samp. "Poczet ksiazat Pomorza Gdanskiego", Gdańsk 1974
   B. Sliwinski, "Poczet ksiazaat gdanskich", Gdańsk 1997
   Wojciech Myslenicki, "Pomorscy sprzymierzenscy Jagiellonczylow", Wyd. Poznanskie, Poznań 1979
   J. Spors, "Podzially administracyjne Pomorza Gdanskiego i Slawiensko-Slupksiego od XII do poczatkow XIV w", Słupsk 1983
   K. Slaski, "Podzially terytorialne Pomorza w XII–XII w.", Poznań 1960
   Edward Rymar, Krewni i powinowaci ksiazat pomorskich w zrodłach sredniowiecznych (XII–początek XVI w.), Materially Zachodniopomorskie, vol. XXXI