Henry Browne Blackwell (1825 - 1909)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bristol, City of Bristol, UK
Death: Died in Boston, MA, USA
Cause of death: inflammation of the bowels
Managed by: Lizzie Saunby
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About Henry Browne Blackwell

Henry Browne Blackwell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Henry Browne Blackwell


Born


May 4, 1825

Bristol, England

Died


September 7, 1909

Dorchester, Massachusetts

Occupation


Activist


Spouse


Lucy Stone


Children


Alice Stone Blackwell


Henry Browne Blackwell or sometimes Henry Brown Blackwell (May 4, 1825 – September 7, 1909) was an American advocate for social and economic reform. He was one of the founders of the Republican Party and the American Woman Suffrage Association. He published Woman's Journal starting in 1870 in Boston, Massachusetts with Lucy Stone.[1][2][3][4]


Contents

 [hide]  1 Birth
2 Family
3 Advocacy
4 Marriage
5 Death
6 Legacy
7 Timeline
8 Archive
9 Writings
10 References

[edit] Birth


He was born in Bristol, England, the son of sugar refiner Samuel Blackwell. The father moved his family to the United States in 1832, first living in New York City, and later in New Jersey. The father's interest in social reform was passed on to his children. As a child he was taught to treat people as equals in race, sex, and social class.


[edit] Family

Samuel Charles Blackwell, was the husband of Antoinette Brown, the first woman ordained in a recognized church in the United States, and also a prominent speaker in the abolitionist and women's suffrage movements.
Elizabeth Blackwell, was the first female graduate of a medical school in the United States and the first to practice medicine.
Emily Blackwell was the third woman to receive a U.S. medical degree.

The Blackwells moved to the United states from England in 1832 after a fire destroyed the family business. Their sugar business suffered in the U.S. until it was destroyed completely in 1837 by financial panic. After their move to New York the family became very involved in the anti-slavery movement. They opened their home as a refuge for the abolitionists. In 1837, the family moved to Cincinnati, Ohio to start over. Not long after, Henry's father died and the family plunged into a financial crisis. Henry’s mother and sisters opened a day school for girls to support the family financially. Henry and his brother found office jobs until the opening of their own hardware business.


[edit] Advocacy


Blackwell decided to devote his life to women's rights when he saw his sister struggling to become the first female doctor in the United States. One of his first acts as an advocate of women’s rights was to write southern legislative bodies proposing the extension of women’s suffrage.[5]


[edit] Marriage


Blackwell married Lucy Stone on May 1, 1855 after a two-year courtship. In support of women's rights, Blackwell decided that he would publicly renounce all non-mutual rights given legally to the husband in a marriage. At the wedding, the couple read out a "Marriage Protest" that they had written together. In the same vein, and contrary to common practice, Stone continued to use her own name after marriage.


[edit] Death


Blackwell died of inflammation of the bowels in 1909.[2][6]


[edit] Legacy


Alice Stone Blackwell, the daughter of Blackwell and Lucy Stone, helped her parents in editing the Woman's Journal; she became another leader for women's rights as well as for the Temperance movement and Prohibition.[7]


[edit] Timeline

1825, May 4 Born, Bristol, England
1832 Emigrated with his family to the United States
1853 Made his first speech for woman suffrage at convention in Cleveland, Ohio
1855, May 1 Married Lucy Stone, and on the same day published with her a joint protest against the inequalities of the marriage law
1855-1868 Engaged in bookselling, sugar refining, and real estate
1869-1901 Chiefly engaged in work for the American Woman Suffrage Association (after 1890, the National American Woman Suffrage Association)
1872-1893 Coeditor, Woman's Journal
1893-1909 Editor, Woman's Journal
1909, September 7 Died, Dorchester, Mass.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Browne_Blackwell -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_B._Blackwell

Henry Browne Blackwell or sometimes Henry Brown Blackwell (May 4, 1825 – September 7, 1909) was an American advocate for social and economic reform. He was one of the founders of the Republican Party and the American Woman Suffrage Association. He published Woman's Journal starting in 1870 in Boston, Massachusetts with Lucy Stone.


Birth


He was born in Bristol, England, the son of sugar refiner Samuel Blackwell. The father moved his family to the United States in 1832, first living in New York City, and later in New Jersey. The father's interest in social reform was passed on to his children. As a child he was taught to treat people as equals in race, sex, and social class.


Family

Samuel Charles Blackwell, was the husband of Antoinette Brown, the first woman ordained in a recognized church in the United States, and also a prominent speaker in the abolitionist and women's suffrage movements.
Elizabeth Blackwell, was the first female graduate of a medical school in the United States and the first to practice medicine.
Emily Blackwell was the third woman to receive a U.S. medical degree.

The Blackwells moved to the United states from England in 1832 after a fire destroyed the family business. Their sugar business suffered in the U.S. until it was destroyed completely in 1837 by financial panic. After their move to New York the family became very involved in the anti-slavery movement. They opened their home as a refuge for the abolitionists. In 1837, the family moved to Cincinnati, Ohio to start over. Not long after, Henry's father died and the family plunged into a financial crisis. Henry’s mother and sisters opened a day school for girls to support the family financially. Henry and his brother found office jobs until the opening of their own hardware business.


Advocacy


Blackwell decided to devote his life to women's rights when he saw his sister struggling to become the first female doctor in the United States. One of his first acts as an advocate of women’s rights was to write southern legislative bodies proposing the extension of women’s suffrage.


Marriage


Blackwell married Lucy Stone on May 1, 1855 after a two-year courtship. In support of women's rights, Blackwell decided that he would publicly renounce all non-mutual rights given legally to the husband in a marriage. At the wedding, the couple read out a "Marriage Protest" that they had written together. In the same vein, and contrary to common practice, Stone continued to use her own name after marriage.


Death


Blackwell died of inflammation of the bowels in 1909.


Legacy


Alice Stone Blackwell, the daughter of Blackwell and Lucy Stone, helped her parents in editing the Woman's Journal; she became another leader for women's rights as well as for the Temperance movement and Prohibition.


Timeline

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_B._Blackwell#Timeline

http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~sch00050

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Henry Browne Blackwell's Timeline

1825
May 4, 1825
Bristol, City of Bristol, UK
1857
September 14, 1857
Age 32
East Orange, NJ, USA
1909
September 7, 1909
Age 84
Boston, MA, USA
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