Alphonse, comte de Poitiers

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Alphonse Capet, comte de Toulouse

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Poissy, Ile-de-France, France
Death: Died in Corneto Castle, Corneto, Sienne, Italy
Cause of death: Dysenterie
Place of Burial: Basilique Saint Denis, Saint-Denis, Seine-Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Louis VIII le Lion, roi de France and Blanche de Castille, reine consort de France
Husband of Joan of Poitiers (of Toulouse) Capet, Comtesse de Toulouse
Brother of Blanche Capet, (mort jeune); Agnès Capet; Philippe de France; Jean Capet de France; Louis IX le Saint, roi de France and 7 others

Managed by: Noah Gregory Tutak
Last Updated:

About Alphonse, comte de Poitiers

Alphonse de Poitiers

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphonse_de_Poitiers

Alphonse de Poitiers, né le 11 novembre 1220 à Poissy et mort le 21 août 1271, prince de sang royal français, était le frère du roi Saint Louis. Il fut comte de Poitiers, de Saintonge et d'Auvergne de 1241 à 1271, ainsi que comte de Toulouse de 1249 à 1271.

Fils du roi Louis VIII et de Blanche de Castille, il reçoit en 1225, par testament de son père, le comté de Poitiers, la Saintonge et une partie du comté d'Auvergne en apanage.

Un premier projet de mariage avec la fille d’Hugues X de Lusignan (1227) est annulé à la signature du traité de Paris en 1229, qui lui promet Jeanne, fille de Raymond VII (IX) de Saint-Gilles, comte de Toulouse. Le contrat de mariage prévoit que Raymond VII conserve l’usufruit du comté de Toulouse, dont la propriété est transmise à sa fille Jeanne, qui hérite de toutes ses autres possessions.

Sa jeunesse est mal connue, il apparaît essentiellement dans les vies de saint Louis comme un de ses compagnons.

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Alfonso, Count of Poitou

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alfonso or Alphonse (11 November 1220 – 21 August 1271) was the Count of Poitou from 1225 and Count of Toulouse (as Alfonso II) from 1247.

Alphonse was a son of Louis VIII, King of France and Blanche of Castile. He was a younger brother of Louis IX of France and an older brother of Charles I of Sicily.

The Treaty of Paris stipulated that a brother of King Louis was to marry Joan of Toulouse, daughter of Raymond VII of Toulouse, and so in 1237 Alphonse married her.[1]

By the terms of his father's will he received an appanage of Poitou and Auvergne. He won the battle of Taillebourg in the Saintonge War with his brother Louis IX, against a revolt allied with king Henry III of England.

He took part in two crusades with his brother, St Louis, in 1248 (the Seventh Crusade) and in 1270 (the Eighth Crusade). For the first of these, he raised a large sum and a substantial force, arriving in Damietta on 24 October 1249, after the town had already been captured.[2] He sailed for home on 10 August 1250.[3] His father-in-law had died while he was away, and he went directly to Toulouse to take possession.[4] There was some resistance to his accession as count, which was suppressed with the help of his mother Blanche of Castile who was acting as regent in the absence of Louis IX.[5] The county of Toulouse, since them, was joined to the Alphonse's appanage.

In 1252, on the death of his mother, Blanche of Castile, he was joint regent with Charles of Anjou until the return of Louis IX. During that time he took a great part in the campaigns and negotiations which led to the Treaty of Paris in 1259, under which King Henry III of England recognized his loss of continental territory to France (including Normandy, Maine, Anjou, and Poitou) in exchange for France withdrawing support from English rebels.

His main work was on his own estates. There he repaired the evils of the Albigensian war and made a first attempt at administrative centralization, thus preparing the way for union with the crown. The charter known as "Alphonsine," granted to the town of Riom, became the code of public law for Auvergne. Honest and moderate, protecting the middle classes against exactions of the nobles, he exercised a happy influence upon the south, in spite of his naturally despotic character and his continual and pressing need of money. He is noted for ordering the first recorded local expulsion of Jews, when he did so in Poitou in 1249.

Aside from the crusades, Alfonso stayed primarily in Paris, governing his estates by officials, inspectors who reviewed the officials work, and a constant stream of messages.[6]

When Louis IX again engaged in a crusade (the Eighth Crusade), Alphonse again raised a large sum of money and accompanied his brother.[7]. This time, however, he did not return to France, dying while on his way back, probably at Savona in Italy, on 21 August 1271.

His death without heirs raised some questions as to the succession to his lands. One possibility was that they should revert to the crown, another that they should be redistributed to his family. The latter was claimed by Charles of Anjou, but in 1283 Parlement decided that the County of Toulouse should revert to the crown, if there were no male heirs.[5] Alfonso's wife Joan (who died five days after Alfonso) had attempted to dispose of some of her inherited lands in her will. Joan was the only surviving child and heiress of Raymond VII, Count of Toulouse, Duke of Narbonne, and Marquis of Provence, so under Provencal and French law, the lands should have gone to her nearest male relative. But, her will was invalidated by Parlement in 1274[5] One specific bequest in Alfonso's will, giving his wife's lands in the Comtat Venaissin to the Holy See, was allowed, and it became a Papal territory, a status that it retained until 1791.

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Twin of Jean. Died young.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphonse_of_Toulouse

Alfonso, Count of Poitou

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Coat of arms: Per pale azure semé-de-lis or (France ancient) dimidiating gules semé of castles or (Castile).

Alfonso or Alphonse (11 November 1220, Poissy – 21 August 1271) was the Count of Poitou from 1225 and Count of Toulouse (as Alfonso II) from 1247.

Alphonse was a son of Louis VIII, King of France and Blanche of Castile. He was a younger brother of Louis IX of France and an older brother of Charles I of Sicily.

The Treaty of Paris stipulated that a brother of King Louis was to marry Joan of Toulouse, daughter of Raymond VII of Toulouse, and so in 1237 Alphonse married her.[1]

By the terms of his father's will he received an appanage of Poitou and Auvergne. He won the battle of Taillebourg in the Saintonge War with his brother Louis IX, against a revolt allied with king Henry III of England.

He took part in two crusades with his brother, St Louis, in 1248 (the Seventh Crusade) and in 1270 (the Eighth Crusade). For the first of these, he raised a large sum and a substantial force, arriving in Damietta on 24 October 1249, after the town had already been captured.[2] He sailed for home on 10 August 1250.[3] His father-in-law had died while he was away, and he went directly to Toulouse to take possession.[4] There was some resistance to his accession as count, which was suppressed with the help of his mother Blanche of Castile who was acting as regent in the absence of Louis IX.[5] The county of Toulouse, since them, was joined to the Alphonse's appanage.

In 1252, on the death of his mother, Blanche of Castile, he was joint regent with Charles of Anjou until the return of Louis IX. During that time he took a great part in the campaigns and negotiations which led to the Treaty of Paris in 1259, under which King Henry III of England recognized his loss of continental territory to France (including Normandy, Maine, Anjou, and Poitou) in exchange for France withdrawing support from English rebels.

His main work was on his own estates. There he repaired the evils of the Albigensian war and made a first attempt at administrative centralization, thus preparing the way for union with the crown. The charter known as "Alphonsine," granted to the town of Riom, became the code of public law for Auvergne. Honest and moderate, protecting the middle classes against exactions of the nobles, he exercised a happy influence upon the south, in spite of his naturally despotic character and his continual and pressing need of money. He is noted for ordering the first recorded local expulsion of Jews, when he did so in Poitou in 1249.

Aside from the crusades, Alfonso stayed primarily in Paris, governing his estates by officials, inspectors who reviewed the officials work, and a constant stream of messages.[6]

When Louis IX again engaged in a crusade (the Eighth Crusade), Alphonse again raised a large sum of money and accompanied his brother.[7]. This time, however, he did not return to France, dying while on his way back, probably at Savona in Italy, on 21 August 1271.

His death without heirs raised some questions as to the succession to his lands. One possibility was that they should revert to the crown, another that they should be redistributed to his family. The latter was claimed by Charles of Anjou, but in 1283 Parlement decided that the County of Toulouse should revert to the crown, if there were no male heirs.[5] Alfonso's wife Joan (who died five days after Alfonso) had attempted to dispose of some of her inherited lands in her will. Joan was the only surviving child and heiress of Raymond VII, Count of Toulouse, Duke of Narbonne, and Marquis of Provence, so under Provençal and French law, the lands should have gone to her nearest male relative. But, her will was invalidated by Parlement in 1274[5] One specific bequest in Alfonso's will, giving his wife's lands in the Comtat Venaissin to the Holy See, was allowed, and it became a Papal territory, a status that it retained until 1791.

Notes

  1. ^ Fawtier 123
  2. ^ Strayer, 496-7
  3. ^ Strayer 505
  4. ^ Hallam 218
  5. ^ a b c Hallam 258
  6. ^ Petit-Dutaillis 299-300
  7. ^ Strayer 511

[edit] References

[edit] English-language

   * Fawtier, Robert (1960). The Capetian Kings of France. ISBN 0312119003.  (translated by Lionel Butler and R. J. Adam)
   * Hallam, Elizabeth M. (1980). Capetian France, 987-1328. ISBN 0582489091. 
   * Petit-Dutaillis, Charles (1936). The Feudal Monarchy in France and England from the Tenth to the Thirteenth Century.  (translated by E. D. Hunt)
   * Strayer, Joseph R. (1969). "The Crusades of Louis IX". in R. L. Wolff and H. W. Hazard. The later Crusades, 1189-1311 (A History of the Crusades, volume, II). pp. 486–518. http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/History.CrusTwo. 

[edit] French-language

   * B. Ledain, Histoire d'Alphonse, frère de Saint Louis, et du comté de Poitou sous son administration (1241-1271) (Poitiers, 1869)
   * E. Bourarie, Saint Louis et Alphonse de Poitiers (Paris, 1870)
   * A. Molinier, Étude sur l'administration de Saint Louis et d'Alphonse de Poitiers (Toulouse, 1880)
   * A. Molinier, Correspondance administrative d'Alphonse de Poitiers in the Collection de documents inédits pour servir à l'histoire de France (Paris, 1894 and 1895).
   * This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Preceded by

— Count of Poitiers

1225 – 1271 to royal domain

Preceded by

Raymond VII Count of Toulouse

1249 – 1271

With: Joan

This page was last modified on 5 June 2010 at 12:51. --------------------

    ALPHONSE de France (11 Nov 1220-Castle of Corneto, near Siena 21 Aug 1271, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).  The Chronicon Turonense records that King Louis left six sons (in order) "Ludovicum primogenitum, Robertum, Amfulsum, Johannem, Dagobertum id est Philippum, et Stephanum" and one daughter "Isabellam" when he died[534].  The testament of Louis VIII King of France dated Jun 1225 bequeathes “comitatum Andegavie et Cenomannie” to “tercius filius noster” and “comitatum Pictavie et totam Alverniam” to “quartus filius noster”[535].  Assuming that the order of birth of Alphonse and Jean is correctly recorded in the Chronicon Turonense, this testament indicates that Anjou and Maine were originally destined for Alphonse not Jean.  He is recorded as brother of Louis IX King of France by Matthew of Paris, who states that the king sent him home with his brother Charles after the battle of Mansurah in 1250[536].  He was invested as Comte de Poitiers et d’Auvergne by his brother King Louis 24 Jun 1241.  During King Louis IX’s absence on crusade, Alphonse at first remained in France to assist their mother the regent.  He left on crusade with his wife from Aigues-Mortes 26 Aug 1249.  He was captured with the King 5 Apr 1250 at Mansurah.  He succeeded as Comte de Toulouse by right of his wife in 1249 during his absence abroad.  He took possession of Toulouse in Oct 1250, making his official entry 23 May 1251.  Following the death of his mother in 1252, he took an active part in governing France (with his brother Charles Comte d’Anjou), taking charge in particular of foreign affairs and military operations.  Matthew of Paris records in 1252 that he suffered from an incurable disease[537].  The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XIII Kal Sep" of "Alfonsus quondam Pictavie et Tholose comes frater quondam regum…Ludovici…et Karoli regis Cicilie"[538].  A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the death in 1271 of "Alfonsus comes Tholosanus filius regis Francie" at "Savonam feria VI"[539].  Betrothed (by treaty Vendôme Mar 1227) to ISABELLE de Lusignan, daughter of HUGUES [XI] “le Brun” Comte de la Marche & his wife Isabelle Ctss d'Angoulême (-14 Jan 1300).  The primary source which confirms her betrothal has not yet been identified.  m (by treaty 1229, 13 Mar 1234 or 1241) JEANNE de Toulouse, daughter and heiress of RAIMOND VII Comte de Toulouse & his first wife Infanta doña Sancha de Aragón (1220-Castle of Corneto, near Siena 25 Aug 1271, bur Notre-Dame de Gercy, Brie).  The papal dispensation for the marriage of "L. regem Francorum...A. frater." and "R. filium quondam comitis Tolosani...filia" despite their 4o consanguinity is dated 26 Jun 1229[540].  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens records that "la fille du comte…Jeanne" was 9 years old in 1229[541].  The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the marriage of "alter regis frater Alphonsus" and "filia Raymundi comitis Tolosani", but does not name her[542].  The Chronique de Guillaume de Nangis records in 1241 the marriage of "Saint Louis roi de France…Alphonse son frère" and "Jeanne fille du comte de Toulouse", together with "la terre d'Auvergne, du Poitou, et les terres des Albigeois"[543].  She succeeded her father 27 Sep 1249 as Ctss de Toulouse.  A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the death in 1271 of "domina Johanna comitissa Tholose, uxor supradicti comitis" (immediately following the record of the death of her husband) at "Savonam...feria 2"[544].  The testament of Jeanne Ctss de Toulouse dated 22 Jun 1270 provided bequests to "dominæ Mariæ consanguinæ nostræ", widow of "domini Othonis quondam vicecomitis Leomaniæ" and now "uxoris domini Archambaudi comitis Petragoricensis", to two of Marie's brothers Guillaume and Bernard, and to Gaillarde de Toulouse, daughter of her first cousin Bertrand de Toulouse Vicomte de Bruniquel[545].  

[534] Chronicon Turonense, RHGF XVIII, p. 317. [535] Layettes du Trésor des Chartes II, 1710, p. 54. [536] MP, Vol. V, 1250, p. 175. [537] MP, Vol. V, 1252, p. 354. [538] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Obituaire du xii siècle, p. 83. [539] Vic, Dom C. de and Dom Vaissete (1840) Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn. (Paris), Tome II, Preuves, CXX, p. 680. [540] Histoire Générale de Languedoc Tome V, Preuves, CLII, p. 658. [541] Lagarde, C. (trans.) (1864) Chronique de Maître Guillaume de Puylaurens sur la guerre des Albigeois (1202-1272) (Béziers), Chap. XL, p. 235. [542] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1237, MGH SS XXIII, p. 941. [543] Guillaume de Nangis, p. 150. [544] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 2nd Edn., Tome II, Preuves, CXX, p. 680. [545] Col. Périgord, Vol. 53, fol 322, citing Archives nat. de Fr., Trésor de Chartes, boîte cotée 'Testaments des rois, reines et grands seigneurs', 2e partie, Testament de Jeanne, fille de Raimond comte de Toulouse et de Poitiers, femme d'Alphonse de France comte de Poitiers. [JCC]

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 ALPHONSE de France (Lorrez-le-Bocage en Gâtinais, Seine-et-Marne 26 Jan 1213-died young, bur Notre-Dame de Poissy).  Twin with his brother Jean.  The Chronicon Bernardi Iterii records the birth of two twins "in festo sancti Policarpi à Lorre" in 1212 to "uxor Ludovici regis junioris"[528].  The primary source which confirms his name has not yet been identified. 

4. JEAN de France (Lorrez-le-Bocage en Gâtinais, Seine-et-Marne 26 Jan 1213-died young, bur Notre-Dame de Poissy). Twin with his brother Alphonse. The Chronicon Bernardi Iterii records the birth of two twins "in festo sancti Policarpi à Lorre" in 1212 to "uxor Ludovici regis junioris"[529]. The primary source which confirms his name has not yet been identified. (from Medlands)

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Alphonse, comte de Poitiers's Timeline

1220
November 11, 1220
Poissy, Ile-de-France, France
1241
1241
Age 20
1271
August 21, 1271
Age 50
Corneto Castle, Corneto, Sienne, Italy
1933
June 24, 1933
Age 50
June 24, 1933
Age 50
December 15, 1933
Age 50
December 15, 1933
Age 50
1988
March 8, 1988
Age 50
March 8, 1988
Age 50
March 24, 1988
Age 50