Sitric "Cáech" ua Ímair, King of Dublin & York

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Sitric ua Ímair, King of Dublin & York

Gaelic: Sitric Cáech ua Ímair, King of Dublin & York, Norse, Old: Sigtryggr ua Ímair, King of Dublin & York
Also Known As: "Sitric Gále", "Sigtrygg Caoch", "Sigtrigg"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dublin, Ireland
Death: Died in York, England
Immediate Family:

Son of N.N. Ivarsson
Husband of NN Sithric's first wife of York, St Edith of Polesworth and Eadgyth
Father of Gothfrith Gofraid Sitricsson King Of Dublin; Harald, King of Limerick and Olaf Sithricsson, King of Dublin & York

Occupation: King of Dublin & York
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sitric "Cáech" ua Ímair, King of Dublin & York

Sigtrygg or Sithric of York

Married:

1. (first wife), three sons: Harald, Olaf, Guthfrith

2. Eadgyth of Wessex, no children


http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm

SIHTRIC "Caoch", grandson of IMAR, son of --- (-[926/27]). The Annals of Ulster record that "Sitriuc grandson of Imar landed with his fleet at Cenn Fuait on the coast of Laigin” and “Ragnall grandson of Imar with his second fleet moved against the foreigners of Loch dá Chaech” in 917[1157]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Sitriuc grandson of Imar” defeated “Niall son of Aed king of Ireland…in the battle of Cenn Fuait” in 917 and that he “entered Ath Cliath” in the same year[1158]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Sitriuc grandson of Imar abandoned Ath Cliath” in 920[1159]. He invaded Mercia in 920 with an army from Dublin, destroying Davenport in Cheshire[1160]. Simeon of Durham records that "King Sihtric stormed Devonport" in 920[1161].

He succeeded his first cousin in 921 as SIHTRIC King of York. He proposed an alliance to Æthelstan King of Wessex, which was sealed in 926 by his marriage to King Æthelstan's sister. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 927 of "Sitriuc grandson of Ímar, king of the dark foreigners and the fair foreigners…at an immature age"[1162]. Simeon of Durham records the death of "Sihtric king of the Northumbrians" died in 926[1163]. The Annals of the Four Masters record the death in 925 of “Sitric son of Imhar lord of the Dubhghoill and Finnghoill”[1164]. Florence of Worcester records the death of "Northanhymbrorum rex Sihtricus", undated but dateable to [926/27] from the context[1165].

m firstly ---. The name of Sihtric's first wife is not known but the fact of this earlier marriage is dictated by the chronology of his sons.

m secondly (Tamworth 30 Jan 926) EADGYTH of Wessex, daughter of EDWARD I “the Elder” King of Wessex & his first wife Ecgwynn ([895/902]-, bur Tamworth). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states that "King Athelstan [gave] Sihtric king of Northumbria…his sister in marriage" at Tamworth 30 Jan 925[1166]. The Book of Hyde names "Athelstanum…et Elfredum et Edgytham" as the children of King Eadweard "ex concubina Egwynna", specifying that Eadgyth married "Sirichio regi Northanhymbrorum" and was buried at Tamworth[1167]. Her marriage was arranged to seal the alliance which Sihtric King of York proposed to her brother. After her husband's death, she became a nun at Polesworth Abbey, Warwickshire in 927, transferring to Tamworth Abbey, Gloucestershire where she was elected Abbess. Later canonised as St Edith of Polesworth or St Edith of Tamworth, her feast day is 15 or 19 July[1168].

King Sihtric & his first wife had three children:

a) HARALD (-killed 940). The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Aralt grandson of Imhar, the son of Sitric, lord of the foreigners of Luimneach” was killed in 938 “in Connaught by the Caenraighi of Aidhne”[1169]. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 940 of "Aralt grandson of Ímar at the hands of the Connachta”[1170].

b) OLAF [Anlaf] Sihtricson (-Iona [978/80]). He was accepted as OLAF King of York by the Northumbrians in 927 after the death of his father, and was supported by his uncle Guthfrith who came from Dublin. However, Æthelstan invaded Northumbria and expelled Olaf who joined his father's former associates in Ireland[1171]. Florence of Worcester records that "Northhymbrenses" chose "regem Northmannorum Anlafum" as king, undated but dateable to [941] from the context[1172]. Siimeon of Durham records that "the son of Sihtric named Onlaf reigned over the Northumbrians" in 941 but was driven out in 943[1173]. He lost the territories gained by Olaf Guthfrithson to Edmund King of Wessex in 942, and he was driven out of York and deposed in favour of his cousin Rægnald. He returned to Northumbria in 944, reasserting himself as king in opposition to Rægnald, but he was expelled by Edmund King of Wessex later that year[1174]. Simeon of Durham records that King Edmund expelled "king…Anlaf the son of Sihtric and [king] Reignold the son of Guthferth" from Northumbria in 944[1175]. Florence of Worcester records that Eadmund King of Wessex expelled "duos reges, Anlafum regis…Sihtrici filium, et Reignoldum Guthferthi filium" from Northumbria, undated but dateable to [944] from the context[1176]. He returned to York once more in 949, expelling King Erik "Blodøks/Blood-axe", but was finally driven out in his turn by Erik in 952. King of Dublin 941/43, 945/49 and 953/981.

- KINGS of DUBLIN.

c) GUTHFRITH (-after 951). Florence of Worcester records that "filio illius Guthfertho", who had succeeded his father, was expelled after the death of "Northanhymbrorum rex Sihtricus", undated but dateable to [926/27] from the context[1177], but this appears to confuse Guthfrith, son of Sihtric, with Sihtric´s other son Olaf or which Sihtric´s brother also named Guthfrith. The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Godfrey son of Sitric with the foreigners of Ath-cliath” plundered “churches of Meath” in 949[1178]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Gothfrith son of Sitriuc with the foreigners of Ath Cliath” plundered churches in 951[1179].


Sihtric Caech, King of Northumbria1

M, #102919, d. 927

Last Edited=3 Dec 2005

    Sihtric Caech, King of Northumbria married Saint Edith (?), daughter of Eadweard I, King of Wessex and Ecgwyn (?), on 30 January 926 at Tamworth, Gloucestershire, England. (1) 

He died in 927. (1)

    Sihtric Caech, King of Northumbria gained the title of King of Northumbria. (1)

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10292.htm#i102919


http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/IRELAND.htm

SIHTRIC "Caoch" (-927). The Annals of Ulster record that "Sitriuc grandson of Imar landed with his fleet at Cenn Fuait on the coast of Laigin” and “Ragnall grandson of Imar with his second fleet moved against the foreigners of Loch dá Chaech” in 917[1021]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Sitriuc grandson of Imar” defeated “Niall son of Aed king of Ireland…in the battle of Cenn Fuait” in 917 and that he “entered Ath Cliath” in the same year[1022]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Sitriuc grandson of Imar abandoned Ath Cliath” in 920[1023]. He invaded Mercia in 920 with an army from Dublin, destroying Davenport in Cheshire[1024]. Simeon of Durham records that "King Sihtric stormed Devonport" in 920[1025]. He succeeded his first cousin in 921 as SIHTRIC King of York. He proposed an alliance to Æthelstan King of Wessex, which was sealed in 926 by his marriage to King Æthelstan's sister. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 927 of "Sitriuc grandson of Ímar, king of the dark foreigners and the fair foreigners…at an immature age"[1026]. Simeon of Durham records the death of "Sihtric king of the Northumbrians" died in 926[1027]. The Annals of the Four Masters record the death in 925 of “Sitric son of Imhar lord of the Dubhghoill and Finnghoill”[1028].

m firstly ---. The name of Sihtric's first wife is not known but the fact of this earlier marriage is dictated by the chronology of his son Olaf.

m secondly (Tamworth 30 Jan 926) EADGYTH of Wessex, daughter of EDWARD I “the Elder” King of Wessex & his first wife Ecgwynn ([895/902]-, bur Tamworth). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states that "King Athelstan [gave] Sihtric king of Northumbria…his sister in marriage" at Tamworth 30 Jan 925[1029]. The Book of Hyde names "Athelstanum…et Elfredum et Edgytham" as the children of King Eadweard "ex concubina Egwynna", specifying that Eadgyth married "Sirichio regi Northanhymbrorum" and was buried at Tamworth[1030]. Her marriage was arranged to seal the alliance which Sihtric King of York proposed to her brother. After her husband's death, she became a nun at Polesworth Abbey, Warwickshire in 927, transferring to Tamworth Abbey, Gloucestershire where she was elected Abbess. Later canonised as St Edith of Polesworth or St Edith of Tamworth, her feast day is 15 or 19 July[1031]. King

Sihtric & his first wife had three children:

(a) HARALD (-killed 940). The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Aralt grandson of Imhar, the son of Sitric, lord of the foreigners of Luimneach” was killed in 938 “in Connaught by the Caenraighi of Aidhne”[1032]. The Annals of Inisfallen record the death in 940 of "Aralt grandson of Ímar at the hands of the Connachta”[1033].

(b) OLAF [Anlaf] Sihtricson (-Iona [978/80]). He was accepted as King of York by the Northumbrians in 927 after the death of his father, and was supported by his uncle Guthfrith who came from Dublin. King of Dublin 941/43, 945/49 and 953/981.

- see below.

(c) GUTHFRITH (-after 951). The Annals of the Four Masters record that “Godfrey son of Sitric with the foreigners of Ath-cliath” plundered “churches of Meath” in 949[1034]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Gothfrith son of Sitriuc with the foreigners of Ath Cliath” plundered churches in 951[1035].



Sitric Caoch ua Ímair, rí Dubgall & Finngall, was related to the English king Aethelstan.

Sitric also went by the name of Sitric "the Blind" and also Sitric Gále and also Sihtric Caoch the Dane and also Sigtryggr (Old Norse). He was referred to as lord of the foreigners of Luimneach.

He was leader of a group of exiled Irish Norse from Lancashire and Cumbria who retook Dublin in 914 at Ireland. According to the Annals of the Four Masters (915): "Sitric, grandson of Imhar, with his fleet, took up at Ceann-fuait, in the east of Leinster. / Sitrioc, ua h-Iomhair cona chobhlach do ghabháil oc Cind Fuaith i n-airer Laighen." ( (an unknown value)).

He slew rí Laigin Augaire mac Ailella Uí Muiredaig in 917 at the Battle of Cennfuait; according to the Annals of Ulster (917): "Sitriuc grandson of Ímar entered Áth Cliath. / Sitriuc h. Imair do tuidecht i n-Ath Cliath."

Sitric recaptured Dublin, and reestablished the Viking kingdom there in 917. According to the Annals of the Four Masters (917): "The battle of Ath-cliath (i.e., of Cill-Mosamhog, by the side of Ath-cliath) was gained over the Irish, by Imhar and Sitric Gale, on the 17th of October, in which were slain Niall Glundubh, son of Aedh Finnliath, King of Ireland, after he had been three years in the sovereignty. / Cath Atha Cliath (.i. i Cill Mo Samhócc la toebh Atha Cliath) for Ghaoidhealaibh ria n-Gallaibh .i. ria n-Iomhar & ria Sitriug Gále, .i. in xv October, in ro marbhadh Niall Glúndubh, mac Aedha Finnleith rí Ereann iar m-beith dó trí bliadhna isin righi." ( (an unknown value)). According to the Annals of Ulster (917): "Sitriuc, grandson of Ímar, landed with his fleet at Cenn Fuait on the coast of Laigin. Ragnall, grandson of Ímar, with his second fleet moved against the foreigners of Loch dá Chaech. A slaughter of the foreigners at Neimlid in Muma. The Eóganacht and the Ciarraige made another slaughter. / Sitriuc h. Imair cona chobluch do ghabail oc Cinn Fhuait i n-airiur Laigen. Ragnall h. h-Imair cona chobluch ailiu co Gallu Locha Da Chaech. Ár n-Gall oc Neimlid la Mumain. Ár n-aile la Eoganacht & Ciaraidhe."

Sitric was King of Dublin between 917 and 920. According to the Annals of Ulster (918): "Warfare between Niall son of Aed, king of Temair, and Sitriuc grandson of Ímar. / Cocadh iter Niall m. Aedho, ri Temhrach, & Sitriuc h. n-Imair."

Sitric attacked the English midland kingdom of Mercia from the Mersey frontier in 919. He married unknown (?) before 920.

According to the Annals of Ulster (920): "Sitriuc, grandson of Ímar, abandoned Áth Cliath, through the power of God. / Sitriuc ua h-Imair do derghiu Atha Cliath per potestatem diuinam."

Sitric was King of York between 921 and 927; he was King of Northumbria circa 925.

Sitric acknowledged the superiority of King Athelstan with his marriage to Athelstan's sister. According to the Annals of the Four Masters (925): "Sitric, son of Imhar, lord of the Dubhghoill and Finnghoill, died. / Sitriuc ua h-Iomhair, tighearna Dubhghall & Fionnghall, d'écc." ( (an unknown value)).

Sitric married Edith of Wessex, daughter of King Edward "the Elder" of the English and his mistress Ægwina, on 30 January 925 at Tamworth, West Midlands (she was not the mother of our ancestor Amlaib).

According to the Chronicon Scotorum (927): "Sitriuc grandson of Ímar, king of the white foreigners and the dark foreigners, dies." According to the Annals of Ulster (927): "Sitriuc grandson of Ímar, king of the dark foreigners and the fair foreigners, died at an immature age. / Sitriuc h. Imair, ri Dubgall & Finngall, inmatura etate mortuus est."

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p318.htm#i12042 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )



 Sitric Caoch ua Ímair, rí Dubgall & Finngall was related to Amlaíb Cuarán mac Sitric of Dublin; the son of Sihtric, king of Deira, and was related to the English king Aethelstan.2 Sitric Caoch ua Ímair, rí Dubgall & Finngall also went by the name of Sitric "the Blind". Also called Sitric Gále.3 He was referred to as lord of the foreigners of Luimneach.4 Also called Sigtryggr Old Norse.5 Also called Sihtric Caoch the Dane. Also called Sitric Caoch. He was a witness where Sitric mac Ímair can almost certainly be ruled out as the possible father of Sitric ua Ímair, because Vikings were very rarely named after their fathers.5 Sitric Caoch ua Ímair, rí Dubgall & Finngall was born circa 890. The grandson of Ivar, King of Dublin and York. He was the son of N.N. mac Ímair. Sitric Caoch ua Ímair, rí Dubgall & Finngall was leader of a group of exiled Irish Norse from Lancashire and Cumbria who retook Dublin in 914 at Ireland. Annals of the Four Masters 915: "Sitric, grandson of Imhar, with his fleet, took up at Ceann-fuait, in the east of Leinster. / Sitrioc, ua h-Iomhair cona chobhlach do ghabháil oc Cind Fuaith i n-airer Laighen." ( (an unknown value)).6 He witnessed the death of rí Laigin Augaire mac Ailella Uí Muiredaig in 917 at the Battle of Cennfuait; Killed by Viking Sitric ua Imair.7,8,9 Annals of Ulster 917: "Sitriuc grandson of Ímar entered Áth Cliath. / Sitriuc h. Imair do tuidecht i n-Ath Cliath."10 Sitric Caoch ua Ímair, rí Dubgall & Finngall defeated the Leinstermen and killed Augaire mac Ailella, king of Laigin, and Máel Mórda mac Muirecáin, king of Airthir Liphi, in 917 at the Battle of Cennfuait.9,5,11 He re-captured Dublin, and re-established the Viking kingdom there in 917.11 Annals of the Four Masters 917: "The battle of Ath-cliath (i. e. of Cill-Mosamhog, by the side of Ath-cliath) was gained over the Irish, by Imhar and Sitric Gale, on the 17th of October, in which were slain Niall Glundubh, son of Aedh Finnliath, King of Ireland, after he had been three years in the sovereignty. / Cath Atha Cliath (.i. i Cill Mo Samhócc la toebh Atha Cliath) for Ghaoidhealaibh ria n-Gallaibh .i. ria n-Iomhar & ria Sitriug Gále, .i. in xv October, in ro marbhadh Niall Glúndubh, mac Aedha Finnleith rí Ereann iar m-beith dó trí bliadhna isin righi." ( (an unknown value)).3 Annals of Ulster 917: "Sitriuc, grandson of Ímar, landed with his fleet at Cenn Fuait on the coast of Laigin. Ragnall, grandson of Ímar, with his second fleet moved against the foreigners of Loch dá Chaech. A slaughter of the foreigners at Neimlid in Muma. The Eóganacht and the Ciarraige made another slaughter. / Sitriuc h. Imair cona chobluch do ghabail oc Cinn Fhuait i n-airiur Laigen. Ragnall h. h-Imair cona chobluch ailiu co Gallu Locha Da Chaech. Ár n-Gall oc Neimlid la Mumain. Ár n-aile la Eoganacht & Ciaraidhe."12 He slew rí Airthir-Liphi Máel Mórda mac Muirecáin Uí Fáeláin in battle in 917 at the Battle of Cennfuait; Killed by Sitric ua Imair.13,5,14 King of Dublin between 917 and 920. Annals of Ulster 918: "Warfare between Niall son of Aed, king of Temair, and Sitriuc grandson of Ímar. / Cocadh iter Niall m. Aedho, ri Temhrach, & Sitriuc h. n-Imair."15 Sitric Caoch ua Ímair, rí Dubgall & Finngall attacked the English midland kingdom of Mercia from the Mersey frontier in 919. He married unknown (?) before 920; Previous marriage.5 Annals of Ulster 920: "Sitriuc, grandson of Ímar, abandoned Áth Cliath, through the power of God. / Sitriuc ua h-Imair do derghiu Atha Cliath per potestatem diuinam."16 King of York between 921 and 927.5 King of Northumberland circa 925.17 Sitric Caoch ua Ímair, rí Dubgall & Finngall acknowledged the superiority of King Athelstan with his marriage to Athelstan's sister. Annals of the Four Masters 925: "Sitric, son of Imhar, lord of the Dubhghoill and Finnghoill, died. / Sitriuc ua h-Iomhair, tighearna Dubhghall & Fionnghall, d'écc." ( (an unknown value)).18 He married Edith of Wessex, daughter of Edward "the Elder", King of the English and Ægwina , mistress of King Edward the Elder, on 30 January 925 at Tamworth, West Midlands; Not the mother of Amlaib.5,17 Chronicon Scotorum 927: "Sitriuc grandson of Ímar, king of the white foreigners and the dark foreigners, dies."19 Annals of Ulster 927: "Sitriuc grandson of Ímar, king of the dark foreigners and the fair foreigners, died at an immature age. / Sitriuc h. Imair, ri Dubgall & Finngall, inmatura etate mortuus est."20 Sitric Caoch ua Ímair, rí Dubgall & Finngall died in 927.5,2,20

Family 1

unknown (?)

Children

   * Aralt mac Sitric of Dublin+ d. 9384
   * Amlaíb Cuarán mac Sitric of Dublin+ b. b 920, d. 9811,21,22

Family 2

Edith of Wessex b. circa 899, d. before March 927

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p318.htm#i12042



About Sitric "Cáech" ua Ímair, King of Dublin & York (svenska)

Sigtrygg II (Gale) SIGTRYGGSSON

Yrke: Kung i Dublin, Irland, 917-920 och Northumberland, England

Far: Sigtrygg (den blinde) SIGURDSSON (865 - 888)

Född: omkring 885 Irland, Dublin 1)

Död: omkring 927 Irland, Dublin 2)

Familj med Eadgyth (Edit) ENGLAND (897 - 937)

Vigsel: 925-07-30 England, Tamworth, Staffordshire 3)

Barn: Harald SIGTRYGGSSON (916 - 940)

Noteringar

Kallas också Sigtrygg 'Enöga' eller Sigtrygg 'Enöye'. (Källa: G.V.C Young, 1986)

Kung i Dublin på Irland 917-920. (Källa: Irlands regentlängd)

Sigtrygg var sønn av Sigurd Ivarrson, som var bror til Bård, Sigurd og Guttorm. (Källa: Tom Björnstad)

Källor

1) Tom Björnstad, Norge (webbplats)

2) Landsarkivets bibliotek, G.V.C. Young, Isle of Man, England

3) Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Hull, England

Senast uppdaterad 010604

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Sitric "Cáech" ua Ímair, King of Dublin & York's Timeline

880
880
Dublin, Ireland
915
915
Age 35
Ireland
916
916
Age 36
Dublin, Irland
917
917
- 920
Age 37
England
918
918
Age 38
York, United Kingdom
927
March 927
Age 47
York, England
927
Age 47