Charles Crismon (1807 - 1893)

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Birthplace: Hopkinsville, Christian, KY, USA
Death: Died in Lehi, Maricopa, AZ, USA
Managed by: Randy Stebbing
Last Updated:

About Charles Crismon

http://www.wendycat.com/geoffrey/history/families/lewis/john_moss_lewis_and_martha_jane_chrisman.html

http://www.surnames.com/arminta/john_moss_lewis_.htm

CHARLES CRISMON

(Father of Martha Jane Crismon)

Charles Crismon was born December 25, 1805 at Christian County, Kentucky. He was one of the pioneer builders of Salt Lake City, Utah, prominent colonizer in San Bernardino, California and in the Salt River Valley of Arizona as well as in several eastern states.

In 1830 he married Mary Hill and moved to Jackson County, Illinois where he engaged in farming and built mills.

He joined the Church in 1837. In 1838 during the Mormon exodus from Ohio to Missouri he went with his team to assist the prophet Joseph Smith in moving. On one occasion he helped the prophet Joseph escape a mob by hiding him in a faked wagon-load of firewood and driving to a river where the prophet crossed in a rowboat.

Later he sold his property in Illinois and took his family to Missouri, arriving near Far West about the last of August of that year. In the early part of 1839 he was in Morgan County, Illinois and in 1842 settled at Macedonia, Hancock County, about 20 miles east of Nauvoo. There he engaged in mill building and owned a cording machine. In December 1845 he moved to Nauvoo and remained until the exodus from Illinois.

Crossing the Mississippi on February 8, 1846 he and his family joined the camp on Sugar Creek. They were connected with Bishop George Miller. Mr. Crismon was a captain under Bishop Miller and remained in that position until after the founding of the settlement at Ponca. They spent the winter about a hundred and fifty miles north of Winter Quarters and endured many hardships before returning to Winter Quarters and the main body of the Saints.

Father Crismon had returned from Ponca in advance of his family and in the winter of 1846 was sent by President Young on a mission to Mississippi, to visit some families in that state and make arrangements for their immigration west. He was accompanied on this mission by Bryant Nowlen and returned with John Brown who was chosen one of the pioneers. The Mississippi Saints joined the pioneers at Ft. Laramie and accompanied them to Salt Lake Valley.

Mr. Crismon, with his son George, made two trips with teams into Missouri to obtain supplies for the westward journey. At Winter Quarters they were detained while getting their grain ground and consequently were the last of the party of emigrants to cross the Elkhorn. They reached the Elkhorn the day Jacob Wetharby was killed by Indians and Joined Jedidiah Grant's six hundred and were in Willard Snow's fifty and Jacob Grant's ten, all the way to Salt Lake Valley.

Among the exciting incidents of the trip was a stampede of the cattle about 250 miles west of the Missouri River. In this stampede Charles Crismon lost an ox which returned to Winter Quarters, and was taken from the stray pond by a friend who returned it to Mrs. Crismon in the fall of 1848. This was remarkable considering the great distance that the ox had to go to get back to Winter Quarters over country roamed by buffalo and infested by Indians. Incidentally the stray pond bill was five cents.

Charles Crismon has the distinction of builder of mills--building first mills in the west and distinction of first mill run by streams.

During the latter part of 1847 Father Crismon built a small grist mill at the mouth of City Creek Canyon near where third street now crosses the bed of that stream, the first mill built in the region of Salt Lake. On this same creek, a short distance above, he put up a saw mill and this was one of the first saw mills erected in the valley. In 1848 he sold both mills to Brigham Young who operated them for many years.

About the same time he built a home near the site of the present state penitentiary and resided there until he removed to California.

It was in the latter part of April 1849, that Mr. Crismon and his family set out for the Land of Gold. They took the Humboldt route and arrived in Sacramento on the 3rd of July; at that time there was but one house in town although there were a number of tents. Mr. Crismon engaged in mining on the Mormon Bar on the north fork of American River for a few months and during the following winter lived at Mission Delores in San Francisco.

In July 1850 he moved to Cheno Ranch in the southern part of the state of California and assisted in founding the city of San Bernardino. He also built the first grist mill in San Bernardino. (I have a picture of that old mill).

When I was seven years of age my father, Charles Crismon, joined the church in Morgan Co., Illinois and went with Joseph Smith and family to Missouri. Later, he came back to Illinois for mother had not accepted the gospel. He took very ill and the doctors gave him up to die when Father Smith and an Elder from Missouri stopped at their house on their return from Kirtland. They expressed a desire to see father and mother objected on account of her disbelief, but they went into his room, spoke to him, knelt down by the bed and administered to him, telling him he should be made well and soon be able to go to Missouri, that mother should be convinced and that he should take his family with him. In ten days he was able to transact his business and sell his property. This convinced my mother, and she was baptized by Elder Levi Merrick. She became a faithful worker in the church and always had a testimony that she had seen the power of healing.

In the fall, with Elder Merrick, our family moved to Missouri where my father bought a home about twenty-five miles from Far West. Being very wealthy, my father had lots of stock and valuables and our home was one of peace until one night after prayers, my mother's sister who had joined the church with father, having the gift of tongues, told father to go to Far West as soon as possible. Next morning he moved the family then returned for some stock but found that the mob had taken all and burned the house, leaving him only the one wagon and team he had used in the moving.

For a time, seven families lived in two log rooms while the mob surrounded the city and took the prophet and leading men prisoners.

In the winter, we were driven out and went back to our old home in Illinois where we lived two years, later moving to MacDonis, eighty miles from Carthage Jail. I saw the mob going back to Layharp, saying there was be no more church for "Old Joe Smith" was dead.

In the winter of '45, we moved to Nauvoo where father and mother received their endowments in the temple, crossed Mississippi River Feb. 8, 1846, wintered on Punca River with Bishop Miller's Company. We traveled to Missouri River with the company, father building bridges and making roads all the way, and were at Sarpee Station when the Mormon Battalion was mustered. Later, we returned to Winter Quarters, fitted out and started for Salt Lake City in '47, along with Grant's "hundred", William Snow's "fifty", and Jacob Gates' "ten" sharing the hardships and trials of all pioneers. Three days before reaching Salt Lake, Sister Grant died. They made her a simple coffin of a wagon box and Brother Grant in company with Brother and Sister Leonard took the body to Salt Lake.

We were in Salt Lake the time the crickets took the grain. That year I went to school to a young woman by name of Mary Jane Dilworth, who later married Brother Hammon from the Sandwich Islands.

In May '48, in company with Father's family and an organized company, my husband and I was sent to California to colonize. Arriving at San Francisco in the fall, we stayed there until '51 when we moved to William's Ranch in Southern California. In '51 Brother Lyman and Brother Rich brought a company to Pasadena and bought the San Bernadino ranch where four of my children were born.

Going back to Salt Lake City in '58, we lived there until called in '64 to colonize Bear Lake, Idaho. After living in Bear Lake four years, we moved to Richmond, Cache Co., Utah (Mahlin born there) in '69 we moved to Coalville, Utah until we left for Arizona, October '78, arriving the last of January '79.

In Arizona times were very hard. I had to cord, spin, weave and knit all the clothes for twelve children.

My father built the first grist mill in Utah at City Creek Canyon, just east of Salt Lake City, the first adobe house with shingles and a floor, which he later sold to Brigham Young.

I am the mother of twelve children, seven boys and five girls, the grandmother of fifty four and the great-grandmother of forty-six. Six of my boys have been on a mission. I have made ten trips to Salt Lake City and return, going once to be present at the Jubilee, and three trips to Mexico to visit children. I have done work for the dead, the genealogy of which I found while on my visit to my old home in the east, traveling to the world's fair at St. Louis. (Oct. 1904)

Now, at the age of eighty-three, I live in Mesa at the home of one of my sons. I still have faith in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and can bear my testimony to its truth.

Allene Lewis

Pioneer Immigrants to Utah Territory <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=5423>

Page: 000620

Name: Charles Crismon

Gender: male

Birth Date: 25 Dec 1807

Birth Place: Christian County, Kentucky

Parent1: George Chrisiman

Parent2: Elizabeth Hegler

Spouse: Mary Hill;Mary Gray;Ellen Wilcox;Louise Bischoff;Amelia Ehristina Haffel

Marriage Date: 06 May 1830

Departure Date: 08 Feb 1846;spring 1847;1849;1857

Departure Place: Nauvoo, Ill.;Ponco, 150 Miles North of Winter Quarters;Salt Lake C.;San Bornardino Calif.

Travel Company: (Wife) Mary Polly Hill Crismon, (33), Daughters; Martha Jane (15), Esther Ann (9), Samantha (7), Mary Ann (5), Emily Percinda (Months), Sons: George (14), Charles (37) accompanied him on the trip to S.L. C. Ellen (1849) John Franklin (1852) Cyothia Adeline (1854) Walter Scott (1856)

Party: George Miller Co. Settled Ponco; To Utah with Jedediah Grant Company.

Arrival Date: (Utah) 02 Oct 1847

Arrival Place: Salt Lake City - Built a grist mill at mouth of City Creek Canyon

Religion: LDS

Place Settled: Salt Lake City Utah' Sanbernardino, Cailf, Salt Lake, Mesa Arizona

Occupation: Millwight

Death Date: 23 Mar 1890

Death Place: Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona

Burial Place: Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona

Sources: Heart Throbs of the West, D.U.P. Vol 3 pp 2&3 Daughters of Utah Pioneers Vol 4 pp 399-400 As Far Back as We Know by wirgil & Helen Crismon Mesa, AZ Library FH C867c

Comments: Charles Criemant Family alas settled San Benordins Calif and Mass. Alizana.

Sub Name: Mary Ida Burgoyne

Sub Date: 01 Nov 1990 Pioneer Immigrants to Utah Territory.

Possible Match: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=throbs&gsco=1&gspl=1%2c&Submit=Search&ltpop=1&prox=1&yeart=a&ti=0&gss=angs&sourceid=2524&gsfn=charles&gsln=crismon&ct=3523&clx=NxtPg

Heart Throbs of the West <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=3240>

There is a reference to a Charles Chrisman being involved in mining activities in the Tintic, Utah district in 1874.

Heart Throbs of the West <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=3240>

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=throbs&gsco=1&gspl=1%2c&Submit=Search&ltpop=1&prox=1&yeart=a&ti=0&gss=angs&sourceid=2524&gsfn=charles&gsln=crismon&ct=5312

Charles Crismon was born December 25, 1807 in Christian County, Kentucky. He learned the milling trade from his father who was a miller in Germany. He joined the Church in 1830 in Scott County, Illinois. Two years later, the family moved to Caldwell County, Missouri. When the Saints were driven out of Missouri, they moved back to Illinois and after several other moves, the Crismon family settled in Nauvoo. While in Illinois, Mr. Crismon erected and operated several mills. In the spring of 1847, the Crismon family, after securing supplies and an outfit, began the dreary and arduous trip across the plains to Utah. They traveled in the Jedediah Grant Company and reached Utah October 2, 1847. Soon after their arrival in the valley, Charles Crismon built a small grist mill at the mouth of City Creek Canyon, on what is now Third Avenue and Canyon Road. This was the first mill built in Salt Lake Valley. The machinery was very crude. The mill stones were obtained in the mountains east of Salt Lake City and were chiseled by hand. This mill was used to grind wheat brought across the plains by the Pioneers of 1847. A notice was published in the Deseret News of December 2, 1847, as follows: "The High Council decided Brother Crismon be paid 20c per bushel for grinding; that he keep an account of the number of bushels he grinds, for whom and time occupied in so doing. If payment doesn't suffice, then the council will reconsider the matter." (On December 10, 1938, the Vilate Kimball Camp, D.U.P., erected a marker on the site of this old mill. During the excavation, the workmen found hewn rocks and adobe bricks which formed the corner of an old structure. This is thought to be the original corner of the old mill's foundation.) Early in the spring of 1848, Charles Crismon put up a saw mill about a block north of the grist mill, on the same creek. That same year, he sold both mills to Brigham Young, who operated them for many years. The following year, in 1849, Charles Crismon moved to California where he became interested in many enterprises such as mills, mining and stock raising. When Johnston's Army was on its march to Utah in 1858, Charles Crismon and his family, under advice of Brigham Young, returned to Utah. In 1865 and 1866, he and his son, George, built the Husler Mill on State Road, about four miles south of Salt Lake. In 1878, Charles Crismon removed to Arizona where he assisted in colonizing and with his son, built the Crismon Mill near Phoenix, Arizona. He died in Arizona in 1893, at the old age of eighty-eight years, loved and honored by all who knew him.—Vilate Kimball Camp.

Heart Throbs of the West <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=3240>

Charles Crismon was born December 25, 1807 in Christian County, Kentucky. He learned the milling trade from his father who was a miller in Germany. He joined the Church in 1830 in Scott County, Illinois. Two years later, the family moved to Caldwell County, Missouri. When the Saints were driven out of Missouri, they moved back to Illinois and after several other moves, the Crismon family settled in Nauvoo. While in Illinois, Mr. Crismon erected and operated several mills.

In the spring of 1847, the Crismon family, after securing supplies and an outfit, began the dreary and arduous trip across the plains to Utah. They traveled in the Jedediah Grant Company and reached Utah October 2, 1847. Soon after their arrival in the valley, Charles Crismon built a small grist mill at the mouth of City Creek Canyon, on what is now Third Avenue and Canyon Road. This was the first mill built in Salt Lake Valley. The machinery was very crude. The mill stones were obtained in the mountains east of Salt Lake City and were chiseled by hand. This mill was used to grind wheat brought across the plains by the Pioneers of 1847. A notice was published in the Deseret News of December 2, 1847, as follows: "The High Council decided Brother Crismon be paid 20c per bushel for grinding; that he keep an account of the number of bushels he grinds, for whom and time occupied in so doing. If payment doesn't suffice, then the council will reconsider the matter." (On December 10, 1938, the Vilate Kimball Camp, D.U.P., erected a marker on the site of this old mill. During the excavation, the workmen found hewn rocks and adobe bricks which formed the corner of an old structure. This is thought to be the original corner of the old mill's foundation.) Early in the spring of 1848, Charles Crismon put up a saw mill about a block north of the grist mill, on the same creek. That same year, he sold both mills to Brigham Young, who operated them for many years. The following year, in 1849, Charles Crismon moved to California where he became interested in many enterprises such as mills, mining and stock raising. When Johnston's Army was on its march to Utah in 1858, Charles Crismon and his family, under advice of Brigham Young, returned to Utah. In 1865 and 1866, he and his son, George, built the Husler Mill on State Road, about four miles south of Salt Lake. In 1878, Charles Crismon removed to Arizona where he assisted in colonizing and with his son, built the Crismon Mill near Phoenix, Arizona. He died in Arizona in 1893, at the old age of eighty-eight years, loved and honored by all who knew him.—Vilate Kimball Camp.

"This monument marks the site of the Crismon Mill, the first grist mill built in the territory of Utah. Built by Charles Crismon in the fall of 1847. This mill ground the wheat brought across the plains by the pioneers of 1847.—Vilate Kimball Camp, Salt Lake County, Daughters of Utah Pioneers." (Marker Inscription)

Heart Throbs of the West <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=324

Roads—Roads to the forests were always essential accompaniments of the mountain lumber industry. Whenever a new area was opened, a new road was necessary. All of them were built through private initiative and were generally toll roads, the Mormon Road being the only important exception to the rule. According to the Church records, the route to the top of the San Bernardino mountain range was selected by Lyman, Bishop Crosby, and Charles Crismon in April, 1852. They reported that the mountains would be easy of access through "Hot Springs (Waterman) Canyon." The Council then voted to build a road to the timber, making it a public and not a toll road.

Heart Throbs of the West <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=3240>

Mesa:—The settlement was founded by the Latter-day Saints from Utah and Bear Lake County, Idaho. On September 14, 1877, Francis M.. Elijah and John H. Pomeroy, George W. and Warren L. Sirrine, and James Harvey Blair of Paris, and Theodore C. and Parley P. Serrine and Charles Mallory of Montpelier, Idaho, left their homes with wagons, teams and supplies to make new homes in Arizona. In Salt Lake City they were joined by William Newell, Charles I. Robson, Job Henry Smith, Wiliiam Schwartz, William and Charles Crismon of Salt Lake City, and Jesse D. Hobson of Coalville, Utah. Most of these brethren had their families with them.

Utah, Our Pioneer Heritage <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=3239>

In July 1850, Charles Crismon, pioneer mill builder, established his residence on the Chino ranch and assisted in the rounding of San Bernardino. It was to the Crismon home that Apostles Rich and Lyman came when they were negotiating the purchase of a ranch in California. It is claimed that Crismon operated a portable sawmill in Mill Creek Canyon, California, shortly after the arrival of the colonists. Early in 1853 the Deseret News announced that Crismon had purchased a steam engine of 30 horsepower and made it ready to carry up the mountains. Crismon evidently sold a half interest in the mill to Jefferson Hunt for $6,000 as such a deed is recorded in the County Recorder's office. Later Captain Hunt acquired full ownership, and in 1857 when he returned to Utah, Captain Hunt sold the mill to John Rowland.

Utah, Our Pioneer Heritage <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=3239>

...When the wheat was partly ripe, in early July, it was gathered and ground in coffee mills. This we did until a small gristmill or crusher—for it had no bolt to separate the bran from the flour—was put up at the mouth of City Creek Canyon by a man named Crismon. It had one pair of stone burrs about three feet in diameter on which was placed a hopper.

...

Utah, Our Pioneer Heritage <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=3239>

The first grain grinding mill in the Valley was completed some time in the winter of 1847–48. It was operated by Charles Crismon and was located on City Creek. Prior to that time hand coffee grinders were used in the various homes to break or grind the corn and wheat into suitable form for use as flour or meal. This story is told of the first meal grinding mill erected in the Valley. The proprietor would fill the hopper and go about his business, allowing the water power to turn the mill. The meal would pay out as it was ground, into a suitable container. On a few occasions the miller found little or no meal had accumulated and suspected theft. Stationing himself secretly on watch, he discovered a large, hungry dog at the spout, eating the meat as fast as the mill could produce it. Some persons even said that the lanky animal used to betray himself by bellowing up the spout when the meal did not run fast enough to suit him.

  • *

History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

Charles Crismon

The pioneer mill-builder of Utah, also a prominent colonizer in California and in Arizona, Charles Crismon was known as a man of ability and enterprise. He was born December 5, 1805, in Christian county, Kentucky, and remained there until the year 1830, when he married and moved to Jackson county, Illinois, where he settled down to farming and building mills. The maiden name of his wife was Mary Hill, Mr. Crismon joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1837. Early in 1838, during the Mormon exodus from Ohio to Missouri, he went with his team to assist the Prophet Joseph Smith in moving to the latter State. He then sold his property in Illinois and took his family to Missouri, arriving near Far West about the last of August. Later in the year, when the persecution against the Saints was raging, he moved into that city and remained there until the general expulsion. History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

Charles Crismon

In the early part of 1839 he was in Morgan county, Illinois, and in 1842 settled at Macedonia, Hancock county, about twenty miles in an easterly direction from Nauvoo. He there engaged in mill building, and was the owner of a carding machine at that place. In December, 1845, he took up his abode at Nauvoo, where he resided until the Mormon exodus from Illinois. History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

Charles Crismon

Crossing the Mississippi on the 8th of February, 1846, he and his family joined the camps on Sugar Creek. They were connected with Bishop George Miller's company, which was in advance of the others most of the way to the Missouri River. Mr. Crismon was captain under Bishop Miller, and remained in that position until after the rounding of the settlement of Ponca, to which point the Bishop led his detachment in disobedience to the instructions of President Young. The latter desired him to establish a temporary settlement at or near Grand Island, along the line of travel, but Miller, who was becoming disaffected, led his company out of the line of travel, across the country to the junction of the Running Water and Missouri rivers, about one hundred and fifty miles north of Winter Quarters. After wintering there and enduring many hardships, most of the company, the Crismons included, having lost confidence in Miller, found their way back to Winter Quarters, where they joined the main body of the Saints. History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

Charles Crismon

Mr. Crismon had returned from Pones in advance of his family, and in the winter of 1846–7 was sent by President Young on a mission to Mississippi, to visit some families in that State and make arrangements for their emigration to the West. He was accompanied on this mission by Bryant Nowlen, and returned with John Brown, who was chosen one of the Pioneers. The Mississippi Saints joined the Pioneers at Fort Laramie and accompanied them to Salt Lake valley. History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

Charles Crismon

His family having joined him, Mr. Crismon, with his son George, made two trips with teams into Missouri to obtain supplies for the westward journey. At Winter Quarters they were detained while getting their grain ground, and consequently were the last of the season's emigrants to cross the Elk Horn and connect themselves with the companies then moving. They reached the Horn the day that Jacob Wetherby was killed by Indians. They joined Jedediah M. Grant's hundred, and were in Willard Snow's fifty and Jacob Gates' ten, all the way to Salt Lake valley. History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

Charles Crismon

Among the exciting incidents of the trip was a stampede of cattle, about two hundred and fifty miles west of the Missouri. In this stampede Mr. Crismon lost an ox, which returned to Winter Quarters. It was taken from the estray pound there, by a friend of the owner, and delivered to him in Salt Lake valley in the fall of 1848. This was rather remarkable, considering the distance the ox had to travel back to Winter Quarters, over country covered with buffalo and infested by Indians. The estray pound bill was five cents—another remarkable circumstance, in view of the rates that now prevail. History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

Charles Crismon

During the latter part of 1847 Mr. Crismon, while living in the Old Fort, built a small grist mill at the mouth of City Creek canyon, near the point where Third Street now crosses the bed of that stream. It was the first mill built in this region. On the same creek, a short distance above, he put up a saw mill, and this was one of the first saw mills erected here. In the fall of 1848 he sold both mills to President Brigham Young, who operated them for many years. About the same time he built a home near the site of the present Penitentiary, and resided there until he removed to California. History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

Charles Crismon

It was in the latter part of April, 1849, that Charles Crismon and his family set out for the land of gold. They took the Humboldt route and arrived at Sacramento on the 3rd of July. At that time there was but one house in the town, though there was a number of tents. He was engaged in mining at Mormon Bar on the north fork of American River, for a few months, and during the following winter lived at Mission Dolores, San Francisco. In July, 1850, he removed to the Cheno Ranch in the southern part of the State, and assisted to found, in 1851, the city of San Bernardino. He built the first sawmill south of Santa Cruz, and one of the first grist-mills in that place. In the Stake organization at San Bernardino he was a member of the High Council. History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

Charles Crismon

He returned to Utah in 1858, locating in the Fourteenth Ward, Salt Lake City. He built the Husler mill in 1865 and during the next twelve years was engaged in freighting, railroad contracting, stock-raising, coal-mining and gold and silver mining. He is said to have introduced into Utah the transitory system of sheep-herding, moving camp on wheels from desert to mountain, with the alternation of the winter and summer seasons. History of Utah by Orson F. Whitney

Volume 4

First Immigrants

In 1878 Mr. Crismon removed to Arizona. He was one of the early settlers of Salt River valley, and built the second grist mill there. His home was near Mesa City, and he was a member of the High Council of Maricopa Stake. He died March 23, 1890. Among his sons are the well known Crismon brothers, George, Charles, John and Scott. He had three families in Arizona.

  • *********

http://members.cox.net/charlestippet/chris003.htm

12. Charles3 Crismon (George <chris002.htm>2Chrisman <chris002.htm>, Michael <chris001.htm>1Christman <chris001.htm>); b. 25 Dec 1807 Christian County, KY; m. Mary Hill, daughter of John Hill and Patsy Carlton, 5 May 1830 Morgan County, IL; m. Elizabeth Hill, daughter of Jehu Hill and Martha Carlin, 20 Jan 1846; m. Mary Grey, daughter of Thomas Pearson and Jane Moody, 16 Jul 1854; m. Louise Christine Bishoff, daughter of Christian Bishoff and Johanne Marie Rasmussen, 10 May 1862 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Ellen Wilcox, daughter of John Wilcox and Sarah Melissa Hurley, 10 May 1862 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Christine Amelia Hessel, daughter of Peter Hessel and Anne Margaretta Swensen, 12 Oct 1867; d. 23 Mar 1890 in Lehi (now Mesa), Maricopa County, AZ at age 82; bur. circa 23 Mar 1890 in Lehi (now Mesa), Maricopa County, AZ.

He was also known as Charles Chrisman. He and Mary Hill appeared on the census of 1830 Morgan County, IL. He appeared on the census of 1860 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT. He appeared on the census of 1870 in Mill Creek Ward, Salt Lake County, UT. He and Louise Christine Bishoff appeared on the census of 1 Jun 1880 in Utahville, Maricopa County, AZ. He and Ellen Wilcox appeared on the census of 1 Jun 1880 in Utahville, Maricopa County, AZ. He and Mary Grey appeared on the census of 1 Jun 1880 in Utahville, Maricopa County, AZ.

Children of Charles3 Crismon and Mary Hill were as follows:

i. Martha Jane4 Crismon; b. 8 Sep 1831 in Jacksonville, Morgan County, IL; m. John Moss Lewis 10 Aug 1848 in Deseret, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 13 Dec 1919 in Mesa, Maricopa County, AZ at age 88; bur. circa 13 Dec 1919 in Mesa, Maricopa County, AZ.

ii. George C Crismon; b. 5 Jul 1833 in Jacksonville, Morgan County, IL; m. Mary Louise Tanner 22 Dec 1856 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA; m. Mary Ann Foster 27 Jun 1871 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; bur. circa 27 Jan 1908 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 27 Jan 1908 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT at age 74.

iii. James Crismon; b. 8 Sep 1834 Morgan County, IL; d. Jan 1837 at age 2.

iv. Hester Ann Crismon; b. 27 Nov 1835 in Jacksonville, Morgan County, IL; m. George Warren Sirrine 4 Jul 1852 in San Bernardino, San Berdardino County, CA; d. 6 Jun 1893 in Mesa, Maricopa County, AZ at age 57; bur. circa 6 Jun 1893 in Mesa Cemetery, Mesa, Maricopa County, AZ.

She was also known as Esther Ann.

v. Samantha Crismon; b. 27 Mar 1840 in near Geneva, Scott (now Morgan) County, IL; m. Dudley Chase 19 Jul 1857 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA; d. 9 Jul 1899 in Harrisville, Weber County, UT at age 59; bur. circa 9 Jul 1899 in Ogden, Weber County, UT.

vi. Mary Ann Crismon; b. 13 Feb 1842 McDonough County, IL; m. James Henry Horne 24 Jul 1860 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 11 Dec 1906 in Mesa, Maricopa County, AZ at age 64; bur. 12 Dec 1906 in Mesa, Maricopa County, AZ.

vii. Charles Crismon Jr; b. 14 Jun 1844 in Macedonia, Hancock County, IL; m. Elizabeth T Cain, daughter of Joseph Cain and Elizabeth Whitaker, 1 Jun 1872 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 16 Mar 1916 at age 71.

viii. Emily Percinda Crismon; b. 18 Jan 1847 in Poncha Nation, IA; m. Elijah Malin Weiler 24 Dec 1864; d. 28 Apr 1913 at age 66.

ix. Ellen Crismon; b. 18 Jul 1849 CA; m. Hyrum C Shurtliff 1 Jan 1867; d. 3 Feb 1882 at age 32.

x. John Franklin Crismon; b. 14 Feb 1852 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA; m. Jane Agnes Taylor Feb 1878; d. 12 May 1907 at age 55.

xi. Cynthia Oxoline Crismon; b. 14 Jun 1854 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA; m. John Corbin Young 22 Jun 1880; d. 2 Dec 1926 at age 72.

xii. Walter Scott Crismon; b. 27 Aug 1856 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA; m. Fannie Vilate Little 17 Jan 1882 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 3 Jul 1939 in San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA at age 82.

There were no children of Charles3 Crismon and Elizabeth Hill.

Children of Charles3 Crismon and Mary Grey were:

i. William4 Crismon; b. 31 May 1855 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA; m. Jane Jones; d. Feb 1942 at age 86.

He appeared on the census of 1 Jun 1880 in Utahville, Maricopa County, AZ.

Children of Charles3 Crismon and Ellen Wilcox were as follows:

i. Annie Eliza4 Crismon; b. 3 May 1863 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT.

She died in infancy.

ii. Elizabeth Crismon; b. 18 Oct 1864 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Dr Clarence J Williams 15 Jan 1894; she and Dr Clarence J Williams were divorced; d. 16 Jun 1946 at age 81.

iii. Mary Adaline Crismon; b. 4 Jun 1866 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Franklin Carlton Johnson 28 Aug 1886; d. 3 Aug 1950 at age 84.

iv. Oliver Crismon; b. 4 Feb 1868 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 4 Jul 1869 at age 1.

v. Clara Louise Crismon; b. 3 Apr 1870 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Marcus LeBaron Johnson 12 Feb 1890; d. 20 Dec 1965 at age 95.

vi. Fredrick Wilcox Crismon; b. 19 Feb 1872 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Annie May Taylor 3 Dec 1902; d. 13 Jul 1918 at age 46.

vii. Herbert John Crismon; b. 24 Feb 1874 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Cora Ida Watson; d. 3 Apr 1937 at age 63.

viii. Della Gertrude Crismon; b. 23 Aug 1877 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Frank D Chapman; d. 16 Dec 1947 at age 70.

ix. Nellie Crismon; b. 10 Aug 1878 in Lehi (now Mesa), Maricopa County, AZ; m. Clarence J Williams; d. 14 Nov 1947 at age 69.

x. Carl Crismon; b. 8 Sep 1882 in Mesa, Maricopa County, AZ; d. 24 Sep 1890 at age 8.

Children of Charles3 Crismon and Louise Christine Bishoff were as follows:

i. Alfred Charles4 Crismon; b. 19 Mar 1863 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 3 May 1877 at age 14.

ii. Ernest Crismon; b. 3 Dec 1864 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Sarah Vilate Ellsworth 29 Aug 1889; d. 27 Jan 1924 at age 59.

iii. Josephine Louvina Crismon; b. 1 Dec 1868 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Louis Ellsworth 22 Feb 1889; d. 23 Jan 1948 at age 79.

She and Joseph Benjamin Crismon were twins.

iv. Joseph Benjamin Crismon; b. 1 Dec 1868 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 1 Jun 1869.

He and Josephine Louvina Crismon were twins.

v. David Crismon; b. 3 Nov 1870 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 3 Dec 1949 at age 79.

He was a bachelor.

vi. Nettie May Crismon; b. 8 May 1872 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 9 Oct 1873 at age 1.

vii. Herman Eugene Crismon; b. 24 Feb 1874 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Wealthia Brewer 13 Mar 1908; d. 1 Nov 1944 at age 70.

viii. Ada Amanda Crismon; b. 3 Mar 1876 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; m. Stephen Byers; m. Orson Shreeve.

ix. Louise Alexandra Crismon; b. 24 Dec 1877 in Brigham, Apache County, AZ; m. Albert B Harper 15 Nov 1905.

x. Charles B Crismon; b. 24 Feb 1880 in Lehi (now Mesa), Maricopa County, AZ; m. Irene Pomeroy, daughter of John Haskell Pomeroy and Emily Stratton, 25 Aug 1905 in Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ.

xi. George Franklin Crismon; b. 19 Mar 1882 in Lehi (now Mesa), Maricopa County, AZ; m. Ethel Leona Bullock 19 Nov 1905; d. 19 Feb 1943 at age 60.

Children of Charles3 Crismon and Christine Amelia Hessel were:

i. Annie Telula4 Crismon; b. 31 Jan 1871 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT; d. 24 Sep 1955 in Payson, Utah County, UT at age 84.

  • **********

Conquerors of the West: Stalwart Mormon Pioneers, Vols. 1-4

Name: Charles Crismon

Birth Date: 25 Dec 1807

Birth Place: Christian, Kentucky

Parents: George and Elizabeth Hagler Christman

Death Date: 23 Mar 1890

Death Place: Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona

Arrival: 2 Oct 1847, Jedediah M. Grant Co.

Spouse: Mary Hill

Marriage Date: 06 May 1830

Married 2nd: Elizabeth Hill Charles will always be associated with the development of the West, particularly with grist mills, saw mills, sugar and silk mills. He joined the Church in its infancy. He said his baptism cured him of a lingering illness. Brigham Young sent him to New Orleans to help converts that were arriving, to know of the trek going west after the Prophet was martyred. He returned to Nauvoo and obtained the material for a grist mill, which he built in Salt Lake . He ran freight lines that he established during the next 30 years. He helped build the railroad and did much work that helped him to know the West as few men did. He helped in the settlement of many Mormon Colonies, particularly in San Bernardino, California , and later in Southern Arizona . He became interested in mining and helped discover and develop some of the largest copper and gold fields in the state. He is believed to be the first millionaire in Utah . There were many other businesses he was a part of during his life. He became a rancher in Southern Arizona and was known for his cattle and fine horses. He was always active in the church and community and held many positions. Children: Martha Jane , b. 8 Sep 1831 . George , b. 5 Jul 1833 . James , b. 8 Sep 1834 . Esther Ann , b. 27 Nov 1837 . Samantha , b. 27 Mar 1840 . Mary Ann , b. 13 Feb 1842 . Charles , b. 13 Jun 1844 . Emily Precinda , b. 18 Jan 1847 . Ellen , b. 18 Jul 1849 . John Franklin , b. 14 Feb 1852 . Cynthia Adeline , b. 14 Jun 1854 . Walter Scott , b. 27 Aug 1856 . Dawn Curtis

CENSUS: 1880

Name: Chas. Crismon

Home in 1880: Utahville, Maricopa, Arizona

Age: 70

Estimated birth year: abt 1810

Birthplace: Kentucky

Relation to head-of-household: Self (Head)

Spouse's name: Louisa

Father's birthplace: ---

Mother's birthplace: ---

Neighbors: View others on page

Occupation: Farmer

Marital Status: Married

Race: White

Gender: Male

View image

Household Members:

Name Age

Chas. Crismon 70

Louisa Crismon 37

Ernest Crismon 15

Oscar Crismon 13

Josephine Crismon 11

David Crismon 9

Herman Crismon 7

Ada Crismon 4

Louisa Crismon 2

Charles Crismon 3M

Ellen Crismon 39

Lizzie Crismon 15

Addie Crismon 13

Olivia Crismon 11

Fred'k. Crismon 8

Herbert J. Crismon 6

Della Crismon 4

Nellie Crismon 1

UTAH PIONEER: Company: Jedediah M. Grant - Willard Snow Company (1847)

http://www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneerdetails/0,15791,4018-1-1566,00.html

view all 68

Charles Crismon's Timeline

1807
December 25, 1807
Hopkinsville, Christian, KY, USA
1830
May 6, 1830
Age 22
Illinois, United States
1830
Age 22
1831
September 8, 1831
Age 23
Jacksonville, Morgan, IL, USA
1833
July 5, 1833
Age 25
Jacksonville, Morgan, Illinois, United States
1835
September 8, 1835
Age 27
Morgan, Illinois, USA
November 27, 1835
Age 27
Jacksonville, Morgan, Illinois, United States
1837
1837
Age 29
1840
March 27, 1840
Age 32
Geneva, Kane, Illinois, USA
1842
February 13, 1842
Age 34
McDonough, IL, USA