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Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)

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  • Charles Edward Parker (1920 - 1997)
    Obituary
  • Saval (Val) Baker Jennings (1917 - 1997)
    Life's Story ofSaval (Val) Baker JenningsI am writing this life history at the age of 73. The date is July 2, 1990.I was born in Baker, White Pine County, Nevada on January 25, 1917. There was no docto...
  • Paul Jay Miller (1921 - 2020)
    ORRVILLE - Paul Jay Miller of Orrville died suddenly at his home on May 10, 2020 at the age of 99. He was the last survivor of a large blended family. He was known to all by Jay, his middle name. Jay w...
  • Woodrow Wilson Worthley (1912 - 1995)
    WOODROW WILSON WORTHLEY SERVED IN THE CCC . HE WAS HONORABLY DISCHARGED FROM THE ARMY ON AUGUST 8 1945 in FT LOGAN CO. FROM THE US ARMY AS A PRIVATE FIRST CLASS COMPANY C 47 MEDICAL BATTALION. HE SERVE...
  • Reuben Andrew Hamsher (1923 - 2009)
    SUGARCREEK -- Reuben A. Hamsher, 86, Sugarcreek, died Friday, Sept. 4, 2009, at Walnut Hills Nursing Home.He was born July 3, 1923, in Walnut Creek Township to the late Milo and Ollie (Miller) Hamsher ...

Wikipedia

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a public work relief program that operated from 1933 to 1942 in the United States for unemployed, unmarried men from relief families as part of the New Deal. Originally for young men ages 18–23, it was eventually expanded to young men ages 17–28. Robert Fechner was the head of the agency. It was a major part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal that provided unskilled manual labor jobs related to the conservation and development of natural resources in rural lands owned by federal, state and local governments. The CCC was designed to provide jobs for young men, to relieve families who had difficulty finding jobs during the Great Depression in the United States while at the same time implementing a general natural resource conservation program in every state and territory. Maximum enrollment at any one time was 300,000; in nine years 3 million young men participated in the CCC, which provided them with shelter, clothing, and food, together with a small wage of $30 a month ($25 of which had to be sent home to their families).

The American public made the CCC the most popular of all the New Deal programs. Principal benefits of an individual's enrollment in the CCC included improved physical condition, heightened morale, and increased employability. Implicitly, the CCC also led to a greater public awareness and appreciation of the outdoors and the nation's natural resources; and the continued need for a carefully planned, comprehensive national program for the protection and development of natural resources.

During the time of the CCC, enrollees planted nearly 3 billion trees to help reforest America, constructed more than 800 parks nationwide and upgraded most state parks, updated forest fire fighting methods, and built a network of service buildings and public roadways in remote areas.

The CCC operated separate programs for veterans and Native Americans.

Despite its popular support, the CCC was never a permanent agency. It depended on emergency and temporary Congressional legislation for its existence. By 1942, with World War II and the draft in operation, need for work relief declined and Congress voted to close the program.