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South Africa - Towns and Cities D-G

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South Africa - Towns and Cities D-G

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  • Add the profiles of the founders of places in South Africa to the project. If the person is on Geni please add the link to their profile, and make this a bold entry. If the person is not on Geni add a link to an external source but do not make the link bold. This will help us to see who still needs to be added/found on Geni. The lists gathered in this and other linked pages to this project can help establish the names of a place at the time an event took place.
  • Add the Place name to the list below - arranged Alphabetically, or contact a collaborator to do so.
  • If you have links to related web pages that would be of interest to others please add them in the relevant section .
  • Add any documents of interest using the menu at the top right of the page, and then add a link to the document in the text under the heading below. If you do not know how to do this please contact one of the other collaborators to assist you.

NOTE

When adding place names to events in profile information please use the place name as it was at the time of the event. If you use the "start typing ..." for place name it will fill in the modern place name. The solution is to - manually fill the place name in reading from your original source.

Historical Province and Post 1994 Provinces are added under each place name in the listings.

D

Da Gama Park

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTownship in the Simon's Town district, north-west of the town. Situated in the Else River Valley, established for 'navy men' and their families. It was named after Vasco da Gama, the Portuguese navigator.

Dal Josafat

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifIndustrial township in the valley between Paarl and Wellington, housing most of the industries of Paarl. A cemetery of the Huguenots was laid out in 1692. where a number of pioneers of the Afrikaans language are buried. The name is of biblical origin, referring to a place of judgement (Joel 3:1-2). Also encountered as Daljosafat and Dal van Josafat.

Dalmanutha

Transvaal (post 1995 Mpumalanga)
Monometsi.

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifStation about 16 km east of Belfast, on the route between Pretoria and Maputo. Named after the farm, which took its name from a biblical town on the Sea of Galilee (Mark 8:10). The name is said to mean 'house of widowhood'. The area is known to the local inhabitants as Monometsi. A clash between the Bakoni and Matabele occurred here. It was also the scene of the last pitched battle of the Second Anglo-Boer War (1899- 1902) which took place from 25 August 1900

Dalton

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA village in 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) east of New Hanover and 35 kilometres (22 mi) south of Greytown in the uMshwati Local Municipality. Named after North Dalton in Yorkshire, where Henry Boast, who organized an immigration to Natal of people from Yorkshire in 1850, came from.

Dan Pienaarville

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Dana Baai

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifApproximately halfway between Port Elizabeth and Cape Town, 4 kilometers off the N2 highway. The central part of Mossel Bay is about 12 kilometers from Dana Bay. The area is rich in history regarding the Khoisan people that found a home here and archaeological findings date back almost 175,000 years. WIKI

Danger Point

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifPromontory at the southern extremity of Walker Bay, south-east of Gans Bay, in the Hermanus district. It is named because the reefs and rocks present a serious hazard to ships approaching the shore too closely. The Birkenhead was wrecked here on 26 February 1852 with the loss of 445 lives. A lighthouse (WIKI) 46 m high, with a range of 29 km, was erected here. The name Danger Point is also borne by a promontory between East London and Gonubie Mouth.

Danielskuil

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA settlement 142 kilometres (88 mi) north-west of Kimberley and 72 km (45 mi) north-east of Postmasburg. It is named after a cone-shaped depression 6 metres (20 ft) deep in the dolomitic limestone; with a domed covering, reminiscent of the biblical ‘Daniel in the lions' den’ (Afrikaans: kuil, ‘hole’, ‘pit’). The Griqua leader Adam Kok is said to have used this depression as a prison, and to also have kept snakes in it. The area was famous because of the Griqua Chief who ruled there by the name of Barend Barends. Barend Barends was the son of a “half-Hottentot Dutchman” and one of the most important leaders along the turbulent northern frontier of the Cape Colony from 1790 to 1834. He was one of the first chiefs of the Griqua tribe, an indigenous Khoi group. A book, Barend Barends - Die Vergete Kaptein van Danielskuil, has been recently published about his story. During the Anglo Boer war (1899-1902) the British army built and used a blockhouse fort, which overlooks the town from the north

Dannhauser

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA former coal mining town. The town was named after Renier Dannhauser 1836-1909, who purchased the farm Palmietfontein from the Natal Government in 1872. It was proclaimed a village in 1937. Note linked profile is not to an immigrant (as suggested at WIKI but dates fit and DN place of death is Dannhauser; Proclaimed in 1937, it was possibly named after Thomas Richard Dannhauser, a former acting landdrost of Weenen.

Danskraal

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifAn historic site about 5 km north-east of Ladysmith in the former Kliprivier district, said to be the place where the Voortrekkers camped a week before the Battle of Blood River on 16 December 1838 and where the first vow was taken which led to the Day of the Covenant. The name means 'village of dancing'; it was here that the Voortrekker commando was entertained with ceremonial dances by the Zulus of Matowan or Nodotta. The South African Railways has locomotive workshops at Danskraal, which was still known as Daimana in c. 1935

Darling 1853

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifAt the beginning of the 18th century about 29 farmers lived in an area called Groenkloof and on one of these farms, Langfontein, Darling was founded in 1853. It was named after Sir Charles Henry Darling who in 1851 went to the Cape as Lieutenant Governor. The Darling Museum shows the history of the town and the Darling creamery which was established in 1899 by two Swedish settlers, Nils Georg Moller and G. Threnstrom, and was closed in 1950.

Darnall

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Dassenberg

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
Former name of Heerenlogementsberg.

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif It is derived from Dutch dassen, 'coneys', 'rock-rabbits' (Hyrax or Procavia capensis), and was given by Simon van der Stel

Dassen Island

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
Dasseneiland

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifIsland about 5 km long and 2 km wide, 58 km north-west of Table Bay. Named because of the abun- dance of rock-rabbits or conies (Hyrax or Procavia capensis, dassen in Dutch) fopund there. Named Ilha Branca ('white island') by the early Portuguese mariners, it was renamed Elizabeth Eiland by 'Joris van Spilbergen WIKI in 1601, and Coney Island by Sir Edward Michelbourne WIKI in 1605. The form Dasseneiland is preferred for official purposes.

Daveyton 1952

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA township in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. It borders Etwatwa to the north-east, Springs to the south and Benoni to the south-west. The nearest town is Benoni, about 18 kilometres away. Daveyton was established in 1952, and named after William Albert Davey, the Mayor of Benoni from 1951 to 1953. Daveyton achieved municipal status in 1983.

De Aar 1839

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDe Aar was originally established on the Farm "De Aar." and named by its owner, Jan Gabriel Vermeulen, in 1839. The name means "the artery," a reference to its underground water supply. The Cape Government Railways were founded in 1872, and the route that the government chose for the line to connect the Kimberley diamond fields to Cape Town on the coast, ran directly through De Aar. In 1899 two brothers who ran a trading store and hotel at the junction, Isaac and Wulf Friedlander, purchased the farm of De Aar. Following the Anglo Boer War, the Friedlander brothers surveyed the land for the establishment of a town. The municipality was created a year later and the town's first mayor, Dr Harry Baker, was elected in 1907.

De Doorns 1725/1877

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThe town takes its name from the farm "De Doorns boven aan de Hex Rivier" (‘the thorns on the upper Hex River’), known as early as 1725. The area was declared a sub-drosty of Tulbagh in 1819 and the farm became the seat of the area's own drostdy in 1822. The De Doorns farm was bought by the government of Cape Prime Minister John Molteno in 1875, to build a railway station for the rapidly expanding Cape Government Railways. The line was immediately built through De Doorns, connecting it to Cape Town on the coast and reaching Montagu Road(later Touws River) in 1877, on its way to Kimberley. The hamlet of De Doorns would later developed around the station.

De Hoop 1938

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDe Hoop Dam is a dam on the Kamdeboo River, near Graaf-Reinet, Western Cape, South Africa. It was established in 1938 and its primary purpose is for irrigation.

De Kelders

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifHoliday resort 19 km south-west of Stanford, between Gans Bay and Hermanus. Afrikaans for ‘the cellars’, the name is derived from caves in sandstone cliffs there. De Kelders is also an excellent whale watching location

De Kuiper's Drift

Transvaal (post 1995 Mpumalanga)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFord in the Crocodile River near Komatipoort. It was named on 10 October 1960 by General Rudolph Christiaan Hiemstra in honour of Frans de Kuiper who in 1725 led what was probably the first expedition of white people into the Transvaal from the east, ie from Delagoa Bay, to seek a route to Monomotapa

De Rust 1900

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThe name is Dutch and literally translates to "The Rest", referring to the town's original purpose of being a resting place for settlers en route through the challenging terrain of a nearby Swartberg gorge. It was laid out in 1900 on the farm De Rust

Dealesville 1899

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown some 70 km north-west of Bloemfontein, 55 km south-east of Boshof and 111 km north-east of Kimberley. It was laid out on the farm Klipfontein and named after the owner, John Henry Deale. It was proclaimed a township in 1899 and achieved municipal status in 1914.

Debe Nek

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifSettlement 19 km west-north-west of King William's Town and 38 km east of Alice. Takes its name from the Debe (Khoekhoen for 'brackish') River, from the defile ('nek') through which the Debe River flows. This was the site of the Battle of Amalinda between Ndlambe and Gaika in 1818. Now a health resort

Delporton

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Delareyville 1914

Transvaal(post 1994 North West)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 96 km south-west of Lichtenburg, 82 km north-east of Vryburg, 114 km north-west of Wolmarans- stad, and 61 km north of Schweizer- Reneke. It was laid out in 1914 and declared a border industry area in 1968. It was named after Jacobus Hercules (Hendrik) de la Rey (1847- 1914), General of the Boer forces in the Anglo-Boer War, who was shot and killed by police when the motor car in which he was travelling failed to stop at a road-block

Delmas 1907

Transvaal (post 1995 Mpumalanga)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown about 19 km north-east of Springs and 73 km south-east of Pretoria. It was laid out on the form Witklip in 1907, and has been administered by a town council since 1965. Dialectic French for 'small farm', the name was given by Frank Campbell Dumat, former owner of Witklip, after his grandfather's farm in France

Delportshoop 1871

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDelportshoop developed from a diamond-diggers’ camp. The public diggings were proclaimed in November 1871, a village management board was instituted in 1931, and municipal status attained in 1970. Delportshoop was originally called “Thomas Hope”, but later the name was changed to “Delport’s Hope” . The first Prosecutor was P.J. Marais. He farmed on Langberg in the region. Marais were told a story that the first diamond was find by a young man whose surname was Delport. The diamond diggers then changed it to Delport’s Hope. Later the ‘’Hope’’, became ‘’Hoop’’

Dendron

Transvaal (post 1994 Limpopo)
Now Mogwadi

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifSmall town located about 61 km northwest of Polokwane. It was laid out on the farm Duitsland and then managed by a health committee. The former name is derived from the Greek word for ‘tree’ and refers to the abundance of indigenous trees in the area.

Deneysville 1936

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDeneysville was established in 1936 and named after Deneys Reitz, writer of Commando: A Boer Journal of the Boer War and son of former Orange Free State president Francis William Reitz. The lake formed by the Vaal Dam was apparently originally planned to be named Lake Deneys but was never formally adopted. The town "Deneysville" however, established on the shores of the dam was named after him.

Denneburg

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
Paarl

Dennehof

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

Derby

Transvaal (post 1994 North West)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifVillage 117 km west-north-west of Johannesburg, 60 km south-west of Rustenburg and 17 km east of Koster. Laid out on portions of the farms Rietfontein and Vlakfontein, it was named after Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, British Secretary of State.

Despatch, Port Alfred

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThe town is situated on rich clay soil and in the late 1800s was the site of a flourishing brick industry. Despatch's name derives from this brick industry history on the account that bricks were dispatched from the original railway siding. Many of the older buildings in Uitenhage and Port Elizabeth were built from these bricks. Most of these early bricks can be identified by the word 'Despatch' imprinted on the top and bottom of the brick. The only reminder of the town's brick industry past is a chimney built in 1882 which formed part of the Brick Works.

Devon

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifVillage some 18 km west of Leslie and 40 km east-south-east of Springs. Named after the home county in England of the surveyor who laid it out. Important for natural gas in the vicinity

Dewetsdorp 1890

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThe town was set up, without approval of the Volksraad, by field-cornet Jacobus de Wet, father of the Second Anglo-Boer War general Christiaan de Wet. Eventually recognised officially, the town became a municipality and named De Wet in 1890. General Christian de Wet successfully attacked English forces stationed there in November 1900. It was laid out on the farm Kareefontein in 1876 and at first bore this name. Applications to the Volksraad in 1876 for the establishment of a village failed, but another request in 1879 led to recognition in 1880 under the name Dewetsdorp. Municipal status was attained in 1890. Dewetsdorp was the scene of heavy fighting in the Second Anglo-Boer War. In 1927, three officials died when the town hall was blown up by one Huibrecht Jacob de Leeuw in an attempt to cover up evidence of his embezzlement of town funds. The new Town Hall, built in 1928, was declared a South African Heritage Site in 1995.

Die Vlakte

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFarm - a tract of land with associated buildings devoted to agriculture. Vlakte means plains or flats.

Die Vleie

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDie Vleie - translated is The Lakes".

Diep River

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifRiver rising north of Assegaaibos and flowing south-east to join the Krom River between Clarkson and Humansdorp. Afrikaans or Dutch for 'deep river', the name refers to the depth of the ravine through which it flows.

Dieprivier

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFormer name of Bietourivier. The name is Afrikaans for 'deep river'

Dinuzulu

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Dlamini

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Dingaanstat

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif - 'stat' or village of Dingane ka Senzangakhona Zulu. The village is known to the Zulu as Umgungundlovu, and was under Zulu rule from 1795 until 1840. Now a mission station of the Dutch Reformed Church, it is situated between Melmoth and Babanango.

Döhne

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifAn agricultural research station 6 kilometres north of Stutterheim. On 24 September 1834, the Berlin Missionary Society's first South African mission station, Bethany, was founded on the Riet River between Edenburg and Trompsburg in the Orange Free State. With the arrival of more missionaries in 1837, the society expanded its work to the Eastern Cape and the Xhosa. Here Döhne played an important role in the founding of the stations Bethel and Itemba. These stations were abandoned during the Frontier War of 1846–47, when the missionaries found refuge in the neighbouring colony of Natal. With the closing of the Eastern Cape missions, the focus of the Berlin Missionary Society shifted to Natal and the Transvaal. Christianenberg, Emmaus and other mission stations were established there, and Döhne became a well-known figure among the Voortrekkers. In 1857 some German veterans of the Crimean War settled around Fort Döhne which had been built near the mission station. The settlement was named Döhne after Jacob Ludwig Döhne (1811–1879), the lexicographer and philologist from the Berlin Missionary Society, who was responsible for compiling A Zulu-Kafir Dictionary (Cape Town, 1857) after spending twenty years documenting the language and dialects, also translating the New Testament into Xhosa and Zulu.

Donnybrook

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA settlement in Harry Gwala District Municipality about 80 km southwest of Pietermaritzburg. It was named after Donnybrook, a suburb of Dublin, by Robert Comrie, the owner of the farm on which it was laid out

Doonside 1910

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA small coastal resort town about 30 km south-west of Durban, between Amanzimtoti and Illovo Beach. It is a part of the eThekwini metropolitan municipality. At first the siding was called Middleton, after its builder Probably William Henry Middleton, but to avoid confusion with Middleton in the Cape the name was changed in 1910 to Doonside, after a house called Lorna Doone which overlooked the siding

Doornkloof

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Dordrecht 1856

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown on the northern slopes of the Stormberg, some 76 km north-north-east of Queenstown and 88 km southwest of Barkly East. It was established in 1856 on the farm Boschrand and became a municipality in 1867. It was named after Dordrecht in Holland, in memory of an historic synod of Reformed churches held there in 1618-1619. Notorious for its cold winters.

Doringbaai

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDoringbaai, previously known as Thornbay, is a small fishing village. The main economic activity is the packaging and export of crayfish. In the past, the bay at Doringbaai was used as an anchorage for the trade route; provisions were deposited here and transported to Vanrhynsdorp by camel. The lighthouse, one of the local landmarks, was built in 1963

Douglas 1867

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFounded in 1848 as a mission station on the farm Backhouse by the Reverend Isaac Hughes, who had been working along the Vaal River since 1845. In 1867, a group of Europeans from Griquatown signed an agreement giving them the right to establish a town. The town was named after General Sir Percy Douglas, Lieutenant Governor of the Cape Colony.

Draghoender

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
Former name of Marydale

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA railway station and post office 3 km to the north, in the Prieska district. Derived from Afrikaans dragonder, 'dragoon'

Drakensberg

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifMountain range about 1 046 km long, extending eastwards from near Dordrecht for 130 km, then northwards to near Tzaneen. Of Dutch origin, the name means 'dragon mountain'. The Sotho name is said to be Quathlamba, Zulu Khahlamba, variously explained as 'anything thrown in a heap', 'a barrier, as of pointed spears', etc. Other forms include Kwahlamba, Kwathlamba, Qathlamba, Quahlamba, etc.

Drakenstein 1685

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThe Drakenstein Mountains were named in honour of H.A. van Reede tot Drakenstein who visited the Cape as Commissioner-General in 1685; Drakenstein (modern spelling usually Drakestein) was the name of his estate in the Netherlands.

Drieankerbaai 1661

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThree Anchor https://www.geni.com/project-4478818/edit#Bay''' Small anchorage in Table Bay. The name, first encountered in 1661, possibly refers to anchors securing chains stretched as defence across the bay. The form Drieankerbaai is preferred for official purposes

Driefontein

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Drummond

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA town in eThekwini Metro 45 km west of Durban. It was named after F.C. Drummond, former director of the Natal Land and Colonisation Company. It is famous for being the halfway mark of the Comrades Marathon.

Dube

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Duduza 1964

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA township west of Nigel on the East Rand. It was established in 1964 when Africans were resettled from Charterston because it was considered by the apartheid government to be too close to a white town. A local authority was established in 1983. Duduza experienced violent school, consumer, bus, and rent boycotts from 1984 to 1987. A state of emergency was imposed in July 1985 and the South African Army was called in as the violence peaked.

Duiwelskloof 1920

Transvaal (post 1994 Limpopo)
Modjadji 1914
Modjadjiskloof 2004
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifVillage in the Letaba district, 24 km north of Tzaneen. Surveyed in 1919 and proclaimed in 1920, it is administered by a village management board. The name, Afrikaans for 'Devil's ravine', was possibly given by virtue of the rugged, awe inspiring aspect, or because of the difficulty with which laden wagons trekked through it in the rainy season. The railway station was called Modjadji in 1914 but was later renamed Modjadjiskloof on June 14, 2004 in honour of the Modjadji or Rain Queen, hereditary ruler of the Balobedu people of the area and the only ruling queen in South Africa.

Dukuduku

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifSee St. Lucia

Dullstroom 1893

Transvaal (post 1995 Mpumalanga)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 35 km north of Belfast and some 53 km south-west of Lydenburg. It was proclaimed on 9 October 1893 and named after a merchant from Amsterdam, Wolterus Dull, chairman of a committee which rendered assistance to families who had suffered losses during the First Anglo-Boer War. The element stroom, 'stream', refers to the Crocodile River nearby. One of the coldest towns in South Africa, Dullstroom boasts the highest station (2 076 m) and is the only place in the country where beech and elm trees grow; they were planted by Dutch immigrants.

Duma

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Dumakude

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Dumbe

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
See Paulpietersburg.

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif Zulu name of Paulpietersburg. It is derived from madumbe, a wild fruit (Colocasia antiquorum) growing on the Dumbe- berg south and east of the town.

Dundee 1882

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifCoal mining town 8 km east of Glencoe and 77 km northeast of Ladysmith. It was laid out in 1882, came under local administration in 1897 and was proclaimed a borough in 1902. It was named after Dundee in Scotland, birthplace of its founder, William Craighead Smith and other family members. His Father, Peter Smith, was owner of the farm Dundee, bought from Voortrekker settle Dekker. The iron-ore and coal deposits in the area have made it a centre of mining and industrial activity.

Dunge

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Dungeni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Dunnottar

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Durban

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThe modern city of Durban dates from 1824, when the settlement was established on the northern shores of the bay near today's Farewell Square. Lt. Francis George Farewell Wiki together with a trading company called J. R. Thompson & Co., decided to open trade relations with Shaka, the Zulu King, and establish a trading station at the Bay. Henry Francis Fynn, another trader at Delagoa Bay, was also involved. Fynn left Delagoa Bay and sailed for the Bay of Natal on the brig Julia, while Farewell followed six weeks later on the Antelope. Between them they had 26 possible settlers, although only 18 stayed. On a visit to King Shaka, Henry Francis Fynn succeeded in befriending King by helping him recover from a stab wound that he had suffered as a result of an assassination attempt by one of his half-brothers. As a token of his gratitude King Shaka granted Fynn a "25-mile strip of coast a hundred miles in depth". On 7 August 1824 they concluded negotiations with King Shaka for a cession of land, including the Bay of Natal and land extending ten miles south of the Bay, twenty-five miles north of the Bay and one hundred miles inland. Farewell took possession of this grant and raised the Union Jack with a Royal Salute, which consisted of 4 cannon shots and twenty musket shots. Only six of the original eighteen would-be settlers remained, and these six can be regarded as the founders of Port Natal as a British colony. These six were joined by Lt. James Saunders King and Nathaniel Isaacs in 1825. On 23 June 1835, it was decided to build a capital town and name it "D'Urban" after Sir Benjamin D'Urban WIKI, who was the governor of the Cape Colony at the time.

Durbanville 1825

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDurbanville is a former town in the Western Cape province of South Africa, it now forms part of the greater City of Cape Town metropolitan area. Durbanville was founded in the early 19th century around a fresh water spring and was primarily a watering station for travellers between Cape Town and the interior. Durbanville was originally known as Pampoenkraal (from the Afrikaans words pampoen meaning pumpkin, and kraal meaning corral - an enclosure for livestock). In 1825 a group of local farmers requested permission from Lord Charles Somerset (governor of the Cape Colony at that time) to build their own church. The Dutch Reformed Church was commended in 1825 and inaugurated a year later on 6 August 1826. A small village grew between the church and the outspan (overnight stop). During 1836 the inhabitants of Pampoenkraal petitioned the Governor of the Cape Colony, Sir Benjamin d'Urban, for permission to rename the village D'Urban in his honour. Permission was duly granted and the new name persisted until 1886 when it was renamed to Durbanville in order to avoid confusion with Durban - a major port city in the east of South Africa. Durbanville had its own court house, jail and magistrate from the 1870s and becamhttps://www.geni.com/project-4478818/edit#e a Magisterial District of Bellville. The court house complex still exists in altered form within the Rust-en-Vrede complex, originally erected in 1850. A village management board was established in 1897 and a municipality in 1901. The first mayor elected was John King. The village grew rapidly after the turn of 19th century and a local wagon industry developed. The King Brothers Wagon Works' used to be South Africa's biggest wagon works. At the turn of the century, it employed more than 200 men, which just about accounted for the entire village.

Durnacol

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA small suburban town. The name is an acronym for Durban Navigational Collieries, a mine that was opened at the turn of the 20th century. The mine ceased production activities in 2000. At present, the area of the mine property is being rehabilitated and is being managed by the local municipality. Many of the mining company's houses have been sold to individual owners

Dutoitspan 1870

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
Beaonsfield 1910

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDu Toit's Pan, now usually Dutoitspan, refers to one of the earliest diamond mining camps at what is now Kimberley, South Africa. It was renamed Beaconsfield, which existed as a separate borough from Kimberley itself until Kimberley and Beaconsfield were amalgamated as the City of Kimberley in 1912

Dutywa 1858

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

(previously Idutywa)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA town in Mbashe Local Municipality, founded in 1858 as a military fort after a dispute between a Natal Colony raiding party and its local people. It is named after the Dutywa River, a tributary of the Mbhashe River. The name means "place of disorder" in the Xhosa language; its spelling was officially changed from "Idutywa" to "Dutywa" on 16 July 2004. The settlement was laid out in 1884 and was made a municipality in 1913. The town is the birthplace of former South African President, Thabo Mbeki

Dwarskersbos

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFishing village in the Piketberg district, about 11 km north of Laaiplek. The Portuguese navigator Vasco da Gama first set foot on South African soil on 7 November 1497 nearby when he explored the present St Helena Bay. A tidal wave 6m high struck Dwarskersbos on 27 August 1969. The name is said to be derived from Afrikaans; kersbos is a type of plant, Euclea polyandra, or Sarcocaulon species. The beach stretches from Velddrif and Dwarskerbos to Elands Bay, making it the longest uninterrupted sandy beach in South Africa

Dwarskloof

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Dysselsdorp 1838

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifVillage about 30 km east of Oudtshoorn, site of a London Mission Station established in 1838. Managed by the Oudtshoorn Divisional Council since 1926.


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E

East London 1836

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

(Xhosa: eMonti; Afrikaans: Oos-Londen)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifEast London (Afrikaans: Oos-Londen, Xhosa: eMonti is a city on the southeast coast of South Africa, situated at 32.97°S and 27.87°E in the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality.. The city lies on the Indian Ocean coast, largely between the Buffalo River and the Nahoon River, and hosts the country's only river port. Lieutenant John Bailie of the Royal Navy, one of the 1820 Settlers, surveyed the Buffalo River mouth and founded the town in 1836, a memorial on Signal Hill commemorating the event. The city formed around the only river port in South Africa and was originally known as Port Rex. This settlement on the West Bank was the nucleus of the town of East London, which was elevated to city status in 1914. During the early to mid-19th century frontier wars between the British settlers and the local Xhosa inhabitants, East London served as a supply port to service the military headquarters at nearby King William’s Town, about thirty miles away. A British fort, Fort Glamorgan, was built on the West Bank in 1847, and annexed to the Cape Colony that same year. This fort is one of a series of forts the British built, that include Fort Murray, Fort White, Fort Cox, Fort Hare and Fort Beaufort, in the border area that became known as British Kaffraria British Kaffraria was a British colony from 1835 to 1866 with King William's Town as the capital With later development of the port came the settlement of permanent residents, including German settlers, most of whom were bachelors. These settlers were responsible for German names of some towns in the vicinity of East London such as Stutterheim and Berlin. Today, German surnames such as Gehring, Salzwedel and Peinke are still common in East London, but the descendants of the settlers rapidly became anglicised. The existing port, in the mouth of the Buffalo River, adjoining the Indian Ocean, began operating in 1870. In 1872, the Cape Colony, under the leadership of its first Prime Minister John Molteno, attained a degree of independence from Britain. The new government merged the three neighbouring settlements of East London, East London East and Panmure in 1873, forming the core of the current municipality, and in 1876 it began construction on the region's railway lines, commencing on the river's east bank. At the same time, it began construction of the East London harbour. This new infrastructure rapidly accelerated development of the area, into today’s thriving city of East London.

Ebenezer 1831

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
Ebenhaeser
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifEstablished by a German named von Wurmb in 1831 in 1831. The name, a version of Ebenezer, is of biblical origin (1 Sam. 7:12) and means 'stone of help'.

Edenburg 1862

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 85 km south-south-west of Bloemfontein. Laid out on the farm Rietfontein in 1862, it became a municipality in 1891. The name is said to be either of biblical origin or an adaptation of Edinburgh, name of the birthplace in Scotland of the Reverend Andrew Murray (1828- 1917), for many years the only minister in the Orange Free State.

Edendale 1851

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA township established in 1851, when 100 black Christian families settled on the farm Welverdiend, about 10 km from Pietermaritzburg, and renamed it to its present name. The village was laid out under the guidance of James Allison, who had broken with the Wesleyan Missionary Society in 1851

Edenvale 1903

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown some 15 km east of Johannesburg, 10 km north of Germiston and 9 km west of Jan Smuts Airport. Established in1903, after the Anglo Boer War as a small settlement named Rietfontein which sprung up around the Rietfontein Gold Mine. It was made a municipality in 1942. It was initially populated by Cornish mineworkers. Probably named after one of the owners of the farm, John Eden.

Edenville 1912

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 48 km north-east of Kroonstad and 50 km south-west of Heilbron. It was established on the farms Erfdeel-Noord, Langland and Welgelegen in 1912, and attained municipal status in 1921. The name is assumed to refer to the biblical Garden of Eden

Eendekuil

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

Eerste River

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifNow Buffels River. Named by survivors of the Stavenisse, wrecked in 1686, who built a new ship to sail to the Cape. The name is Afrikaans (originally Dutch) and means 'first river'

Eerste River (suburb)

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifEersterivier in Afrikaans. A suburb of Cape Town. It started off as many different farms and expanded vastly after the 1980s.

Eerstegoud 1871

Transvaal (post 1994 Limpopo)
Perviously Marabastad 1868

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifVillage 14 km south-west of Pietersburg. Laid out in 1868, it was at first called Marabastad. At the request of the inhabitants the name was changed about 1954 to Eerstegoud, Afrikaans for 'first gold', in memory of the discovery in 1871 of the first gold in the Transvaal at Eersteling by Edward Button

Eikepark

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Ekudabuleni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Ekukhanyeni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Ekuvukeni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Ekangala

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Eland

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Elands Bay

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA town located about 220 kilometres north from Cape Town. It is a world class surfing location and is also noted for its caves, which have a number of rock paintings

Elandsberg

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifMountain some 10 km north-east of Cradock. Afrikaans for 'elands mountain', it was named after the antelopes (Taurotragus oryx) which occurred there in great numbers. The pioneer explorer Colonel Robert Jacob Gordon (1743-1795) named it and the other mountains there, such as the Barbersberg and Michausberg, Fiscaal Boers Gebergte.

Elandskloof

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

Elandskloofberge

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifMountains bordering on the Groenland. Afrikaans for 'elands ravine mountains', the name is said to be translated from Khoekhoen. These mountains are also named after the Taurotragus oryx.

Elandslaagte

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFarming and coal-mining centre some 26 km north-east of Ladysmith. Afrikaans for 'elands flat', it was the scene of one of the first battles of the Second Anglo-Boer War, on 21 October 1899. Monuments have been erected to the fallen on both sides.

Elandspad

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifSir Lowry's Pass Former name of Sir Lowry's Pass. Named after the eland (Taurotragus oryx) which followed this path to cross the Hottentots Holland Mountains; probably a translation of Khoekhoen Gantouw

Elgin

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifElgin is a large, area of land, circled by mountains, in the Overberg region of South Africa. This broad upland valley lies about 70 km southeast of Cape Town, just beyond the Hottentots Holland Mountains. Sir Antonie Viljoen, an Afrikaans medical doctor, bought a farm named Oak Valley Estate in the Elgin Valley in 1898. He spent much of the next few years under house arrest on his farm (he had signed up as a medical officer with the Boer army during the war, and was soon captured by the British. His internment on Oak Valley was only granted on condition that he paid for the services of two British soldiers to guard him for the duration of the war)! Amongst his many farming achievements were the purchase of the first deciduous fruit trees in the Elgin valley. In 1903 an Italian South African family named Molteno began farming in the area. Two friends of Dr Viljoen, the young brothers Edward, Possibly Edward Bartle Frere Molteno and Harry Molteno initially bought a small plot of land named "Glen Elgin", near the modern Elgin railway station, where they grew vegetables. They soon started growing deciduous fruit though, and built up a vast fruit farming enterprise that spanned the entire valley.

Elim District 1824

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifEstablished in 1824 by German missionaries as a Moravian mission station - it was given this biblical name (Exod. 15:27) which means '(palm) trees'

Elliot 1885

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

now called Khowa //www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown on the Slang River, 80 km south-west of Maclear and 65 km south-east of Barkly East, 9 km from the Transkei border. It was established in 1885 and became a municipality in 1911. Named after Sir Henry George Elliot (1826-1912), Chief Magistrate of the Transkeian territories from 1891 to 1902.

Elliotdale

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 50 km south of Umtata, 22 km south-east of Mqanduli. Named after Sir Henry George Elliot, Chief Magistrate of the Transkei from 1891 to 1902.

Ellisras 1960

Transvaal (post 1994 Limpopo)
2002 renamed Lephalale)’’
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifNamed after the original farm owners, Patrick Ellis and Piet Erasmus Established 1960 In the Limpopo province of South Africa immediately east of the Waterberg Coalfield.. In 2002, Ellisras was renamed Lephalale by the provincial government of Limpopo, after the main river that crosses the municipality. Lephalale is divided into three main subsections, Lephalale, Onverwacht and Marapong.

Elsburg 1887

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 6 km south-east of Germiston. Laid out on the farm Klippoortjie in 1887 and proclaimed a town in 1908, it was named after the owner, F C Els. It was administered by a health committee from 1908 and by a village council from 1938. Munici- pal status was achieved in October 1957. It almost became the capital of the goldfields instead of Johannesburg

Elsiesrivier

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
Elsie's River

Elsieskraal River

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifRises on the flanks of the Tygerberg and flows west and south-west to enter the Swart River at Pinelands. Formerly Elsjes Kraal Rivier, it may have been named after Elsje van Suurwaarde, wife of Andries de Man, owner of the farm Doodenkraal in the Tygerberg and Secunde in the time of Simon van der Stel

Elysium

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Emagidini

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Emalangeni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Emandleni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Emashingeni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Embo

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

eMondlo

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Empangeni 1851

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA town 157 kilometres north of Durban. In 1851, the Norwegian Missionary Society established a mission station on the banks of the eMpangeni river. The river was named after the profusion of Mpange trees (Trema guineensis) growing along its banks. The mission was later moved to Eshowe, 61 kilometres north-west. In 1894 a magistracy was established. The Zululand Railway reached the town in January 1903 and linked the area to Durban and Eshowe. The government planted eucalyptus trees in 1905 as part of an experimental timber plantation. The plantation was a success and led to a large scale planting along the coastal belt. In 1906 Empangeni became a village. Empangeni was officially proclaimed as a township on 15 January 1931 and declared a borough on 13 October 1960

eNdondakusuka

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Engcobo 1876-1881

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

Ngcobo

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 85 km west of Umtata, 77 km north- east of Idutywa, on a spur of the Kumba Mountains. It became a municipality in March 1917. Of Xhosa origin, the name is said to mean 'a place with trees and long grass next to a stream'. On 1 November 1859 Chief Fubu of the amaQwathi met with Archdeacon Waters and the Rev John Gordon of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (SPG). As a result, they were granted a stretch of land in the Xuka valley, and soon after the All Saints mission station was founded on the site under the leadership of the Rev Gordon. In 1876 Walter Stanford arrived at the station to take up his appointment as Resident Magistrate to the amaQwathi. He established the seat of his magistracy some 8 km from the station on a site known locally as Engcobo, a Xhosa term meaning "a green place next to a stream". In 1879 the amaQwathi rose in rebellion and, during the ensuing hostilities, both the mission and the magistracy were burnt to the ground, forcing their residents to flee. Following the surrender of the amaQwathi, the magistracy was re-established at Engcobo in 1881. The town was previously located in Mjanyana, well known as a leper institution.

Enhlalakahle

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
See Greytown below

Ennerdale

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifEnnerdale was declared as a coloured group area under the apartheid regime. Even though apartheid ended in 1994, Ennerdale still remains a largely coloured community.

Enon 1818

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

formerly known as Witterivier //www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifa small town named after the biblical place mentioned in John 3:23, 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) east of Kirkwood and 60 kilometres (37 mi) north-east of Uitenhage. Enon was formed in 1818 by the Moravian Missionary Society on request of the Area Landdrost Jacob Glen Cuyler to serve as a buffer between the Xhosa, Tembu and Fingo tribes living outside the Cape Colony and the European farmers and towns inside the Cape Colony. The land was granted to the Missionary Society in trust, to be administrated on behalf of the Cape Colony in the interests of residents of the missionary station.

Enstra 1943

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifIndustrial suburb of Springs, township on the farm Geduld in the Springs district, proclaimed on 17 April 1943. Established primarily for the first paper-mill of the South African Pulp and Paper Industries, the name is derived from enterprise and straw, from which paper was to be made

Entembeni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Enyati Anthracide Mine

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Epping 1940s

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifIndustrial area of Cape Town that is situated to the south of Thornton, east of Pinelands and north of Langa first developed in the late 1940s.

Erasmus 1904

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
Former name of Bronkhorstspruit
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifNamed after C J G Erasmus, the owner of the farm Hondsrivier on which it was established in 1904

Ermelo 1879

Transvaal (post 1995 Mpumalanga)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 237 km east of Johannesburg. Laid out on the farm Nooitgedacht purchased from P.J. Fourie in 1879 in 1879, it was proclaimed a town in 1880 and named after Ermelo in the Netherlands, where the Dutch Reformed minister Frans Lion Cachet had been converted to Christianity. In 1901 Ermelo was razed to the ground by the British forces, but it was rebuilt after 1903.

eSbongile

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Eshowe

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown on the Mlalazi River, about 140 km north- east of Durban and 24 km north- west of Gingindlovu. It was proclaimed a town in 1915, and became a borough in 1954. It is said to be named after the sound of wind in the trees. Other explanations of this Zulu name are that it means 'windy place' and that it refers to a type of plant growing there (Xysmalobium), repellent to dogs and therefore used in the preparation of hides. In 1860 Cetshwayo WIKI, then only a Zulu prince, built a kraal here and named the place Eziqwaqweni (the abode of robbers). A mission station was established at Eshowe in 1861 once permission had been obtained from the Zulu King Cetshwayo by Norwegian missionary, the Reverend Ommund Oftebro 1820-1893. Later the station was called the KwaMondi Mission Station (place of Mondi) after the Zulu name which was given to Oftebro.

eSibongile

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Esikhawini

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Esiphahleni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Estcourt 1848

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown on the Bushmans River, 256 km from Durban and 30 km south-east of Colenso. Laid out in 1848, it was named Bushmans River Post or Bushmans Drift. In 1859 the seat of magistracy was moved from Weenen to Estcourt. It became a township in 1905 and reached borough status in 1914. The name was changed in 1863 to Estcourt, said to be in honour of a British member of Parliament, Thomas H Estcourt, a friend of an early settler, J W Wilks.

Evander 1955

Transvaal (post 1995 Mpumalanga)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTownship 80 km east of Springs, 8 km south of Kinross and 48 km west of Bethal. Laid out as a mining town by the Union Corporation Ltd in 1955, it was named after Evelyn Anderson, nee Gartherall, the wife of Peter Maltitz Anderson a former managing director of the company. Originally part of the Bethal district (named after a town 36 km to the east).

Evaton 1904

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
Formerly Residensia.

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif Named after Eva, daughter of James B Tucker, who laid out the township in 1904 on the farm Wildebeesfontein.

Excelsior 1911

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown in the Winburg district, about 105 km north-east of Bloemfontein and 55 km south of Winburg. It was laid out in 1910 on the farms Excelsior and Sunlight, and proclaimed a town n 1911. The name is Latin and means 'more elevated'.

Ezakheni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
See Ladysmith

Ezembeni

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
Dududu
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifAlso referred to as Zembeni by locals. Dududu WIKI

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F

Faure

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA hamlet about 16 km south-west of Stellenbosch and 13 km north-west of Strand. Administratively it is a suburb of the City of Cape Town, and is in the Helderberg region. Nearby is the kramat or tomb of Sheik Yusuf (1626-1699), an Islamic expatriate priest. Faure is a common surname; it is uncertain after whom this place was named. Faure is a common surname; it is uncertain after whom this place was named. See SA History Online Abraham Faure

Fauresmith 1849

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThe Freestate town of Fauresmith, was named after Lord Harry Smith and Rev Abraham Faure. WIKI Abraham Faure

Felixton 1907

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifVillage in the Lower Umfolozi district, 10 km south-east of Empangeni. First settled in 1907, there is no local authority. Said to have been named either after Viscount Herbert John Gladstone, nicknamed Felix, or after a local pioneer, Felix Piccione

Ferreirasdorp 1886

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifColonel Ignatius Ferreira The suburb is named after, leader of the original group of diggers who settled in this area in 1886. Ferreirasdorp is an inner-city suburb of Johannesburg, South Africa. First known as Ferreira's Camp (Afrikaans: Ferreiraskamp) and later Ferreira's Township, it is the oldest part of Johannesburg. Sometimes referred to as the "cradle of Johannesburg", it is where the first gold diggings started and where the first diggers initially settled. *The city grew around the mining camp in the Ferreirasdorp area and Johannesburg’s Main Street developed from a rough track where the present Albert Street led off towards Ferreira’s Camp.

Ficksburg 1867

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown on the western bank of the Caledon River and the eastern slopes of the Imperani Mountain, 203 km east- north-east of Bloemfontein and 67 km south-east of Senekal. It was laid out in 1867 on the farms Generaalsvlei, Kromdraai, Losberg and Sikonjelasberg, and became a municipality in May 1891. It was named after Johan Izak Jacobus Fick (1816-1892), Commandant-General of the OFS, who played a prominent role in the Basuto Wars of 1865- 1868

Finsbury

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Fish Hoek 1818

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFish Hoek, Vissers Baay or Visch Hoek appears on the earliest maps of the Cape. Now a holiday resort and residential area in the Simon's Town district, on the western coast of False Bay, about 30 km south of Cape Town. First settled about 1818, the town was laid out on the farm Vischhoek in 1919 administered by a village management board since 1927, and became a municipality in 1940. Well known for fossilized skeletons of Fish Hoek Man, about 10 000 years old. The name, partially translated from Dutch, means 'fish corner'. It was taken from the inlet, known as such as early as 1672. The Afrikaans form Vishoek is preferred for official purposes. The first grant of Crown land in Fish Hoek was granted to Andries Bruins in 1818. The land was sold several times before being bought by Hester Sophia de Kock in 1883. She was then a spinster of 51 years old. In 1901, late in life, she married a local farmer, Jacob Isaac de Villiers, who came to live with her on the farm. Although she farmed wheat and vegetables, she started providing accommodation for people who wanted to stay in Fish Hoek, and so became the first local tourist entrepreneur. After they died the land was sold off, the first sale taking place in 1918. The oldest house on the bay, now named Uitkyk, was bought as a fisherman's cottage in 1918 by the Mossop family of Mossop Leathers, and is still in the Mossop family. There had been a building on that site since the 1690s; a poshuis or post house and a whaling station office is all that is known of its history. As there was a good train service to Cape Town a more permanent community arose. By 1940 it was big enough to be declared a municipality and was administered by the Town Council until 1996. Hester and Isaac de Villiers, with other members of their family, are buried in the small graveyard next to the NG Kerk (Dutch Reformed Church) in Kommetjie Road. The farmhouse on the site of the present Homestead Naval Mess near the railway crossing became a hotel. The original building subsequently burned down in 1947.

Fisherhaven

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA suburb of the whale watching town of Hermanus - a popular birdwatching and holiday destination.

Flagstaff

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifZacharia George Bowles EXCERPT FROM the Memoirs of Kenneth Harvey Owen dated 1965 (in my possession - Neville Owen - grandson)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifI am not sure of the chronological sequence of events of my father’s history but he at one time had a Trading Station together with his brother-in-law Zacky Bowles, at Flagstaff. Whether this was before or after his marriage to Miss Harvey I do not know.

I have often heard him tell of the way in which Flagstaff, in Eastern Pondoland, received its name. When he and Zacky Bowles had the Trading Store there, they decided to erect a flagstaff and on this they hoisted the Union Jack each Sunday in order that it might be known that their store was closed, and from this, the little village of Flagstaff derived its name. My father and his brother made a survey for a water furrow to lead water some 2 miles to their station. This water I believe is still flowing.

Florentia

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifCornelis Floris Johannes Meyer A suburb of Alberton was named after Cornelis Floris Johannes Meyer, son of Org Meyer, after his death his wife sold/donated part of their farm for the establishment of the suburb.

Florisbad

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA health resort 45 km northwest of Bloemfontein and 47 km south-west of Brandfort, near the Haagenstad salt-pan. Named after Floris Venter who opened up the mineral spring. Florisbad archaeological and paleontological site is now a tourist attraction.

Fochville

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 50 km north-east of Potchefstroom, 20 km south-east of Carletonville and 74 km south-west of Johannesburg. It was laid out during World War I on portions of the farms Kraalkop and Leeuspruit, and proclaimed on 15 November 1920. In 1951 a village council was instituted. It was named after Marshall Ferdinand Foch (1851-1929), Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Forces in France during World War I

Fodo

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Fort Beaufort 1837

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif(Xhosa: iBhofolo) is a town in the Amatole District . established in 1837 and became a municipality in 1883. The town lies at the confluence of the Kat River and Brak River between the Keiskamma and Great Fish Rivers. The roots of Fort Beaufort is a mission station that the Reverend Joseph Williams of the London Missionary Society established in 1816. In 1822, Colonel Maurice Scott of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment constructed a blockhouse about three miles from the mission station as a military frontier post and stronghold against raids by the Xhosa under their chief, Maqoma. The British named it Fort Beaufort to honour the Duke of Beaufort, father of Lord Charles Henry Somerset, first British governor of the Cape Colony (1814 to 1826). After the 6th Xhosa War (1834–1835), Governor Sir Benjamin d'Urban authorised construction of a fort at the site of the original blockhouse. The new buildings included a military hospital, guard houses, infantry barracks, and officers' quarters.

Fort Cunynghame

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA saw-milling centre about 5 km north-north-west of Döhne, at the north-eastern foot of the Xolora Mountains. It was a telegraph office manned by the Frontier and Mounted (FAM) Police, named after Lieutenant Arthur Cunynghame who was in its command. In July 1878 the Government ordered that all members of the force employed as telegraphists should return to the ranks or apply for their discharges. As a result Fort Cunynghame was closed in August 1879. SA History Online

Fort Frederick 1799

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifEarly name of Port Elizabeth, built in 1799 in order to stop the French from conquering the Cape Colony during the Napoleonic wars and played a vital role in establishing British rule in South Africa in combination with the Battle of Blaauwberg. Named after Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, commander-in-chief of the British Army, it was built by troops sent to Algoa Bay to prevent a possible landing of French troops, under Napoleon to assist the Graaff-Reinet rebels during the Napoleonic wars, this event is often regarded to be the beginning of the British rule in the Cape Colony.

Fort Nottingham

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Fouriesburg 1892

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA small town about 50 km south-south-east of Bethlehem, 53 km north-east of Ficksburg and 10 km from Caledon's Poort, where the river, the border with Lesotho, is crossed by a bridge. It was laid out in 1892 on the farm Groenfontein and named after the owner, Christoffel Fourie. It was the scene of heavy fighting during the Second Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902) and was almost completely destroyed.

Frankfort 1847

Orange Free State (post 1994 Free State)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifVillage 51 km north-east of King William's Town. It developed from a settlement of members of the British-German Legion in 1857 and is named after Frankfurt in Germany by Albert van Gordon.

Frankfort1857

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifVillage 51 km north-east of King William's Town which developed from a settlement of members of the British- German Legion in 1857, named after Frankfurt in Germany.

Franklin

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Franschoek 1692

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
Originally area known as Oliphantshoek . French Corner

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFirst farm in valley 1692 Heinrich Muller, a European colonist from Basel, was allotted the first farm in the area and named it Keerweder. First Huguenots 8 October 1694 .

  • 1713 area known as de France Hoek
  • 1795 map Frans Hoeck or la Petite Rochelle.
  • 1805 Field cornetcy named FRANSCHHOEK
  • 1845 Same name for Dutch Reformed congregation Franschhoek. A number of residents petitioned the Governor in 1859 to change the name of the village to Roubaixdorp after Mr P E de Roubaix, MP for Paarl. They argued that the name Franschhoek referred to the field-cornetcy and that the village had never been officially named. Their wish was granted and the village christened Roubaixdorp on Saturday 25th August, 1860 but it caused a division in the community and soon reverted to being called Franschhoek again. 1881 Franschoek Municipality or town. https://www.museum.co.za/history.html

Franskraalstrand

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA coastal village near to Gansbaai.

Fraserburg 1851

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifReverend Colin Fraser Established in 1851 on the farm Rietfontein, and named after the Scottish immigrant Reverend Colin Fraser, and a church elder G.J. Meyburgh.

Frederikstad 1885

Transvaal (post 1994 North West
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif'Hamlet about 34 km south-west of Carletonville and 23 km north of Potchefstroom, established in 1885 and named after Frederik Wolmarans. Fighting took place here during the Second Anglo-Boer War. The name is also encountered as Frederickstad.

Friemersheim

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA small agricultural community about 15 km from Groot-Brakrivier, founded by a German missionary in the early nineteenth century. In 1869, through the efforts of Reverend Johann Kretzen of the Berliner Missionary Society, a school and church were built on the farm Gonnakraal, which Kretzen had bought for his sister. When she died in 1872, he bequeathed the farm to the Dutch Reformed Missionary Society, and later it was renamed Friemersheim, after Kretzen's town of birth in Germany. It remained in the ownership of the Dutch Reformed Church until the 1960s, when it was sold to the state.


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G

Ga-Rankuwa

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA large settlement located about 37 km north-west of Pretoria. It used to fall in Bophuthatswana during the apartheid years, and under the North West province until the early 2000s. The area around Ga-Rankuwa had been settled by Tswana people since at least the 17th century. Many of these communities were conquered by the invading Ndebele (or Matabele) under Mzilikazi in the early 19th century. When the Boers defeated and drove away the Matebele and claimed ownership of the land of that kingdom, they divided the area into farms and distributed the land among themselves. In 1860 thirty families who were an extension of the Bakwena people of Betanie got together to purchase the Farm Hebron from the Traansvaal Republic Government. This farm at the time extended to an area that was half of the present Ga-Rankuwa. The Bakwena people through the Bakwena chief, Mamogale, and several German Lutheran missionaries and other missionaries such as those of the Methodist church, began collecting cattle and money from Tswana in the area who were indentured to Boers to buy back land that had been taken away from them. Chief Mamogale and the missionaries bought back several farms, including Ga-Rankuwa, and Chief Mamogale was able to establish a chiefdom that came to be called the Bakwena Ba Magopa. In the 1960s, under apartheid, the "Reserves" or "Native Areas" came to be called "homelands," and Ga-Rankuwa was included into the homeland of Bophuthatswana. WIKI

Gamkavallei

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

Gamtoosvallei

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifGamtoos River Rising in the Sneeuberg, flows southwards for 560 km and enters the Indian Ocean at St Francis Bay near Humansdorp. The upper reaches are called the Kariega, the middle portion from near Winter- hoek the Groot River, and the last 87 km the Gamtoos. Of Khoekhoen origin, the name is probably derived from that of a tribe, the Gamtoos or Gamtouers, etc

Gans Bay

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifGansbaai (Dutch/Afrikaans for "bay of geese," sometimes referred to as Gans Bay or Gangs Bay) is a fishing town and popular tourist destination i It is known for its dense population of great white sharks and as a whale-watching location. Gansbaai Fishing village south of Walker Bay, 48 km south-east of Hermanus, 22 km south-west of Stanford and some 6 km north-east of Danger Point. Originally known as Gansgat, ie 'goose hole', after the wild geese there, it was laid out on the farm Strandfontein and became a municipality in April 1962. The form Gansbaai is preferred for official use.

Ganspan

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDuring World War II there were three Internment Camps in the region, one at Ganspan and two at Andalusia. Internees were mostly German Families .

Gantouw

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifShort-cut to the top of Sir Lowry's Pass in the Hottentots Holland Mountains. Derived from Khoekhoen, it means 'eland path', possibly from the route those animals took to cross the mountains.

Garies

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown in the Namaqualand district, at the foot of the Kamiesberg, 46 km south of Kamieskroon and 146 km northwest of Vanrhynsdorp. The name is Khoekhoen and means 'couchgrass', Afrikaans 'kweek'.

Garlington

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Gatyane

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

(previously Willowvale)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifEstablished as a military post in 1879 and so named because of its situation on a stream with willow trees on its banks.

Gcumisa

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Gcuwa

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

(previously Butterworth) //www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFirst established as a Wesleyan mission station in 1827 north of the Great Kei River in British Kaffraria. It was named after Joseph Butterworth.

Gcwensa

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Geluksburg

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Genadendal 1737

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif Moravian mission station south of the Riviersonderend Mountains, 35 km north-east of Caledon and 6 km north-west of Greyton. Founded in 1737 by Georg Schmidt, it is the oldest mission station in South Africa. The name is of Dutch origin, 'dale of mercy'. Its picturesque surroundings and buildings make it a favourite spot for artists. Formerly known as Baviaanskloof; the name was changed in 1806

George 1811

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThe city of George was established as a result of the growing demand for timber and the wood used in building, transport and furniture. In 1776 the Dutch East India Company established an outpost for the provision of timber; its location is thought to be near the western end of York Street. The Timber Post had its own Poshouer (manager), some 12 woodcutters, a blacksmith, wagon maker and 200 oxen plus families. After 1795 and the British occupation of the Cape, a caretaker of the forests in the area was appointed. After the second British occupation in 1806, it was decided that the Swellendam magistracy was too large and needed to be sub-divided. George was chosen because of the availability of good water. In 1811 George was declared a separate district and Adrian van Kervel was appointed the first Landrost (magistrate) and the town was proclaimed by the Earl of Caledon, governor of the Cape Colony on St George's Day, 23 April 1811, and named after the reigning British monarch, King George III. George gained municipal status in 1837.

Germiston 1904

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)
Previously Elandsfontein

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifCity about 54 km south of Pretoria and 16 km south-east of Johannesburg. It was established in the early days of the gold rush when two prospectors, John Jack from the farm of Germiston near Glasgow and August Simmer from Vacha in Germany, struck paydirt on the farm of Elandsfontein. In August 1887, the pair were on their way to the Eastern Transvaal when they outspanned (rest the pack animals) on the farm Elandsfontein and decided to stay and buy the land. Both men made fortunes and the town sprang up 2 km from the Simmer and Jack mine named after Jack's fathers farm. It was Elandsfontein until 1904 when it was officially named Germiston, after a farm near Glasgow in Scotland, birthplace of John Jack, a gold-mining pioneer.

Geysdorp 1895

Transvaal (post 1994 North West
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown about 24 km south-west of Delareyville. It was laid out in 1895 on the farm Paardefontein. Probably named after Commandant Nicolaas Claudius Gey van Pittius (1837-1893), Administrator of the Boer republic of Goshen

Gingindlovu

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA town in Uthungulu District Municipality 21 km south-east of Eshowe. The name was first applied to one of Cetshwayo's military kraals nearby. Of Zulu origin, it is said to mean 'place of the big elephant' or, more possibly, 'swallower of the elephant', referring to Cetshwayo's victory over his brother Mbulazi in 1856

Glackstadt 1906

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifVillage about 32 km south-east of Vryheid. Formed in 1906 as the centre for farming families. The name is German and means 'city of happiness'. This village was probably named after the city on the Elbe River in Germany.

Glen Grey

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

Lady Frere //www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFormer name for the area around Lady Frere, east of Queenstown.

Glen Lynden 1820

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifThomas Pringle In 1820 The Scottish settlers in Pringle's Party were sent to the Baviaans River area, where they settled and called the area Glen Lynden - a Scottish name. The countryside was perhaps reminiscent of a Scottish Glen. The Town of Glen Lynden was built in 1855. Glen Lynden is situated in Bedford, Eastern Cape. The plaque on the small church reads : Old Glen Lynden Church. This church was built in 1828 by the Government through the influence of Thomas Pringle for the Scottish Settlers and their Dutch neighbours. It became a Dutch Reformed Church in 1829. (Erected by the Historical Monuments Commission).

Glencoe 1903

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifWhen coal was discovered at Dundee about 8 km away a way was needed to transport the coal to the factories other than ox wagons. The railway from Durban to Johannesburg arrived on 4 September 1889, and a village sprung up where a branch line was built from the Durban-Johannesburg line to the eastern Transvaal in 1903. It was laid out in 1921 and achieved borough status in 1934, when it was renamed Glencoe, after a mountain valley in Lochaber, Scotland.

Glentana

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA village established in the early 20th century, when the first houses in the area were built. The origin of the town's name is unclear, but it is believed to be related to a kind of whiskey brewed in Northern Scotland which carries the same name.

Godide

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Goedverwacht 1810

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA village originating from a cattle farm established in 1810, which was then bought by Moravian missionaries in 1889.

Gonubie

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifSeaside town at the mouth of the Gqunube (Gonubie) River, 21 km north-east of East London. The name is said to be derived from Khoekhoen and to mean 'bramble river', after Royena growing there.

Goodwood 1905

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown in the Bellville district, 11 km east- north-east from the centre of Cape Town. Established in 1905, it became a municipality in 1938. It was named after a race-course in England, as it was intended that this, too, should be a racing centre, but after one race the project was abandoned.

Gordonia

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifDistrict with Upington as principal town, bordering on Botswana and South-West Africa. Formerly known as Korannaland, it was named after Sir Gordon Sprigg, Prime Minister of the Cape Colony four times between 1878 and 1892, who visited it in the company of Sir Thomas Upington.

Gordonsbaai 1902

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
Gordon's Bay
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown in the north-eastern corner of False Bay, 6 km south-east of Strand. Known as Fisch Hoek in early times, it was renamed after Colonel Robert Jacob Gordon (1743-1795), traveller and soldier. In 1902 it came under a village management board, and in 1961 municipal status was attained. It is a very popular resort.

Gouda

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif Town about 38 km south of Porterville, 14 km west of Tulbagh and 61 km north-west of Worcester. Prior to 1929 it was known as Porterville Road. Of Khoekhoen origin, the name Gouda is said to mean 'antelope'. Another possible explanation is 'honey path', 'honey defile'

Goudini

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifRegion with Rawsonville as principal town, also including the Breede River Valley, Du Toitskloof, Lake Marais, Stettynskloof and Worcester. The name is of Khoekhoen origin, and has been explained as 'bitter honey', 'wild honey', 'honey beer' and 'faecal honey'. Noted as a health resort with mineral springs. Other forms encountered include Gaudini, Gaudine, Ghaudinee, and Goudene Dina.

Gouritsmond

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif"Die Mond", as it is nicknamed, is a popular fishing location.

Gqeberha

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

See Port Elizabeth

Graafwater 1910

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown about 285 km north-east of Cape Town, 32 km west of Clanwilliam and 32 km south-east of Lambert's Bay. Established after the railway junction between Cape Town and Bitterfontein was built in 1910. Administered by a local body since 1950 and by a village management board since 1953. The name is Afrikaans and probably refers to a hole dug in the bed of a river to obtain water.

Graaff-Reinet 1786

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifCornelis Sebastian Jacob van de Graaff (1734-1776) The town was founded by the VOC Dutch East India Company in 1786, being named after the then governor of Cape Colony, Cornelis Jacob van de Graeff/Graaf, and his wife Hester Cornelia Reynet

Grabouw 1837

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown on the Palmiet River in the Caledon district, 19 km south-east of board of commissioners from 1837, and became a municipality in 1862. Became the centre of the British Settlers of 1820 and obtained a bishopric in 1853. Rhodes University is situated there. The town's location was first a stopping point for wagons on the route eastwards from Cape Town. The area was known at the time as "Koffiekraal". Another colonial name for the area was "Groenland" ("Greenland" in Dutch) - a name given by early European settlers to various parts of the region, but which now applies only to the mountainous area to the north. The town itself was created on the farm "Grietjiesgat", bought in 1856 by Wilhelm Langschmidt, a painter from Cape Town, who started the community around his wife's little trading store. Langschmidt named the village after the German town Grabow where he was born. It was initially spelt as "Grabau"

Grahamstown 1812

Cape (post 1994 Eastern Cape)
Grahamstad
(post 2020 Makhanda)

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifJohn Graham 1778-1821 Grahamstown was founded in 1812 as a military outpost by Lieutenant-Colonel John Graham as part of the effort to secure the eastern frontier of British influence in the then Cape Colony against the Xhosa, whose lands lay just to the east. The town's name change from Grahamstown to Makhanda was officially gazetted on 29 June 2018, renamed Makhanda in memory of Xhosa warrior and prophet Makhanda ka Nxele.

Graskop 1880-1890

Transvaal (post 1995 Mpumalanga)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 14 km south-east of Pilgrim's Rest and 28 km north of Sabie. It was laid out between 1880 and 1890 on a farm belonging to Abel Erasmus, Native Commissioner of the Transvaal Republic. Named after a grassy hillock (Afrikaans gras, 'grass', kop, 'hillock'). Originally it was a mining camp.

Gravelotte 1916

Transvaal (post 1994 Limpopo)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifMining centre 10 km north-east of Leydsdorp and 52 km north-west of Hoedspruit. It was established in 1916 and named after the farm owned by a Prussian missionary who had fought in the European Battle of Gravelotte (1870–71).[2]

Great Brak River

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
1859 Groot-Brakrivier

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif (Afrikaans: Groot-Brakrivier) is an historic coastal village in the Mossel Bay Local Municipality, founded by the Searle family of Surrey, England; Richard (originally a labourer), emigrated to South Africa under a government-sponsored scheme in 1845. He arrived in Great Brak River to work for the Central Road Board in 1850. Richard's brother, Charles, and sister-in-law, Pamela, nee Holmes are credited with founding the village in 1859. The Searle family went on to be toll keepers (toll houses were operated by private contractors during the 1800s), and would establish shopping, accommodation, shoe-making and timber businesses in the village.

Green Hills

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Green Point 1675

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif(Afrikaans: Groenpunt) is an affluent suburb on the Atlantic Seaboard of Cape Town, South Africa located to the north west of the central business district. North- western extremity of the promontory at the northern end of the Cape Peninsula. Known to the Portuguese as Ponta da Praia, it was named Green Point in 1675, making it the second oldest English place name in South Africa (Chapman's Peak is said to be the oldest). The first lighthouse in South Africa was erected here in 1824

Greenspark

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Greykerk

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Greylingstad 1909/1910 - 1914

Transvaal (post 1995 Mpumalanga)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown founded in 1909 by the Dutch Reformed Church The name was first borne by a town established in 1910 about 5 km south of the present one and named after a local pioneer, Pieter Jacobus Greyling, stepson of Piet Retief. In 1914 the name Greylingstad was transferred to its present site, laid out in 1913, replacing the name Willemsdal, after Willem Bezuidenhout, owner of the farm. During the Boer War the Scottish Rifles built a number of small forts overlooking the town and the farms beyond the hills. The Scottish Rifles laid out the initials "SR" on the hill overlooking the town, and it was always clearly visible from the main street of Greylingstad.

Greyton 1854

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifEstablished in 1854 on the Sonderend River, 6 km east of Genadendal, 39 km north-east of Caledon and 145 km east of Cape Town. Attained municipal status in February 1910. Named after Sir George Grey (1812-1898), Governor of the Cape Colony from 1854 to 1859 and 1860 to 1861.

Greytown 1850

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
Enhlalakahle
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown on the Umvoti River, 64 km north of Pietermaritzburg. It was laid out in 1850, proclaimed a township in 1896 and became a borough in 1915. Named after Sir George Grey (1812-1898), Governor of the Cape Colony. It was the scene of action during the Bambata Rebellion of 1906; now the centre of a wattle-growing industry.

Griekwastad 1812

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
Griquatown / Klaarwater

//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif (Afrikaans for "Griqua city") is a country town sometimes still called Griquatown, a name which is now considered historical. In 1801 William Anderson WIKI and Cornelius Kramer, of the London Missionary Society, established a station among the Griqua at Leeuwenkuil. In about 1805 they moved the station to another spring further up the valley and called it Klaarwater. Their second choice was little better than their first, and for many years a lack of water prevented any further development. The name of the settlement was changed later to Griquatown or Griekwastad in Afrikaans. They lived among a mixed nomadic community of the Chaguriqua tribe and "bastaards" (people of mixed origin) from Piketberg. Their two leaders Andries Waterboer and Adam Kok II later had a dispute and Kok left for Philippolis. From 1813 to 17 July 1871, the town and its surrounding area functioned as Waterboer's Land. Waterboer himself lived in a "palace", which in reality was a house with six rooms. A monument for Waterboer was later erected near the town's hospital. Dr. Robert Moffat and his wife Mary Moffat, on their way to the town of Kuruman, were residing in Griquatown when their daughter, also Mary (later Mrs. David Livingstone), was born in 1821. There is now a museum that is dedicated to her rather than the founder of the town, William Anderson.

Groblersdal

Transvaal (post 1994 Limpopo)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifWillem Jacobus Grobler Groblersdal is a farming town is South Africa's second largest irrigation settlement. Groblersdal was laid out on the farm "Klipbank" taking advantage of the Loskop Dam, and named after the original owner Jacobus Grobler.

Groblershoop 1914

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifFounded in 1914 on the farm Sternham, but renamed in 1939 after Piet Grobler, a former Minister of Agriculture.

Groot-Elandsvlei

Transvaal (post 1994 Gauteng)

Groot-Jongensfontein

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)

Groot-Marico 1845

Transvaal (post 1994 North West
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifTown 38 km east of Zeerust. Although settled as early as 1845, it was founded on the farm Wonderfontein in 1948 and is administered by a health committee. Named after the Marico River. The origin of the name is uncertain; it has been explained as meaning 'place of blood', 'place of cornering and killing', 'the meandering or erratic one', and 'pastures'

Grootmis

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA settlement near the mouth of the Buffels River. The name is Afrikaans, meaning "large mist", and it is named this because the fog hangs over the coastline for days at a time.

Grootdrink

Cape (post 1994 Northern Cape)

Grotto Bay

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA coastal private property which was declared a nature reserve in 2002

Groutville 1844

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)
Formerly Umvoti
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifMission station south-west of Stanger. Established in 1844 by the Reverend Aldin Grout WIKI (1803–1894) of the American Missionary Society and named after him. Formerly it was known as Umvoti.

Guguletu

Cape (post 1994 Western Cape)
//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gifA township established in the 1960s due to the overcrowding of Langa, which was the only black residential area for Cape Town at the time. The name is a contraction of igugu lethu, which is Xhosa for our pride. Gugulethu, along with Nyanga,

Gule

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)

Gwazumlungu Nlovu

Natal (post 1994 KwaZulu-Natal)


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