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  • Milton R. Halladay (1874 - 1961)
    Milton R. Halladay, 1874-1961, a native of Vermont, was a noted political cartoonist for the Providence Journal for nearly fifty years, and his cartoons were published in countless other newspapers and...
  • Nina E. Allender (1873 - 1957)
    Nina Evans Allender was an American artist, cartoonist, and women's rights activist. She studied art in the United States and Europe with William Merritt Chase and Robert Henri. Allender worked as an o...
  • James Grover Thurber (1894 - 1961)
    James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894 – November 2, 1961) was an American author, cartoonist and celebrated wit. Thurber was best known for his cartoons and short stories, published mainly in...
  • John Terry (deceased)
    John Terry contributed, along with his brother Paul Terry, to a weekly comic strip about a dog titled "Alonzo" for the San Francisco Call.
  • Paul Houlton Terry (1887 - 1971)
    Terry was raised in San Francisco and in 1904 he began working as a news photographer and began to draw cartoons for newspapers. He contributed, along with his brother John Terry, to a weekly comic str...

A cartoonist is a person who specializes in drawing cartoons. This work is usually humorous, mainly created for entertainment, political commentary or advertising. Throughout the 20th century, cartoons were widely published in print media of various kinds, featured in magazines such as The New Yorker and Punch and distributed to newspapers through such organization as King Features Syndicate. Today, both original and vintage cartoons can be found online.

Cartoonists may work in many different formats: animation, booklets, comic strips, comic books, editorial cartoons, graphic novels, manuals, single-panel gag cartoons or video game packaging. A cartoonist traditionally developed rough sketches into finished pencil drawings and then, for reproduction purposes, completed the artwork in black India ink, using either a brush or a metal-nibbed pen. Traditionally, cartoonists often used a Winsor & Newton #3, Series 7 brush in combination with a crowquill pen. Today, many cartoonists work with Micron pens, which are made in six different sizes, from .20 mm to .50 mm.

Cartoonists increasingly work in digital media. To illustrate the Blondie comic strip, the cartoonist John Marshall works directly on a Wacom tablet connected to his Macintosh computer. In some cases, cartoonists work on properties created by their forebears.






List of cartoonists

List of editorial cartoonists

List of American comics creators

List of comic creators