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Peter Shirts (Schertz)

Birthdate: (74)
Birthplace: St. Clair Township, Columbiana County, Ohio, United States
Death: circa 1882 (69-77)
Fruitland, San Juan, New Mexico, United States
Place of Burial: Kirtland, San Juan, New Mexico, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Michael Shirts and Elizabeth Shirts
Husband of Belana White Shirts; Margaret Shirts; Belana White Pulsipher and Matilda Shirts
Father of Elsie Richards Kraft; Peter Shurtz; Eliza Jane Rawlings; George Washington Shirts; King Darius Shirts and 6 others
Brother of John Schertz; Martha Queen; George Shirts; Margaret Kirkendall; Michael Shirts Or Schertz, Jr and 2 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Peter Shirts

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)

Find a Grave

Birth: Aug. 23, 1808 Columbiana County Ohio, USA

Death: 1882 Fruitland San Juan County New Mexico, USA

Born in St Clair, Columbiana, Ohio

Son of Michael Schertz and Elizabeth vander Beek

Married Margaret Cameron, 8 Sep 1831, St Clair Twp., Columbiana, Ohio

Children - George Washington Shirts, King Darius Shirts, Don Carlos Shirts, Sariah Jane Shirts, Elizabeth Ann Shirts, Moroni Shirts, Sarah Ann Shirts

Married Belana White Pulsipher, 10 Feb 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Children - Peter Shurtz, Eliza Jane Shirts, Elsie Shirts

Married Ann Elizabeth Dufresne, 25 Nov 1856, later divorced

Married Matilda Murch, 16 Nov 1859, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Helped raise Peter's children.

History - Peter was a special missionary to the Lamanites. He was an explorer and true pioneer. He was one of the leaders of the Nauvoo Legion. He helped to build the Nauvoo and Kirtland Temples. On the 21st of January 1846 Peter Shirts and Margaret Cameron were endowed in the Nauvoo Temple.

He was closely associated with Joseph Smith, Brigham Young and others leaders of the church. He was appointed by Brigham Young to locate different parts of the county suitable for settlement and agriculture pursuits.

He came to Utah in 1849 and settled in Parowan. A fort was built there in 1852 and was named "Shirts Fort." In 1855 he and Rufus Allen assisted in surveying what is now Las Vegas. The surveying was done without instruments.

In 1857 he was appointed to work among the Indians. In 1859 he brought his family to Mill Creek and in 1860 they settled on the Upper Snake Creek in Provo Valley. Here he built a saw mill in order to get timber to build a road into the mountains. Part of the road up Snake Creek Canyon is still called "Shirts' Dugway."

He was a man with a restless, eager spirit, a true Latter-day Saint who was also a lonely trailblazer. He penetrated into many remote, hidden valleys and mountain passes.

One famous story concerning Peter and the Indians occurred during the winter of 1865-66. Peter, his wife, two daughters and a son had been pioneering the lonely valley of the Pahreah river, east of Kanab. Their friends had been expecting them back in southern Utah, but when the snow fell, Peter didn't arrive. The winter was hard and the Indians were hungry, so they had raided many small settlements, even killing some people. It was reported that Peter and his family had been killed also.

The next spring, as soon as the snow melted, twenty men from the Iron Military District went in to find them. They were surprised to see him tilling his fields with a group of men pulling his plow.

It seems that as he had been making preparations to leave the valley in the fall, the Indians had stolen all his stock but one cow, so he couldn't move. He walled up his windows and barricaded his door and kept his double-barreled shotgun with plenty of buckshot. He also kept his pitchfork, pick and other tools ready for action, if needed.

Although the Indians planned all winter to kill Peter, he gave them food to keep them from starving. When the Indian chief was severely afflicted with boils, Peter was able to cure him.

The following spring, Peter told the Indians, "You have eaten my food. I must raise more for another winter. Because you ate my oxen, you must pull my plow."

He left Provo Valley in 1868 and settled about 35 miles east of Kanab. Here he built a grist mill. He later took his family to the Rio Virgin Country. He is said to have discovered Iron Mountain. In 1879 he assisted at "Hole in the Rock" helping to feed the starving emigrants.

In the spring of 1882, Peter packed his donkey and headed out into the wilderness as he had done many other times. This time he hadn't come back and no one heard from him again. In 1958, the family discovered that a man answering Peter's description, who called himself, had been in Fruitland, San Juan, New Mexico in 1882 and had become ill and died in the late summer of 1882. He was buried there. Whether the "Old Daniel Boone" in the one buried there, or not, the family has since put a tombstone there for him.

Residents of Old Fort Harmony

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)


Family links:

Parents:
  • Michael (Schertz)Shirts (1779 - 1865)
  • Elizabeth VanderBeek Shirts (1788 - 1865)
Spouses:
  • Margaret Cameron Shirts (1808 - 1850)
  • Belana White Pulsipher (1829 - 1859)
  • Matilda Murch Pinney (1824 - 1890)
Children:
  • George Washington Shirts (1832 - 1857)*
  • King Darius Shirts (1833 - 1882)*
  • Don Carlos Shirts (1836 - 1922)*
  • Sariah Jane Shirts McDonald (1838 - 1919)*
  • Bassi Shirts (1842 - 1842)*
  • Sarah Ann Shirts (1843 - 1844)*
  • Elizabeth Ann Shirts McDonald (1848 - 1937)*
  • Peter Shurtz (1856 - 1943)*
  • Eliza Jane Shirts Rawlings (1858 - 1934)*

Burial: Kirtland Cemetery Kirtland San Juan County New Mexico, USA Plot: E-26


Find a Grave

Birth: Aug. 23, 1808 Columbiana County Ohio, USA

Death: 1882 Fruitland San Juan County New Mexico, USA

Born in St Clair, Columbiana, Ohio

Son of Michael Schertz and Elizabeth vander Beek

Married Margaret Cameron, 8 Sep 1831, St Clair Twp., Columbiana, Ohio

Children - George Washington Shirts, King Darius Shirts, Don Carlos Shirts, Sariah Jane Shirts, Elizabeth Ann Shirts, Moroni Shirts, Sarah Ann Shirts

Married Belana White Pulsipher, 10 Feb 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Children - Peter Shurtz, Eliza Jane Shirts, Elsie Shirts

Married Ann Elizabeth Dufresne, 25 Nov 1856, later divorced

Married Matilda Murch, 16 Nov 1859, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Helped raise Peter's children.

History - Peter was a special missionary to the Lamanites. He was an explorer and true pioneer. He was one of the leaders of the Nauvoo Legion. He helped to build the Nauvoo and Kirtland Temples. On the 21st of January 1846 Peter Shirts and Margaret Cameron were endowed in the Nauvoo Temple.

He was closely associated with Joseph Smith, Brigham Young and others leaders of the church. He was appointed by Brigham Young to locate different parts of the county suitable for settlement and agriculture pursuits.

He came to Utah in 1849 and settled in Parowan. A fort was built there in 1852 and was named "Shirts Fort." In 1855 he and Rufus Allen assisted in surveying what is now Las Vegas. The surveying was done without instruments.

In 1857 he was appointed to work among the Indians. In 1859 he brought his family to Mill Creek and in 1860 they settled on the Upper Snake Creek in Provo Valley. Here he built a saw mill in order to get timber to build a road into the mountains. Part of the road up Snake Creek Canyon is still called "Shirts' Dugway."

He was a man with a restless, eager spirit, a true Latter-day Saint who was also a lonely trailblazer. He penetrated into many remote, hidden valleys and mountain passes.

One famous story concerning Peter and the Indians occurred during the winter of 1865-66. Peter, his wife, two daughters and a son had been pioneering the lonely valley of the Pahreah river, east of Kanab. Their friends had been expecting them back in southern Utah, but when the snow fell, Peter didn't arrive. The winter was hard and the Indians were hungry, so they had raided many small settlements, even killing some people. It was reported that Peter and his family had been killed also.

The next spring, as soon as the snow melted, twenty men from the Iron Military District went in to find them. They were surprised to see him tilling his fields with a group of men pulling his plow.

It seems that as he had been making preparations to leave the valley in the fall, the Indians had stolen all his stock but one cow, so he couldn't move. He walled up his windows and barricaded his door and kept his double-barreled shotgun with plenty of buckshot. He also kept his pitchfork, pick and other tools ready for action, if needed.

Although the Indians planned all winter to kill Peter, he gave them food to keep them from starving. When the Indian chief was severely afflicted with boils, Peter was able to cure him.

The following spring, Peter told the Indians, "You have eaten my food. I must raise more for another winter. Because you ate my oxen, you must pull my plow."

He left Provo Valley in 1868 and settled about 35 miles east of Kanab. Here he built a grist mill. He later took his family to the Rio Virgin Country. He is said to have discovered Iron Mountain. In 1879 he assisted at "Hole in the Rock" helping to feed the starving emigrants.

In the spring of 1882, Peter packed his donkey and headed out into the wilderness as he had done many other times. This time he hadn't come back and no one heard from him again. In 1958, the family discovered that a man answering Peter's description, who called himself, had been in Fruitland, San Juan, New Mexico in 1882 and had become ill and died in the late summer of 1882. He was buried there. Whether the "Old Daniel Boone" in the one buried there, or not, the family has since put a tombstone there for him.

Residents of Old Fort Harmony

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)


Family links:

Parents:
  • Michael (Schertz)Shirts (1779 - 1865)
  • Elizabeth VanderBeek Shirts (1788 - 1865)
Spouses:
  • Margaret Cameron Shirts (1808 - 1850)
  • Belana White Pulsipher (1829 - 1859)
  • Matilda Murch Pinney (1824 - 1890)
Children:
  • George Washington Shirts (1832 - 1857)*
  • King Darius Shirts (1833 - 1882)*
  • Don Carlos Shirts (1836 - 1922)*
  • Sariah Jane Shirts McDonald (1838 - 1919)*
  • Bassi Shirts (1842 - 1842)*
  • Sarah Ann Shirts (1843 - 1844)*
  • Elizabeth Ann Shirts McDonald (1848 - 1937)*
  • Peter Shurtz (1856 - 1943)*
  • Eliza Jane Shirts Rawlings (1858 - 1934)*


Burial: Kirtland Cemetery Kirtland San Juan County New Mexico, USA Plot: E-26

  • Residence: Columbiana, Ohio, United States, Columbiana, Ohio, United States - 1840
  • Residence: Beaver County, UT, Beaver County, UT - 1856
  • Residence: Utah County, UT, Utah County, UT - 1856
  • Residence: District 7 Iron City, Iron, Utah Territory, United States, District 7 Iron City, Iron, Utah Territory, United States - 1870
  • Residence: Iron, Utah, USA, Iron, Utah, USA - 1776/1956

Born in St Clair, Columbiana, Ohio

Son of Michael Schertz and Elizabeth vander Beek

Married Margaret Cameron, 8 Sep 1831, St Clair Twp., Columbiana, Ohio

Children - George Washington Shirts, King Darius Shirts, Don Carlos Shirts, Sariah Jane Shirts, Elizabeth Ann Shirts, Moroni Shirts, Sarah Ann Shirts

Married Belana White Pulsipher, 10 Feb 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Children - Peter Shurtz, Eliza Jane Shirts, Elsie Shirts

Married Ann Elizabeth Dufresne, 25 Nov 1856, later divorced

Married Matilda Murch, 16 Nov 1859, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Helped raise Peter's children.

History - Peter was a special missionary to the Lamanites. He was an explorer and true pioneer. He was one of the leaders of the Nauvoo Legion. He helped to build the Nauvoo and Kirtland Temples. On the 21st of January 1846 Peter Shirts and Margaret Cameron were endowed in the Nauvoo Temple.

He was closely associated with Joseph Smith, Brigham Young and others leaders of the church. He was appointed by Brigham Young to locate different parts of the county suitable for settlement and agriculture pursuits.

He came to Utah in 1849 and settled in Parowan. A fort was built there in 1852 and was named "Shirts Fort." In 1855 he and Rufus Allen assisted in surveying what is now Las Vegas. The surveying was done without instruments.

In 1857 he was appointed to work among the Indians. In 1859 he brought his family to Mill Creek and in 1860 they settled on the Upper Snake Creek in Provo Valley. Here he built a saw mill in order to get timber to build a road into the mountains. Part of the road up Snake Creek Canyon is still called "Shirts' Dugway."

He was a man with a restless, eager spirit, a true Latter-day Saint who was also a lonely trailblazer. He penetrated into many remote, hidden valleys and mountain passes.

One famous story concerning Peter and the Indians occurred during the winter of 1865-66. Peter, his wife, two daughters and a son had been pioneering the lonely valley of the Pahreah river, east of Kanab. Their friends had been expecting them back in southern Utah, but when the snow fell, Peter didn't arrive. The winter was hard and the Indians were hungry, so they had raided many small settlements, even killing some people. It was reported that Peter and his family had been killed also.

The next spring, as soon as the snow melted, twenty men from the Iron Military District went in to find them. They were surprised to see him tilling his fields with a group of men pulling his plow.

It seems that as he had been making preparations to leave the valley in the fall, the Indians had stolen all his stock but one cow, so he couldn't move. He walled up his windows and barricaded his door and kept his double-barreled shotgun with plenty of buckshot. He also kept his pitchfork, pick and other tools ready for action, if needed.

Although the Indians planned all winter to kill Peter, he gave them food to keep them from starving. When the Indian chief was severely afflicted with boils, Peter was able to cure him.

The following spring, Peter told the Indians, "You have eaten my food. I must raise more for another winter. Because you ate my oxen, you must pull my plow."

He left Provo Valley in 1868 and settled about 35 miles east of Kanab. Here he built a grist mill. He later took his family to the Rio Virgin Country. He is said to have discovered Iron Mountain. In 1879 he assisted at "Hole in the Rock" helping to feed the starving emigrants.

In the spring of 1882, Peter packed his donkey and headed out into the wilderness as he had done many other times. This time he hadn't come back and no one heard from him again. In 1958, the family discovered that a man answering Peter's description, who called himself, had been in Fruitland, San Juan, New Mexico in 1882 and had become ill and died in the late summer of 1882. He was buried there. Whether the "Old Daniel Boone" in the one buried there, or not, the family has since put a tombstone there for him.

Residents of Old Fort Harmony

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850); Age at Departure: 41

Hurricane Hintons and Spendloves -- This book about John Nock Hinton mentions that Don Carlos, King Darius, and others were some of the first settlers in the Virgin City and Grafton. Mentioned on pg 24 & 26 of book. Building roads for the Nephi twist.

Born in St Clair, Columbiana, Ohio

Son of Michael Schertz and Elizabeth vander Beek

Married Margaret Cameron, 8 Sep 1831, St Clair Twp., Columbiana, Ohio

Children - George Washington Shirts, King Darius Shirts, Don Carlos Shirts, Sariah Jane Shirts, Elizabeth Ann Shirts, Moroni Shirts, Sarah Ann Shirts

Married Belana White Pulsipher, 10 Feb 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Children - Peter Shurtz, Eliza Jane Shirts, Elsie Shirts

Married Ann Elizabeth Dufresne, 25 Nov 1856, later divorced

Married Matilda Murch, 16 Nov 1859, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Helped raise Peter's children.

History - Peter was a special missionary to the Lamanites. He was an explorer and true pioneer. He was one of the leaders of the Nauvoo Legion. He helped to build the Nauvoo and Kirtland Temples. On the 21st of January 1846 Peter Shirts and Margaret Cameron were endowed in the Nauvoo Temple.

He was closely associated with Joseph Smith, Brigham Young and others leaders of the church. He was appointed by Brigham Young to locate different parts of the county suitable for settlement and agriculture pursuits.

He came to Utah in 1849 and settled in Parowan. A fort was built there in 1852 and was named "Shirts Fort." In 1855 he and Rufus Allen assisted in surveying what is now Las Vegas. The surveying was done without instruments.

In 1857 he was appointed to work among the Indians. In 1859 he brought his family to Mill Creek and in 1860 they settled on the Upper Snake Creek in Provo Valley. Here he built a saw mill in order to get timber to build a road into the mountains. Part of the road up Snake Creek Canyon is still called "Shirts' Dugway."

He was a man with a restless, eager spirit, a true Latter-day Saint who was also a lonely trailblazer. He penetrated into many remote, hidden valleys and mountain passes.

One famous story concerning Peter and the Indians occurred during the winter of 1865-66. Peter, his wife, two daughters and a son had been pioneering the lonely valley of the Pahreah river, east of Kanab. Their friends had been expecting them back in southern Utah, but when the snow fell, Peter didn't arrive. The winter was hard and the Indians were hungry, so they had raided many small settlements, even killing some people. It was reported that Peter and his family had been killed also.

The next spring, as soon as the snow melted, twenty men from the Iron Military District went in to find them. They were surprised to see him tilling his fields with a group of men pulling his plow.

It seems that as he had been making preparations to leave the valley in the fall, the Indians had stolen all his stock but one cow, so he couldn't move. He walled up his windows and barricaded his door and kept his double-barreled shotgun with plenty of buckshot. He also kept his pitchfork, pick and other tools ready for action, if needed.

Although the Indians planned all winter to kill Peter, he gave them food to keep them from starving. When the Indian chief was severely afflicted with boils, Peter was able to cure him.

The following spring, Peter told the Indians, "You have eaten my food. I must raise more for another winter. Because you ate my oxen, you must pull my plow."

He left Provo Valley in 1868 and settled about 35 miles east of Kanab. Here he built a grist mill. He later took his family to the Rio Virgin Country. He is said to have discovered Iron Mountain. In 1879 he assisted at "Hole in the Rock" helping to feed the starving emigrants.

In the spring of 1882, Peter packed his donkey and headed out into the wilderness as he had done many other times. This time he hadn't come back and no one heard from him again. In 1958, the family discovered that a man answering Peter's description, who called himself, had been in Fruitland, San Juan, New Mexico in 1882 and had become ill and died in the late summer of 1882. He was buried there. Whether the "Old Daniel Boone" in the one buried there, or not, the family has since put a tombstone there for him.

Residents of Old Fort Harmony

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850); Age at Departure: 41

Hurricane Hintons and Spendloves -- This book about John Nock Hinton mentions that Don Carlos, King Darius, and others were some of the first settlers in the Virgin City and Grafton. Mentioned on pg 24 & 26 of book. Building roads for the Nephi twist.

view all 18

Peter Shirts's Timeline

1808
August 23, 1808
St. Clair Township, Columbiana County, Ohio, United States
1832
April 13, 1832
Age 23
Columbiana County, Ohio, United States
1833
July 8, 1833
Age 24
Columbiana, OH, United States
1834
November 30, 1834
Age 26
Kirtland, Lake, OH, United States
1836
July 28, 1836
Age 27
Kirtland, Lake County, Ohio, United States
1838
December 22, 1838
Age 30
Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
1842
February 1842
Age 33
Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, United States
1843
September 15, 1843
Age 35
Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, United States
1848
November 10, 1848
Age 40
Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, United States