Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll

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Colin Campbell

Also Known As: "Colin 1st Earl of Argyll of Scotland Campbell", "Colin Campbell of Loch Awe", "2nd Lord Lorne", "1st Earl of Argyll", "Colin Mulle (Bold Earl Colin)"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lochow, Argyllshire, Scotland (United Kingdom)
Death: May 10, 1493 (59)
Tullibardine, Perthshire, Scotland (United Kingdom)
Immediate Family:

Son of Archibald Campbell, Master of Campbell; Archibald Campbell; Elizabeth Somerville and Elizabeth Campbell
Husband of Lady Margaret Isabel Stewart Of Lorn, Baroness Campbell, Countess Argyll and Isabel Stewart of Lorn, Countess of Argyll
Father of Helen Campbell, Lady Of Argyll, Countess of Eglinton; Catherine Campbell of Argyll; Mary Campbell, of Argyll; Thomas Campbell, 1st of Lundie; Elizabeth Campbell, of Argyll and 6 others
Brother of Duncan Campbell; Anne Campbell; Catherine MacIean and N.N. Campbell of Argyle

Occupation: Lord High Chancellor Of Scotland, Lord Chancellor of Scotland, Justiciary of Scotland, 1st Earl of Argyll, Lord Argyll
Managed by: Esther Rowe Irish
Last Updated:

About Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Campbell,_1st_Earl_of_Argyll

Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll (c. 1433 – 10 May 1493) was a Scottish nobleman.

  • Arms of Campbell, Duke of Argyll.svg
  • Arms of Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll and Lord of Lorne (from c.1470)
  • Title Earl of Argyll
  • Tenure 1457 – 10 May 1493
  • Other titles Lord Lorne
  • 2nd Lord Campbell
  • Nationality Scottish
  • Residence Castle Campbell
  • Predecessor Duncan Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell
  • Successor Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll
  • Spouse(s) Isabel Stewart

Issue Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll

  • Hon. Thomas Campbell
  • Margaret Campbell, Lady Seton
  • Isabel Campbell-Drummond
  • Helen Campbell, Countess of Eglinton
  • Elizabeth Campbell, Lady Oliphant
  • Mary Campbell-MacDonald
  • Agnes Campbell
  • Catharine Campbell-MacLeod Parents
  • Archibald Campbell, Master of Campbell
  • Elizabeth Somerville

Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll (ca. 1433 – d. 10 May 1493), was a medieval Scottish nobleman, peer, and politician. He was the son of Archibald Campbell, Master of Campbell and Elizabeth Somerville. He had the sobriquet Colin Mulle, Bold Earl Colin.

Biography

In 1453, when his father died, young Colin Campbell was placed in the custody of his uncle, Colin Campbell, 1st of Glenorchy, and succeeded his grandfather, Duncan Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell, to become 2nd Lord Campbell. In 1457, he was created Earl of Argyll by King James II of Scotland, who was grateful for the loyalty of his father during the troubles early in his reign. In 1460, Campbell had a commission as Bailie of Cowal.

His uncle Colin arranged a marriage for him with Isabella Stewart, daughter and co-heiress of John Stewart, Lord Lorne (d.1463). Through this marriage, the Earl of Argyll received Castle Gloom (he would change the name of the castle to "Castle Campbell" in February 1490), and the neighboring estate in the parish of Dollar in Clackmannanshire. Castle Campbell then became the primary seat of the Earls and Dukes of Argyll for the next two centuries.

The exact date of the marriage is unknown, but in 1460, shortly after the boy-king, James III of Scotland, came to the throne, Campbell was called upon to intervene in a feud in his wife's family. Allan MacDougall (called Allan of Lorne of the Wood), desiring to hold the estates belonging to his elder brother, John Ker of Lorne, seized his brother and imprisoned him in a dungeon on the island of Kerrera, with the intention of starving him to death. Campbell appeared with a fleet of war galleys and completely defeated MacDougall, burning his fleet, killing most of his men, and restoring the elder brother to his rightful inheritance.

Colin Campbell was often sent on diplomatic missions, the first being in 1463, when King James III sent him to negotiate a truce with King Edward IV of England. One of the main terms of that truce was that neither king would support the enemies of the other.

In 1464, Campbell was made master of the King's household, and in 1465, he was appointed Lord Justiciary of Scotland, south of the Firth of Forth, a position he held in conjunction with Robert Boyd, 1st Lord Boyd, until Boyd fell out with the King and fled to England later in 1469, at which time, Campbell held the position alone. In 1466, he founded a chapel dedicated to St. Ninian at Dunure in Ayrshire.

As a result of his marriage with Isabel Stewart, Campbell acquired the title Lord Lorne in 1469, which had previously been held by his wife's uncle, John Stewart. In exchange for this title, Campbell gave Stewart other lands, and Stewart received the title Lord Innermeath. Having received the title Lord Lorne, Campbell took the symbol of the galley from the Lorne heraldry as part of his Achievement. In the event that he might never have a male heir, he entailed the lordship of Lorne to his uncle Colin; if his uncle were to die, to his other uncle, Duncan Campbell; then to Colin Campbell of Arduquholm and to the heirs male of his body, which failing, then to his brothers, Archibald and Robert. In 1471, he received the heritable offices of Justiciary and Sheriff of Lorne.

On 15 January 1472, King James III granted Dunoon Castle to Campbell and his heirs, with the power to appoint constables, porters, jailers, watermen, and other necessary offices. At the same time, he granted the Earl, the lands of Borland. On 20 February 1473, Campbell received a charter of the office of Justiciar, Chamberlain, Sheriff, and Bailie within the King's lordship of Cowal. Then on 8 May 1474, he received one to erect his town of Inverary into a burgh of barony.

In 1474, Campbell was again sent as a commissioner to treat with King Edward IV, regarding breaches of the truce. In the resulting pact, which was to endure until July 1483, a marriage was arranged between Prince James Stewart of Scotland (King James III's son) and Princess Cecily of England (King Edward IV's daughter), a match which did not come to pass due to continued hostilities between the two nations.

In 1475, when King James III was trying to subjugate John of Islay, Earl of Ross, Campbell was given a commission of lieutenancy to execute the forfeiture of the Earl of Ross' lands. In 1479, he was confirmed in the offices of Lieutenant and Commissary of Argyll, which had been held by his ancestors, Gillespic and Colin Campbell, since 1382.

Further favors came to the Earl of Argyll in 1480, when the King granted him 160 marklands of the lordship of Knapdale, including the keeping of Castle Sween, for one silver penny in blench farm, i.e., nominal rent. This property had formerly belonged to the Earl of Ross. Early in 1483, King James III appointed Campbell as Lord High Chancellor of Scotland and awarded him the lands of Pinkerton in the barony of Dunbar, probably for Campbell's loyalty to the King during the rebellion of Archibald Douglas, Earl of Angus, which had led to the murder of some of King's favorites, after the confrontation at Lauder in 1482. These lands had previously been held by the King's brother, Prince Alexander Stewart, Duke of Albany, who was in league with the Earl of Angus.

In 1484, Campbell was active in diplomatic campaigns. In July, he was sent as a commissioner to Paris to renew the “ancient league” between France and Scotland, a mission completed on 9 July. Then on 21 September, once King James III had gotten the upper hand against the rebels, he was part of the delegation who met with King Richard III of England at Nottingham to conclude peace, a treaty which was to run until September 1487. He was also appointed as one of the Scots who would periodically meet with the English at Berwick to determine whether or not the stipulations in the treaty were being followed. To strengthen the resolve of the parties and to keep the truce, a second marriage was arranged, between Prince James Stewart and Lady Ann de la Pole (1476–1495), daughter of John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, and a niece of King Richard III. This second marriage negotiation also collapsed as a result of King Richard's defeat at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.

Campbell threw in with the rebels, after Parliament had strengthened King James's hand against the rebellious nobles in October 1487. At about this time, the King forced Campbell out of the chancellorship,[28] in favor of William Elphinstone, Bishop of Aberdeen. In 1488, Campbell was not present at the Battle of Sauchieburn on 11 June, or in the days following, because he was in England on an embassy to King Henry VII of England, having been sent there on behalf of Prince James Stewart and the rebels to seek English help against King James III.

Once Prince James Stewart ascended to the Scottish throne as "King James IV", he restored Campbell to the position of High Chancellor. Furthermore, the new king gave him the lands of Rosneath in Dunbartonshire on 9 January 1490, which remained in the Campbell family until 1939. Campbell continued in favor with King James IV, and on 21 December 1491, he was one of the conservators of the truce between England and Scotland, which was extended to 1496. One author has claimed that, one reason James III of Scotland has long had a sinister reputation is that “such accounts as we have of him are written by the partisans of his unruly nobles, such as the Earls of Argyll, Lennox, and Angus.”

Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll, died in 1493, and was buried at Kilmun Parish Church on Cowal Peninsula. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Archibald Campbell.

Family By his wife, Isabel Stewart, Campbell had two sons and seven daughters:

  • Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll
  • Hon. Thomas Campbell, ancestor of the Campbells of Lundie in Forfarshire.
  • Lady Margaret Campbell, married to George Seton, Lord Seton.
  • Lady Isabel Campbell, married to William Drummond, Master of Drummond, grandmother of David Drummond, 2nd Lord Drummond of Cargill, ancestor of the Earls of Perth.
  • Lady Helen Campbell, married to Hugh Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Eglinton.
  • Lady Elizabeth Campbell, married to John Oliphant, 2nd Lord Oliphant.
  • Lady Mary Campbell, married to Aonghas MacDonald, natural son and heir of John of Islay, Earl of Ross.
  • Lady Agnes Campbell, said to have been married to Alexander Mackenzie of Kintail, though some state this is disproved.[38][39]
  • Lady Catharine Campbell, married to Torquil MacLeod of Clan MacLeod of Lewis.

References

  • Bulloch, John, ed. (September 1903). "Notable Men and Women of Argyleshire". Scottish Notes and Queries. 5: 35. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  • Henderson, Thomas Findlayson, ed. (1886). Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith. p. 8:345. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  • Kippis, Andrew, ed. (1784). Biographia Britannica (2nd ed.). London. p. 3:177. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
Cokayne, George; Gibbs, Vicary (1910). The Complete Peerage (Rev. ed.). London:: St. Catherine. p. 198. Retrieved 23 January 2017. 

*Bulloch. Scottish Notes.

  • Tytler, Patrick Fraser (1866). The History of Scotland. Edinburgh. p. 158. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
Henderson. DNB.

*Wagner, John A. (2001). Encyclopedia of the Wars of the Roses. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. p. 139. Retrieved 23 January 2017.

  • Brydges, Egerton (1812). Collins's Peerage of England. London. p. 7:423. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
Henderson. DNB.

*Turpie, Thomas J. M. "Scottish Saints, Cults, and Pilgrimage from the Black Death to the Reformation, c.1349-1560". Edinburgh Research Archive. University of Edinburgh. Retrieved 24 January 2017.

  • Paul, James Balfour, ed. (1904). The Scots Peerage. Edinburgh: David Douglas. p. 1:333. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 423.

*Cokayne. Complete Peerage. p. 148.

  • Jamieson, John; Brown, William (1830). Select Views of the Royal Palaces of Scotland. Edinburgh. p. 22. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
Paul. Scots Peerage. p. 333.

*Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 424.

  • Oram, Richard (2001). Kings and Queens of Scotland. Stroud, Gloucestershire: History Press. ISBN 978-0752419916.
Cokayne. Complete Peerage. p. 198.
Fourth Report of the Royal Commission on Historic Manuscripts. London. 1874. p. 1:476. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
Henderson. DNB.
Taylor, James (1899). The Great Historic Families of Scotland. London. p. 1:111. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 426.
Henderson. DNB.
Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 425.
Henderson. DNB.
Cannon, John (2009). A Dictionary of British History (Rev. ed.). Oxford: Oxford UP. p. 33. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
Henderson. DNB.
Lang, Andrew (1911). Encyclopedia Britannica (11th ed.). New York. p. 24:441. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
Henderson. DNB.
Boardman, Stephen J. (2006). The Campbells, 1250-1513. Edinburgh: John Donald. p. 250. ISBN 978-0859766319.
Paul. Scots Peerage.
Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 427.
Lang. Encyc. Britannica.
"List of Burials". Historic Kilmun. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
Paul. Scots Peerage. p. 1:334–35.
Paul. Scots Peerage. p. 1:335.
Mackenzie, Alexander (1894). History of the Mackenzies. Inverness. p. 81. Peerage of Scotland Preceded by Duncan Campbell	Lord Campbell 1453–1493	Succeeded by Archibald Campbell New creation	Earl of Argyll 1457–1493 Lord Lorne 1470–1493 Political offices Preceded by John Laing	Lord Chancellor of Scotland 1483–1488	Succeeded by William Elphinstone Preceded by William Elphinstone	Lord Chancellor of Scotland 1488–1492	Succeeded by Archibald Douglas

family

Son of Archibald Campbell, Master of Campbell and Elizabeth Somerville. Married Isabel, daughter of John Stewart of Lorn.

From page 356 of The Scots Peerage, Volume 1

CAMPBELL, DUKE OF ARGYLL 335

By Isabel Stewart, his wife, already described, who died at Dumbarton 26 October 1510, and was buried at Kilmun, he had issue :

  • 1. ARCHIBALD, second Earl of Argyll.
  • 2. Thomas, ancestor of the first family of the Campbells of Lundie, in Forfarshire.
  • 3. Margaret, married after 1469 9 to George, Lord Seton, and had issue.
  • 4. Isabel, married to William, Master of Drummond, eldest son of John, first Lord Drummond, generally said to have been executed in his father's lifetime, 1490, 1 and had issue.
  • 5. Helen, married, 21 April 1478, to Hugh, first Earl of Eglintoun ; he died June 1545, aged eighty-four. 2
  • 6. Elizabeth, married to John, second Lord Oliphant ; he died 1516.
  • 7. Mary, married to Angus Macdonald, natural son and heir of tailzie of John, Earl of Ross. He was treacherously slain by MacOairbre, an Irish harper, at Inverness, 1490 ; they had no issue. 3
  • 8. Agnes, said to have been married to Alexander Mackenzie of Kintail, ancestor of the Earls of Seaforth, but this can be proved to be quite erroneous. 4
  • 9. Catherine, married, 1498, to Torquil Macleod of Lewis. Catherine is said by Macfarlane to have married Lachlan ' Oig ' Maclean. 5

biography

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Campbell,_1st_Earl_of_Argyll

He was the son of Archibald Campbell, Master of Campbell and Elizabeth Somerville. Elizabeth Somerville was the daughter of John Somerville, 2nd Lord Somerville and Helen Hepburn. Colin Campbell succeeded his grandfather Duncan Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell in 1453, and was created Earl of Argyll in 1457 and Lord Lorne in 1470, after the resignation of his wife's uncle Walter Stewart, 3rd Lord Lorne, who became Lord Innermeath.

Campbell had supported King James II against the "Black Douglases", led by the 8th Earl of Douglas, and was given the earldom by King James III. James also gave him the position of Lord Chancellor of Scotland, but he eventually collaborated in the slaying of James III in 1484. In 1488 he became Lord Chancellor again, this time given by James IV of Scotland.

By Isabel Stewart, his wife, eldest daughter of John, Lord of Lorn, the first Earl of Argyl has two sons and seven daughters. Archibald, his elder son, became second earl, and Thomas, the younger, was the ancestor of the Campbells of Lundie , in Forfarshire. Another daughter was married to Torqui Macleod of the Lewis.

notes

"He married Isabelle Stewart, daughter of John Stewart, 2nd Lord Lorne in 1465. His oldest son was Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll, his middle son was Thomas Campbell, and his youngest son was Sir Colin Campbell of Glen Orchy . Sir Colin Campbell of Glen Orchy was the ancestor of the Earls of Breadalbane). The poet Iseabail Ní Mheic Cailéin was Sir Colin Campbell of Glen Orchy's daughter."

Not in the Scots Peerage.


COLIN CAMPBELL, FIRST EARL OF ARGYLL, was granted that title by King James II in 1457. Under King James III he held the offices of lord privy seal, master of the household, and lord high chancellor. His wife was Isabel, daughter of coheir of John Stewart lord Lorn. Their children were Archibald, Thomas, Margaret, Isabel, Helen, Mary, Catherine, and two other daughters whose names are not known. Colin died in 1493.

Duncan "Na-Adh" had a charter to Menstrie 6 Feb. 1392/3. He succeeded his father about 1414 when with the consent of his son Celestin he confirmed a grant which had been made by his father to his kinsman Ronald Malcolmson of Craignish. He is called "Cambel de Ergyle" in the list of hostages for the release of James I in 1423 and his annual income was given as 1500 marks. He was a member of the privy council and justiciar and lord lieutenant of Argyllshire.

The story goes that while Sir Colin was off fighting in the Holy Land his wife built for him the castle of Kilchurn on its peninsula at the end of Loch Awe. He was so long absent that it was said he was dead, and the lady, like Penelope in the classic tale, was besieged by suitors. After long delays a neighbouring baron, MacCorquodale, it is said, forced her to a marriage. While the marriage feast was going on, a beggar came to the door. He refused to drink the health of the bride unless she herself handed him the cup. This she did, and as the beggar drank and returned it she gave a cry, for in the bottom lay Sir Colin’s signet ring. The beggar was Sir Colin himself, returned just in time to rescue his wife.

Kilchurn was occupied by the Campbells until the 1740's and was greatly enlarged in 1693.

Sources

  1. Scots Peerage page 332-335

Pedigree Resource File

name:

Colin /Campbell/ 1st Earl of Argyll[1]

sexo: male

nacimiento: aproximadamente 1433

                           Minor=1453/Lochawe, Argyll and Bute, Scotland [11]

bautismo en otra Iglesia: 1453

                                             Minor-1453/ 

matrimonio: antes de 9 April 1465

                         Argyll, Argyll and Bute, Scotland 

Padres

Padre: Archibald Celestin /Campbell/

madre: Elizabeth /Somerville/

Matrimonios (1)

cónyuge: Elizabeth /Stewart/ Countess of Argyll

matrimonio: antes de 9 April 1465

                           Argyll, Argyll and Bute, Scotland 

Ocultar hijos (9)

hijo 1:

Agnes /Campbell/ Lady sexo: female nacimiento: from 1371 to 1426

                          Scotland 

defunción: from 1402 to 1465

                       Scotland 

hijo 2:

Marion /Campbell/ sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1457

                               Lochawe, Argyll and Bute, Scotland  defunción: 

hijo 3:

Margaret /Campbell/ sexo: female nacimiento: 25 February 1456

                            Argyll, Argyll and Bute, Scotland  defunción: 

hijo 4:

Isabel /Campbell/ sexo: female nacimiento: 5 December 1458

                         Lochawe, Argyll and Bute, Scotland  defunción:    antes de 14 June 1493 
                     Stobhall, Cargill, Perth and Kinross, Scotland 

hijo 5:

Helen /Campbell/ sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1460

                            Eglinton Castle, North Ayrshire, Scotland  defunción:        después de 23 January 1527 

hijo 6:

Catherine /Campbell/ sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1462

                           Eglinton Castle, North Ayrshire, Scotland  defunción:        después de 1498

hijo 7:

Elizabeth /Campbell/ sexo: female nacimiento: 17 April 1462

                          Argyll, Argyll and Bute, Scotland  defunción: 

hijo 8:

Archibald /Campbell/ 2nd Earl of Argyll

sexo:              male nacimiento:    aproximadamente 1466 
                        Glen Orchy, Argyll and Bute, Scotland  defunción:      9 September 1513 
                        Battle of Flodden Field, Branxton, Northumberland, England  entierro:          Kilmun, Cowal, Argyll and Bute, Scotland 

hijo 9:

DaughterofColin /Campbell/ Lady of Argyle sexo: female defunción:

Notas (1) [Isiaha Lee.ged]

1st Earl Of Argyll, so created 1457; Master King's Household 1464; Lord High Chancellor of Scotland 1483. [Burke's Peerage]

17 Apr 1470-Lord Of Lorne

---

Colin Campbell, 2nd Lord Campbell, d. 19 May 1493, Justiciar of Scotland, cr 1457 [?]; m. bef 9 Apr 1465 Isobel (or Elizabeth), eldest daughter of John Stewart, 2nd Lord Lorn. [Magna Charta Sureties]

...

BARONY OF CAMPBELL (II) 1453

EARLDOM OF ARGYLL [SCT] (I) 1457

COLIN (CAMPBELL), LORD CAMPBELL [SCT], son and heir of Archibald CAMPBELL, of Lochow, Argyll, styled MASTER OF CAMPBELL, by, as is said (aa), Elizabeth, daughter of John (SOMERVILE), 3rd LORD SOMERVILE, which Archibald was son and heir apparent of Duncan, 1st LORD CAMPBELL [SCT], but died v.p., between April 1431 and March 1440, probably before 1439. He succeeded to the dignity of a Lord of Parliament [SCT] by the death of his said grandfather, in 1453, being then a minor, and was created by James II, in 1457 Earl Of Argyll [SCT]. He was employed in various embassies to England and France, was Master of the Household 1464, and Chancellor [SCT] 1483 to February 1488, and again June 1488 till his death. In 1460 he had a commission as Bailie of Cowal. In 1471 he had a charter of the heritable offices of Justiciary and Sheriff within the lordship of Lorne. In 1479 he had a charter confirming to him the offices of Lieutenant and Commissary of Argyll, as held by his ancestors Gillespic and Colin Cambel under a charter of 1382. In 1487 he joined the conspiracy of the nobles against James III.

He married, before 9 April 1465, Elizabeth or Isabel, daughter and senior coheir of John (STEWART), 2nd LORD LORNE [SCT]. On the resignation of her uncle, Walter STEWART, the heir male of the family, till then usually designated LORD LORNE, but afterwards LORD INNERMEATH [SCT], he obtained a crown charter of the Lordship of Lorne (dominium De Lorne), 17 April 1470, to him and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy, to Colin Campbell Nelesoun, to Duncan Campbell (brother of Sir Colin, of Glenorchy), &C., each in like manner respectively. It was made a condition of this resignation that the resigner should continue a Lord of Parliament by the style of Lord of Innermeath "or any other honourable place that pleases him." From that time the Earl is usually designated (as are his successors) "Earl Of Argyll, Lord Campbell and Lorne." After the rebellion in 1487, which ended in the death of James III at Sauchieburn, he was deprived of the office of Chancellor, but was reinstated by James IV in 1488, as above. He died in May 1493. His widow died 26 October 1510, at Dunbarton, and was buried at Kilmun. [CP I:198, XIV:33, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

__

Colin, second Lord Campbell, already referred to as Colin McGillespic in a writ of 1450 noted above. He succeeded his grandfather in 1453, and is said, but not on good authority, to have been a minor under the guardianship of his uncle, Sir Colin Campbell of Glenurcy. It is probable his uncle had only a gift of his marriage, and he arranged a union between his nephew and Isabel or Elizabeth Stewart, one of the three daughters and co-heirs of John, Lord Of Lorne, and sister of his own wife, a very advantageous match for the house. He was created Earl Of Argyll 1457. In 1462, he and Lord Boyd were acting as justiciars of Scotland south of the Forth, an office which, after the fall of his colleague, he continued to exercise by himself for many years. He was one of the commissioners for negotiating a truce with King Edward IV of England 1463, and had the appointment of Master of the King's Household 1464. He obtained a confirmation of a charter of Walter, Lord Lorne, to him of the lands of Kippane Le Muretoun et Le Myretoun in Perthshire, 7 May 1466; and three days later he had a grant to himself and his wife, daughter of the late John, Lord Of Lorne, of a third part of the lands of Kuldrane (Coldraine) and other lands in Fife and Perth, on the resignation of Mariota, his wife's sister, and on 8 February 1466-67 a grant of the lands of Pannel, co Perth. On 30 November 1469 he entered into a transaction with Walter, Lord Lorne, uncle of his wife, by which Walter resigned the lordship of Lorne in favour of the Earl, in exchange for the barony of Innermeath, and the Earl Of Argyll obtained a charter of the whole lordship of Lorne, 17 April 1470, to himself and the heirs-male of his body, whom failing to a series of other subsitutes with a similar remainder in each case. The Earl thereupon added the designation of Lord Lorne to his other titles, and took the galley of Lorne into his own achievement, and from this time the Earls of Argyll are usually designated in addition Lords Campbell and Lorne. On 18 January 1472-73 he had a gift of the keepership of the Castle of Dunoon.

He had a charter of the office of Justiciar, Chamberlain, Sheriff, and Bailie, within the limits of the King's lordship of King's Cowal, 26 February 1472-73, and another, erecting his town of Innowreyra (Inveraray) into a burgh of barony, 8 May 1474.

The Earl was one of the commissioners who settled the treaty of alliance with King Edward IV, 1474, by which James, Prince of Scotland was affianced to Cecilia, Edward's youngest daughter. He had a joint commission of the lieutenancy of the districts of Argyll, Lorne, Menteith, and others, along with Laurence, Lord Oliphant, John Drummond of Stobhall, and William Stirling of Keir, 4 December 1475. On 26 February 1480-81 he had a charter of certain lands in Knapdale, and the keepership of the royal castle of Castelsone (Castle Sweyn).

He was appointe Lord High Chancellor of Scotland early in 1483, as on 29 April that year he obtained a charter under that designation, erecting the lands of Pinkerton in the constabulary of Haddington into a free barony. In 1485 he had a charter of the lands of Craigdrum, co Argyll.

The Earl was one of the commissioners sent to France in 1484, to renew the ancient league with that crown, which was confirmed at Paris, 9 July of that year. He was also one of the commissioners who concluded a pacification with Richard III at Nottingham, 21 September 1484, where it was agreed that Prince James should marry Anne De La Pole, only daughter of the Duke of Suffolk, and niece of the English monarch.

In May 1488 the Earl Of Argyll and other noblemen and prelates obtained a safe-conduct from King Henry IV to come into England, where he was at the period of the murder of James III. He was continued in the Chancellor's office by King James IV, and had a charter from that King, expressed in very flattering terms, of the lands of Roseneath, 9 Januray 1489-90. He also obtained an Act of Parliament on the third of the following month, changing the name of his stonghold on the south slope of the Ochils from Castle Gloom to Castle Campbell, under which designation its picturesque ruins are still known.

He was one of the conservators of a truce with England for five years, 21 December 1491, and died 10 May 1493.

By Isabel Stewart, his wife, already described, who died at Dumbarton 26 October 1510, and was buried at Kilmun, he had issue. [The Scots Peerage I:332-334]

_______________________________

Colin Campbell, second Lord Campbell, and first Earl of Atholl (d 1493), was the son of Archibald, second, but eldest, surviving son of Dir Duncan Campbell of Lochow, created Lord Campbell in 1445. He succeeded his grandfather in 1453. On the death of his father he was placed under the care of his uncle, Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy, who concluded a match between him and Isabel Stewart, the eldest of three daughters, and coheiresses of John, third Lord Of Lorne. Having acquired the principal part of the landed property of the two sisters of his wife, he exchanged certain lands in Perthshire for the lordship of Lorne with Walter, their uncle, on whom the lordship of Lorne, which stood limited to heirs male had devolved. In 1457 he was created, by James II, Earl Of Argyll. He was one of the commissioners for negotiating a truce with Edward IV of England, in 1463. In 1465 he was appointed, along with Lord Boyd, lord justiciary of Scotland on the south of the Forth, and after the flight of Lord Boyd to England he acted as sole justiciary. In 1474 he was appointed one of the commissioners to settle the treaty of alliance with Edward IV, by which James, prince of Scotland, was affianced to Cecilia, youngest daughter of Edward. Early in 1483 he received the office of lord high chancellor of Scotland. He was one of the commissioners sent to France in 1484 to renew the ancient league with the crown, which was confirmed at Paris 9 July, and also one of the commissioners who concluded the pecification at Nottingham with Richard III, 21 Sept of the same year. In 1487 he joined the conspiracy of the nobles against James III, and at the time of the murder of the king, after the battle of Sauchisburn, he was in England on an embassy to Henry VII. After the accession of James IV he was restored to the office of high lord chancellor. He died 10 May 1492. He had two sons and seven daughters. It is from him that the greatness of the house of Argyll properly dates. Besides the lordship of Lorne he also acquired that of Campbell and Cable Campbell in the parish of Dollar, and 1481 he received a grant of many land in Knapdale, along with the keeping of Castle Sweyn, which had formerly been held by the lords of the Isles. In the general political transactions of Scotland he acted a leading part, and as regards the south-western highland he laid the foundation of that unrivalled influence which the house of Argyll has enjoyed for many centuries. [Dictionary of National Biography III:797-798]

...x

Fuentes (11) 1. Brent W. Ruesch 2. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, 2000 G.E. Cokayne, with Vicary Gibbs 3. Calvin W. Sweat 4. Isiaha Lee 5. Thomas Charles Renehan 6. Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, 1999 Charles Mosely, Editor-in-Chief 7. A History of the Clan Maclean J.P. Maclean 8. Macdonald of the Isles A M W Stirling 9. The Scots Peerage Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, editor 10. The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, 5th Edition, 1999 Frederick Lewis Weis with William R. Beall, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. 11. Linda Lollis

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Cita de este registro

"Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/3SRZ-B6Z : accessed 2014-02-28), entry for Colin /Campbell/ 1st Earl of Argyll

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Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (28.2.2014)

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2013) Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll (c. 1433 – 10 May 1493) was a Scottish nobleman. Biography[edit]

He was the son of Gillespic (Archibald) Campbell, Master of Campbell and Elizabeth Somerville. Colin Campbell succeeded his grandfather Duncan Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell in 1453, and was created Earl of Argyll in 1457 and Lord Lorne in 1470, after the resignation of his wife's uncle Walter Stewart, 3rd Lord Lorne, who became Lord Innermeath. Campbell had supported King James II against the "Black Douglases", led by the 8th Earl of Douglas, and was given the earldom by King James III. James also gave him the position of Lord Chancellor of Scotland, but he eventually collaborated in the slaying of James III in 1484. In 1488 he became Lord Chancellor again, this time given by James IV of Scotland. Marriage and issue[edit]

He married Isabelle Stewart, daughter of John Stewart, 2nd Lord Lorne in 1465, and had issue:[1] Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll.[1]. Thomas Campbell Margaret Campbell, married George Seton, 4th Lord Seton Isabel Campbell, married William Drummond, Master of Drummond, son to John Drummond, 1st Lord Drummond Mary Campbell married Aonghas Óg Lord of the isles. Helen Campbell, married to Hugh Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Eglinton Elizabeth Campbell, married John Oliphant, 2nd Lord Oliphant Catherine Campbell, married Lachlan Og Maclean References[edit]

Jump up ^ Balfour Paul, J. Scots Peerage vol i, pp 334-335



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Campbell,_1st_Earl_of_Argyll

http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/TNGWebsite/getper...



From Lochawe and was 2nd Lord Lorne. He was made 1st Earl of Argyll in 1457. He served a Justiciar of Scotland south of the Forth and in 1463 as commissioner to arrange a truce with King Edward IV of England He was Master of the Kings Household in 1464 and Keeper of Dunoon Castle in 1472/3. He was appointed Lord High Chancellor of Scotland in 1483



Supported King James II against Black Douglases, 8th Earl of Douglas

Was given Earldom by King James III

Lord Chancellor of Scotland from 1483 - 1488

But eventually collaborated in the slaying of King James III in 1484

In 1488was given Lord Chancellor of Scotland again, this time by James IV

References

[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Campbell]


Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll

Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll (c. 1433 – 10 May 1493), was a medieval Scottish nobleman, peer, and politician. He was the son of Archibald Campbell, Master of Campbell and Elizabeth Somerville. He had the sobriquet Colin Mulle, Bold Earl Colin.[1]

Biography

In 1453, when his father died, young Colin Campbell was placed in the custody of his uncle, Colin Campbell, 1st of Glenorchy, and succeeded his grandfather, Duncan Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell, to become 2nd Lord Campbell.[2] In 1457, he was created Earl of Argyll by King James II of Scotland, who was grateful for the loyalty of his father during the troubles early in his reign.[3] In 1460, Campbell had a commission as Bailie of Cowal.[4]

His uncle Colin arranged a marriage for him with Isabella Stewart, daughter and co-heiress of John Stewart, Lord Lorne (d.1463).[5] Through this marriage, the Earl of Argyll received Castle Gloom (he would change the name of the castle to "Castle Campbell" in February 1490), and the neighbouring estate in the parish of Dollar in Clackmannanshire.[6] Castle Campbell then became the primary seat of the Earls and Dukes of Argyll for the next two centuries.

The exact date of the marriage is unknown, but in 1460, shortly after the boy-king, James III of Scotland, came to the throne, Campbell was called upon to intervene in a feud in his wife's family. Allan MacDougall (called Allan of Lorne of the Wood), desiring to hold the estates belonging to his elder brother, John Ker of Lorne, seized his brother and imprisoned him in a dungeon on the island of Kerrera, with the intention of starving him to death. Campbell appeared with a fleet of war galleys and completely defeated MacDougall, burning his fleet, killing most of his men, and restoring the elder brother to his rightful inheritance.[7]

Colin Campbell was often sent on diplomatic missions, the first being in 1463 when King James III sent him to negotiate a truce with King Edward IV of England.[8] One of the main terms of that truce was that neither king would support the enemies of the other.[9]

In 1464, Campbell was made master of the King's household,[10] and in 1465, he was appointed Lord Justiciary of Scotland, south of the Firth of Forth, a position he held in conjunction with Robert Boyd, 1st Lord Boyd, until Boyd fell out with the King and fled to England later in 1469, at which time, Campbell held the position alone.[11] In 1466, he founded a chapel dedicated to St. Ninian at Dunure in Ayrshire.[12]

As a result of his marriage with Isabel Stewart, Campbell acquired the title Lord Lorne in 1469, which had previously been held by his wife's uncle, John Stewart. In exchange for this title, Campbell gave Stewart other lands, and Stewart received the title Lord Innermeath.[13] Having received the title Lord Lorne, Campbell took the symbol of the galley from the Lorne heraldry as a part of his Achievement. In the event that he might never have a male heir, he entailed the lordship of Lorne to his uncle Colin; if his uncle was to die, to his other uncle, Duncan Campbell; then to Colin Campbell of Arduquholm and to the heirs male of his body, which failing, then to his brothers, Archibald and Robert.[14] In 1471, he received the heritable offices of Justiciary and Sheriff of Lorne.[15]

On 15 January 1472, King James III granted Dunoon Castle to Campbell and his heirs, with the power to appoint constables, porters, jailers, watermen, and other necessary offices. At the same time, he granted the Earl, the lands of Borland.[16] On 20 February 1473, Campbell received a charter of the office of Justiciar, Chamberlain, Sheriff, and Bailie within the King's lordship of Cowal. Then on 8 May 1474, he received one to erect his town of Inverary into a burgh of barony.[17]

In 1474, Campbell was again sent as a commissioner to treat with King Edward IV, regarding breaches of the truce. In the resulting pact, which was to endure until July 1483, a marriage was arranged between Prince James Stewart of Scotland (King James III's son) and Princess Cecily of England (King Edward IV's daughter), a match which did not come to pass due to continued hostilities between the two nations.[18]

In 1475, when King James III was trying to subjugate John of Islay, Earl of Ross, Campbell was given a commission of lieutenancy to execute the forfeiture of the Earl of Ross' lands.[19] In 1479, he was confirmed in the offices of Lieutenant and Commissary of Argyll, which had been held by his ancestors, Gillespic and Colin Campbell, since 1382.[20]

Further favours came to the Earl of Argyll in 1480, when the King granted him 160 marklands of the lordship of Knapdale, including the keeping of Castle Sween, for one silver penny in blench farm, i.e., nominal rent.[21] This property had formerly belonged to the Earl of Ross.[22] Early in 1483, King James III appointed Campbell as Lord High Chancellor of Scotland and awarded him the lands of Pinkerton in the barony of Dunbar, probably for Campbell's loyalty to the King during the rebellion of Archibald Douglas, Earl of Angus, which had led to the murder of some of King's favourites, after the confrontation at Lauder in 1482.[23] These lands had previously been held by the King's brother, Prince Alexander Stewart, Duke of Albany, who was in league with the Earl of Angus.[24]

In 1484, Campbell was active in diplomatic campaigns. In July, he was sent as a commissioner to Paris to renew the “ancient league” between France and Scotland, a mission completed on 9 July.[25] Then on 21 September, once King James III had gotten the upper hand against the rebels, he was part of the delegation who met with King Richard III of England at Nottingham to conclude peace, a treaty which was to run until September 1487. He was also appointed as one of the Scots who would periodically meet with the English at Berwick to determine whether or not the stipulations in the treaty were being followed. To strengthen the resolve of the parties and to keep the truce, a second marriage was arranged, between Prince James Stewart and Lady Ann de la Pole (1476–1495), daughter of John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, and a niece of King Richard III. This second marriage negotiation also collapsed as a result of King Richard's defeat at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.[26]

Campbell threw in with the rebels after Parliament had strengthened King James's hand against the rebellious nobles in October 1487.[27] At about this time, the King forced Campbell out of the chancellorship,[28] in favour of William Elphinstone, Bishop of Aberdeen. In 1488, Campbell was not present at the Battle of Sauchieburn on 11 June, or in the days following, because he was in England on an embassy to King Henry VII of England,[29] having been sent there on behalf of Prince James Stewart and the rebels to seek English help against King James III.[30]

Once Prince James Stewart ascended to the Scottish throne as "King James IV", he restored Campbell to the position of High Chancellor.[31] Furthermore, the new king gave him the lands of Rosneath in Dunbartonshire on 9 January 1490, which remained in the Campbell family until 1939.[32] Campbell continued in favour with King James IV, and on 21 December 1491, he was one of the conservators of the truce between England and Scotland, which was extended to 1496.[33][34] One author has claimed that one reason James III of Scotland has long had a sinister reputation is that “such accounts as we have of him are written by the partisans of his unruly nobles, such as the Earls of Argyll, Lennox, and Angus.”[35]

Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll, died in 1493 and was buried at Kilmun Parish Church on Cowal Peninsula. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Archibald Campbell.[36]

Family

By his wife, Isabel Stewart, Campbell had two sons and seven daughters:[37]

  1. Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll
  2. Hon. Thomas Campbell, ancestor of the Campbells of Lundie in Forfarshire.
  3. Lady Margaret Campbell, married to George Seton, Lord Seton.
  4. Lady Isabel Campbell, married to William Drummond, Master of Drummond, grandmother of David Drummond, 2nd Lord Drummond of Cargill, ancestor of the Earls of Perth.
  5. Lady Helen Campbell, married to Hugh Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Eglinton.
  6. Lady Elizabeth Campbell, married to John Oliphant, 2nd Lord Oliphant.
  7. Lady Mary Campbell, married to Aonghas MacDonald, natural son and heir of John of Islay, Earl of Ross.
  8. Lady Agnes Campbell, said to have been married to Alexander Mackenzie of Kintail, though some state this is disproved.[38][39]
  9. Lady Catharine Campbell, married to Torquil MacLeod of Clan MacLeod of Lewis.

References

  1. Bulloch, John (September 1903). Bulloch, John (ed.). "Notable Men and Women of Argyleshire". Scottish Notes and Queries. 5: 35. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  2. Henderson, Thomas Findlayson, ed. (1886). Dictionary of National Biography. Volume 08. London: Smith. p. 8:345. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  3. Kippis, Andrew (1784). Kippis, Andrew (ed.). Biographia Britannica (2nd ed.). London. p. 3:177. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  4. Cokayne, George; Gibbs, Vicary (1910). The Complete Peerage (Rev. ed.). London: St. Catherine. p. 198. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  5. Bulloch. Scottish Notes. D. Wyllie and Son.
  6. Bulloch. Scottish Notes. D. Wyllie and Son.
  7. Tytler, Patrick Fraser (1866). The History of Scotland. Edinburgh. p. 158. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  8. Henderson. DNB.
  9. Wagner, John A. (2001). Encyclopedia of the Wars of the Roses. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. p. 139. ISBN 9781851093588. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  10. Brydges, Egerton (1812). Collins's Peerage of England. London. p. 7:423. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  11. Henderson. DNB.
  12. Turpie, Thomas J. M. "Scottish Saints, Cults, and Pilgrimage from the Black Death to the Reformation, c.1349-1560". Edinburgh Research Archive. University of Edinburgh. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  13. Paul, James Balfour, ed. (1904). The Scots Peerage. Edinburgh: David Douglas. p. 1:333. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  14. Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 423.
  15. Cokayne. Complete Peerage. p. 148.
  16. Jamieson, John; Brown, William (1830). Select Views of the Royal Palaces of Scotland. Edinburgh. p. 22. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  17. Paul. Scots Peerage. p. 333.
  18. Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 424.
  19. Oram, Richard (2001). Kings and Queens of Scotland. Stroud, Gloucestershire: History Press. ISBN 978-0752419916.
  20. Cokayne. Complete Peerage. p. 198.
  21. Fourth Report of the Royal Commission on Historic Manuscripts. London. 1874. p. 1:476. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  22. Henderson. DNB.
  23. Taylor, James (1899). The Great Historic Families of Scotland. London. p. 1:111. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  24. Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 426.
  25. Henderson. DNB.
  26. Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 425.
  27. Henderson. DNB.
  28. Cannon, John (2009). A Dictionary of British History (Rev. ed.). Oxford: Oxford UP. p. 33. ISBN 9780199550371. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  29. Henderson. DNB.
  30. Lang, Andrew (1911). Encyclopedia Britannica (11th ed.). New York. p. 24:441. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  31. Henderson. DNB.
  32. Boardman, Stephen J. (2006). The Campbells, 1250-1513. Edinburgh: John Donald. p. 250. ISBN 978-0859766319.
  33. Paul (1904). Scots Peerage. D. Douglas.
  34. Brydges. Collins's Peerage. p. 427.
  35. Lang. Encyc. Britannica.
  36. "List of Burials". Historic Kilmun. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  37. Paul. Scots Peerage. p. 1:334–35.
  38. Paul. Scots Peerage. p. 1:335.
  39. Mackenzie, Alexander (1894). History of the Mackenzies. Inverness. p. 81.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Campbell,_1st_Earl_of_Argyll]


Family Search: [https://ancestors.familysearch.org/en/LBJQ-CSS/sir-colin-campbell-1...]

SPOUSES AND CHILDREN:

  • Sir Colin Campbell 1st Earl of Argyll - 1433-1493 Marriage: 9 April 1453 Glenorchy and Inishail, Argyll, Scotland
  • Isabella Elizabeth Stewart - 1427-1510

Children (6)

  1. Lady Mary Campbell of Argyll - 1452-1528
  2. Thomas Campbell - 1455-1513
  3. Sir Archibald Gillispie Campbell 2nd Earl of Argyll - 1458-1513
  4. Lady Isabel Campbell of Argyll - 1459-1492
  5. Helen Campbell 15th PGGM Lady of Argyll, Countess of Eglinton - 1460-1528
  6. Lady Catherine Campbell - 1460-1516

PARENTS AND SIBLINGS:

  • Lord Archibald Gillespic Campbell - 1405-1440 Marriage: 13 January 1432 Carnwath, Lanarkshire, Scotland
  • Lady Elizabeth Somerville - 1415-1460

Children (6)

  1. Lady Elizabeth Campbell - 1430-1485
  2. Anne Campbell - 1431-?
  3. Duncan Campbell - 1431-?
  4. Lady Catherine Campbell - 1432-1482
  5. Sir Colin Campbell 1st Earl of Argyll - 1433-1493
  6. Margaret Campbell - 1440-1530
view all 18

Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll's Timeline

1433
September 10, 1433
Lochow, Argyllshire, Scotland (United Kingdom)
1433
Argyll, Scotland, United Kingdom
1451
1451
Eglinton, Ayrshire, Scotland
1452
1452
1453
January 10, 1453
Midlothian, Scotland
1455
1455
Argyll, Scotland
1458
December 5, 1458
In Ardkinglass, Lochgoilhead, Argyllshire, Scotland
1460
June 21, 1460
Eglinton, Argyll, Scotland