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Profiles

  • Bethia Wharton (1672 - 1705)
    Children of Richard Wharton and Sarah Higginson, born at Boston, were: 2. Bethia, born September 18, 1672.  Living in 1705, unmarried. notes From "Road to Failure" Chapter One of The Road ...
  • Sarah Cotta (1671 - 1743)
    Sarah Wharton, daughter of Richard Wharton (died 1689) and Sarah Higginson, his second wife (died 1676), was born on August 7, 1671 at Boston. She married on May 4, 1698 at Boston to John Cotta (son of...
  • Silence Harris (1693 - 1771)
    Children of Thomas Harris and Hepzibah Croswell born at Charlestown: 4. Silence, b  8 February 1693 - d  23 May 1771.  A shopkeeper in Boston. "John1 Harris of Charlestown, M...
  • William Andrews of Cambridge, Mariner (1595 - 1652)
    William Andrews of Cambridge, Mariner D.L. Jacobus in an American Genealogist Article entitled "Andrews Families of Western Connecticut," explains that Savage's Genealogical Dictionary has combined t...
  • William Hooker, of Farmington (1663 - 1689)
    William Hooker of Farmington b.16 May 1663 Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut, United States d.bet 8 Aug 1689 and 31 Dec 1689 Farmington, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Marriage bef 1690 ...

"No man of sense ought to be ashamed of being called a shopkeeper" - Napoleon

This is a global project - everyone is invited to add their retailing ancestors to this project (profiles must be set to public). Project collaborators, feel free to update the project description, adding notes, documents, images, resources ... and inviting more collaborators.

See Notable Retailers

Notes

From Researching the history of shops

By the late 17th century England and Wales had about 40,000 shopkeepers, according to the estimate of pioneer statistician Gregory King.

From Jews of Brooklyn

"If today most people consider Jewish candy stores just a place to buy sweets, sixty years ago they were an important element in the social fabric. These places were gathering places, meeting places, centers of the community ..."


From Britain: a History of Shopkeeping, Empire and Racial Tensions

"My interest in the corner shop is personal – my parents’ shop formed the backdrop to my daily life. Growing up, the shop served as my playground, library, kitchen, bus stop, and office, and continues to play a huge part in my experience of that most elusive of concepts – ‘home’."

See Notable Retailers

A - Z of Shopkeepers and Retailers

Bakers

Barbers

Those who cut, dress, groom, style and shave males' hair

Booksellers

Butchers

  • Pork Butchers
  • Poulterers

Cheesemongers

Confectioners

Cordwainers

  • Cobblers

Department Stores

Drapers

originally a retailer or wholesaler of cloth mainly for clothing. A draper may also operate as a cloth merchant or a haberdasher.

  • Dressmakers
  • Haberdashers - selling small articles for sewing, such as buttons, ribbons, zips etc.
  • Tailors

Fishmongers

Florists

Grocers

Gunsmiths

those who repair, modifiy, design, or build firearms

Hairdressers

Those who cut or style hair in order to change or maintain a person's image. See Hairdresser

Hardware Stores

Jewellers

Locksmiths

Milliners

Newsagents

Opticians

  • Oculist
  • Optometrist

Pawnbrokers

Lending money on portable security - Lending money on portable security - see History of pawnbroking

Pharmacists

  • Druggists

Post Offices

Restauranteurs

  • Teashops

Tobacconists

Victuallers

Resources