ASHWATHAMA DRONA (deceased)

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About ASHWATHAMA DRONA

Ashwatthama's role in the Kurukshetra war

Since Hastinapur, ruled by King Dhrishtrastra, offered Dronacharya the privilege of teaching the Kuru princes, both Dronacharya and Ashwatthama were loyal to Hastinapur and fought for the Kauravas in the Kurukshetra war. Before Dronacharya's death, Ashwatthama visited his father in order to seek his blessing so that he could win the war for the Kauravas, but Dronacharya refused. He advised Ashwatthama to win the war using his own strength and not through a blessing from him. After the death of Dushaasana, Ashwatthama even suggested to Duryodhan to make peace with the Pandavas, keeping in mind the welfare of Hastinapur, but Duryodhan strongly rejected his suggestion. Ashwatthama's hatred towards the Pandavas increased after Duryodhan's defeat to Bhima during the Gadayuddha. [edit]Ashwatthama meets Duryodhana On the night after Duryodhan was mortally wounded by Bhima during the Gadayuddha, Ashwatthama, along with Kripacharya and Kritavarma visited the spot where the dying Duryodhana was lying. Ashwatthama told Duryodhana that he will never forgive the Pandavas for leading Duryodhana to this situation and also for his father's (Dronacharya) dishonourable death. He swore to kill the Pandavas by any possible means. Duryodhana made Ashwatthama the General of the Kaurava forces. [edit]Ashwatthama's attack on Pandava camp

Arastthaman propitiates Śiva before making a night attack on the Pandava camp On the last night of the war after Duryodhana's defeat, a very disturbed and restless Ashwatthama was sitting sleepless under a large tree. An owl caught his attention. He observed that an owl was being attacked and harassed by crows in the morning. This owl attacked the same group of crows at night. This gave him an idea of attacking the Pandava camp at midnight. He gathered the only other surviving Kaurava warriors -- Kritavarma and Kripacharya and attacked the Pandava camp on the 18th night of the Kurukshetra war. He killed Dhrishtadyumna, Shikhandi and many other prominent warriors of Pandava army while they were sleeping. Those who tried to flee from Ashwatthama's wrath, were hacked down by Kripacharyya and Kritavarma who were positioned at the camp's entrance. He killed Draupadi's five sons, the Upapandavas, while they were sleeping believing them to be the five Pandava brothers. After destroying the entire Pandava camp, Ashwatthama carried the five heads of Draupadi's sons and proceeded towards Duryodana claiming that he had beheaded the Pandavas. Then, Duryodana told him to give the head of Bhima. Ashwatthama gave the head of Draupadi's son thinking that it to be Bheema's head. Duryodana held it in his palm and tried to crush the head into pieces. Since, the head facing Duryodana does not turn on the other side, then Duryodana declared that Ashwatthama has not killed Bhima and other Pandava brothers. This was because the magnitude of the sibling rivalry between Duryodana and Bheema is to such a height, that even after beheading Bhima, Bhima's head will never see Duryodana's face. This makes Duryodhana sad, as Draupadi's sons are the last Kuru princes to rule Hastinapura. Then Duryodhana dies. Ashwatthama, realising his mistake, went to Sage Vedavyasa's ashram in order to seek salvation (prayaschittam) for his crime. Aswattahma believed that it was acceptable for him to attack the unexpected Pandavas due to his father’s death by unjust means. Although he did believe his vengeance to be justified, he was warned by people of his own side that it was not. Kripa even tells Aswatthama to seek the advice of Dhristarashtra and Vidura, elders of his family who are much wiser and more experienced than the young Aswatthama. “Aswatthama rejects Kripa’s reasoning: all men favour their own judgements Aswatthama, though a Brahmin, has always followed the Kshatriya Dharma."[3] They are not too pleased with Aswattahma‘s words and advise him not to go through with this adharmic plan. “Kripa emphasises the importance of taking the advise of friends and elders, and counsels Aswatthama against pursuing his plan."[4] [edit]Pandavas chase for Ashwatthama

Ashvatthaman losses his Shirortana The Pandavas and Krishna who were away during night, now returned to their camp the next day morning. Incensed over this cowardly act of Ashwatthama, the Pandavas went after him to sage Vyasa's ashram. On seeing the approaching angered Pandavas, Ashwatthama who learnt that he had killed the upapandavas and not the Pandavas, realised that he was trapped with the Pandavas. As a last resort, he used his sacred knowledge of the Vedas to devise a Bramhashirastra from a blade of grass and invoked it against the Pandavas and Krishna, although he was strictly forbidden to do so by his father Dronacharya for any purpose whatsoever. On seeing the Brahmashirastra approaching the Pandavas, Krishna asked Arjuna to invoke the same. Arjuna invokes Bramhashirastra, which he received by Dronacharya itself, towards Ashwatthama. On seeing the two powerful astras heading for a head on cataclysmic (catastrophic) collision that would result in the total annihilation of the entire Earth, sage Vyasa stopped these divine weapons from colliding with each other by using his yogic power. He asked both these warriors to withdraw their respective weapons. Arjuna was able to withdraw his Brahmashirastra, while Ashwatthama could not do so as Dronocharya did not teach his son how to withdraw it.An archer who is able to invoke and withdraw any Divyastra (Divine Weapon) can invoke it as many times as he wishes. Dronacharya taught Arjuna to withdraw Brahmashirastra but he did not do so to Ashwathama, thus limiting the power of Ashwathama to invoke Brahmashirastra for only one instance. However, Ahswathama was given the option of deviating his weapon towards one single isolated object in a place that was not inhabited by any form of life, so that the Brahmashirastra does not harm anyone on Earth. But Ashwatthama, out of spite, directed the weapon towards the womb of Uttara (wife of Abhimanyu) who was carrying Abhimanyu's son (Parikshit) in an attempt to end the lineage of the Pandavas. Krishna used his sudarshana chakra to stop the Brahmashirastra and save Uttara's unborn child. [edit]Krishna's curse on Ashwatthama Bhishma strove hard throughout his life to protect Hastinapur in his quest of finding the legal heir of Sathyavati's clan. Bhishma entrusted on Krishna this responsibility of finding the next heir of Sathyavati's family and to continue the lineage of the Pandavas. Although, after Duryodhana's defeat it appeared that Hastinapur was now safe, as it was clear that Yudhishthira was the next king of Hastinapur, Ashwatthama's action brought an end to the Pandava line. Lord Krishna then placed a curse on Ashwatthama that "he will carry the burden of all people's sins on his shoulders and will roam alone like a ghost without getting any love and courtesy till the end of Kaliyuga;[5] He will have neither any hospitality nor any accommodation; He will be in total isolation from mankind and society; His body will suffer from a host of incurable diseases forming sores and ulcers that would never heal". Ashwatthama had a gem which was similar to Shamantakamani on his forehead which used to protect the wearer from fear of any snakes, ghosts, demigods and demons. So, Ashwatthama was asked to surrender this gem. Lord Sri Krishna further states that "the wound caused by the removal of this gem on his forehead will never heal and will suffer from leprosy, till the end of Kaliyuga". It is believed that in Kaliyuga, his name will be "Suryakanta". Thus, Ashwatthama will be in search of death every moment, and yet he will never die. At the end of Kali Yuga, Ashwatthama is to meet Sri Kalki, the tenth and final avatar of Lord Vishnu. [edit]Krishna revives Abhimanyu's son Uttara delivered a child which was dead. All the women approached lord Krishna to bring the baby back to life who was the only successor of the Pandava dynasty. Krishna poured a few drops of water on his hands and said, "If I have truly followed Dharma throughout my life, then let this child come back to life". He sprinkled the water on the child and touched him on his chest, reviving Abhimanyu's son. Later, Abhimanyu's son becomes an ardent devotee of lord Krishna and was named Parikshit (the one who has been tested, when he was in his mother's womb; Lord Krishna rescued him in the womb). The Pandavas ruled for 36 years. After the end of Pandavas, Parikshit ruled Hastinapur for 27 years and was succeeded by Janamejaya. [edit]Ashwatthama and Brahmastra

Ashwatthama seeks the knowledge of Brahmastra from his father Dronacharya. [edit]The partial knowledge of Abhimanyu and Ashwatthama Abhimanyu is often quoted as an example for his partial knowledge about Chakravyha. Abhimanyu knew how to penetrate the Chakravyha, but did not know how to exit from it during the time of danger contributed to his death. Similarly, Ashwatthama had a partial knowledge in the context of Brahmastra. He only knew how to invoke it. But did not know how to withdraw it. It was only Arjuna who had complete knowledge of both Padmavyooha (to break and exit from it) and Brahmastra (to invoke and withdraw it). In case of Ashwatthama, Dronacharya teaches Ashwatthama only to invoke Brahmastra, but does not teach him how to withdraw it. If an archer is aware of both the invocation and withdrawal of any Celestial weapon (Dev-astra), then he can invoke it as many times as he wants. Hence, to avoid Ashwatthama from invoking Brahmastra multiple times, Dronacharya only gives a partial knowledge about it.[citation needed]If an archer invokes Brahmastra, it not only destroys the target, but also leads to a famine for 12 years in the region. If a Brahmastra is invoked twice, then it can even lead to draining the entire ocean on Earth. The battle was reaching to a point of no end when a vengeful Ashathama invoked the potent Brahmastra and shot an arrow in gross violation of the code of conduct to use such a powerful weapon on mortals, when Krishna intervened and made the rishiputra realize his folly. Regretful and a tired Ashwathama realized his folly and was repentant, at which, Krishna offered a solution resulting in limited damage by making the weapon kill the, foetus form of Parikshit, while in Uttara's womb (to be later revived by Krishna himself, and later who would turn into the famous King Parikshit) and as a repentance, made Ashwathama lose his source of power, the jewel that adorned his shining forehead. This loss of the jewel that adorned his forehead made Ashwathama lose his state of mental alertness and was forced to retire to obscurity as a derelict in the forests. Uttara's son, Parikshit, was the sole surviving dynasty of the Kuru clan and eventually became king of Hastinapura.

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ASHWATHAMA DRONA's Timeline

-3113
-3113
- -3093
Hastinapur, Uttar Pradesh, India

EVENTS:-- KRIPA AS A STUDENT & TEACHER---DRONA AS A DECIPLE WITH BHARADWAJA ALONG WITH DRUPADA AND DRONA WITH PARASURAMA----CHILD ASHWATHAMA & EVENT WITH DRUPADA. ENCOUNTER WITH PRINCES OF KURUS.

-3093
-3093
- -3093
Hastinapur, Uttar Pradesh, India

1) EXHIBITION OF PRINCESS'S SKILLS AND THE TOURNAMENT..

2) KARNA & CROWNED AS KING OF ANGA.

# 3) GURU DRONA'S TUITION FEE

-3093
- -3081
Hastinapur, Uttar Pradesh, India

Military academy of Drona
Hastinapura the capital of Kuru kingdom was the center of military education during the period ofMahabharata. Drona was the foremost of the preceptors in all modes of warfare. Drona himself learned the science of warfare from his father Bharadwaja and the great warrior of the age viz Bhargava Rama.Bhishma, who was the foremost of the Kuru warriors, also was a disciple of Bhargava Rama. Kripawas another preceptor of arms. Under the guidance of all these scions of military science, the Pandavas and Kauravas became highly skilled in warfare. This military academy was the reason for the dominance of Kauravas and Pandavas among the kingdoms of ancient India. In the academy, Drona taught his disciples skills such as archery, mace fighting, sword fighting, and javelin fighting, among other weaponry skills, and these in permutation with the modes of warfare on foot, on horse, on a chariot, and on a war-elephant. He also taught his students how to form military formations, how to strategize the military moves and how to ride chariots. Drona's specialty was archery, particularly in the situation where the bowman was moving in a chariot. Arjuna was the foremost among his disciples as a bowman. Bhima and Duryodhana excelled in mace-fight; Dhristadyumna, Nakula and Sahadeva excelled in sword-fight.
Even Dhristadyumna, the prince from the Panchala Kingdom who was closest competitor of the Kurus for dominance in Aryavarta, came to study the science of warfare under Drona, in his military academy at Hastinapura, the capital of Kurus (1,169). Others who came to Hastinapura seeking military science were Ekalavya the prince of Nishada Kingdom (1,134) and Karna the prince from Anga Kingdom, ruled by Suta tribes.

-3067
June -3067
Hastinapur, Uttar Pradesh, India

JUSTIFICATION FOR MAHABHARATA WAR DATE & LORD KRISHNA’S PEACE EFFORTS. SRIKRISHNA'S BEST EFFORTS OF TALKING WITH ALL KAVRAVAS, SINGLY & JOINTLY, NOT SUCCESSFUL AND DURYODHANA REFUSED TO GIVE EVEN LAND SIZE OF A NEEDLE.
Lord Krishna never wanted Mahabharata war to happen hence just before the war’s start he had gone on his final peace mission to persuade Dhitrashtra’s son Duryodhana to abandon the war in the month of Kartika (a Hindu calendar month) but because of the planetary position that time Dhitrashtra didn’t agree & the war was fought.
To find Mahabharata’s war date Dr. Achar had searched for years between 3500 BCE to about 500 CE, range of 4000 years. He found that during those 4000 years Saturn was 137 times in Aldebaran (Rohini Nakshatra).
To simplify Dr. Achar’s findings - We all know that a circle consists of 360 degrees. There are 27 constellations (Nakshatras). Thus every constellation (Nakshatra) consists of around 13.33 degrees.
Saturn takes a little over 29 years to complete one revolution around the Sun i.e. 360 degrees. Thus Saturn after a little over 29 years will return to Aldebaran (Rohini Nakshatra).
To understand how Dr. Achar found Saturn being in Aldebaran (Rohini Nakshatra) 137 times between 3500 BCE to 500 CE we can divide 4000 (the range of years Dr. Achar took into consideration) by 137 (the number of years Saturn was in Aldebaran as per his findings) & we get 29.197 that is a little over 29 years as Saturn returns to a particular constellation (Nakshatra) after a little over 29 years.
Then Dr. Achar searched for those years when Saturn was in Aldebaran (Rohini Nakshatra) & Mars was retrograde in Antares (Jyeshtha Nakshatra).
Dr. Achar found that in those 4000 years Saturn in Aldebaran (Rohini Nakshatra)& retrograde Mars in Antares (Jyeshtha Nakshatra) happened 17 times.
As per Bhishma Parvan (3.29) a lunar eclipse occurred in the month of Kartika (a Hindu calendar month) near Pleiades & was followed by a solar eclipse near Antares (Jyeshtha Nakshatra).
To discard the incorrect years out of 17 years that he found Dr. Achar looked for those years when a lunar eclipse occurred in the month of Kartika (a Hindu calendar month), Saturn was in Aldebaran (Rohini Nakshatra) & retrograde Mars was in Antares (Jyeshtha Nakshatra).
He found that it happened only 2 times in 3067 BCE & 2183 BCE.
To discard the incorrect year Dr. Achar thought of finding in which year out of 3067 BCE & 2183 BCE a solar eclipse was followed by a lunar eclipse that occurred in the month ofKartika (a Hindu calendar month).
He found that in both 2183 & 3067 BCE a solar eclipse near Antares (Jyeshtha Nakshatra) was followed by a lunar eclipse that occurred in October 21 2183 BCE.
Further he used winter solstice’s date mentioned in the Parvans (Mahabharata reference books) to eliminate either 3067 BCE or 2183 BCE to find Mahabharata’s war year. He found that in 2183 BCE winter solstice occurred when moon’s phase was waning (Krishna Panchami) & in 3067 BCE winter solstice occurred when moon’s phase was waxing(Shukla Panchami).
The Mahabharata reference books i.e. Bhishma Parvan & Udyoga Parvan state that moon’s phase was waxing during winter solstice.
Also as per Mahabharata’s epic war rules weren’t followed from 14th day onwards. One of the war’s rules was that war should be stopped at sunset. It wasn’t followed & war used to get over only at moon rise at night.
Moon rising at night indicates that on war’s 14th day moon was waning as waning moon rises at night. Thus moon being waning on 14th day indicates that war didn’t start on a new moon day.
The epic of Mahabharata also states that war started didn’t start on a new moon day(Amavasya).
Thus by using winter solstice & moon’s phase during the time of war year 2183 was discarded & year 3067 was considered to be Mahabharata’s war year.
Although many researchers have found some date of Mahabharata war but Dr. Achar has been able to match all the astronomical references mentioned in the Mahabharata Parvans with the Planetarium software he used.
Thus Dr. Achar was able to match the planetary information on the events & dates mentioned in the Mahabharata epic & reference books i.e. Parvans with the computer software program used to check its authenticity. His war date findings also match with Professor K. Srinivasa Raghavan.
Some other information mentioned in The Udyoga Parvan states that just before the war Lord Krishna had gone to Hastinapur on his final peace mission to persuade Dhitrashtra to abandon the war.
He had started his journey when moon was in constellation Zeta Piscium (Revati Nakshatra).
The day on which Dhitrashtra’s son Duryodhana turned down Lord Krishna’s efforts to abandon war that time moon was in constellation Delta Cancri (Pushya Nakshatra).
When Lord Krishna left Hastinapur with Karna (as Karna wanted to be Lord Krishna’s charioteer to accompany Lord Krishna for some time) after his efforts to abandon war failed on that day moon was in constellation Beta Leonis (Uttara Phalguni Nakshatra).
On his journey with Lord Krishna Karna discussed planetary positions in sky that time & interpreted that such planetary positions stand for a bad omen.
Professor K. Srinivasa Raghavan with his extensive research had also found that Mahabharata’s war happened in 3067 BCE & his findings matched with the astronomical references mentioned in Mahabharata’s Parvans. As per his findings
Lord Krishna departs on September 26, 3067 BCE to Hastinapur to meet Dhitrashtra to abandon war.
Lord Krishna reached Hastinapur on September 28th, 3067 BCE.
Lunar eclipse occurred (at Pleiades) on September 29th, 3067 BCE.
Krishna rides with Karna on October 8th, 3067 BCE.
Solar eclipse (at Antares) occurred on October 14th, 3067 BCE.
War started on November 22nd, 3067 BCE.
Winter solstice was on January 13, 3066 BCE.
Bhishma expired on January 17th, 3066 BCE.
Departure of Lord Krishna in 3031 BCE.
Thus Lord Krishna’s existence & Mahabharata’s war can’t be just Maharishi Ved Vyas’simagination but it was indeed a true incident & Lord Krishna was an extraordinary person & principal character in Mahabharata hence he is worshipped till now in many countries.

November 22, -3067
- November 22, -3067
Kurukshetra, Kurukshetra, Haryana, India

THE 10 GENERALS OF KAURAVA ARHY WERE 1) KRIPA, 2) DRONA, 3) SHALYA, 4) JAYADRATHA, 5) SUDAKSHINA, 6) KRITAVARMA, 7) ASWATHAMA, 8) KARNA, 9) SHAKUNI, 10) BAHLIKA

DAY-1--NOV. 22nd 3067 BC FRIDAY, PANDAVAS SUFFERED NUMEROUS LOSSES:---

GITA UPADESAM BY SRIKRISHNA TO ARJUNA

Shalya kills Uttara
When the battle commenced, Bhishma went through the Pandava army wreaking havoc wherever he went. Abhimanyu, Arjuna's son, seeing this went straight at Bhishma, defeated his bodyguards and directly attacked the commander of the Kaurava forces. The Pandavas suffered numerous losses and were defeated at the end of the first day. Virata's sons, Uttaraand Sweta, were slain by Shalya and Bhishma. Krishna consoled the distraught Yudhisthira saying that eventually victory would be his.

Kurukshetra War
(Details given are according to the epic Mahabharata)

The position of the Kuru kingdom in Iron Age Vedic India
Date Various dates (6000 BCE – 500 BCE[1])- fought for 18 days.
Location Kurukshetra, modern-day Haryana, India
Result Victory for Pandavas and allies, fall of Kauravas.
Dhritarashtra abdicated the throne of Hastinapura and Yudhisthira succeeded him.
Yuyutsu was appointed as Yudhisthira's subordinate king in Indraprastha.
Various succession took place due to many kings and rulers' deaths in the war: Anga, Chedi, Gandhara, Kalinga, Kosala, Madra, Magadha, Matsya, Panchala, Sindhu, Virata.
The center of power in the Gangetic basin shifted from the Kurus to the Panchalas.
Territorial
changes Reunification of the Kuru states of Hastinapura and Indraprastha under the Pandavas.
Return of Panchala lands held by Drona to the original Panchala state.
Truce and status quo ante bellum in elsewhere.
Belligerents
Territory-less Pandavas of the Kurus with the support of the mighty Panchala tribe and others. Kauravas (Kuru tribe) with capital at Hastinapura and their allies
Commanders and leaders
Overlord
Yudhisthira
Commanders-in-chief
Shweta (day 1) †
Dhrishtadyumna (day 2-18) †
Strategists
Krishna Overlord
Duryodhana †
Commanders-in-chief
Bhishma (day 1-10) †
Drona (day 11-15) †
Karna (day 16-17) †
Shalya (day 18) †
Ashwatthama (night raid)
Strategists
Shakuni †
Strength
7 Akshauhinis
(1,530,900 soldiers) 11 Akshauhinis
(2,405,700 soldiers)
Casualties and losses
Almost total,
only 8 known survivors - the five Pandavas, Krishna, Satyaki, Yuyutsu. Normally 7 are recognized, with Yuyutsu excluded. Almost total,
only 4 known survivors - Ashwatthama, Sage Kripa, Kritavarma, Vrishakethu (son of Karna). Normally 3 are recognized, with Vrishakethu excluded.
The Kurukshetra War was, according to the Indian epic poem Mahābhārata, a conflict that arose from a dynastic succession struggle between two groups of cousins of an Indo-Aryan kingdom called Kuru, the Kauravas and Pandavas, for the throne of Hastinapura. It involved a number of ancient kingdoms participating as allies of the rival groups.
The location of the battle was Kurukshetra in the modern state of Haryana in India. The conflict is believed to form an essential component of an ancient work called Jaya and hence the epic Mahābhārata.
Mahābhārata states that the war lasted only eighteen days during which vast armies from all over the Indian Subcontinent fought alongside the two rivals. Despite only referring to these eighteen days, the war narrative forms more than a quarter of the book, suggesting its relative importance within the epic, which overall spans decades of the warring families.
The narrative describes individual battles of various heroes of both sides, battle-field deaths of some of the prominent heroes, military formations employed on each day by both armies, war diplomacy, meetings and discussions among the heroes and commanders before commencement of war on each day and the weapons used. The chapters (parvas) dealing with the war (from chapter six to ten) are considered amongst the oldest in the entire Mahābhārata.[citation needed]
The Kurukshetra War is believed to date variously from 6000 BCE to 500 BCE,[1] based on the astronomical and literary information from Mahābhārata. The history of the Kurukshetra War is also traced to the Battle of the Ten Kings mentioned in Rigveda.[2]
Contents [hide]
1 Historical context
2 Background
3 Combatants
4 Krishna's peace mission
5 War preparations
5.1 Pandava army
5.2 Kaurava army
5.3 Neutral parties
5.4 Army divisions and weaponry
5.5 Military formations
5.6 Rules of engagement
6 Course of war
6.1 Before the battle
6.2 Bhagavad Gita
6.3 Day 1
6.4 Day 2
6.5 Day 3
6.6 Day 4
6.7 Days 5-9
6.8 Day 10
6.9 Day 11
6.10 Day 12
6.11 Day 13
6.12 Day 14
6.13 Day 15
6.14 Day 16
6.15 Day 17
6.16 Day 18
6.17 Aftermath
7 Gallery
8 References
9 External links

Mahabharata: The Great War and World History
By Jahnava Nitai Das | Published on 11-11-2011 in Spiritual Articles

The topic of this issue is the Mahabharata war in relation to world history and culture. We will begin the topic with a question we received sometime back:

"In the Mahabharata, the war seemed to have affected the whole world. We don’t find so many references to such of a huge event in other cultures. Why are there no references to a great world event?"

There is reference to a great war both in the Mayan culture and in old Chinese traditions. They speak about a huge war that happened long, long ago; but they give no details. They only knew that such a war had occurred.

After any war two things happen. In certain regions, nothing develops for a long time; and in certain other regions everything expands very rapidly. The same thing has happened after the Kurukshetra war. In some places everything just stopped; there was no communication. These places became completely isolated from the rest of the world.

You can imagine the situation of those other kingdoms which were working under the fifty-four kingdoms, the Aryan empire. When a huge war like this is waged on the other side of the globe, and none of the kings ever returned, and their armies also didn’t come back, what would be the state of communication?

These kingdoms would have become completely alien to everything. No one would have known what happened. The king with his entire army went to fight in the great war, and that's it. They just disappeared, never to be heard from again. The agents from the ruling kingdoms no longer came to collect taxes, no information was being sent from the world capital. Suddenly these former colonies are isolated and free. They don't have to pay taxes anymore, nor do they have to be subservient.

Naturally the new king would try to make a lot of indigenous effort to put forth their own culture. And if there were any texts left that said his grand father was a slave of Kaikeya, he would just burn it. They wouldn't want to keep such information.

The same thing happened in the modern World War, which was actually just a war around the world. But the Mahabharata war was one massacre at one single place, and nobody went back. None of the kings or soldiers returned to tell what happened.

It is described that the cremations were done there and the rituals were also done there. Even the widows of the other kings were adopted there by the capital, Hastinapura. Seven different types of cremations were done, like mass cremations, individual cremations, etc. After the cremations, the widows were all adopted by Hastinapura there itself. There was practically no one going back to their own countries, hardly a single channel of communication.

We can imagine if we were a distant country ruling under one of these fifty-four kings, the Aryan empire, and we see no one is returning from the battle, no communication is coming from the battle; what would we do? Immediately we would destroy the old information, that showed us as slaves to these Aryan kings, and emerge as a great self-manifesting empire like Egypt. This is exactly what they did.

The destruction caused by the war was not only external. The destruction of the war was also in the minds of the people. After those heavy astras were used, in the minds of the people anything subtle, anything delicate, anything perfectional was completely burnt out. It is just like in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, till today you find the children are disabled. How many years has it been? It was only two primitive bombs. They were so gross and physical, but the radioactivity of that is still being seen today.

Then we can understand, according to the descriptions within the Mahabharata, what was the destruction of the Brahmastras used in the war. What was the Agni-astras they were using? What was the power of the wind in the Vayu-astra? It was not only blowing in Kurukshetra, it was blowing all over the planet. What would have happened to the people’s minds because of the diffusion of all these energies?

Everything became lost. Naturally people would not even be able to think that they were serving, or they had been paying tax to the Aryan kings of such and such countries. The whole thing had no meaning any more.

This is known as the "dark period" after the Mahabharata war. Kathacharit-sagara has stories about this dark time. In the Tamil literature also it discusses this period. There was a dark period in between where no one knew what happened. Only the thieves, either through ship or through land, were ruling the world. In Tamil it is known as "kalapirar kalam" which means the time of the unknown kings, unknown rulers. The Tamil literature gives 3,000 years for it. And then the Cheras, Cholas and Pandiyas came to power. In between it was completely dark. And these Cheras, Cholas and Pandiyas were actually descendants of the original Cheras, Cholas and Pandiyas who took part in the Mahabharata war.

The Chola king was the one who ran the kitchen for the Pandavas. That is there in the Tamil literature. Those people who ran the kitchen, they were not just cooks; they were all soldiers. They went to help in the war and when the division of work was given, they were given the kitchen. So they were cooking. There are hundreds of Tamil verses glorifying that king who cooked for the Pandavas during the Mahabharata war. It is there in the Tamil literature.

If this war never happened, if Kurushetra was only symbolic of the body, mind and senses; why would this Aryan king have spent twenty years of his ruling time in the North cooking for someone else. These are clear proofs. There was a dark time in between. The dark time was nothing but the reactions of the war. After the dark time, those who emerged powerful were not all the authentic rulers. Some were descendants, but most were just those who utilized this opportunity to gain power. This is why it is not mentioned in other cultures, it is not recorded. A great war is mentioned, but no details are given.

Even in the mythology of the Greeks it is there, only the time is looking different. The time frame does not look like it is the Mahabharata war, but the great Achilles fighting and other such stories of Greek mythology have a very close similarity to stories from the Kurushetra war. In Greek mythology some of these stories are internally dated much before the time of the Kurushetra war. The reason is because they wanted to have a separate identity, therefore they told it as though it happened at a much more ancient time. It may sound like mythology, but its just the histories which have been handed down from the Kurushetra war by the bards and entertainers.

The bards and entertainers were not killed. This is an important point in understanding how this history has spread. At that time, war meant that during every evening they had theater, they had dance, they had jokers, etc. They had all varieties of entertainment, and none of these entertainers were killed. That was the rule according to dharma-shastra, they were not supposed to be killed. Everyone died on the battlefield of Kurukshetra, but all of these bards, poets and entertainers lived. This is how the stories were spread.

The people who did street dances and folk dances, poetry and songs, they all went back. But because the armies and kings were not there, they did not reach as far as they had come from. These entertainers had traveled along with the armies and kings, from distant lands. When the battle was finished, they had no king or army to take them back to their homeland, which in some cases was on the other side of the world. They traveled on their own, alone, and managed to reach some distance, somewhere. They did not make it home to their own countries, but they traveled as far as they could go alone. And when they stopped, unable to go any further, there they would have searched for some patron to perform for.

They must have been highly impressed with this war. Whatever had happened, whatever they saw, the battles between the heroes on both sides; it had impressed them so much. Naturally they would dramatize this and make stories of wars, of great battles, of what they had just witnessed.

In this Great war, who would have come back? Only the entertainers; the nandis, vandis and mahatis; those people who woke up the king’s everyday. They are the one's who lived to spread these stories. When their kings died they would leave. This was the tradition. The king goes to the battle with a full entourage . If the king is killed in the second day of the battle, the king who killed him takes his army. This was the system in those days. This was not the case for those who made a pact; like Dhristadyumna was in a pact with the Pandavas. His army would not go to Duryodhana. But those individual kings who came to the help the Pandavas, if the king is killed then everything that he has, including his ornaments, dress and animals, belongs to the king who killed him. Actually his country also belongs to that king. That was how the war was fought. Everything including the ornaments he was wearing, his armor, they belong to the winner. Only his astras won't be taken, because astras won’t serve one unless you have done the proper upasana. The astras will go back to the rishi or the deva who has given them. This was the rule of war.

Once their king was killed, what would the entertainers do? They would not continue sitting there glorifying their dead king while the war was still continuing. As soon as their king died, they would leave the battle field. So for them, the outcome of the war was not even known. But when they left they had nothing, no escort, no entourage; they were alone. So they would travel as far as they could and as quickly as they could, until they reached whatever place they could find. They would be looking for a new patron. And if they found one, the first thing they will say is, "Have you heard? There was a war!" Once they have found a patron they will start performing. But the war was still running, and they would not want to be involved in politics, so to protect themselves they will begin, "Long, long ago..." And that would begin the dramatization of the Great War. This is how the information spread. You can find in every ethnic culture in the world, without fail, there is discussion of a Great War. How does that come about? It may not go by the name Mahabharata, but the great war is there, everywhere.

There is an entire culture whose literature is based around crying, the Sumerian culture. All of their ancient writings are the cries of women who have lost their husbands in the war. Those who can read ancient Tamil will see that their script is almost identical, it is similar to the Dravida alphabets; and even the meanings of the sentences can be understood, it is so similar.

Their texts are saying the same thing as the Mahabharata. A city was built, there was gambling, another city was burnt, a lady was insulted, and because of that there was fire. The order may not be the same, but the elements are identical. After the war, there was crying by the widows. And this crying is the substance of the Sumerian writings. Each song is a cry. It is the same thing as found in the Mahabharata. There is a chapter in the Mahabharata, "the crying of the queens in the war after the kings died". It is identical. Everyone is talking about this same great war.

Even in regards to geography, the ancient cultures are speaking the same thing. There is always mention of a river that is running on four sides of a mountain. They may make the map based on their own idea of how the river is coming down from the mountain, but the substance is the same. They may not understand that it is referring to the four branches of the Ganga which go to the four different levels of the universe, but they have the basic concept. In China it is there. In the Maya culture it is there. This is the same concept as found in the Bhagavatam and other Vedic texts.

There are many other parallels between the world cultures, pointing to a common source. Symbolically the Swastika is found all over the world - in Native American tribes, in Europe, in ancient India. Hitler was trying to revive the old Germanic and Norse tales of the Aryan kings, but he failed to understand the entire tradition. The Swastika represents life, but he chose to reverse it, thus signifying death. Even linguistically, the Indo-European languages, such as Sanskrit, Latin, Greek and their many derivatives, have countless similarities. This all points out that there was originally one culture, one civilization. The Great War described throughout the world is the Mahabharata war.

One may ask, "Why don't the other countries present it in the exact same way?" It is because they were countries working under the fifty-four kings. They were subservient to the Aryan empire, and this war made them free. It was their chance to rewrite the history, to make their civilization the center of time.

The rulers in Hastinapura allowed it to happen by their negligence. Parikshit Maharaja did not function as an emperor of the world for a long time, and as a result there was no unification of the countries done under him. And after him, Janamejaya spent his whole life trying to kill the snakes, until finally he became sick of everything and left the kingdom. Because of this the Aryan kings became weak.

According to Kathacharit-sagara, after the dark period it was Bhima’s grandsons who sprung to power from Ujjain and other places. It was in their line that Vikramaditya later came. In Arjuna's line there was no powerful descendant, although there were some in Kundinapura. But their line quickly became diffused. The Indonesian city, Yogyakarta, previously known as Yajna-karta, was ruled by Bhima’s grandson. It was there that he performed one thousand yajnas, and that is how the city was named. That was much after the war.

In some places the remnants of Vedic culture are more powerful. Their presence is felt more directly. But in other places the remnants are faint and more difficult to perceive. Just like the Sun worshippers of Japan. Previously it was part of a huge land mass in the pacific, but by the movement of the land and the sea it has become a tiny island. In that ancient land, they were worshippers of the Sun god. It was the same with the Lemurian land mass that was between Africa and India. The Tamil literatures describe a massive land going towards the west from the present Indian coast.

After every Yuga there is a change of land and sea. There is one chapter on this in the pratisarga parva of the Bhavishya Purana. It speaks about how the land and sea change by the influence of time. This is how the flood of Noah described in the bible occurred. It was taken as a big dissolution, as a pralaya, but it was just the change of yugas. When Noah built the Arc, He was under the mountain Tuhinachala. Today the Tuhinachala is now a desert. It is no longer a mountain.

There is another case from Bhima’s time, when he went for collection for the Rajasuya sacrifice. He went from Puri to Burma by chariot by crossing two mountains. There was no Bay of Bengal. And now that there is a bay of Bengal, we see two tiny islands, Andaman and Nicobar. They were the mountains that Bhima crossed, today they are just small islands.

It is the same situation with New Zealand. They were not islands, but the peaks of mountains. They belonged to a giant land mass that connected to what was the Kimpurusha Varsha. But today they are also islands because of the land changes that occurred when the yugas changed.

So, with all this - the Great War followed by massive changes in the earth's geography - the civilizations were heavily affected. Vyasadeva describes this war by saying, “There had not been a war as heavy as this at any time in all the lands.” He describes it this way because all of the demons and all of the devas took part in this war at one place - Kurukshetra. It was the heaviest war in the history, fought between universal powers. Thus its effects were felt in all places throughout the world.

December 4, -3067
Kurukshetra, Kurukshetra, Haryana, India

Day 13--DEC 4th WEDNESDAY- ABHIMANYU KILLS LAKSHMAN KUMARA (DURYODHANA'S SON); AND ABHIMANYU WAS KILLED BY JAYADRATHA.

Duryodhana summoned King Bhagadatta, the monarch of Pragjyotisha (modern day Assam, India). Bhagadatta had thousands of gigantic elephants in his stable and was considered the strongest warrior on this planet in elephant warfare. Bhagadatta attacked Arjuna with his gigantic elephant named Suprateeka. It was a fierce battle in which Bhagadatta matched Arjuna astra for astra.
On the other side of the battlefield, the remaining four Pandavas and their allies were finding it impossible to break Dronacharya's Chakravyuha formation. As Arjuna was busy fighting with the Trigartadesa princes and the Prajayogastha monarch on the other side of the battlefield, he could not be summoned to break the Chakravyuha formation, which could only be broken by entering and exiting the formation. Yudhisthira instructed, Abhimanyu, one of Arjuna's sons to break the Chakravyuha formation. Abhimanyu knew the secret of entering the Chakravyuh formation, but did not know how to exit it. In the Chakra vyuh, many Kaurava princes attacked Abhimanyu simultaneoursly (against the rules of Dharma yuddh) and killed him.
Upon learning of the death of his son, Arjuna vowed to kill Jayadratha on the morrow before the battle ended at sunset, otherwise he would throw himself into the fire.

ON THE 13TH DAY

A) ENTERING CHAKRAVYUKHA

1) THE SAMSHAPTAHA CHALLENGED ARJUNA TO THE FAR SOUTH OF THE BATTLE FIELD, AWAY FROM THE CHAKRAVYUKHA.
2) GHATOTKACHA, DRUPADA, VIRATA AND OTHERS FROM PANDAVA SIDE TRIED TO PENETRATE THE FORMATION OF CHAKRAVYUKHA BUT IN VAIN.
3) YUDHISTHIRA REQUESTED ABHIMANYU TO BREAK CHAKRAVYUKHA
4) IT WAS FEARFUL BATTLE THAT ABHIMANYU FOUGHT SINGLE HANDEDLY.
5)ABHIMANYU GREATLY TORMENTED THE KAURAVA ARMY.
6) JAYADRATHA OBSTRUCTED THE PATH OF PANDAVA ARMY ENTERING CHAKRAVYUKHA AND CONTAINED THEIR ADVANCES.

B) WITHIN CHAKRAVYUKHA BRAVE ABHIMANYU FIGHTS

1) WITH ONE SHARP ARROW, HE BEHEADED, DURYODHANA'S SON LAKHMANA AND WOUNDED DURYODHANA & KARNA
2) KARNA SHOT ABHIMANYU'S BOW TO PIECES
3)KRITAVARMA KILLED HIS HORSES
4) KRIPA SHOT HIS ATTENDANTS
5) ABHIMANYU PICKED UP A SWORD &SHIELD AND JUMPED INTO THE FRAY
6) SHIELD WAS SHATTERED BY KARNA
7)ABHIMANYU PICKED UP A WHEEL WHICH WAS BROKEN TO PIECES
8) HE TOOK UP A MACE; DUSHASANA'S SON ALSO TOOK UP A MACE; HURT BY EACH OTHERS BLOWS, BOTH COLLAPSED SIMULTANEOUSLY
9) RECOVERING FIRST , SON OF DUSHASANA STRUCK A HEAVY BLOW ON ABHIMANYU'S HEAD AND ABHIMANYU FELL NEVER TO RISE AGAIN.

C)ARJUNA'S VOW

1)YUDHISTHIRA NARRATED, HOW JAYADRATHA WITH THE ASSURANCE OF A BOON GIVEN BY SIVA, RESTRAINED THE PANDAVAS, FROM GOING TO THE HELP OF ABHIMANYU.
2) ANGERED BY THE DEATH OF HIS SON, ARJUNA THUS TOOK THE VOW TO " KILL JAYADRATHA BEFORE SUNDOWN NEXT DAY OR I WILL CONSIGN MYSELF TO FLAMES"

December 5, -3067
- December 5, -3067
Kurukshetra, Kurukshetra, Haryana, India

ON THE 14th NIGHT OF THE BATTLE,
1) KAURAVA SOLDERS ENFEEBLED BY LACK OF SLEEP AND TERRIFIED BY THE DARK NIGHT AMOK UNDER ARJUNA'S ONSLAUGHT.
2) GHATOTKACHA TRIED VARIOUS TRICKS AND CREATED ILLUSION AFTER ILLUSION TO SCARE ASHWATTHAMA.
3)THE KAURAVA ARMY RAN HALTER SHELTER IN FEAR OF ARJUNA.
4)ALL THIS WHILE THE BATTLE WAS BEINGWAGED IN THE DEAD OF NIGHT, AIDED BY GUESSWORK AND THE CALLING OUT OF NAMES.
5) DURYODHANA COMMANDED HIS SOLDERS ON FOOT TO CARRY TORCHES AND THE PANDAVA SOLDERS DID LIKEWISE AND SOON THE WHOLE BATTLE FIELD WAS LIT UP.
6) THE TWO RAKSHASAS, GATOTKACHA & ALAMBHUSA FOUGHT WITH VARIOUS WEAPONS AND FINALLY WITH BARE HAND. AT LAST WITH A SWORD & DREADFUL CRY GATOTKACHA CUT OFF HIS OPPONENT'S HEAD.
7) ALTHOUGH KARNA ABLY CONFRONTED HIM, GATOTKACHA'S ONSLAUGHT TERRIFIED THE KAURAVAS.
RELUCTANTLY KARNA TOOK UP THE SHAKTI IN HIS RIGHT HAND AND HURLED IT AT GATOTKACHA; THE SHAKTI PIERCED AND FELLED GATOTKACHA AND A VAST NUMBER OF KAURAVA SOLDERS WERE CRUSHED UNDER HIS WEIGHT.
8) WITH TWO SHARP JAVELINS, DRONA KILLED VIRATA AND DRUPADA. DHRISTADYUMNA WAS STUNNED WITH GRIEF.

December 6, -3067
Kurukshetra, Kurukshetra, Haryana, India

ON THE 15th Day OF WAR,-DEC. 6 FRIDAY,DRONA KILLED DRUPADA AND DRONA WAS KILLED BY DARISTADYUMNA.
KUNTI SECRETLY MET HER FIRST SON KARNA & GOT A PROMISE FROM HIM, THAT HE WOULD SPARE ALL PANDAVAS EXCEPT ARJUNA.

After King Drupada and King Virata were slain by Drona, Bhima, and Dhristadyumna fought him on the fifteenth day. Because Drona was very powerful and inconquerable having the irresistible brahmadanda, Krishna hinted to Yudhisthira that Drona would give up his arms if his son Ashwathama was dead. Bhima proceeded to kill an elephant named Ashwathama, and loudly proclaimed that Ashwathama was dead. Drona approached Yudhisthira to seek the truth of his son's death. Yudhisthira proclaimed Ashwathama Hatahath, naro va Kunjaro va, implying Ashwathama had died but he was nor sure whether it was a Drona's son or an elephant, The latter part of his proclamation (Naro va Kunjaro va) were drowned out by sound of the conch blown by Krishna intentionally (a different version of the story is that Yudhisthira pronounced the last words so feebly that Drona could not hear the word elephant). Prior to this incident, the chariot of Yudhisthira, proclaimed as Dharma raja (King of righteousness), hovered a few inches off the ground. After the event, the chariot landed on the ground as he refused to obey Lord Krishna's instructions.
Drona was disheartened, and laid down his weapons. He was then killed by Dhristadyumna to avenge his father's death and satisfy his vow. Later, the Pandava's mother Kunti secretly met her abandoned son Karna and requested him to spare the Pandavas, as they were his younger brothers. Karna promised Kunti that he would spare them except for Arjuna, but also added that he would not fire a weapon against Arjun twice.

ON THE 15th DAY OF THE BATTLE:--PART I
1) DHRISTADHYUMNA WAS STUNNED WITH GRIEF, WHEN HE SAW DRONA KILLED HIS FATHER (DRUPADA) AS WELL AS HIS SONS. SWEARING REVENGE, DHRISTADHYUMNA ATTACKED DRONA AND THE KAURAVAS.
2) AFTER PROLONGED FIGHT WITH EARTHLY AND CELESTIAL WEAPONS, DRONA SENT BRAHMASTRA TOWARDS ARJUNA WHO COUNTERED IT WITH THE SAME ASTRA.
3) SRIKRISHNA SAID, "IF DRONA IS USING UNFAIR MEANS BY USING DIVINE WEAPONS AGAINST ORDINARY SOLDERS; I AM SURE IF HE HEARS THAT HIS SON ASHWATTHAMA IS NO MORE, HE WILL STOP FIGHTING''.
4) BHEEMA KILLED AN ELEPHANT CALLED ASHWATTHAMA & ANNOUNCED "ASHWATHAMA IS DEAD" WITH A SHOCK DRONA ASKED YUDHISTHIRA WHETHER IT WAS A FACT AND YUDHISTHIRA CONFIRMED IT; DRONA THREW HIS WEAPONS AWAY AND SAT DOWN IN HIS CHARIOT IN A POSE OF MEDITATION
5) DHRISHTADHYUMNA TOOK ADVANTAGE OF THIS AND POUNCED ON DRONA, SWORD IN HAND AND KILLED HIM AS HE HAD VOWED TO DO.

ON THE 15th DAY OF BATTLE:- PART II --EFFECT OF NARAYANASTRA

1)HEARING THE NEWS OF THE DEATH OF HIS FATHER (DRONA), ASHWATTHAMA WAS LIVID WITH RAGE. HE SAID " I POSSESS THE DIVINE NARAYANA ASTRA WHICH NO ONE KNOWS OF ITS GREAT PROWESS; WITH IT I WILL DESTROY ALL MY ENEMIES AND DHRISTADYUMNA.
2) THEN ASHWATTHAMA INVOKED THE NARAYANASTRA; THOUSANDS OF ARROWS SPRANG FORTH FROM THE WEAPON AND CLOUDED THE SKY; THE MORE THE PANDAVA FORCES OPPOSED IT, THE MORE POWERFUL THE ASTRA BECAME.
3) DIRECTED BY KRISHNA, THE PANDAVA WARRIORS GOT READY TO RENOUNCE THE WEAPONS AND EVEN THE VERY THOUGHT OF THEM.
4) BOTH KRISHNA & ARJUNA HELD BHEEMA DOWN TILL ASTRA PASSED OVER THEIR HEADS. THE AIR COOLED DOWN AND THE SOLDERS & ANIMALS REVIVED.
5) ALAS NEITHER DOES THIS WEAPON RETURN TO ASHWATTHAMA, NOR CAN IT BE INVOKED AGAIN!
6) IMPATIENT TO KILL ARJUNA, ASHWATTHAMA INVOKED THE AGNEYASTRA; ARJUNA THEN USED THE BRAHMASTRA WHICH SUBDUES THE MOST POWERFUL WEAPONS.

December 8, -3067
Kurukshetra, Kurukshetra, Haryana, India

DAY 17-DEC. 8th 3067BC, SUNDAY.
FACE TO FACE WITH KARNA
NAGA ASTHIRA
ARJUNA ESCAPES, FROM NAGA ASHTHIRA (ARROW)

A little known story is that at the time of the great war when Arjun and Karan come face to face with each other, the Naga King Aswasena desirous of avenging the death of his mother from Arjuna, in that battle quietly slips into the quiver of Karnna in the guise of an Arrow. It is this Arrow that had almost killed Arjuna had it not been for Krishna who by pressing his feet on the chariot sank it one cubit deep into the earth hence the arrow missing its aim.

KARNA DEAD BY ARJUNA'S ARROWS.

On the seventeenth day, Karna defeated the pandava brothersSahadeva and Yudhisthira in battle but spared their lives. Later, Karna resumed duelling with Arjuna. During their duel, Karna's chariot wheel got stuck in the mud and Karna asked for a pause. Krishna reminded Arjuna about Karna's ruthlessness unto Abhimanyu while he was similarly left without chariot and weapons. Hearing his son's fate, Arjuna shot his arrow and decapitated Karna. Before the day's battle, Karna's sacred armour ('Kavacha') and earrings ('Kundala') were taken as alms by Lord Indra disguised as a brahmin, which resulted in his death by Arjuna's arrows.

ON THE 17th DAY OF BATTLE--BHEEMA KILLED DUSHASANA AND ARJUNA KILLED KARNA:--

1) IN THE GENERAL FIGHT THAT ENSUED, BHEEMA ENCOUNTERED DUSHASANA; WHEN HIS BOW WAS BROKEN, BHEEMA TOOK UP A HUGE MACE.
2)AFTER HE KNOCKED DUSHASANA OFF HIS CHARIOT, BHEEMA LET OUT A ROAR ANS CUT OFF DUSHASANA'S RIGHT HAND, RIPPED OPEN HIS CHEST AND TASTED HIS BLOOD.
3)KARNA'S SON VIRSHASENA WAS TORMENTING NAKULA; BHEEMA CALLED ARJUNA FOR HELP; ARJUNA'S SHARP ARROWS FOUND THEIR MARK.KARNA SAW HIS SON BEING KILLED.
4) AT LAST THE TWO HEROES, ARJUNA & KARNA WERE FACE TO FACE, WELL MATCHED; INSTEAD OF EARTHLY WEAPONS, THEY RESORTED TO CELESTIAL ONES.
5) KARNA AIMED THE NAGAASTRA AT ARJUNA'S NECK. JUST IN TIME, KRISHNA PRESSED HARD SO THAT THE HORSES BENT DOWN AND CHARIOT SUNK BY FIVE INCHES IN THE GROUND. NOW THE WEAPON SCRAPPED PAST, ARJUNA'S HEAD AND KNOCKED HIS CROWN.
6) MEANWHILE KARNA'S CHARIOT WHEEL WAS SUNKING INTO THE GROUND AND KARNA WAS FORCED TO DESCEND. KRISHNA SAID " HURRY ARJUNA! KILL HIM BEFORE HE GETS UP ON HIS CHARIOT".
7) ARJUNA INVOKED A DIVINE ASTRA 'ANJALIKA' AND AIMED IT AT KARNA WHO WAS STILL STRUGGLING TO LIFT THE WHEEL. THE HEAD OF GREAT KARNA FELL ON THE GROUND.. THUS ON THE AFTERNOON OF THE SEVENTEENTH DAY OF THE GREAT WAR, KARNA LAY DEAD ON THE BATTLEFIELD.

December 9, -3067
- December 9, -3067
Kurukshetra, Kurukshetra, Haryana, India

ON THE 18th NIGHT OF MAHABHARATA WAR,
1) ACCOMPANIED BY KRIPACHARYA AND KRITAVARMA, ASWATHAMA RUSHED TO SEE, THE DYING DURYODHANA AND THEY FOUND HIM BLEEDING PROFUSELY & TOSSING & TURNING HELPLESSLY IN AGONY.
2) THE TEARS IN DURYODHANA'S EYES FILLED ASHWATHAMA WITH RAGE; DURYODHANA REQUESTED KRIPACHARYA TO INSTALL ASHWATHAMA AS A COMMANDER OF THEIR ARMY.KRIPACHARYA POURED THE WATER OVER ASHWATHAMA AS A RITUAL OF THE CEREMONIAL BATH AND THE THREE WARRIORS LEFT THE KING TO THE FOREST.
3) SAFE IN THE HEART OF FOREST, WEARY & WOUNDED, KRITAVARMA AND KRIPACHARYA FELL ASLEEP AS SOON AS THEY LAY DOWN; BUT ASWATHAMA COULD NOT.
4) ANGER AND VENGEFUL THOUGHTS HAD ROBBED HIS EYES OF SLEEP; LOOKING VACANTLY AROUND HIM, HE GAZED UP, AT THE BANYAN TREE. SUDDENLY A TERRIBLE LOOKING OWL, SWEPT DOWN ON THE SLEEPING CROWS AND ATTACKED THEM WITHOUT MERCY. WATCHING THIS FROM BELOW AN IDEA TOOK ROOT IN ASWATHAMA'S MIND.
5) THEN THE THREE OF THEM PROCEEDED TO THE PANDAVAS CAMP .ASHWATHAMA, AFTER KICKING AND CRUSHING DHRISHTADYUMNA TO DEATH BEGAN TO ATTACK OTHER WARRIORS. LIKE MUTE AND HELPLESS ANIMALS, MANY WARRIORS WERE SLAUGHTERED BY ASHWATHAMA.SOON SHIKHANDI AND ONE BY ONE ALL OF THE SONS OF DRAUPADI AND ALL PANCHALAS WERE KILLED.WHILE STILL IN HALF SLEEP SOME SOLDERS TRIED TO RUN OUT OF THE CAM BUT KRITAVARMA & KRIPACHARYA WERE READY TO CATCH THEM.IN A BID TO HELP ASHWATHAMA, THEY SET FIRE TO THE CAMP FROM THREE SIDES.
6) WHEN THEY REACHED & CONVEYED THE NEWS TO DURYODHANA, THEY FOUND HIM BARELY BREATHING; BY BLESSING ASHWATHAMA, DURYODHANA BREATHED HIS LAST.