Roger de Mortimer, Lord of Wigmore

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Roger de Mortimer (de Warenne), Lord of Wigmore

Also Known As: "Roger DE MORTIMER", "Roger filii episcopali"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mortemer-en-Brai, sur la rivière d´Eaulne, Normandie, France.
Death: 1078 (55-56)
Saint-Valery-en-Caux, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
Place of Burial: Mortemer Abbey, Mortemer, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Rodulf / Ranulph I de Warenne and Béatrice de Vascoeuïl
Husband of Hawise de Mortimer
Father of Ralph de Mortimer, Sr de Saint-Victor-en-Caux, Baron of Wigmore
Brother of Rudolf de Warenne, II

Occupation: Sieur, de Mortemer-en-Bray, Sn be Mortemer-sur-Eautne
Managed by: Pam Wilson (may be slow to respond)
Last Updated:

About Roger de Mortimer, Lord of Wigmore

He is believed to have possibly been a brother or close kinsman to Rodolf/Ranulf de Warenne and Guillaume/William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey.

He and Ranulf were possibly sons or grandsons of Walter de Saint-Martin. There is also a possibility that they were sons of Hugues de Coutances, Bishop of Coutances***[See note below arguing against this]. I have come across some sources that suggest yet another possible parentage--i.e., that he may have been the illegitimate son of Hugh d'Ivry, Bishop of Bayeux.

According to Charles Cawley, "According to the Complete Peerage, Roger [I] de Mortemer came from Mortemer-sur-Eaulne, near Neufchâtel-en-Brai (upstream of Dieppe on the river Béthune, in the eastern part of the Pays de Caux) in Normandy, which it says must be distinguished from "Mortemer-en-Lions, the site of the abbey of the same name"[208]. Le Prévost is more specific, stating that he was from "Mortemer-en-Brai, sur la rivière d´Eaulne" and adding "on voit encore l´emplacement du château" (writing in 1840)[209]. Roger [I] is recorded by Orderic Vitalis as having led "omnes Caletenses" (from the Pays de Caux) at the battle of Mortemer against the French in 1054 but that his castle was confiscated after he had helped the escape of one of the French prisoners[210]. Although Roger was later reconciled with the king and recovered some of his lands, the castle of Mortemer remained with the Warenne family. The descendants of Roger [I] continued to bear the name "Mortimer", derived from the castle, despite its early confiscation."

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#...

ROGER [I] de Mortemer (-[1078/86]). Seigneur de Mortemer-sur-Eaulne, near Neufchâtel-en-Brai, Normandy. [same person as…? ROGER, son of HUGUES d´Ivry Bishop of Bayeux & his [wife/mistress ---] (-after [1037/55]).

The question of the possible co-identity of Roger [I] de Mortemer and Roger, son of the bishop, is discussed in the Introduction to the present chapter.]

Roger de Mortemer was related to the Warenne family but the precise relationship has not been determined, as discussed further in the Introduction above.

Orderic Vitalis records that "Roberti Aucensis comiitis et Rogerii de Mortuomari" led the Norman forces ("Caletorum catervam" = troops from the pays de Caux) who defeated Eudes, brother of Henri I King of France ("Odonem fratrem suum") "apud Mortuum-mare" in 1054[220]. In a later passage, recounting a death-bed speech of William I King of England, the same source records that "Rogerium de Mortuomari et omnes Caletenses" had defeated the French troops "apud Mortuum-Mare" but that "Rogerius princeps" helped the escape of "Rodulfus…comes" (identified more precisely in another passage as "Radulfum comitem de Monte-Desiderii") to whom he had done homage, for which treachery Roger was exiled and his lands confiscated, including "castrum…Mortui Mari" which was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius"[221].

The Brevis Relatio de Origine Willelmi Conquestoris records that "Rogero de Mortuomari" contributed 120 ships towards the invasion of England in 1066[222], which suggests that he had been fully reconciled with the future William I King of England by that time.

He acquired land at Wigmore which had been forfeited by Roger Earl of Hereford in 1075[223]. "…Rotberto de Bello Monte, Henrici de Bello Monte, Rotberti Gifordi, Rogerii de Mortuo Mari, Goiffridi de Calvo Monte, Radulfi dapiferi, Mauricii cancellarii, Willelmi de Warenna, Gundrede uxoris W. de Warenna" subscribed the undated charter under which William I King of England confirmed the donation by William de Warenne of the church of St Pancras to the monastery of Cluny[224], dated to [1078/81] by the Complete Peerage[225].

Roger is not named in Domesday Book in 1086.

m HAWISE, daughter of --- (-after her husband). The Chronique de Normandie, based on le Roman de Rou, records that "Rogier de Mortemer" married "la Contesse de Glochestre que Jehan de la Chapelle avoit amée" after the conquest of England[226]. "Hadvise et Radulfi filii eius" donated land "in episcopatu Ambianensium apud Mers" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery)[227]. As her husband is not named in the grant, it is likely that she outlived him. Roger de Mortemer & his wife had one child:

a) RALPH [I] de Mortemer [Mortimer] (-5 Aug after [1115/18]). "Hadvise et Radulfi filii eius" donated land "in episcopatu Ambianensium apud Mers" to Saint-Victor-en-Caux by undated charter (a copy of which is attached to a late-12th century transcription of a charter under which Hugh de Mortimer confirmed donations to the monastery)[228]. He succeeded his father as Lord of Wigmore, and of other land in Herefordshire and Shropshire.

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Roger was also known as Roger filii Episcopi Mortimer. [Note from Curator; we have separated the identities of these two Rogers; please see the other profile.]

Roger is deemed by some to be the son of William de Warenne, and by others the son of Walter de St. Martin, brother of William. He was related by blood to William the Conqueror, his mother being the niece of Gunnora, wife of Richard sans Peur, Duke of Normandy

Roger de Mortemer was a Norman from Mortemer, canton Neufchatel-en-Bray, Seine-Maritime, Normandy.

Roger lost some of his land to his kinsman William de Warenne following the battle of Mortemer, at which he had assisted the escape of a French prisoner,

Roger reconciled with William of Normandy, and he went on to acquire lands in England--lands centered upon Wigmore forfeited by Roger earl of Hereford circa 1075.

Roger died before 1086.

Note from Pam Wilson: I have come across some sources that suggest yet another possible parentage--i.e., that he may have been the illegitimate son of Hugh d'Ivry, Bishop of Bayeux.

conclusion: parents unknown, spouses last name unknown, birth date unknown, sons birthdate unknown

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Charles Cawley also writes: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm

There has been considerable debate about the ancestry of Roger [I] de Mortemer. The first question relates to the possible relationship between Roger [I] de Mortemer and William de Warenne 1st Earl of Surrey. This issue is discussed in the Complete Peerage which concludes that "its exact nature has not at present been discovered"[211]. The fact of the family relationship is indicated by Orderic Vitalis who, in a passage recounting an alleged death-bed speech of William I King of England, records that the castle of Mortemer, confiscated from Roger [I] de Mortemer after the battle of Mortemer in 1054, was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius"[212]. In addition to this, Robert de Torigny, in his description of abbeys in Normandy, records that "Rogerius de Mortuo Mari, filius Walterii de Sancto Martino, frater vero primi Willermi de Warenna" founded "monasterium Sancti Victoris"[213]. A third source, Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...una earum” married “patri primi Willelmi de Warenna” by whom she had “idem Willelmus postea comes Surreiæ et Rogerus de Mortuo-mari frater ipsius” [although an undated charter quoted in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY, which records a sale of property by “Hugo de Flamenvilla”, indicates that Raoul´s second wife was the mother of his son Guillaume][214]. The second source is clearly incorrect as regards the parentage of William de Warenne, whose father is confirmed in other primary sources as Raoul de Warenne (see the document NORMANDY NOBILITY, WARENNE). It is also clear that Roger [I] de Mortemer (already holder of a castle in 1054) must have been considerably older than William de Warenne, and so could hardly have been his brother. Stapleton proposed in 1846 that Roger [I] de Mortimer and Raoul de Warenne, father of William de Warenne 1st Earl of Surrey, were brothers, arguing that, because they are both mentioned in charters of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen in connection with the same property (see below), they had probably inherited it jointly[215].


Stapleton also proposed that Roger [I] de Mortemer was the same person as Roger, son of "Bishop Hugues". The question of the identity of Bishop Hugues is discussed in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY. Roger, son of the bishop, is named in three charters, two of which name his father as Bishop Hugues. Firstly, "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…" witnessed an undated charter which records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ"[216]. Secondly, "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[217]. Thirdly, "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi", sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by charter dated 1074[218]. The Complete Peerage dismisses Stapleton´s hypothesis[219]. It argues firstly that the wife of Roger [I] de Mortemer is named Hawise in primary sources, compared with Oda as the wife of Roger, son of the bishop, and also that the bishop´s son is recorded with children named Guillaume and Hugues, whereas Roger [I]´s heir was named Ralph, although it would not be beyond the stretch of imagination to combine the two families, with Roger having married twice. The third difficulty proposed by the Complete Peerage is harder to dismiss. This is that the 1074 charter quoted above implies that Roger, father of Guillaume, was already deceased at the time of the sale of their property to Raoul de Warenne, whereas sources demonstrate that Roger [I] de Mortemer was still alive in 1078. A further difficulty with Stapleton´s hypothesis is that, if it was correct, the same person would have been referred to in the sources sometimes as "filius episcopi" and sometimes as "de Mortuomari". Such dual appellations are unusual. Different primary sources at the time usually refer to the same individual by the same name and epithet, presumably reflecting the style by which he was normally known among his contemporaries. If a person was known by two names, the style "X qui et Y" was usually adopted in the sources. One possible explanation for this apparent exception to normal practice is that, after the confiscation of his castle, "Rogerius de Mortuomari" became known as "Rogerius filius episcopi", although this does not appear consistent with the survival of the name Mortimer among Roger´s descendants long after the castle was lost.

Sources

  • [211] CP IX Appendix A, p. 3.
  • [212] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, pp. 236-7.
  • [213] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen), Tome II, p. 201.
  • [214] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
  • [215] Stapleton, Archæological Journal, Vol. III (1846), pp. 1-26, cited in CP IX Appendix A, p. 6 footnote e.
  • [216] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XXVII, p. 435.
  • [217] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XL, p. 442.
  • [218] Deville, A. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de la Sainte-Trinité du Mont de Rouen, Collection des cartularies de France Tome III (same volume as Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin) (Paris) ("Rouen Sainte-Trinité"), XXXV, p. 440.
  • [219] CP IX Appendix A, p. 7.

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MORTIMER family, of Wigmore. Herefordshire.

Dictionary of Welsh Biography, The National Library of Wales http://yba.llgc.org.uk/en/s-MORT-WIG-1075.html

The Mortimer family came over to England from Normandy as part of the invading army of William the Conqueror, and c. 1075, one of the family, Ralph de Mortimer. was granted certain lands in Shropshire and Herefordshire, with the castle and township of Wigmore in the latter county as focal point. It was from this beginning that the family eventually grew to be a dominant factor in Welsh border history. There are references to the first Ralph fortifying the castle of 'Dinieithon,' and conquering 'Melenyth,' both in modern Radnorshire. During the 12th cent, it appears, from the scattered references available, that there was much fighting between the Mortimers and the Welsh. In 1144 Hugh de Mortimer reconquered Maelienydd and Elfael, this implying a previous conquest and loss, and in 1145 he captured the prince Rhys ap Hywel. He was also responsible for the death of Maredudd ap Madog ab Idnerth in 1146. roger de mortimer was imprisoned for two years in 1179 owing to his followers having been involved in the death of Cadwallon ap Madog, and in 1191 he was banished for three years, this time on a charge of conspiring with the Welsh against the king. He returned in due course, and in 1195 drove Cadwallon's sons out of Maelienydd. but in 1196 he and Hugh de Say of Richard's castle were heavily defeated by Rhys ap Gruffydd near Radnor. In the first half of the 13th cent. Llewelyn ap lorwerth became one of the most powerful princes in Cymru, and in 1230 the Mortimers associated themselves with this prince when Ralph de Mortimer m. his daughter Gwladus Ddu. Their son, Roger de Mortimer, considerably extended the family's territorial possessions in Cymru by his marriage in 1247 with Matilda, eldest daughter of William de Braose (see under Braose), formerly Lord of Brecon. Matilda was also joint heir of the Marshal estates in right of her mother Eve, daughter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke (see Marshal family). To the Mortimers, therefore, she brought a third of the great honour of Brecon, the lordship of Radnor, and lands in Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire. With such territorial accretions the family was now assuming a dominant position as marcher lords. Roger's great adversary in Cymru was his kinsman, the Welsh prince Llewelyn ap Gruffydd. There was intermittent fighting and truce-making until both met their deaths in 1282. The struggle between marcher lord and Welsh prince became at this juncture merged in the larger contest between the barons and Henry III, and, later, in the campaigns of Edward I against Cymru. In 1262 and 1266 Mortimer was heavily defeated by Llywelyn, and, in Sept. 1267, by the Treaty of Mont­gomery, large portions of his land were surrendered to that prince. In Nov. 1276 Mortimer was appointed captain for Shropshire, Staffordshire, and Herefordshire, and the adjoining districts, in Edward I's campaign against the Welsh. He was successful in wresting much land from his adversaries. During this time he was also extremely active in the king's service in judicial affairs. He d. in 1282. Edmund de Mortimer (d. 1304) was constantly requested to take measures against the rebellion of Rhys ap Maredudd of Ystrad Tywi, 1287-88. His son, Roger de Mortimer, later 1st Earl of March, combined with his powerful uncle Roger of Chirk (q.v.), and made the family a major power in Welsh affairs. Fearing the influence of their great rivals, the Despensers, in South Cymru, they sided with the Earl of Hereford in his quarrel with the Despensers concerning the acquisition of Gower in 1321. They conducted a successful military campaign in South Cymru, but in Jan. 1321/2, having taken up arms against the king, they were defeated and imprisoned. With the accession of Edward III, however. Roger Mortimer of Wigmore enjoyed greater favour than ever. On 20 Feb. 1326/7, he was appointed justice of Cymru and of the bishopric of Llandaff during the king's pleasure. The latter office was renewed on 4 Aug. 1328, and he was made justice of Cymru for life on 27 Aug. 1328. The appointment as justice of Cymru was renewed on 4 Nov. 1328,. after his elevation to the earldom of March, and on the same day he was appointed justice in the bishopric of St. Davids for life. He had, in June, 1327, been granted custody of the lands of 'Glamorgan and Morgannwg' during the king's pleasure, and in Sept. 1327 was granted lands worth £1.000 per annum, including the castle of Denbigh and the escheated lands of the Earl of Arundel in Cymru. His official position, allied to his great landed possessions, made him well-nigh supreme in Cymru until his death in 1330, when he was executed as a traitor. The next heir was the 1st earl's grandson. Roger de Mortimer (1327?-60), and he, in spite of his grandfather's treason, was gradually allowed to regain his estates in the Welsh March. He d. Feb. 1359/60. During the remainder of the 14th cent, the family does not appear to have played any outstanding part in Welsh affairs. They, however, became connected with the rebellion of Owain Glyndwr at the beginning of the next century. When Roger de Mortimer, 4th earl of March (q.v.), d. in 1398, his son, Edmund, was still a minor, and consequently Roger's brother, also called Edmund, became the most important representative of the family in the Welsh March. When the Glyndwr rebellion broke out, he was associated with his brother-in-law, Henry Percy, in measures against the rebellion. Captured by Glyndwr in 1402, he, however, m. his captor's daughter, Catherine, and entered boldly into his schemes. In the famous treaty of partition drawn up between Mortimer, Glyndwr, and the Earl of Northumberland, Mortimer was to receive the southern half of England. All. however, came to naught and Mortimer perished in the siege of Harlech castle, 1409? Edmund the nephew d. 1425, and the estates now passed to Richard, Duke of York, son of Anne Mortimer and Richard, Duke of Cambridge.

B.T.; Ann. C.; Annales MonasTici; Flores Historiarum; Chronica . . . S. 'Trokelowe; Eulogium Hist.', Cal. Pat. R.', Cal. Charter R.; Cal. Fine R.; Cal. Chancery R.; Dugdale, Monasticon; Rymer, Foedera; Rotidi Parliamentorum; Parliamentary Writs; Chronicon Adas de Usk; Hist. II7.; Complete Peerage; V. M. Powicke, Henry III and the Lord Edward; J. E. Morris, Welsh Wars of Edward I; T. F. Tout, Edward II in English Hist.: W. H. Waters, Edwardian Settlement . . . ,N. Cymru; .}. E. Lloyd. Owen Glendower; D.X.B.; B. P. Evans. 'The Mortimer Family' (Ph.D. thesis, University of Cymru, in N.L.VV. ; Trans. R.H.S., 1915; P. Barbier, The Age of Owain Gwynedd. G.M.G.


http://cybergata.com/roots/4329.htm

Roger de Mortimer Sire de Mortimer

Born: Abt 1029, Mortemer, canton Neufchatel-en-Bray, Seine-Maritime, Normandy Marriage: Hawise 721 Died: Bef 1086

 Noted events in his life were:

• Background Information. 721 Roger de Mortemer, siegneur of Mortemer-sur-Eaulne in Normandy, flourished between 1054 to 1078. He died sometime before 1086. He was married to Hawise, daughter of Ranulf de Montdidier.

He was the leader of the Norman forces at the battle of Mortemer in 1054. He assisted the escape of Ralph, Count of Montididier, to whom he had sworn loyalty. As a result of this, his estate was given to his relative William de Warenne. ~Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans, p. 166

• Background Information. 814 Roger or Ralph de Mortimer, the first of this line to arrive in England at the time of the Normand conquest. He obtained, by force or arms, the castle of Wigmore, in the Marches of Wales. This area a numerous manors in divers counties, all of which he possessed at the time of the Domesday servey. ~Baronia Anglica Concentrata, Vol. I, p. 335

• Background Information. 141 Roger de Mortemer, Seigneur of Mortemer-sur-Eaulne in Normandy, was one of the leaders of the Norman forces at the battle of Mortemer in 1054. Because he assisted the escape of one of the French prisoner, Ralph, Count of Montdidier, to whom he had done homage, he was exiled and his lands confiscated. He was afterward reconciled to Duke William and some of his lands were restored to him, though not Moretmer, which had been given to his consanguineus William de Warenne. Saint-Victor-en-Caux thereupon became the caput of the Norman honor of the family. He is said to have founded the abbey of Saint-Victor-en-Caux. He was living in 1078 or later, but was dead in 1086, when his son Ralph appears in Domesday Book. He married Hawise.

Roger's wife, Hawise, and son, Ralph, gave land in Mers in the diocese of Amiens to the abbey; in 1192 Theobald, Bishop of Amiens, confirmed this gift at Mers. The fact that Hawise held land at Mers in Le Vimeu explains the homage done by Roger de Mortimer to Ralph, Count of Montdider, and suggests that the marriage was earlier than 1054, the date of the battle of Mortemer. Since Hawise and her son join in this gift, she appears to have survived her husband.

~Cokayne's Complete Peerage, 2nd Edition, (Mortimer of Wigmore), Vol. IX. pp. 266-267 Roger married Hawise.721

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  • **

Thomas Stapleton makes the strong argument that Roger de Mortimer and Ralph (Ranulf) de Warenne were the sons of Hugh, Bishop of Coutances (see long excerpt of his writing, below, with many of the Latin sources). However, In a passage very relevant to this profile, Charles Cawley writes: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm

There has been considerable debate about the ancestry of Roger [I] de Mortemer. The first question relates to the possible relationship between Roger [I] de Mortemer and William de Warenne 1st Earl of Surrey. This issue is discussed in the Complete Peerage which concludes that "its exact nature has not at present been discovered"[211]. The fact of the family relationship is indicated by Orderic Vitalis who, in a passage recounting an alleged death-bed speech of William I King of England, records that the castle of Mortemer, confiscated from Roger [I] de Mortemer after the battle of Mortemer in 1054, was granted to "Guillelmo de Guarenna consanguineo eius"[212]. In addition to this, Robert de Torigny, in his description of abbeys in Normandy, records that "Rogerius de Mortuo Mari, filius Walterii de Sancto Martino, frater vero primi Willermi de Warenna" founded "monasterium Sancti Victoris"[213]. A third source, Guillaume of Jumièges records that “nepotes...plures...Gunnor...una earum” married “patri primi Willelmi de Warenna” by whom she had “idem Willelmus postea comes Surreiæ et Rogerus de Mortuo-mari frater ipsius” [although an undated charter quoted in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY, which records a sale of property by “Hugo de Flamenvilla”, indicates that Raoul´s second wife was the mother of his son Guillaume][214]. The second source is clearly incorrect as regards the parentage of William de Warenne, whose father is confirmed in other primary sources as Raoul de Warenne (see the document NORMANDY NOBILITY, WARENNE). It is also clear that Roger [I] de Mortemer (already holder of a castle in 1054) must have been considerably older than William de Warenne, and so could hardly have been his brother. Stapleton proposed in 1846 that Roger [I] de Mortimer and Raoul de Warenne, father of William de Warenne 1st Earl of Surrey, were brothers, arguing that, because they are both mentioned in charters of Sainte-Trinité de Rouen in connection with the same property (see below), they had probably inherited it jointly[215].

Stapleton also proposed that Roger [I] de Mortemer was the same person as Roger, son of "Bishop Hugues". The question of the identity of Bishop Hugues is discussed in the document NORMANDY NOBILITY. Roger, son of the bishop, is named in three charters, two of which name his father as Bishop Hugues. Firstly, "…ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna., Beatricis uxori eius, Rogerii filii episcopi, Huberti filii Turoldi…" witnessed an undated charter which records an agreement between Sainte-Trinité de Rouen and "Rodulfo Warethnæ" to buy land "in Blovilla…apud villam…Merdeplud…et terram prati Sottevillæ"[216]. Secondly, "Rogerius, Hugonis episcopi filius" sold serfs "sub suo dominio in Blovilla et Einardi mansionali et Novillula et in Scurra vel Merdepluet villa…et suæ domus propriæ in urbe Rotomagi" to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen, with the consent of "sua uxore Odain…et eorum filiis Willelmo et Hugone", by undated charter[217]. Thirdly, "Rodulfus de Warenna eiusque conjux…Emma cum filiis suis Rodulfo…atque Willelmo" sold "totius Osulfi Villæ eiusdem Caletensis pagi", sold by "Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi", to Sainte-Trinité de Rouen by charter dated 1074[218].

The Complete Peerage dismisses Stapleton´s hypothesis[219]. It argues firstly that the wife of Roger [I] de Mortemer is named Hawise in primary sources, compared with Oda as the wife of Roger, son of the bishop, and also that the bishop´s son is recorded with children named Guillaume and Hugues, whereas Roger [I]´s heir was named Ralph, although it would not be beyond the stretch of imagination to combine the two families, with Roger having married twice.

The third difficulty proposed by the Complete Peerage is harder to dismiss. This is that the 1074 charter quoted above implies that Roger, father of Guillaume, was already deceased at the time of the sale of their property to Raoul de Warenne, whereas sources demonstrate that Roger [I] de Mortemer was still alive in 1078. A further difficulty with Stapleton´s hypothesis is that, if it was correct, the same person would have been referred to in the sources sometimes as "filius episcopi" and sometimes as "de Mortuomari". Such dual appellations are unusual. Different primary sources at the time usually refer to the same individual by the same name and epithet, presumably reflecting the style by which he was normally known among his contemporaries. If a person was known by two names, the style "X qui et Y" was usually adopted in the sources. One possible explanation for this apparent exception to normal practice is that, after the confiscation of his castle, "Rogerius de Mortuomari" became known as "Rogerius filius episcopi", although this does not appear consistent with the survival of the name Mortimer among Roger´s descendants long after the castle was lost.

Sources

  • [211] CP IX Appendix A, p. 3.
  • [212] Orderic Vitalis (Prévost), Vol. III, Liber VII, XV, pp. 236-7.
  • [213] Delisle, L. (ed.) (1872) Chronique de Robert de Torigni, abbé de Mont-Saint-Michel (Rouen), Tome II, p. 201.
  • [214] Willelmi Gemmetensis monachi Historiæ Normannorum, Du Chesne, A. (1619) Historiæ Normannorum Scriptores Antiqui (Paris) (“Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiæ (Du Chesne, 1619)”), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
  • [215] Stapleton, Archæological Journal, Vol. III (1846), pp. 1-26, cited in CP IX Appendix A, p. 6 footnote e.
  • [216] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XXVII, p. 435.
  • [217] Rouen Sainte-Trinité, XL, p. 442.
  • [218] Deville, A. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de la Sainte-Trinité du Mont de Rouen, Collection des cartularies de France Tome III (same volume as Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin) (Paris) ("Rouen Sainte-Trinité"), XXXV, p. 440.
  • [219] CP IX Appendix A, p. 7.

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Excerpts from Archaeological Journal, March 1846, an article by Thomas Stapleton entitled "OBSERVATIONS IN DISPROOF OF THE PRETENDED MARRIAGE OF WILLIAM DE WARREN, EARL OF SURREY, WITH A DAUGHTER BEGOTTEN OF MATILDIS, DAUGHTER OF BALDWIN, COMTE OF FLANDERS, BY WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR, AND ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE ORIGIN AND EARLY HISTORY OF THE FAMILY IN NORMANDY." pp. 1-26.

The cartulary of the monastery of the Holy Trinity of the Mont de Rouen, subsequently designated the abbey of Sainte Catherine after the acquisition of her relics, a manuscript of the eleventh century, furnishes the earliest notice of the first baron of this name in Normandy. From it we learn that Rodulf de Warren was a sharer and coheir with Roger, son of the bishop, in an extensive fief in the vicinity of Rouen, and that they had also several vills in the pays de Caux, and hence he was doubtless identical with Radulf, son of the bishop, whose name occurs in the following instrument, inserted in the cartulary of the cathedral church of Rouen, which regards the two communes of Douvrend and Bailly la riviere, near Dieppe.

Hoc scriptum est quomodo villa de Duuerent a dominicatu Archiepiscopatus exiit et quomodo postea rediit. Duerent fuit in dominico Sancte Marie. Hugo Archiepiscopus tulit de dominicatu et dedit cuidam militi, Odoni, in matrimonio sororis sue. Mortuo Odone dedit iterum Hugo sororem suam cuidam Henrico cum eadem terra. Postea defuncto Henrico clamat eam Walterus, comes de Medanta, propter hoc quod Henricus suus consanguineus erat, et ita ei dedit Robertus Archiepiscopus. Postea redemit eam Robertus Archiepiscopus, qui eam sibi dederat, pleno pilleo de denariis, et ita redacta est terra de Duerent in dominicatu sancte Marie. In quo Robertus Archiepiscopus dominicatu triginta annis et plus quiete tenuit; sed postea amore captus filiorum Ricardo filio suo injuste tradidit. Membra ipsius terre sunt hec; Putham, Duuerendel, Puteolis, Airumesnil Hagenonmesnil, Hugonismesnil, Rainulfivallis, Le Coldret, Hupei, Cornepit; et partes de Baslei, scilicet Montane, Muntut et Extriemontem, quas adquisivit Robertus Archiepiscopus judicio Ricardi Comitis et principum ejus in appendiciis Duuerent; ad quarum divisionem et saisionem misit Ricardus Comes Goscelinum filium Hecdonis, Ricardum vicecomitem filium Tescelini, et Radulfum filium Episcopi, et Osbertum de Augia. Hi manducaverunt ipse die cum archiepiscopo in silva, que dicitur Blanca, et flagellaverunt ibi plures puerulos atque eos bene refocillaverunt in recordatione et memoria hujus facti. Fuerunt etiam quamplures conpatriote, scilicet, Walterus et Wacelinus frater ejus de Euermo, Hagenon de Hubovilla, Ricardus de Sancto Supplicio, Reinerus de Berengerivilla et Ricardus de Capitevallis et multi aliib.

The cartulary of the abbey of St. Amand contains this record, proving the identity of Roger, son of the bishop, and consequently that of his brother Ralph, as sons of Hugh, bishop of Coutances :—

Cum prescriptis benefices illud etiam in hoc privilegio (i. e. Willelmi Regis Anglorum quinto anno regni sui) annotatur donum, quod Rogeriua filius Hugonis episcopi Constancie urbis, ecclesie gloriose Dei genitricis Marie et beati Amandi Christi antistitis, que est infra muros urbis Rothomagensis, concessit quando filiam suam, videlicet, Emmam Christi obsequio mancipavit. In comitatu Talou hoc mansum, quod vulgo vocatur Herboumesnil, predictus Rogerius dedit cum uno molendino. In eodem comitatu terram que vocatur de la Mare prefate ecclesie tribuit, quam nunc tenet Walchelinus. Preterea hanc terram, quam nunc Turoldus presbyter et fratur ejus Turchitillus tenent, cum hiis, que pertinent ad illam, donavit similiter Rogerius. In hac elemosina habeatur quedam piscaria, que de censu xv solidos solvit monachis Sancti Dionisii unoquoque anno -f Signum Willelmi Normannorum comitis. + Signum ipsius Rogerii.

Aubermesnil is a commune in the canton of Blangy, arrondissement of Neufchatel, departement of La Seine-Inferieure, between Mortemer and Foucarmont, a district which had anciently the name of the comte of Talou, as comprising the territory limited by the river Bresle, anciently named Augus; and it was doubtless parcel of the fief, of which the castle of Mortemer was originally the chief seat, and from which the descendants of Roger, as well as himself, had their surname. Hugh, bishop of Coutances, was present at the dedication of the church of Fecamp in the year 990, and survived as late as the year 1020. Also of his endowment was the priory of St. Lo of Rouen, to which he transferred seven canons, of those who had been appointed to the cathedral of Coutances, afterwards the usual place of residence of his successors in the capital of the duchy, being inclusive of the church of Blosseville-Bonsecours, in the vicinity of the Mont de Rouen, a commune, which was shared between his sons. According to the continuator of William, the monk of Jumieges, whose own history closed with the accession of Robert Courte-heuze to the ducal throne, and who from internal evidence. was doubtless a monk of the abbey of Bec Herluin, the families of Warren and Mortemer derived their descent from a common ancestor, and such tradition was undoubtedly correct. In the text of Duchesne we read this paragraph of this writer, under the heading Quomodo eadem Comitissa sorores suas et neptes nobilioribus Normannorum in conjugium tradidit et de posteritate earumdem, having reference to the countess Gunnor, wife of Richard I. Comte of Normandy, deceased in 996.

Et quoniam de sororibus Gunnoris Comitissae fecimus mentionem, libet etiam de illis, qui secundo gradu consanguinitatis affines eidem fuere, prout ab antiquis accepimus, aliqua dicere. Habuit ergo ex fratre suo Herfasto eadem Comitissa nepotem Osbernum de Crepon, patrem videlicet Willelmi, Comitis Herefordia;, viri per omnia laudabilis. Neptes vero plures praedicta Gunnor habuit: sed solummodo de quinque, quibus maritis nupserint, audivi. Una itaque earum matrimonio copulata est patri primi Willelmi de Warenna, ex qua natus est idem Willelmus, postea Comes Surreiae, et Rogerius de Mortuomari, frater ipsius. Altera Nicholao de Bascheritvilla, ex cujus posteritate natus est Willelmus Martellus et Walterus de Sancto Martino.

The memory of the aged people from whom this writer received this information, cannot be implicitly relied upon, and the lapse of time requires that we ascend a generation higher, so as to fix the marriage of this nameless niece with one contemporary with Richard I. in the person of Hugh, afterwards bishop of Coutances, and father of Ralph de Warren and Roger de Mortemer, as this contemporary charter witnesses.

Non inconsulte antiquorum ritu approbatum constat, ut quod in constabiliendis rebus concors fidelium sententia approbat, hoc fideli litterae tradatur, quae longiore aevo perdurat. Cujus vivaci testimonio cunctis tam presentibus quam et nostris minoribus notum facimus, nos fratres in Rotomagensi monte Sanctae Trinitati, Deo nostro, in unum servientes, quod habita cum Rodulfo Warethnae emptionis conventione in perpetuum hujus nostri loci alodium, e vicino ejus centum acres silvae triginta emimus libris, et quattuordecim acres terrae arabilis in Blovilla decem aliis libris, et item bene ficium coci ejus Odonis apud villam dictam Merdeplud aliis decem libris. Item quoque pratum ponti Hunfridi subjacens decem libris. Item ab eodem Rodulfo terrain unius carrucae ad Blovillam pro sexdecim libris et terram praeti Sottevillse pro decem libris accepimus; et in ejus necessitate pallium unum pro viginti libris et xxx solidis dedimus. Item de supradicta silva centum acras emimus a Rogerio filio Episcopi, qui et particeps et coheres est ejusdem allodii, xv libris. Sed et ipsam partem de castellario, qua nostra: emptioni est continua et ad ipsum pertinebat, emimus xxx solidis. Supradictas autem centum acres quidam noster familiaris, nomine Rogerius, suo adjutorio nos confortavit emere, quum ipse prior xv libras pro sexaginta acres dedit, et post ad centenam perfectionem aliis xv libris, quas solvimus, pervenire nos fecit. Hujus emptionis affirmatorem dominum nostrum Willelmum, Normannorum ducem, ex ejus signo subter agnoscendum constat, et Rotomagensis archiepiscopi Malgerii subsignatam auctoritatem, et hujus rei ne quis infringere presumat affirmationem.

Signum Willelmi comitis. Signum Archipraesulis Malgerii. Signum ejusdem Rodulfi de Guarethna. Signum Beatricis, uxoris ejus. Signum Rogerii filii episcopi. Signum Hubertii filii Turoldi. Signum Willelmi. Signum Hugonis. S. Hepponis. S. Rotberti. S. Warnerii forestarii. S. Erchemboldi. S. Gunfridi. Signum Snelli. Signum Willelmi filii Rogerii, heredis scilicet ipsius, qui, ut omni paternae conventioni annueret, partem suam condonaret, xiiii libras et x solidos a nobis accepit. Signum Hugonis fratris ejus. Signum Rodulfi de Cruizmara. S. Turoldi filii Osberni de Freschenes. Signum Gulberti filii Rodulfi de Cruizmara. Signum Hugonis de Flamenvilla. Ex nostra parte signum Ricardi, senescal. S. Bernardi coci. S. Ansfredi coci. S. Ascelini prepositi. S. Rodulfi filii Benzelli.

Mauger, archbishop of Rouen, was the successor of Archbishop Robert, his paternal uncle, deceased in 1037, which see he retained until May, 1055. Blosseville, Eauplet, and Pont Honfroi, are in the immediate vicinity of the Mont de Rouen, and Sotteville-lez-Rouen lies next its suburb on the south side of the Seine. The use of the word castellarium, in the sense of castellaniae districtus, attests the tenure of this land of Roger to have been annexed to the castle of Mortemer, and among the witnesses are the two sons of Roger, William and Hugh, the former of whom ratified the sale made by his father. Below in the same cartulary we read:

Item Rodulfus de Warenna, consensu uxoris suae vocabulo Emmae, domno Rainerio abbati et Monachis Sanctae Trinitatis totam portionem suam silvae montium Blovillae et Scurrae septem libris denariorum vendidit, quarta feria ante Pascha Domini, Willelmo, inclito duce Normannorum, assensum prebente. S. ejusdem Willelmi comitis. S. ipsius Rodulfi. Signum Emmae, uxoris ejus. S. Hugonis de Flamenvilla. S. Leudonis. Vol. in. c Ex nostra parte. S. Ansfredi, coci. S. Bernardi, coci. S. Warnerii forestarii. S. Alberici forestarii.

Owing to this arrangement Monsieur Deville, the editor of this cartulary, plausibly assumes that these charters were in chronological order, and consequently appended this note; "hic enim invenitur Rodulfus I. de Warenna, conjux Beatricis, postea Emma?, ex qua Rodulfum II. et Willelmum I. filios habuit. Hic Willelmus I. comitatus est Willelmum Conquestorem in Angliam, a quo recepit fere trecenta maneria, postea a Willelmo Rufo, comitatum Surreiae," at the foot of the following charter:

Vir quidem, nomine Hugo de Flamenvilla, vendidit Sanctae Trinitatis monachis decimam, quam tenebat de domino suo Rodulfo de Warethna in Amundi Villa et terram unius mansi, annuente ipso Rodulfo, qui etiam, accepto precio a monachis, dedit illis consuetudinem moltae, quae sui juris erat in praedicto manso; et in Maltevilla decimam, quam ex supradicto viro et ex alio, nomine Willelmo, filio Walonae, tenebat, et unum hortum et decimam culturae de Ramara. Item in eadem villa, &c. In Flamenvilla quoque ipse predictus Hugo totam propriae carrucae decimam, necnon et omnium virorum ejusdem villa ad se pertinentium, tam vernaculorum quam rusticorum, nobis tradidit et donavit. Post modicum tempus pretaxati Hugonis dominus, scilicet supra memoratus Rodulfus et uxor ejus, vocabulo Emma, ac filii eorum Rodulfus et Willelmus, ad nostrum venerunt monasterium; una cum eis venit ipse Hugo, rogavit eos ut harum omnium conventionum donationem in perpetuam hereditatem facereut, et coram altari sancta Trinitatis suis manibus cartam signarent, et fecerunt. Harum omnium conventionum testes multi sunt, et maxime hi, qui eodem die, quo ejus puer monachus est effectus, interfuerunt. Cum quibus ipse etiam predictus Hugo cartam manu sua firmavit, ibidem abbate Rainerio cum suis monachis astante.

S. Rodulfi de Warethna. S. Vidonis de Briothna. S. Willelmi, filii Walonis. S. Emmae, uxoris Rodulfi de Warethna. S. Rodulfi, filii eorum. S. Willelmi fratris ejus. S. ipsius Hugonis de Flamenvilla. S. Rotberti filii ejus. S. Gisleberti filii ejusdem. S. Rodulfi de Wesneval. Ex nostra parte. S. Ricardi senescal. S. Osmundi, marescal. S. Bernardi coci. S. Ansfredi coci.

The second signature is that of Guy de Brionne, son of Rainald, Comte of Burgundy, who in another charter relating to a sale of tithes in Motteville and Emanville is styled Comte; quam venditionem Wido comes et Rodulfus de Warethna, cum uxore sua nomine Emma, annuerunt et confirmaverunt. His mother, Adelis, was daughter of Richard II., Duke of Normandy, and had Brionne of the gift of his cousin; but in the year 1047, he formed a conspiracy to dispossess his benefactor of his sovereignty, and in a battle fought at Val-esdunes in the comte of the Oximin, was defeated by the united forces of the French and Normans. Thence, having fled to Brionne, he was besieged in his castle three years, until, compelled by famine, he surrendered and implored the mercy of the duke, which he obtained, according to William of Jumieges; "cujus dux, suorum consultu, miseriae misertus clementer ille pepercit et recepto castello Brioci cum suis domesticis eum manere in domo suo jussit." This second marriage of Rodulf de Warren was subsequent to the marriage of William the Conqueror with Matilda, daughter of Baldwin de Lille, Comte of Flanders, as we learn from the following record, inserted in the cartulary of the abbey of Preaux, dedicated to St. Peter, in the vicinity of Pont-Audemer; and hence it is probable that the two sons named above were the issue of this first wife and not of the second, as conjectured by Monsieur Deville.

Eodem anno, quo in conjugium sortitus est Normannorum Marchio, Willelmus nomine, Balduini comitis filiam, dedit eancto Petro Pratelli consuetudines, quas habebat in quadam terra, que Wascolium vulgo vocatur, scilicet, hainfaram, utlac, rat, incendium, bernagium, bellum. Pro quibus abbas ejusdem loci Ansfridus nomine ei dignam dedit pecuniam, id est, x libras denariorum et orationes loci Pratelli. Eodem anno quidam miles de Warenna, Radulfus nomine, annuente conjuge sua Beatrice, dedit sancto Petro Pratelli quicquid in eadem terra, scilicet, Wascolio, habebat in piano, in aqua et silva; et ideo dedit ei predictus abbas societatem loci et quinque uncias auri et centum solidos et anulum aureum unum appendentem novem nummos et unum coclar argenteum. Huic conventioni interfuerunt testes ex parte Abbatis Rogerius Alius Hunfridi, eo tempore vicecomes Rotomagi, et Girardus, comitis botellarius, et Guarnerius et Gotmundus et Gaufridus milites Abbatis et Christianus et Herbertus presbyteri. Ex parte vero Radulfi, Godefridus, frater ejus, et Hilbertus Alius Turoldi de Fontanis et Robertus filius Ansfridi de Ivetot.

Ansfridus succeeded as abbot of Preaux, his predecessor Einardus in 1050, and the marriage of Duke William with Matilda did not take place until 1053, so that we are able to fix this date as that of the above grant, and to add a third brother Godefridus to the issue of Hugh, bishop of Coutances. Vascceuil is situate on the river Andelle, in the vicinity of the forest of Lyons. On the other hand the cartulary of the Holy Trinity affords two specific dates as to the time of his being the husband of Emma.

Notum sit omnibus sanctae ecclesie filius tam praesentibus quam etiam futuris, qualiter vir quidam illustris, nomine Rodulfus de Warenna, cum conjuge sua, vocabulo Emma, divina favente gratia, quatuor suis juris ecclesias cum omnibus appenditiis suis, videlicet, harum villarum, id est, Amundi villae, Anglicevillae, Flamenvillae, Maltevillae, domno Abbati Rainerio et monachis ejus pro xxx libris denariorum, in alodio vendiderunt et tradiderunt. Sed et unicuique ecclesiae contiguos sex jugeres terrse, quos acres dicimus, supradicto abbati et monachis in peqietuam hereditatem tradiderunt. Hoc ergo actum est favore et auctoritate Willelmi, consulis Normanniae, qui etiam hujus negotii donationem firmavit, et proprio adnotationis signo cartam corroboravit.

Signum ejusdem Willelmi comitis. Signum Rodulfi de Warenna. Signum Emmas uxoris ejus. Signum Hugonis de Flamenvilla, Ex nostra parte. Signum Bernardi coci. S. Ricardi Senescal. S. Osbemi Bruncosted. S. Ansfredi coci. S. Heddonis de Chanaan. Acta sunt haec anno ab Incarnatione Domini M.LVIIII.

Omnibus sanctae ecclesiae filiis notum sit, quod Rodulfus de Warenna ejusque conjux, vocabulo Emma, cum filiis suis, Rodulfo scilicet atque Willelmo, post annos fere xvi, quam quatuor villarum Caletensis pagi, Maltevillae, videlicet, Flamenvillae, Amundivillae et Anglicevillae ecclesias et earum decimas nobis vendiderant, convenientes in hoc monasterio anno dominicae incarnationis MLXIIII, omnem totius Osulfivillae ejusdem Caletensis pagi, cum ecclesia, decimam, quam a Guillelmo filio Rogerii filii Hugonis episcopi xxx libris denariorum emerant, pro redemptione animarum suarum in perpetuam hereditatem nobis dederunt, et donationem super altare Sancta Trinitatis posuerunt coram testibus.

Signum ipsius Rodulfi. Signum Emmae uxoris ejus. Signum Rodulfi filii eorum. Signum Willelmi, fratris ejus. Signum Hugonis de Flamenvilla. Signum Rainaldi. Signum Guillelmi, filiorum ejus. Signum Gisleberti, clerici. Signum Leudonis. Ex nostra parte testes: Ricardus senescal. Bernardus, cocus; Ricardus de Appivilla; Guillelmus, sartor; Rainaldus, Anglicus; Walterius, cocus; Albericus de Blovilla; Osbernus Bruncosted.

The five churches named in these evidences are those of Mauteville-l'Eneval, otherwise Motteville-les-deux-clochers,Flamanville-l'Eneval, Emanville, Anglesqueville-sur-Saane and Auzouville l'Eneval, the affix of L'Eneval being derived from the manor of Eneval in the parish of Pavilly, which was the head of a barony, including these parishes in the pays de Caux, in times subsequent to the annexation of Normandy to the realm of France. Besides the proof thus afforded of the coheirship of these two brothers in the pays de Caux, we find that Roger, son of Bishop Hugh, sold to the monastery of the Holy Trinity and to the abbot Rainerius the multure of all his men, both free men and husbandmen, living under his rule in Blosseville and Le Mesnil Enard and Neuvillette, and in Lescure and Eauplet, as well as of his own house situate in the city of Rouen, for seven pounds, with the consent of his wife Odain, and their sons William and Hugh. In like manner Ralph de Warren sold for the same sum to the aforesaid abbot the multure of all the men belonging to him in the same villages. The last mention of this baron in the same cartulary occurs in this form, and from it we may infer that he had not been present at the battle of Hastings.

Ea tempestate qua Guillelmus, dux Normannorum egregius, cum classico apparatu ingentique exercitu, Anglorum terram expetiit, quidam miles, nomine Osmundus de Bodes, cum aliis illuc profectus, et langore correptus atque ad extrema perductus, pro animae suae remedio, dedit sanctae Trinitati omnem decimam terrae suae in alodio, quam domini sui Rodulfi de Warenna tenebat beneficio. Unde et eidem domino suo Rodulfo, ut hoc annueret, xxx solidos dedimus; quod et fecit ante altare Sanctae Trinitatis.

Signum Rodulfi de Warenna. Signum ejusdem Osmundi. Signum Rodulfi heredis Osmundi. Testes, Alveredus de la Bruere; GoifTredus del Busc; Ricardus de Drincurt; Ilbertus de Longocampo, Bernardus cocus; Robertus pistor.

Prom these evidences we are able to deduce these facts; that Ralph or Rodulf, son of the bishop, was twice married, and that his two sons were the issue of his first wife, Beatrice, as otherwise they would not have attained sufficient age to have been in arms as early as the year 1055, the exact date of the battle of Mortemer, both according to Ordericus Vitalis, who states it to have occurred in the eighth year after the battle of Val-es-dunes, in 1047, and according to Robert du Mont, who has inserted an account of it in his additions to the chronicle of Sigebert, monk of the abbey of Gemblours in Brabant, under that year. The account of the former writer is put into the discourse, which he attributes to William the Conqueror on his death-bed, in these words; "in time past King Henry (of France) highly incensed against me dispatched a vast army of Franks in two divisions, in order to overwhelm our territories by a double invasion. He himself introduced one phalanx into the diocese of Evreux, in order that he might devastate everything as far as the river Seine, and entrusted another to Odo his brother, and Reginald de Clermont, and to two counts, Ralph de Montdidier and Guy of Ponthieu, that they might quickly enter Normandy by the fords of the Epte, and lay waste Bray and Talou, and the whole of the Roumois, with sword and fire, and from thence continue their ravages, until they reached the sea. I therefore, upon receipt of this intelligence, without delay set out to meet the foe, placed myself with my forces along the bank of the Seine, continually in front of the king's tents, and wheresoever he strove to depopulate my land, with arms and iron I prepared to encounter him. Meanwhile I sent Robert, comte of Eu, and Roger de Mortemer, and other most valiant knights, against Odo and his legions. Who, whilst near a castle, which is called Mortemer, they rencountered the French, the troops of both armies being ready, a terrible battle was fought with great effusion of blood on both sides. On the one party the Gauls were furious, animated with the desire of winning the land; on the other the Normans dealt blows in rage, burning with the hope of escaping defeat, and of defending themselves and their hearths. At length, by the divine aid, the Normans conquered and the French fled. This battle they fought beyond the Seine, in winter before Lent, the eighth year after the battle of Val-es-dunes. Then Guy, comte of Ponthieu, was made prisoner, and Odo, with Reginald and others, who were fleet of foot, was routed. Comte Rodulf likewise would have been in like manner a prisoner, unless Roger, the leader of my forces, had favoured him; for he had long since done homage to him.

Wherefore in this his necessity he rendered to him a fair and sufficient service, in as much as he protected him for three days in his castle, and afterward conducted him safe to his home. For this offence I ejected Roger from Normandy, but soon after, being reconciled, I restored to him the rest of his honours, save the castle of Mortemer, in which he had saved my enemy, and this I took from him rightly, as I believe. Yet nevertheless I gave it to William de Warren, his kinsman, a loyal youth." The same writer also mentions William de Warren as having been present at the battle of Hastings.

The word used by this writer to denote the degree of relationship between Roger de Mortemer and his nephew William de Warren is simply consanguineus; yet the continuator of William of Jumieges describes him as son of the first William de Warren, through ignorance of his real descent, in this passage, at Rogerius de Mortuomari, filius primi Willelmi de Warrenna, monasterium sancti Victoris in proprio solo fundavit. Robert du Mont, in his Tractatus de Abbatibus et Abbatiis Normannorum et aedificatoribus earum, writes at Rogerius de Mortuomari, filius Walterii de Sancto Martino, frater vero primi Willelmi de Warrenna, monasterium in proprio solo fundavit, in utter forge tfulness that it was the niece of the Countess Gunnor, married to Nicholas de Baqueville, who was mother of William Martel and of Walter de St. Martin, as we learn from the continuator of William de Jumieges, (who by many is supposed to have been this identical Robert du Mont, who was a monk and claustral prior of Bec-Herluin, before being elected abbot of Mont St. Michel in 1154,) in the paragraph cited above. The castles of St. Victor and St. Riquieren-riviere were those which remained to Roger de Mortemer after the offence, and near the former was a priory dependant upon the abbey of St. Ouen, which upon the petition of Roger de Mortemer and Advisa his wife, in 1074, was erected into an abbey, and to which the family of Warren were benefactorsc.

c The following charter is evidence of the extent of these benefactions, and fully corroborates the assumed descent of the houses of Warren and Mortimer from a common ancestor:

Hamelinus, Comes Guarenne, venerabili Rotomagensis Ecclesie archiepiscopo et decano ceterisque ejusdem Ecclesie personis et omnibus hominibus suis Francis et Anglis, salutem. Sciates me concessisse et charta mea confirmasse pro salute anime mee et uxoris mee Isabelle Comitisse et Guillelmi filii mei, et parentum et antecessorum nostrorum, omnes donationes, quas Guillelmu8 de Guarenna et Comes Guillelmus, filius ejus, et homines sui dederunt Deo et ecclesie sancti Victoris monachisque ibidem Deo servientibus, tam in ecclesiis quam in decimis, tam in terris quam in redditibus, et in aliis donationibus; scilicet ecclesiam de Bellencumbre cum decima eidem pertinente et decimam molendinorum et thelonei ejusdem ville. Quia vero ab antiquo prefati monachi in ipso redditu molendinorum videlicet et thelonei non amplius quam viginti libras habuerant, ego ex proprio dono meo concessi illis et confirmavi ut integram habeant decimam, sive minuatur redditus sive augeatur. Apud Brachetuit terrain, ubi presbyter manet, et quatuor acras terre et quatuor mansuras; sed una de illis cambiata est pro alia apud Lovetot; item apud Brachetuit totam decimam ovium mearum. Concessi etiam totus nemus Rogerii de Cresseio a nemore Pasnagii usque ad semitam de valle Hidose fovee, sicut idem Rogerius, presente comite Guillelmo et concedente,Deo et sancto Victori dedit et donum super altari cum illo posuit. Concessi etiam, sicut ipse Rogerius concessit, sequentiam ejusdem nemoris in terrain suam, ita ut monachi talem habeant inde justitiam, qualem ipse habebat. Habebit idem Rogerius tres charitates per annum, unam ad Nativitatem, et aliam ad Pascha, tertiam ad festum Sancti Victoris et ad festum Sancti Martini botas vel duos solidos; in unaquaque charitate erunt quatuor simenelli et unum sextarium vini. Ecclesiam quoque de Capramonte et medietatem ejusdem ville, tam in terra quam in aqua. Ecclesiam etiam Sancti Audoeni de Sylva cum decima et decern acras terre. Apud Montem David duas mansuras et unam apud Monsteriolum, datas a Radulpho de Cresseio pro anima fratris sui Hugonis. Relaxavi etiam et concessi ex proprio dono meo redditum, quem de duabus prefatis mansuris, scilicet, Montis David, habere consueveram, videlicet unam minam avene, duas bidentes et duas gallinas, quamdiu abbas et monachi easdem mansuras in suo dominio tenuerint. Quartam quoque partem ecclesie Sancti Helerii et decimam eidem parti pertinentem, datam a Rogerio de Wassonvilla; duas garbas de decima de Almaisnil et Capramonte de feudo meo datas a Rogerio et Amelio fratre ejus. Iterum apud Brachetuit duas partes decime. Quare volo et firmiter precipio quod predicti monachi

Ordericus Vitalis in the fourth book of his Ecclesiastical History, has a paragraph enumerating the several earldoms given in England to his followers by William the Conqueror, inclusive of Walter, surnamed Gifard and William de Warren;

Gualterio quoque cognomento Gifardo, comitatum Buckingeham et Guillelmo de Guarenna, qui Gundredam sororem Gherbodi conjugern habuit, dedit Sutregiam.

As regards both these earldoms, the writer has anticipated their grants by a few years, as the title of earl is not given to either in Domesday Book, and we know from an authentic charter that the latter owed his elevation to King William Rufus. Gorbod, the brother of Gundreda, is mentioned in a preceding paragraph by this writer in these terms:

Cestram et comitatum ejus Gherbodo Flandrensi jamdudum rex dederat; qui magna ibi et difficilia tam ab Anglis quam a Guallis adversantibus pertulerat. Deinde legatione coactus suorum, quos in Flandria dimiserat, et quibus hereditarium honorem suum commiserat, eundi, citoque redeundi lieentiam a rege acceperat; sed ibi adversa illaqueatus fortuna in manus inimicorum inciderat, et in vinculis coercitus, mundanaque felicitate privatus, longae miserise threnos depromere didicerat.

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Roger de Mortimer, Lord of Wigmore's Timeline

1022
1022
Mortemer-en-Brai, sur la rivière d´Eaulne, Normandie, France.
1065
1065
now Saint-Victor-l'Abbaye, Seine-Maritime, Upper Normandy, France
1078
1078
Age 56
Saint-Valery-en-Caux, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
1078
Age 56
Mortemer Abbey, Mortemer, Departement de la Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
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