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Booth Genealogy and Booth Family History Information

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Profiles

  • Abigail Booth, (twin) (1672 - 1704)
    On 10 Oct 1656 Zoeth Howland married Abigail in Dartmouth, MA. Their children include Iv.Abigail Howland. Born on 30 Jun 1672. Twin to Henry. On 6 Dec 1700 when Abigail was 28, she married Abraha...
  • Abraham Booth (1735 - d.)
  • Abraham Booth (1673 - 1741)
    On 6 Dec 1700 when Abigail Howland was 28, she married Abraham Booth, son of John Booth (say 1632-aft Aug 1703), in Dartmouth, MA. Born on 7 Feb 1673 in Scituate, MA.49 Abraham died aft 21 May 1741.
  • Adam De Booth (c.1180 - d.)
    Adam de Boothes ( "Adam [1] DeBoothes, the paternal ancestor of the distinguished Booth Family, was, as his name indicates, descendant of a Norman family of rank who came over to England with William t...
  • Adam Booth (1220 - 1275)
    Pedigree Booth Family A

About the Booth surname

Booth Meaning: dweller at a hut or stall, especially a herdsman's hut.

In Booths in History by John Niccholls Booth, page 5. " ....Booths were not necessarily thinking of a temporary structure like a booth at a fair, but of their ancestral dwellings. To them, a booth was an excellent circular shelter half sunk into the earth, especially favored by herdsmen, shepherds and hunters living in atop the hills of Britain's central and northern highlands." (source Marilyn) -Old Norse meaning 'hut, shed, shelter' - "from the old Danish (Viking) word for 'hut', 'shed', or 'shelter' so often found on high ground, and those who first bore the name were probably cowherd(ers)" per an article in a British journal entitled THE BOOTHS, by Brenda Ralph Lewis. This 'occupational' name seems to be "from the old Danish (Viking) word for 'hut', 'shed', or 'shelter' so often found on high ground, and those who first bore the name were probably cowherd(ers)" per an article in a British journal entitled THE BOOTHS, by Brenda Ralph Lewis. I do not have the publication name or date (within the past two years, as I recall), but could probably get it with some effort as the article alone was mailed to me.I have seen the name de la Bouthe, deBothe, deBoothe, Bothe, Boot, Boothe. The first three seem to have French Norman (and therefore Viking) roots. The Vikings also settled both in Yorkshire and Lancashire by the 9th century and traded with north Europeans since the 6th century. The Danish kingdom included Northumbria in the UK, which encompassed the present Lancashire, according to Lewis. The Vikings also settled both in Yorkshire and Lancashire by the 9th century and traded with north Europeans since the 6th century. The Danish kingdom included Northumbria in the UK, which encompassed the present Lancashire, according to Lewis.(source Barry Peterson)