Pierre De St Julien

Is your surname Julian?

Research the Julian family

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Pierre Rene Julian

Also Known As: "Rene de Julien"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Vitre, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France
Death: 1745 (75-76)
Frederick County, Virginia, USA
Place of Burial: Old Opequon Cemetery, Kernstown, Frederick County, Virginia, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Pierre Rene de St. Julian and Jeanne Janelle LeFebre
Husband of Mary Margaret Julian; Damaris Elizabeth de St Julien; Mary Margaret Scotlay Julien; Mary Margaret Julien; Mary Margaret Bullock and 1 other
Father of Stephen Julian; Damaris Elizabeth Mazyck; Pierre De St Julien; James De St Julien; Henry De St Julien and 21 others
Brother of Aimee de St. Julian; Charlotte Ravenel; Louis de St. Julian; Marguerite de St. Julian; Paul de St. Julian and 3 others

Occupation: Professional Soldier - Hanover House at Clemson U., (more) http://www.gencircles.com/users/1943/1/data/27 (more); http://www.gencircles.com/users/1943/1/data/27, Solider known as Count De Malacar, De Saint Julien
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Pierre De St Julien

Birth: Jul. 4, 1669, France Death: 1745 Winchester Frederick County Virginia, USA

Husband of Mary Margaret Scotlay Bullock (daughter of Stephen Bullock and Patience Paynter/Painter)

"Rene is said to have been a giant in stature with red hair, a quick temper, and an indomitable will, a Presbyterian of the strictest form who particularly disliked the Quaker Testimony against war and slavery. Rene Julien was born in France in 1669, was a Huguenot who fought at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland in 1690 and came to America about 1700. Family tradition has him stopping at the island of Bermuda where he married Mary Bullock. He was a soldier in his youth and was in the army of James II in the English Revolution of 1688. For reasons of preference, he is said to have deserted to the standard of King William along with many others. For his services to King William, he was given a grant of land on the Mississippi River (another source says it was the James River District in what is now Maryland). His grown children were not inclined to go to what was then a savage region and they persuaded him to buy land. He went first to the shores of the Carolina, and loosing two sons there, he moved to the more healthy region on the Eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay. (There was a colony of French families on the Santee River in South Carolina who began to migrate about 1712, due to the unhealthy climate. Rene's family may well have been among them.) Info provided by Connie Bolivar's general sources of information that were Jannette R. Trotter Papers - the McClung Historical Collection, Knox Co, TN and .. Elizabeth Cate Manley's book: "Leaves from the Family Tree".


Family links:

Spouse:
 Mary Margaret Scotlay Bullock De St Julien (1682 - 1750)

Children:
 George Julian (1706 - 1781)*
 Isaac Julien (1716 - 1778)*
 John Julian (1720 - 1762)*
  • Calculated relationship
 

Burial: Old Opequon Cemetery Kernstown Frederick County Virginia, USA


http://www.tngenweb.org/bradley/JulienJulianReneVs2006.html


GEDCOM Note

<b>Rene Julian Family </b>· 22 May 2013 · 3 Comments The Rene Julian FamilyResearched by Doug YorkAnd Rose AdamsFor many years there has been a great confusion about who our Julian ancestor was. Count Pierre de St Julian was the favorite pick of the family, but the truth is that our ancestor is Rene Julian. Rene was born in France ca 1660. One family lore about him is that he was orphaned at a very early age. He became a soldier while very young. . He was a Huguenot and fought in then Battle of the Boyne in Ireland. He was in the Army of James ll in the English revolution of 1688 in which his religious preference was Roman Catholic. He is said to have deserted to the standard of King William of Orange. King James men came to get him and return him to his military service. Rene had a warning and fled out the window in his nightshirt. He went to the neighbor’s house and borrowed clothes and joined the ranks of William of Orange’s men. For his services to King William he received a grant of land along the Mississippi River. He became a professional soldier and spent his youth fighting wars. He was at least forty years old when he left the service of William of Orange and immigrated to the United States.Rene was a large man, very tall with fiery red hair. and had a disposition to match. It is thought that he stopped in Bermuda and married Mary Margaret Bullock. She was a great lady of Spanish descent.Rene was a slaveholder and a Presbyterian and hated the Quakers for their belief against War and Slavery. Mary Bullock came from a very mixed heritage. Her Father, William Bullock, was a Quaker and her grandfather, Captain Stephen Paynter, was a Slaver and ran a ship between Africa and the Carolinas. Rene and Mary Julian first settled on the shores of the Carolinas but he used to tell his family that they never needed to consider themselves settled until they moved on the land grant on the Mississippi. He lost two sons and decided to move to the healthier climate of the Chesapeake Bay area. It is said to be in the Bohemian Manor Cecil County, Maryland.Rene and Mary had seven sons and three daughters. They are as follows:1-Stephen Julian was the oldest living son. He married Alatha Bouchelle. She died young and then he married Ann Hedges2- George Julian born in Berkely, South Carolina. He married Martha Denton.3-Rene Julian Jr. was born in 1710 but very little is known about him. Family lore says that he moved into Georgia and fought in the Revolutionary War, but he would have been very old to do this.4-Mary Julian was born in 1712 in South Carolina. She married John Thompson Jr. She had one son and this family remained in Maryland.5-Peter Julian was born in1714. He first married Mary Baels and second to Ann Brothers. Lydia Julian was born to this union. Peter died as a result of suicide at the age of ninety.6-Isaac Julian was born in Cecil County, Maryland. He married Barbara White. He received a Fairfax grant in 1752. This land was sold when he migrated to North Carolina.7-Jacob Julian was born in 1729 in Cecil County, Maryland. He married Ann Hedges. There are no known descendants and no record of him ever owning land.8-John Julian was born in 1720 in Cecil County, Maryland. He was married to a woman named Elizabeth, who married again after his death to Thomas Allred.9-Catherine Julian born about 1720 and married Joseph Woods.10- Ruth Julian born about 1724 and married Elijah PughRene is living in 1844. He is listed in the tax records as old and infirm and an Object of Charity and exempt from paying taxes. It is thought that he and his wife Mary are buried in the Opequon Cemetery in Frederick County, Virginia. However it is tradition to bury family right on the family plantation, and this could also be the situation as there are no markers to mark where they are buriedThe five sons that came with him to Frederick County, Virginia left for Orange County, North Carolina in the middle of the night because of an Indian threat. It is thought that Lydia Julian migrated with them.The men fought in the Revolutionary with both the British and the Americans. There is a Peter Julian that was captured by the British and held captive on the Prison ship, the New Jersey. No further information is known about this Peter Julian. It is not known if he ties into our Julian line or not and if he died on that ship as many thousands prisoners did.The five sons of Rene are listed in the tax records of Orange County, North Carolina. The belonged to the group called the Regulators that fought Governor Tyron in the Battle Of Almanance because of unfair taxation of the landowners. They signed their names on the petitions to the governor to remove the taxes. They fought in the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. They were land and property owners and had received land grants from the British in Orange County. They were British citizens and if they had not fought on the British side they would have lost their land. After the Revolutionary War they were cited into court to show cause as to why the Americans should not confiscate their property, so they would lose either way. Some of them are listed as deserters as they joined the Continental Army.Some of the descendants of the Julian family moved out of North Carolina with the opening of the Northwest Territory. They moved into Indiana, Ohio, and Illinois.There are many educated people in their posterity including George Julian, an early senator from Indiana.


Husband of Mary Margaret Scotlay Bullock (daughter of Stephen Bullock and Patience Paynter/Painter)

"Rene is said to have been a giant in stature with red hair, a quick temper, and an indomitable will, a Presbyterian of the strictest form who particularly disliked the Quaker Testimony against war and slavery. Rene Julien was born in France in 1669, was a Huguenot who fought at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland in 1690 and came to America about 1700. Family tradition has him stopping at the island of Bermuda where he married Mary Bullock. He was a soldier in his youth and was in the army of James II in the English Revolution of 1688. For reasons of preference, he is said to have deserted to the standard of King William along with many others. For his services to King William, he was given a grant of land on the Mississippi River (another source says it was the James River District in what is now Maryland). His grown children were not inclined to go to what was then a savage region and they persuaded him to buy land. He went first to the shores of the Carolina, and loosing two sons there, he moved to the more healthy region on the Eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay. (There was a colony of French families on the Santee River in South Carolina who began to migrate about 1712, due to the unhealthy climate. Rene's family may well have been among them.) Jannette R. Trotter Papers - the McClung Historical Collection, Knox Co, TN and .. Elizabeth Cate Manley's book: "Leaves from the Family Tree".

Family links: Spouse: Mary Margaret Scotlay Bullock De St Julien (1682 - 1750) Children: George Julian (1706 - 1781) Isaac Julien (1716 - 1778) John Julian (1720 - 1762)

Burial: Old Opequon Cemetery Kernstown Frederick County Virginia, USA Cemetery notes and/or description: Directions: Take Interstate 81 to Exit 310. Turn North on to Rt 37 and take first exit on to Rt 11 South. Continue South for about two miles, passing through two stoplights. Right before you get to the third stoplight, there is a 7-Eleven on the left. Turn left, just before the store, on to Opequon Church Road. Follow the road all the way back to Opequon Church and turn into the church parking lot. The cemetery is to the left.

In the early 1730s William Hoge donated two acres of land for a meeting house and an additional two acres for a cemetery. By 1736, the place of worship was in full use. Since that time, there have been two log and two stone churches built upon the site. The church, and cemetery, served the War of Independence with General George Washington worshipping there on occasion. In addition, there are no less than seven veterans of the revolution buried in the cemetery. During the Civil War, the church was reduced to ruins and the cemetery badly damaged during the two battles of Kernstown. In 1863 services were no longer being held and the church ruins became a stable for horses. In 1889 the Scotish-Irish decendants of the original church got together and planned a reconstruction. The present day church was completed in 1897, being built upon the original 1790 stone foundation. The Opequon Presbyterian Church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and as a Virginia Historic Landmark.

There are five burying grounds at Opequon Presbyterian Church. Burying Ground #1 had burials from 1736 through 1799 and is adjacent to the north wall of the church. Burying Ground #2 was active from about 1745 through 1904 and is the largest of the five. It is to the left as you enter the church property, surrounded by a black iron fence. Burying Ground #3 started interments in 1790, with the last taking place in 1860 and is located slightly south-southwest of the church.

A grand daughter, Nancy Ann Julian (1754-1844), #45350285, is buried in Indiana.* Reference: Find A Grave Memorial - SmartCopy: May 25 2020, 17:33:03 UTC


Pierre de St. Julien Descendant Register, Generation No. 1 1. Pierre de St. Julien (Pierre de St. Julien1) was born 4 JUL 1669. He married Darmaris Elizabeth Le Serrurier, daughter of Jacques Le Serrurier and Elizabeth Legar.

 	 

Children

Pierre de St. Julien and Darmaris Elizabeth Le Serrurier are:

  1. + 2 i. Damaris Elizabeth de St. Julien was born 17 DEC 1690, and died 1775.
  2. + 3 ii. Pierre de St. Julien.
  3. + 4 iii. Paul de St. Julien.
  4. 5 iv. James de St. Julien.
  5. 6 v. Henry de St. Julien.
  6. 7 vi. Daniel de St. Julien.
  7. 8 vii. Joseph de St. Julien.
  8. 9 viii. Alexander de St. Julien.
  9. + 10 ix. Jeanne Marie De St. Julien was born 1707, and died 10 JUN 1764
view all 38

Pierre De St Julien's Timeline

1669
July 4, 1669
Vitre, Departement d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France
1690
December 17, 1690
Charleston, South Carolina, USA
1696
1696
Berkley Co., SC
1700
1700
Santee River, Charleston, S.C.
1704
1704
Charleston, Charleston County, SC, British Colonial America
1704
Cecil County, Province of Maryland
1705
1705
Berkeley, South Carolina, USA