Plautia Urgulanilla

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Plautia Urgulanilla

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lyons, Gaul, Lungundum, France
Death: Mar., 59 AD in Baiae
Immediate Family:

Daughter of <private> and <private>
Ex-wife of Claudius I, Roman Emperor
Partner of Boter
Mother of Claudia; <private> and Claudius Drusus
Sister of <private>

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About Plautia Urgulanilla

Plautia Urgulanilla (fl. 1st century) was the first wife of the future Roman Emperor Claudius. They married sometime around the year 9 CE, when Claudius was 18 years old. According to Suetonius, Claudius divorced her in 24 on grounds of adultery by Plautia and his suspicions of her involvement in the murder of her sister-in-law Apronia.

Family

Her father was Marcus Plautius Silvanus, a general who was consul for the year 2 BC. He had been honored with a triumph.[1]

Urgulanilla was named for her grandmother, Urgulania, a close friend of the Empress Livia Drusilla.

She gave birth to a son, Claudius Drusus, whose betrothal to a daughter of Sejanus instilled great expectations in the prefect,[2] which were left unfulfilled when Drusus died young.

Urgulanilla had a daughter, Claudia, who was born five months after her divorce from Claudius. As Claudia was widely known to be the illegitimate daughter of the freedman Boter, Claudius repudiated the child and he had her laid at Urgulanilla's doorstep.[3] Her adopted nephew was Tiberius Plautius Silvanus Aelianus.

Urgulanilla was Etruscan.[4] A brother of Urgulanilla was made a patrician by Claudius. The adopted son of another of her brothers became consul in 45.[2]

In fiction

Urgulanilla appears as a significant character in Robert Graves I, Claudius. Urgulanilla is a tremendous and bulky woman with a resemblance to Tiberius (who may possibly be her father). She utterly despises Claudius but is relatively ignorant and benign to her husband. She also bears a strong affection for her sister-in-law Numantina, which causes her to kill her brother's second wife. Claudius apathetically divorces Urgulanilla following this suspicion of murder and the revelation that his wife has a child with her slave. While ordered to execute the child Claudius spares it by substituting the baby with a stillborn child to display for repudiation. Urgulanilla later gives Claudius several gifts in her will (prior to his rise to Emperor) and insists that Claudius is not an idiot. Comparatively Urgulanilla proves to be Claudius' best wife as she leaves Claudius on his own and is not openly cruel or manipulative to him.

References

  1. Lives of the Caesars, Suetonius, Barnes & Noble Press, 2004, pg. 208.
  2. Nero: The End of a Dynasty, Miriam Tamara Griffin, Psychology Press, 2000, Pg. 194.
  3. Suetonius. Claud. 27.
  4. Suetonius, Life of Claudius, Section 6.1

Plautia Urgulanilla

Plautia Urgulanilla (fl. 1st century) was the first wife of the future Roman Emperor Claudius. They married sometime around the year 9 CE, when Claudius was 18 years old. According to Suetonius, Claudius divorced her in 24 on grounds of adultery by Plautia and his suspicions of her involvement in the murder of her sister-in-law Apronia.

Family

Her father was Marcus Plautius Silvanus, a general who was consul for the year 2 BC. He had been honored with a triumph.

Urgulanilla was named for her grandmother, Urgulania, a close friend of the Empress Livia Drusilla.

She gave birth to a son, Claudius Drusus, whose betrothal to a daughter of Sejanus instilled great expectations in the prefect, which were left unfulfilled when Drusus died young.

Urgulanilla had a daughter, Claudia, who was born five months after her divorce from Claudius. As Claudia was widely known to be the illegitimate daughter of the freedman Boter, Claudius repudiated the child and he had her laid at Urgulanilla's doorstep. Her adopted nephew was Tiberius Plautius Silvanus Aelianus.

Urgulanilla was Etruscan. A brother of Urgulanilla was made a patrician by Claudius. The adopted son of another of her brothers became consul in 45.

In fiction

Urgulanilla appears as a significant character in Robert Graves I, Claudius. Urgulanilla is a tremendous and bulky woman with a resemblance to Tiberius (who may possibly be her father). She utterly despises Claudius but is relatively ignorant and benign to her husband. She also bears a strong affection for her sister-in-law Numantina, which causes her to kill her brother's second wife. Claudius apathetically divorces Urgulanilla following this suspicion of murder and the revelation that his wife has a child with her slave. While ordered to execute the child Claudius spares it by substituting the baby with a stillborn child to display for repudiation. Urgulanilla later gives Claudius several gifts in her will (prior to his rise to Emperor) and insists that Claudius is not an idiot. Comparatively Urgulanilla proves to be Claudius' best wife as she leaves Claudius on his own and is not openly cruel or manipulative to him.

Source :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plautia_Urgulanilla


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Urgulania (fl. 24 AD), was a prominent noblewoman during the reigns of Augustus and Tiberius, and a friend of the empress Livia. She was the mother of Marcus Plautius Silvanus (consul in 2 BC), who had distinguished himself with Tiberius in the Balkans. She was the grandmother to Plautia Urgulanilla, the first wife of the emperor Claudius, and another Plautius Silvanus, the suspect in a famous murder case.

Due to her closeness with Livia, Tacitus asserts that she held herself above the law. He relates the tale of a man named Lucius Piso who sued Urgulania in the courts. She refused her summons, and instead traveled to the palace where she had Livia issue a statement against Piso's actions. Livia called Tiberius and guard to come and stay with them, which forced Piso to go to them instead of the court. Livia paid a settlement and the matter was closed. Tacitus also states that at a trial where she was called as a witness, Urgulania demanded that the praetor take her deposition in her own home. Even Vestals did not have this privilege.

In 24 AD, Urgulania's star fell as a result of two blows to her family's reputation. Her grandson Silvanus' new wife, Apronia, was found dead in their home, apparently pushed from a great height. Tiberius himself came to investigate the crime scene, and Silvanus was implicated, and tried to claim that his ex-wife had cursed him. Before the trial could begin, Urgulania (perhaps at Livia's behest) sent her grandson a dagger. He used it on himself, saving himself (and her) the disgrace of being convicted of murder. This resulted in a second blow, as Claudius divorced her granddaughter Urgulanilla due a possible role in the murder. Urgulanilla was also put away for adultery, and gave birth to an illegitimate daughter shortly after the divorce. Urgulania's marriage connection with the imperial family was severed.

Understandably, Urgulania is not written of again after these events.

Forrás / Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urgulania


From Wikipedia:

Urgulania (fl. 24 AD), was a prominent noblewoman during the reigns of Augustus and Tiberius, and a friend of the empress Livia. She was the mother of Marcus Plautius Silvanus (consul in 2 BC), who had distinguished himself with Tiberius in the Balkans. She was the grandmother to Plautia Urgulanilla, the first wife of the emperor Claudius, and another Plautius Silvanus, the suspect in a famous murder case.

Due to her closeness with Livia, Tacitus asserts that she held herself above the law. He relates the tale of a man named Lucius Piso who sued Urgulania in the courts. She refused her summons, and instead traveled to the palace where she had Livia issue a statement against Piso's actions. Livia called Tiberius and guard to come and stay with them, which forced Piso to go to them instead of the court. Livia paid a settlement and the matter was closed. Tacitus also states that at a trial where she was called as a witness, Urgulania demanded that the praetor take her deposition in her own home. Even Vestals did not have this privilege.

In 24 AD, Urgulania's star fell as a result of two blows to her family's reputation. Her grandson Silvanus' new wife, Apronia, was found dead in their home, apparently pushed from a great height. Tiberius himself came to investigate the crime scene, and Silvanus was implicated, and tried to claim that his ex-wife had cursed him. Before the trial could begin, Urgulania (perhaps at Livia's behest) sent her grandson a dagger. He used it on himself, saving himself (and her) the disgrace of being convicted of murder. This resulted in a second blow, as Claudius divorced her granddaughter Urgulanilla due a possible role in the murder. Urgulanilla was also put away for adultery, and gave birth to an illegitimate daughter shortly after the divorce. Urgulania's marriage connection with the imperial family was severed.

Understandably, Urgulania is not written of again after these events.

[References

Tacitus book 4:21

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urgulania"


Plautia Urgulanilla

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Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2006)

Plautia Urgulanilla (fl. first century) was the first wife of the future Roman Emperor Claudius. They married sometime around the year 9 CE, when Claudius was 18 years old. According to Suetonius, they divorced in 24 on grounds of adultery by Plautia and suspicion of her involvement in the murder of her sister-in-law.

Her father was Marcus Plautius Silvanus, a general who was consul for the year 2 BC. Urgulanilla was named for her grandmother, Urgulania, a close friend of Livia.

She gave birth to a son, Claudius Drusus (who died young), and a daughter, Claudia, who was born five months after the divorce. As Claudia was widely known to be the illegitimate daughter of the freedman Boter, Claudius repudiated the child and had her laid at Urgulanilla's doorstep.[1] Her adopted nephew was Tiberius Plautius Silvanus Aelianus.

Forrás / Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plautia_Urgulanilla

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