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Jewish families from Ledeč (Ledetsch), Bohemia, Czech Republic

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  • Eduard Kraus (1882 - d.)
    Birth record: LEDEČ NAD SÁZAVOU (Ledetsch, o. Havlíčkův Brod) 966 N 1874-1944 O 1874-1903, 1908-1913, 1915-1927, 1930-1944 Z 1874-1944 (27/265) Marriage record: PRAHA 2706 O 1910 (i) (19/65)
  • Marie Winterstein (deceased)
  • Nathan Kern (1799 - d.)
    To the Geni World Tree project about the Jews of Ledeč nad Sázavou, Bohemia, presented by W.J. Skocpol, skocpol@bu.edu . These selections concerning the Jews of Ledeč are from My Reminiscences by F.J. ...
  • Abraham Herrmann (1807 - 1868)
  • Sara Müller (c.1819 - d.)
    Marriage:

This project seeks to collect all of the Jewish families from the town of Ledeč (Ledetsch) in Bohemia, Czech Republic

See

https://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%BDidovsk%C3%BD_h%C5%99bitov_v_Led... To the Geni World Tree project about the Jews of Ledeč nad Sázavou, Bohemia, presented by W.J. Skocpol, skocpol@bu.edu. These selections concerning the Jews of Ledeč are from My Reminiscences by F.J. Sadílek (1851-1933), who emigrated to Chicago in 1867 at age 16, and then to Wilber, Nebraska. The original publication was Z Mých Upomínek (Narodní Tiskárny, Omaha, Neb.1914). It was translated by his granddaughter Olga Stepanek in 1978, and converted by William J. Skocpol in 2001 into Frank’s Wilber: The Early Days of the Czech Capital of Nebraska (as told by Frank J. Sadilek), available from the Wilber Czech Museum, Box 652, Wilber, Nebraska 68465.

“Like any thirteen or fourteen year old boy, I had a passion for playing cards for money, even though it was only for pennies. My parents had an inn and at that time there was a lot of card playing for money and I was completely happy when I was able to watch from behind, though my father always drove me away when I was caught. I saved every penny so that I could play cards with my comrades, and best of all was playing on Sunday instead of going to church. In a distant garden, surrounded by a wall, we found a little bower and for safety we stuck small stones into the lock of the gate so that it wouldn't open right away if someone came to disturb us. The garden belonged to an Israelite who lived in the town and was named Miller, but because he had hair as red as saffron, and also because there were other people in the town with that name, we called him Kolčavka (little weasel). When the bells rang for the Elevation of the Host at the high mass, we hurried again towards the church and then home with the others.”