Jane (Howard) Neville, Countess of Westmoreland

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Jane Neville (Howard), Countess of Westmoreland

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Of, London, Middlesex,, Greater London, England, United Kingdom
Death: June 30, 1593 (56-64)
Place of Burial: Kenninghall, Norfolk, England
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey and Frances de Vere, Countess of Surrey
Wife of Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmoreland and Edmund Neville, 7th Earl of Westmorland
Mother of Thomas Neville (Lord Westmorland); Eleanor Henshall; Margaret Pudsey; Catherine Grey and Anne Ingleby
Sister of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk; Catherine Berkeley; Henry Howard, Jr., 1st Earl of Northampton and Margaret Scrope
Half sister of Mary Staynings

Occupation: Countess of Westmorland
Managed by: Shirley Marie Caulk
Last Updated:

About Jane (Howard) Neville, Countess of Westmoreland

Jane Neville

Jane Neville (née Howard), Countess of Westmorland (1533/1537 – buried 30 June 1593), was an English noblewoman.

Jane Howard, born between 1533 and 1537,[1] was the daughter of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, and Frances de Vere. Her grandparents on her father's side were Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, and Elizabeth Stafford. Her maternal grandparents were John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford, and Elizabeth Trussell.

Jane Howard had two brothers, Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, and Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton, and two sisters, Katherine Howard, who married Henry Berkeley, 7th Baron Berkeley, and Margaret Howard, who married Henry Scrope, 9th Baron Scrope of Bolton. Jane Howard's youngest sister, Margaret, was born after their father's execution.[2]

Jane Howard's father, the Earl of Surrey, was tried and convicted of treason at the Guildhall on 13 January 1547, and beheaded on Tower Hill on 19 January 1547. In 1548 his children were placed in the care of their aunt, Mary FitzRoy, who appointed the martyrologist, John Foxe, as their tutor.[3]

About 1563/4 Jane Howard married Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmorland, who had succeeded to the earldom after his father's death on 10 February 1564.[4] In November 1569 Westmorland joined the Earl of Northumberland in the Northern Rebellion. After initial successes, Westmorland and Northumberland were forced to flee to the Scottish border when Queen Elizabeth sent forces north under the Earl of Sussex. Sussex proclaimed Westmorland and Northumberland rebels at York on 19 November. Shortly thereafter Northumberland was handed over to the Scottish Regent, the Earl of Moray. However Westmorland was given refuge by Lord Kerr at Ferniehirst Castle in Roxburghshire, and eventually escaped by sea in 1570 to the Spanish Netherlands, where he remained an exile until his death. In 1571 he was attainted, and all his honours forfeited. After her husband's attainder, the Queen granted Jane a pension of £200 for life.[5]

In the events which preceded the Northern Rebellion in 1569, the Countess had more to do with raising the troops than her husband did.[citation needed] She was well educated but perhaps not the cleverest of women when it came to understanding political machinations. She was first to urge the rebels to rise up against Elizabeth I of England, and yet she expected Elizabeth to pardon her when they failed.[citation needed]

The Countess hoped to arrange the marriage of her brother, Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, to Mary, Queen of Scots, and put them both on England's throne.[citation needed] He was executed for treason in 1572 and she lived under house arrest for the rest of her life.[citation needed]

The Countess was buried 30 June 1593 at Kenninghall, Norfolk.[6]

Westmorland continued to be involved for many years in plots to invade England and replace Queen Elizabeth with Mary, Queen of Scots. In 1599 he considered marrying again. His prospective bride was the daughter of President Richardot. Westmorland died 16 November 1601 at Nieuwpoort, Flanders. On 25 June 1604 two of his daughters, Katherine and Anne, were granted pensions of 200 marks a year by King James. Westmorland's cousin, Edmund Neville, the only son of Richard Neville (d. 27 May 1590)[7] by Barbara Arden, the daughter of William Arden[8] of Park Hall, Warwickshire, unsuccessfully claimed the earldom.[9]

On 28 August 1564 Jane Howard married Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmorland, the second but only surviving son of Henry Neville, 5th Earl of Westmorland, by his first wife, Anne Manners, the second daughter of Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, by Eleanor Paston, daughter of Sir William Paston (died c. 20 September 1554), by whom she had one son and four daughters:[10]

  • Lord Neville (1569 – d. 21 April 1571), whose first name is unknown.
  • Margaret Neville, who married Nicholas Pudsey
  • Katherine Neville, who married Sir Thomas Grey of Chillingham, Northumberland, and died without issue.
  • Anne Neville, who married Sir David Ingleby, a younger son of Sir William Ingleby of Ripley, Yorkshire, and died without male issue.
  • Eleanor Neville, who died unmarried before 25 June 1604.

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Neville

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  • Lady Jane Howard1
  • F, #103002, d. circa 27 June 1593
  • Last Edited=14 May 2015
  • Consanguinity Index=0.07%
  • Lady Jane Howard was the daughter of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey and Lady Frances de Vere.2 She married Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmorland, son of Henry Neville, 5th Earl of Westmorland and Lady Anne Manners, between 1563 and 1564.1 She died circa 27 June 1593. She was buried on 30 June 1593 at Kenninghall, Norfolk, England.1 She died intestate and her estate was administered on 11 July 1593.1
  • From between 1563 and 1564, her married name became Neville.1 As a result of her marriage, Lady Jane Howard was styled as Countess of Westmorland on 10 February 1564. She received a pension of £200 after her husband's attainder, increased to £300 in May 1577.1
  • Children of Lady Jane Howard and Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmorland
    • Margaret Neville
    • Catherine Neville
    • Anne Neville+
    • Eleanor Neville d. b 25 Jun 1604
    • unknown Neville, Lord Neville3 b. 1569, d. 21 Apr 1571
  • Citations
  • [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 559. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  • [S37] BP2003 volume 2, page 2906. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  • [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 560.
  • From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p10301.htm#i103002

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 40
  • Neville, Charles by William Arthur Jobson Archbold
  • NEVILLE, CHARLES, sixth Earl of Westmorland (1543–1601), was eldest son of Henry, fifth earl (1525?–1563) [see under Neville, Ralph, fourth Earl], by his first wife, Jane, daughter of Thomas Manners, first earl of Rutland [q. v.] He was born in 1543, and was brought up in all probability as a Roman catholic at Raby Castle, Durham, the family seat. His father certainly was a reactionary, and was one of the supporters of Queen Mary (Hist. MSS. Comm. 7th Rep. App. p. 610). In August 1563 Charles succeeded as sixth Earl of Westmorland on the death of his father. He did not, however, take his seat in the House of Lords till 30 Sept. 1566. His marriage into the Howard family definitely connected him with the old catholic party, but he was loyal in 1565, when the Earl of Bedford met him at Morpeth. He was doubtless fired to rebellion by the advice of his numerous catholic relatives, especially Christopher Neville [q. v.] (cf. Bowes to Sussex, 15 Nov. 1569, in Memorials of the Rebellion, p. 34), and by that of many family friends in the north. Nevertheless in March 1569 he was on the council for the north, and was made a commissioner for musters. His attitude became known in the autumn of 1569. In September he was required to meet the Earl of Sussex at York. He and the Earl of Northumberland declined (4 Nov.) to go [see Percy, Thomas, d. 1572]. The government, finding that the two earls had been in correspondence with the Spanish ambassador, ordered them to come to London, and their refusal to obey was the formal signal of rebellion. Early in November they assembled their forces, marched from Raby to Durham on 14 Nov., restored the mass, and pushed on south to Darlington, and thence towards York. Their first design was to release Mary Queen of Scots, who was then confined at Tutbury; and, as they wished to avoid a check at the outset, they passed by York without assaulting it. A detachment from their army meanwhile had secured Hartlepool in order to keep open communications with the continent, whence aid was expected. By the time the main body reached Clifford Moor Mary was no longer at Tutbury, having been safely moved to Coventry. Their disappointment entirely changed the plans of the rebels, who now most unwisely resolved to retreat, in the hope of holding the north of England, and there intended to wait to give battle to any force that might be sent against them. The leaders were solemnly proclaimed traitors at Windsor on 26 Nov., and on the 30th the retreating army broke up. Westmorland went to Barnard Castle, which was held by Sir George Bowes, who had to capitulate owing to the treachery of the garrison [see under Bowes, Sir George, (1527–1580)]. Thence he led his men to Raby, which is only a few miles distant.
  • At the approach of the main royal army from the south Westmorland fled, with Northumberland, across the border into the country of the Kers, living for a time in the castle of Ferniehurst, Roxburghshire (cf. Memorials, p. 114). Sir Robert Constable, an English spy, was employed to try and induce the earl, who was a connection by marriage (cf. Testamenta Vetusta, p. 705), to come into England, and from Constable's house sue for pardon; but Constable's negotiations were unsuccessful. The account of the transaction will be found in the ‘Sadler State Papers.’ The earl passed over into the Spanish Netherlands. At first he lived at Louvain, and seems to have been provided with money, as he kept twelve or thirteen servants. His pension from the king of Spain was two hundred crowns a month.
  • Meanwhile in 1571 he was formally attainted (13 Eliz. cap. 16), his estates in the diocese of Durham going to the crown instead of to the bishop, on the novel plea that the crown had had the trouble of defending them. The famous castle of Raby remained crown property till it was bought by Sir Harry Vane about 1645, and thus it is now held by Lord Barnard, his representative.
  • Occasional notices of Westmorland, not always to his credit, are found during the next thirty years. In January 1572 he was one of the deputation of English exiles who asked aid from Philip at Brussels in support of the Ridolfi plot. Philip, however, or at all events Alva, knew the real value of his suggestions, and when in 1573 he urged the landing of a force in Northumberland, Alva remarked that his word was that of a nobleman out of his country. In spite of these transactions Westmorland was continually trying to negotiate for his return to England, but the only result seems to have been unsuccessful plots to kidnap him on the part of the English government in 1575 and 1586. About 1577 he went to live at Maestricht, and is said to have been friendly with Don John of Austria, though apparently he had no official relations with him. In 1580 he was colonel of a regiment composed of English refugees in the Spanish service, and in March 1581 he went on a pilgrimage to Rome, to get money if possible. He stayed at the English College, and returned with some sort of a commission. He is said to have lived viciously in later life, and is described in 1583 as ‘a person utterly wasted by looseness of life and by God's punishment.’ He was at Brussels in 1600, thinking of another marriage, but died, deep in debt, at Nieuport on 16 Nov. 1601.
  • Westmorland married before 1564 Jane Howard, eldest daughter of Henry Howard, earl of Surrey [q. v.] His wife, of whom he was evidently fond, was a woman of spirit. Bowes records, in a letter of 15 Nov. 1569, that when Markenfield, Reed, and other rebels left the earl she ‘braste owte agaynste them with great curses, as well for their unhappye counselling as nowe, there cowerd flyghte.’ She had a pension of 300l. from the queen during her husband's exile, died in 1593, and was buried at Kenninghall, Norfolk. By her Westmorland left four daughters: Catherine, married to Sir Thomas Grey of Chillingham, Northumberland; Eleanor, who died unmarried; Margaret, who married Sir Nicholas Pudsey of Yorkshire; Anne, who married David, brother of Sir William Ingleby of Ripley, Yorkshire. Interesting particulars as to Lady Margaret's conversion from Roman catholicism by Mathew Hutton [q. v.] in 1594–5 are to be found in Hutton's ‘Correspondence’ (Surtees Soc.), p. 92, &c.
  • [Surtees's Hist. of Durham, vol. iv.; Surtees's Sketch of the Stock of the Neviles, pp. 11, 12; Cal. of State Papers, Dom.; Froude's Hist. of Engl.; Cal. of Hatfield MSS. iii. 136, 147; Rowland's Hist. Family of Nevill; Memorials of the Rebellion of 1569; Doyle's Official Baronage, iii. 635; Stoney's Life and Times of Sir R. Sadler; Sadler State Papers; Norton's Letters, f. iii.; Bishop Percy's Folio MS. ii. 210, &c.]
  • From: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Neville,_Charles_(DNB00)

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Westmorland married before 1564 Jane Howard, eldest daughter of Henry Howard, earl of Surrey. His wife, of whom he was evidently fond, was a woman of spirit. Bowes records, in a letter of 15 Nov. 1569, that when Markenfield, Reed, and other rebels left the earl she 'braste owte agaynste them with great curses, as well for their unhappye counselling as nowe, there cowerd flyghte.' She had a pension of £300 from the queen during her husband's exile, died in 1593, and was buried at Kenninghall, Norfolk. By her Westmorland left four daughters: Catherine, married to Sir Thomas Grey of Chillingham, Northumberland; Eleanor, who died unmarried; Margaret, who married Sir Nicholas Pudsey of Yorkshire; Anne, who married David, brother of Sir William Ingleby of Ripley, Yorkshire.

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Jane (Howard) Neville, Countess of Westmoreland's Timeline

1533
1533
Greater London, England, United Kingdom
1565
1565
Age 32
1587
1587
Age 54
Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England
1593
June 30, 1593
Age 60
June 30, 1593
Age 60
Kenninghall, Norfolk, England
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