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New Zealand Settler Ships - Tyne 1841

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  • Thomas Henry Sanson (1839 - 1901)
    "Thomas arrived on the TYNE on 9 Aug 1841, into Wellington, with his parents Robert Sanson (1809-1854) & Ann Lucas (1805-1850) and siblings. He married Margaret Galloway in 1861 when he was 23 and she ...
  • Mary Anne Tyne Tocker (1841 - 1922)
  • State Library of New South Wales FL3233506
    Edward Hart (1802 - 1884)
    "Sarah Hart (née Culley) was pregnant with her second child in 1825 when her husband stole food and drink to feed the family. He went on the run for 18 months before being caught and sentenced to seven...
  • Ellen Birkett (1837 - 1929)
    "Ellen Hart was four years old on 9 August 1841 when she and her family arrived at Wellington in New Zealand on board the Tyne. The ship’s passengers were lowered in a basket to a waiting boat, then ca...
  • Sarah Hart (1806 - 1880)
    "Sarah Hart (née Culley) was pregnant with her second child in 1825 when her husband stole food and drink to feed the family. He went on the run for 18 months before being caught and sentenced to seven...

The New Zealand Company barque 'Tyne' was a 500-ton sailing ship under Captain Charles Robertson that arrived at Port Nicholson (Wellington) on 9 August 1841, having sailed from the port of Downs on 9 April 1841.

On 6 September she sailed for Thames and then on to Auckland where she remained until the end of November before returning to Wellington. She sailed for Sydney on 12 February 1842.

On 12 February 1843 the Tyne sailed from London for Nelson, Wellington, and Auckland. She called at the Cape of Good Hope on 12 May, and Hobart on 31 July. At Hobart the Second Officer, James Stewart, fell overboard into the Derwent River and drowned. The ship reached Port Nicholson on 11 August. She arrived at Nelson on 28 September. The Tyne returned to Port Nicholson on 5 November via Kapiti. On 25 November the Tyne sailed for Port Phillip.

In 1844 the Tyne was back in Port Nicholson. She sailed for London on 23 May for London. In early 1845 she sailed for Port Nicholson from London, reaching Stephen Island on 3 September she proceeded into Cook Strait near Cape Terawhiti where she encountered a southerly storm. At about 5pm on 4 September she was driven into rocks losing the main and foremasts. She was then driven ashore. On 6 September soldiers from the 96th Regiment of Foot and the local militia arrived to assist the survivors ashore. No lives were lost.