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  • Minna Asch (1862 - 1940)
    Asch, Minna née Löwenstamm born on 26th March 1862 in Raschkow (poln. Raszkow) / Adelnau / Posen resident of Stettin and Stargard i. Pom. Deportation: from Stettin 12th February 1940, Belzyce, ...
  • Selmar Philipp (1879 - aft.1942)
    Eintrag im »Gedenkbuch« des Bundesarchivs: Philipp, Selmar geboren am 28. April 1879 in Ebeleben / - / Schwarzburg-Sondershausen wohnhaft in Erfurt Deportation: ab Weimar-Leipzig 10. Mai 1942, Belz...
  • Auguste Philipp (1882 - aft.1942)
    Eintrag im »Gedenkbuch« des Bundesarchivs: Philipp, Auguste geborene Katz geboren am 21. Februar 1882 in Gilsa / Fritzlar / Hessen wohnhaft in Erfurt Deportation: ab Weimar-Leipzig 10. Mai 1942, Be...
  • Klara Müller (1890 - 1942)
    Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : Dec 2 2017, 2:16:11 UTC * Date/place of birth identified in Siegfried Wolf. Juden in Thüringen 1933-1945: Biographische Daten . (2000), vol 2 (unpaginated) ...
  • Max Müller, II (1884 - 1942)
    Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : Dec 2 2017, 2:03:22 UTC * Date/place of birth identified in Siegfried Wolf. Juden in Thüringen 1933-1945: Biographische Daten . (2000), vol 2 (unpaginated) ...

This project aims to collect all of the profiles of persons who were inmates of the Ghetto at Belzyce Ghetto near Lublin.
The German army entered the town in mid-September 1939, and the Jewish population became subject to the persecution and terror carried out throughout Lublin Province. In February 1940 about 300 Jews from Stettin (then Germany) were deported to Belzyce. In February and March 1941 about 500 Jews from Cracow and another 500 from Lublin were forced to settle there. On May 12, 1942, several thousand Jews from central Germany (Sachsen and Thuringen) arrived. The town's Jewish population grew to about 4,500 by the time the mass deportations to the death camps began. In spring 1942, the Germans conducted an Aktion to liquidate the remaining Jews in Belzyce. They rounded up over 3,000 Jews for extermination at Sobibor. Subsequently the Germans established a concentration camp in Belzyce in a few houses around the destroyed synagogue. In May 1943 the Belzyce camp was liquidated. Several hundred Jews, mostly women and children, were shot, while another 250 women and 350 men were sent to Benzin, where only a handful survived. After the war the Jewish community in Belzyce was not reconstituted.[Source: Jewish Virtual Library, http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0003_0_02383.html