Caroline Lavinia Harrison

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Caroline Lavinia Harrison (Scott)

Also Known As: "Carrie"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Oxford, Butler, OH
Death: Died in Washington, DC, USA
Cause of death: Tuberculosis
Place of Burial: Crown Hill Cemetery, 700 W 38th St, Indianapolis, IN, USA
Immediate Family:

Daughter of John Witherspoon Scott and Mary Potts Scott
Wife of Benjamin Harrison, 23rd President of the USA
Mother of Russell Benjamin Harrison; Mary Scott McKee and (stillborn daughter) Harrison
Sister of Elizabeth Mayhew Lord; Mary Spears; John Scott, Jr. and Henry Scott

Occupation: First Lady of mthe United States
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Caroline Lavinia Harrison

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_Lavinia_Harrison

http://clinton4.nara.gov/WH/glimpse/firstladies/html/ch23.html

The centennial of President Washington's inauguration heightened the nation's interest in its heroic past, and in 1890 Caroline Scott Harrison lent her prestige as First Lady to the founding of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She served as its first President General. She took a special interest in the history of the White House, and the mature dignity with which she carried out her duties may overshadow the fun-loving nature that had charmed "Ben" Harrison when they met as teenagers.

Caroline held DAR membership # 7 and per the DAR's "Lineage Book of the Charter Members" by Mary S Lockwood published in 1895 was a descendant of Saul Rea, who held civil office during the Revolution and was a member of Congress." and "John Scott was commissary general of the Pennsylvania Line."

Born at Oxford, Ohio, in 1832, "Carrie" was the second daughter of Mary Potts Neal and the Reverend Dr. John W. Scott, a Presbyterian minister and founder of the Oxford Female Institute. As her father's pupil--brown-haired, petite, witty--she infatuated the reserved young Ben, then an honor student at Miami University; they were engaged before his graduation and married in 1853.

After early years of struggle while he established a law practice in Indianapolis, they enjoyed a happy family life interrupted only by the Civil War. Then, while General Harrison became a man of note in his profession, his wife cared for their son and daughter, gave active service to the First Presbyterian Church and to an orphans' home, and extended cordial hospitality to her many friends. Church views to the contrary, she saw no harm in private dancing lessons for her daughter--she liked dancing herself. Blessed with considerable artistic talent, she was an accomplished pianist; she especially enjoyed painting for recreation.

Illness repeatedly kept her away from Washington's winter social season during her husband's term in the Senate, 1881-1887, and she welcomed their return to private life; but she moved with poise to the White House in 1889 to continue the gracious way of life she had always created in her own home.

During the administration the Harrisons' daughter, Mary Harrison McKee, her two children, and other relatives lived at the White House. The First Lady tried in vain to have the overcrowded mansion enlarged but managed to assure an extensive renovation with up-to-date improvements. She established the collection of china associated with White House history. She worked for local charities as well. With other ladies of progressive views, she helped raise funds for the Johns Hopkins University medical school on condition that it admit women. She gave elegant receptions and dinners. In the winter of 1891-1892, however, she had to battle illness as she tried to fulfill her social obligations. She died of tuberculosis at the White House in October 1892, and after services in the East Room was buried from her own church in Indianapolis.

When official mourning ended, Mrs. McKee acted as hostess for her father in the last months of his term. (In 1896 he married his first wife's widowed niece and former secretary, Mary Scott Lord Dimmick; she survived him by nearly 47 years, dying in January 1948.) -------------------- NAME: Caroline Lavinia Scott Harrison

DATE OF BIRTH: October 1, 1832

PLACE OF BIRTH: Oxford, Ohio

DATE OF DEATH: October 25, 1892

PLACE OF DEATH: White House

FAMILY BACKGROUND: Caroline Lavinia Scott, "Carrie," was the first wife of President Benjamin Harrison. She was the daughter of John Witherspoon Scott, a teacher and Presbyterian minister and Mary Potts Neal Scott. She had two sisters: Elizabeth Lord and Mary Spears and two brothers: John and Henry. Her family was Presbyterian.

On October 20, 1853 she married Benjamin Harrison; they had one son, Russell Lord, (changed later to Russell Benjamin) Harrison and two daughters, Mary Scott Harrison McKee and an unnamed still born daughter. Caroline served as First Lady from 1889 to 1892.

EDUCATION: Caroline's parents were not only firm believers in education, but devoted their lives to educating young women and girls. As a young girl, she attended the Farmers College where her father taught. Here, she met and fell in love with Benjamin Harrison.

In 1853 she graduated with a music degree from the Oxford Female Institute, which her father was instrumental in founding. While at the institute, Caroline developed her love for English Literature, drama, music, art and painting. While at Oxford and after graduation in Kentucky, Caroline taught music, home economics and painting to students.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Some regard her as the most underrated First Lady. While grandmotherly in appearance compared to her predecessor and successor, Frances Cleveland, she was greatly devoted to women's rights. She only agreed to assist John Hopkins raise money to start a medical school on the condition they must admit women.

In 1890, the newly formed Daughters of the Revolution asked Caroline to become their President; in February 1892, Caroline gave the first recorded speech by a First Lady at the first congress of the DAR. As First Lady, she urged the American public to support their country by "buying American."

Her love of painting translated into her painting the White House china and also into her painting an orchid print made available to the women and girls of America. She began a preservation program for White House china, furniture and other artifacts which pioneered the necessity of historical preservation in the country.

The Harrisons inherited a White House which was rat infested and filthy. Caroline tried to expand the White House but did receive Congress's approval; instead, she did some remodeling and had electricity installed. However, the Harrisons were weary of this new energy source and avoided the switches. Caroline's efforts at White House expansion highlighted the need for more space to accommodate the increasing complexity of the role of the President.

She brought in the first Christmas tree to the White House in December of 1889; the Marine Band and Sousa revived dancing to the White House which had not been seen since Sara Polk was First Lady in 1845.

Caroline Harrison was deeply respected for her warmth, intelligence and artistic talent and for her devotion to her family and to her beliefs. During the country's centennial celebrations she became ill with tuberculosis and depression and died only four months before President Harrison's term ended.

When Benjamin and Caroline Harrison moved into the White House, they brought the largest accompaniment of relatives since Andrew Johnson. Those living in the White House with them included their son and daughter, the son-in-law and daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, Caroline's father, Caroline's sister and niece for awhile, to name a few. Living quarters at the White House were cramped. The only private bathroom was the President's. The floor plan at the time was the main house. The lower level was for the kitchen and storage. The main level rooms were more public, and the President's office and family living quarters shared the second floor.

In 1889, the Army engineers proposed that the greenhouses move to the east side of the White House and a new executive office building be put on the west. Caroline Harrison considered the plan and began to develop her own. She hated the crowded living area and the tourists made it impossible to use the first floor. She began meeting with Secretary of State Blaine and others about a proposal for Congress. The bill never got to the House floor, but it was not tabled. It remained a possibility. Caroline did receive limited funds to redecorate and make improvements to the White House.

Part of the 2003 exhibit, The Curator's Reserve, displays artifacts dealing with the White House renovation done by Caroline Harrison. Her plan for renovating the White House can be seen in the drawing by architect, Fred Owen. The original house would be the northern focus, with two buildings facing each other to the south. They would be linked to the house from the east and west by two-story halls, with a cylindrical section in the middle. The south end of conservatories would also connect forming a private courtyard in the center. The new building on the east would be the Historical Art or National wing. The new building on the west would be the Official Wing, housing the presidential offices. The plan would have allowed for numerous large rooms. If completed, it would still function well today. Caroline Harrison's plan was the first to move the office spaces out of the house. This would later be accomplished by Teddy Roosevelt's renovation with architect Charles McKim in 1902.

Original fabric swatches that Caroline used in redecorating are displayed with original photographs of the rooms. The photographs of the White House rooms were taken by Miss Frances Benjamin Johnston. Miss Johnston was the official White House photographer for several years. The State Dining Room photograph is next to gold velvet used in the drapes. The image of the East Room shows the opulence of the room. An original piece of golden brocade fabric probably used in drapery is part of the exhibit. Miss Johnston's book states that the East Room is "imposing in white and gold decoration, dating from President Grant's first administration, and with new hangings and furnishings of golden-brown damask."

Velvets used in the Blue Room and Green Room are also displayed. The Green Room was used as a music room, and furnished in pale green plush. Miss Johnston's book states that Mrs. Harrison's bedroom was: "Daintily appointed in pale green and silver, it stands just as Mrs. Harrison left it, and like the rest of the beautified White House, is a memorial to her refined and artistic taste." Caroline must have been fond of the pale green palate as many of the multi-colored fabric pieces are done in green tones.

There are also photographs of the President's office, Cabinet Room, and the family kitchen. The kitchen photo shows Dolley Johnson, the White House cook, originally from Kentucky. The family kitchen was smaller than the main kitchen used for preparing State dinners.

Dinner invitations, table favors, a menu, and family photos at the White House help share the story of the time the Harrison's spent in the White House. Red, white, and blue paper tassels with bells were used at a birthday party for Benjamin Harrison McKee, March 15, 1891. The ribbons on each have the names of Benjamin Harrison McKee, Mary Lodge McKee, and Elizabeth McKee (probably a cousin). Photographs show Baby McKee, Mary Lodge McKee, and Mary Harrison McKee enjoying time on the White House lawn.

Caroline Harrison's plan for the White House was stately and refined. Her redecorating brought her artistic touch to the grand old home. She and her family enjoyed their first years in the White House. Sadly, Caroline would die in her daintily appointed pale green and silver bedroom October 25, 1892. -------------------- NAME: Caroline Lavinia Scott Harrison

DATE OF BIRTH: October 1, 1832

PLACE OF BIRTH: Oxford, Ohio

DATE OF DEATH: October 25, 1892

PLACE OF DEATH: White House

FAMILY BACKGROUND: Caroline Lavinia Scott, "Carrie," was the first wife of President Benjamin Harrison. She was the daughter of John Witherspoon Scott, a teacher and Presbyterian minister and Mary Potts Neal Scott. She had two sisters: Elizabeth Lord and Mary Spears and two brothers: John and Henry. Her family was Presbyterian.

On October 20, 1853 she married Benjamin Harrison; they had one son, Russell Lord, (changed later to Russell Benjamin) Harrison and two daughters, Mary Scott Harrison McKee and an unnamed still born daughter. Caroline served as First Lady from 1889 to 1892.

EDUCATION: Caroline's parents were not only firm believers in education, but devoted their lives to educating young women and girls. As a young girl, she attended the Farmers College where her father taught. Here, she met and fell in love with Benjamin Harrison.

In 1853 she graduated with a music degree from the Oxford Female Institute, which her father was instrumental in founding. While at the institute, Caroline developed her love for English Literature, drama, music, art and painting. While at Oxford and after graduation in Kentucky, Caroline taught music, home economics and painting to students.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Some regard her as the most underrated First Lady. While grandmotherly in appearance compared to her predecessor and successor, Frances Cleveland, she was greatly devoted to women's rights. She only agreed to assist John Hopkins raise money to start a medical school on the condition they must admit women.

In 1890, the newly formed Daughters of the Revolution asked Caroline to become their President; in February 1892, Caroline gave the first recorded speech by a First Lady at the first congress of the DAR. As First Lady, she urged the American public to support their country by "buying American."

Her love of painting translated into her painting the White House china and also into her painting an orchid print made available to the women and girls of America. She began a preservation program for White House china, furniture and other artifacts which pioneered the necessity of historical preservation in the country.

The Harrisons inherited a White House which was rat infested and filthy. Caroline tried to expand the White House but did receive Congress's approval; instead, she did some remodeling and had electricity installed. However, the Harrisons were weary of this new energy source and avoided the switches. Caroline's efforts at White House expansion highlighted the need for more space to accommodate the increasing complexity of the role of the President.

She brought in the first Christmas tree to the White House in December of 1889; the Marine Band and Sousa revived dancing to the White House which had not been seen since Sara Polk was First Lady in 1845.

Caroline Harrison was deeply respected for her warmth, intelligence and artistic talent and for her devotion to her family and to her beliefs. During the country's centennial celebrations she became ill with tuberculosis and depression and died only four months before President Harrison's term ended.

When Benjamin and Caroline Harrison moved into the White House, they brought the largest accompaniment of relatives since Andrew Johnson. Those living in the White House with them included their son and daughter, the son-in-law and daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, Caroline's father, Caroline's sister and niece for awhile, to name a few. Living quarters at the White House were cramped. The only private bathroom was the President's. The floor plan at the time was the main house. The lower level was for the kitchen and storage. The main level rooms were more public, and the President's office and family living quarters shared the second floor.

In 1889, the Army engineers proposed that the greenhouses move to the east side of the White House and a new executive office building be put on the west. Caroline Harrison considered the plan and began to develop her own. She hated the crowded living area and the tourists made it impossible to use the first floor. She began meeting with Secretary of State Blaine and others about a proposal for Congress. The bill never got to the House floor, but it was not tabled. It remained a possibility. Caroline did receive limited funds to redecorate and make improvements to the White House.

Part of the 2003 exhibit, The Curator's Reserve, displays artifacts dealing with the White House renovation done by Caroline Harrison. Her plan for renovating the White House can be seen in the drawing by architect, Fred Owen. The original house would be the northern focus, with two buildings facing each other to the south. They would be linked to the house from the east and west by two-story halls, with a cylindrical section in the middle. The south end of conservatories would also connect forming a private courtyard in the center. The new building on the east would be the Historical Art or National wing. The new building on the west would be the Official Wing, housing the presidential offices. The plan would have allowed for numerous large rooms. If completed, it would still function well today. Caroline Harrison's plan was the first to move the office spaces out of the house. This would later be accomplished by Teddy Roosevelt's renovation with architect Charles McKim in 1902.

Original fabric swatches that Caroline used in redecorating are displayed with original photographs of the rooms. The photographs of the White House rooms were taken by Miss Frances Benjamin Johnston. Miss Johnston was the official White House photographer for several years. The State Dining Room photograph is next to gold velvet used in the drapes. The image of the East Room shows the opulence of the room. An original piece of golden brocade fabric probably used in drapery is part of the exhibit. Miss Johnston's book states that the East Room is "imposing in white and gold decoration, dating from President Grant's first administration, and with new hangings and furnishings of golden-brown damask."

Velvets used in the Blue Room and Green Room are also displayed. The Green Room was used as a music room, and furnished in pale green plush. Miss Johnston's book states that Mrs. Harrison's bedroom was: "Daintily appointed in pale green and silver, it stands just as Mrs. Harrison left it, and like the rest of the beautified White House, is a memorial to her refined and artistic taste." Caroline must have been fond of the pale green palate as many of the multi-colored fabric pieces are done in green tones.

There are also photographs of the President's office, Cabinet Room, and the family kitchen. The kitchen photo shows Dolley Johnson, the White House cook, originally from Kentucky. The family kitchen was smaller than the main kitchen used for preparing State dinners.

Dinner invitations, table favors, a menu, and family photos at the White House help share the story of the time the Harrison's spent in the White House. Red, white, and blue paper tassels with bells were used at a birthday party for Benjamin Harrison McKee, March 15, 1891. The ribbons on each have the names of Benjamin Harrison McKee, Mary Lodge McKee, and Elizabeth McKee (probably a cousin). Photographs show Baby McKee, Mary Lodge McKee, and Mary Harrison McKee enjoying time on the White House lawn.

Caroline Harrison's plan for the White House was stately and refined. Her redecorating brought her artistic touch to the grand old home. She and her family enjoyed their first years in the White House. Sadly, Caroline would die in her daintily appointed pale green and silver bedroom October 25, 1892. --------------------

NAME: Caroline Lavinia Scott Harrison

DATE OF BIRTH: October 1, 1832

PLACE OF BIRTH: Oxford, Ohio

DATE OF DEATH: October 25, 1892

PLACE OF DEATH: White House

FAMILY BACKGROUND: Caroline Lavinia Scott, "Carrie," was the first wife of President Benjamin Harrison. She was the daughter of John Witherspoon Scott, a teacher and Presbyterian minister and Mary Potts Neal Scott. She had two sisters: Elizabeth Lord and Mary Spears and two brothers: John and Henry. Her family was Presbyterian.

On October 20, 1853 she married Benjamin Harrison; they had one son, Russell Lord, (changed later to Russell Benjamin) Harrison and two daughters, Mary Scott Harrison McKee and an unnamed still born daughter. Caroline served as First Lady from 1889 to 1892.

EDUCATION: Caroline's parents were not only firm believers in education, but devoted their lives to educating young women and girls. As a young girl, she attended the Farmers College where her father taught. Here, she met and fell in love with Benjamin Harrison.

In 1853 she graduated with a music degree from the Oxford Female Institute, which her father was instrumental in founding. While at the institute, Caroline developed her love for English Literature, drama, music, art and painting. While at Oxford and after graduation in Kentucky, Caroline taught music, home economics and painting to students.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Some regard her as the most underrated First Lady. While grandmotherly in appearance compared to her predecessor and successor, Frances Cleveland, she was greatly devoted to women's rights. She only agreed to assist John Hopkins raise money to start a medical school on the condition they must admit women.

In 1890, the newly formed Daughters of the Revolution asked Caroline to become their President; in February 1892, Caroline gave the first recorded speech by a First Lady at the first congress of the DAR. As First Lady, she urged the American public to support their country by "buying American."

Her love of painting translated into her painting the White House china and also into her painting an orchid print made available to the women and girls of America. She began a preservation program for White House china, furniture and other artifacts which pioneered the necessity of historical preservation in the country.

The Harrisons inherited a White House which was rat infested and filthy. Caroline tried to expand the White House but did receive Congress's approval; instead, she did some remodeling and had electricity installed. However, the Harrisons were weary of this new energy source and avoided the switches. Caroline's efforts at White House expansion highlighted the need for more space to accommodate the increasing complexity of the role of the President.

She brought in the first Christmas tree to the White House in December of 1889; the Marine Band and Sousa revived dancing to the White House which had not been seen since Sara Polk was First Lady in 1845.

Caroline Harrison was deeply respected for her warmth, intelligence and artistic talent and for her devotion to her family and to her beliefs. During the country's centennial celebrations she became ill with tuberculosis and depression and died only four months before President Harrison's term ended.

When Benjamin and Caroline Harrison moved into the White House, they brought the largest accompaniment of relatives since Andrew Johnson. Those living in the White House with them included their son and daughter, the son-in-law and daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, Caroline's father, Caroline's sister and niece for awhile, to name a few. Living quarters at the White House were cramped. The only private bathroom was the President's. The floor plan at the time was the main house. The lower level was for the kitchen and storage. The main level rooms were more public, and the President's office and family living quarters shared the second floor.

In 1889, the Army engineers proposed that the greenhouses move to the east side of the White House and a new executive office building be put on the west. Caroline Harrison considered the plan and began to develop her own. She hated the crowded living area and the tourists made it impossible to use the first floor. She began meeting with Secretary of State Blaine and others about a proposal for Congress. The bill never got to the House floor, but it was not tabled. It remained a possibility. Caroline did receive limited funds to redecorate and make improvements to the White House.

Part of the 2003 exhibit, The Curator's Reserve, displays artifacts dealing with the White House renovation done by Caroline Harrison. Her plan for renovating the White House can be seen in the drawing by architect, Fred Owen. The original house would be the northern focus, with two buildings facing each other to the south. They would be linked to the house from the east and west by two-story halls, with a cylindrical section in the middle. The south end of conservatories would also connect forming a private courtyard in the center. The new building on the east would be the Historical Art or National wing. The new building on the west would be the Official Wing, housing the presidential offices. The plan would have allowed for numerous large rooms. If completed, it would still function well today. Caroline Harrison's plan was the first to move the office spaces out of the house. This would later be accomplished by Teddy Roosevelt's renovation with architect Charles McKim in 1902.

Original fabric swatches that Caroline used in redecorating are displayed with original photographs of the rooms. The photographs of the White House rooms were taken by Miss Frances Benjamin Johnston. Miss Johnston was the official White House photographer for several years. The State Dining Room photograph is next to gold velvet used in the drapes. The image of the East Room shows the opulence of the room. An original piece of golden brocade fabric probably used in drapery is part of the exhibit. Miss Johnston's book states that the East Room is "imposing in white and gold decoration, dating from President Grant's first administration, and with new hangings and furnishings of golden-brown damask."





Velvets used in the Blue Room and Green Room are also displayed. The Green Room was used as a music room, and furnished in pale green plush. Miss Johnston's book states that Mrs. Harrison's bedroom was: "Daintily appointed in pale green and silver, it stands just as Mrs. Harrison left it, and like the rest of the beautified White House, is a memorial to her refined and artistic taste." Caroline must have been fond of the pale green palate as many of the multi-colored fabric pieces are done in green tones.



There are also photographs of the President's office, Cabinet Room, and the family kitchen. The kitchen photo shows Dolley Johnson, the White House cook, originally from Kentucky. The family kitchen was smaller than the main kitchen used for preparing State dinners.


Dinner invitations, table favors, a menu, and family photos at the White House help share the story of the time the Harrison's spent in the White House. Red, white, and blue paper tassels with bells were used at a birthday party for Benjamin Harrison McKee, March 15, 1891. The ribbons on each have the names of Benjamin Harrison McKee, Mary Lodge McKee, and Elizabeth McKee (probably a cousin). Photographs show Baby McKee, Mary Lodge McKee, and Mary Harrison McKee enjoying time on the White House lawn.

Caroline Harrison's plan for the White House was stately and refined. Her redecorating brought her artistic touch to the grand old home. She and her family enjoyed their first years in the White House. Sadly, Caroline would die in her daintily appointed pale green and silver bedroom October 25, 1892.

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Caroline Lavinia Harrison's Timeline

1832
October 1, 1832
Oxford, Butler, OH
1853
October 20, 1853
Age 21
Oxford, OH

http://www.archive.org/stream/benjaminharrison007546mbp/benjaminhar...

"Benjamin Harrison Hoosier Warrior"

From shortly after Ben's twentieth birthday in late August un-
til the day of their wedding, he and Carrie followed patterns of
conduct wholly unpredictable but thoroughly amusing. She was
intent upon keeping secret the day and the hour so as "to blind
the curious." When Ben visited Oxford, he found her acting
and speaking in the presence of her students and friends "with
as great circumspection as a nun before her abbess." He added:
"Her sewing she does in the privacy of her own chamber. Stu-
diously avoiding an exposure of the suspected garments." Ben,
on the other hand, steadfastly refused to be a victim of the "tyr-
anny of a malicious and gossiping eye," for, as he put it, "con-
science approving, I shall act, though the whole world beside
disapprove." There was a certain amount of good common sense
underlying his attitude, for Ben held it as a principle that "the
man who commits himself to the absurd task of pleasing every-
body, is like a cork intrusted to the reversed and whirling cur-
rents of the 'Devil's Hole* [Niagara], and the one is as likely to
reach the ocean as the other is to maintain a dignified individu-
ality in society'

This show of stoicism, however, was somewhat of a false front.
As the days passed, Ben unbent sufficiently with Anderson to con-
fess that "my spirits are much regulated by my moods in these
times, now cheerful and talkative, and again silent, almost sad."
When he roused himself from these fits, he seemed to renew his
confidence by his determination to succeed in spite of every ob-
stacle, as he was quick to add:

I never lose my courage, however depressed my spirits may be. A
young man with good health and a well trained mind is guilty of
. . . cowardness, when he gives way to discouragement. "Faint heart"
never did anything worthy of man; how then could it win "the fair
lady" who prides herself upon the heroism and bravery of her lover.

By far the most trying problem for Ben was his selection of the
proper wedding garments. Only the timely arrival of his brother
Irwin served to tranquilize his ruffled disposition. "Together,"
he writes to John Anderson, "we spent almost the entire morn-
ing with tailors, boot makers, and gents furnishers." In retro-
spect, Ben's account of this expedition for clothing is quite sig-
nificant, though at the time it was peculiarly painful:

Never did a more disagreeable, vexatious task fall to my lot: from
the earliest thought of the matter to the possession of the last article,
was one continued series of quandaries and perplexities, from each of
which I was only released in the most desperate effort. I chose an
entire suit of black, vest and all.

Ben strongly suspected that his choice of a somber all-black
wedding outfit would be regarded by many as an example of his
lack of taste. But, like most things he did, this departure from
the dictates of fashion was willful and premeditated. Not only
did he select a black satin vest in place of the conventional "white
vest of the drone," but he also indulged his early and growing
fondness for a frock coat. As he admitted:

"Instead of the swallow tail and dept dress, I ordered a frock coat.
I am not entirely satisfied that I was right in this latter particular, but
this I know: that I will look and feel better in the old 'frock'!! I am
very little concerned about my appearance, however, so long as I
maintain gentility and avoid poverty. "

Ben found it difficult to pursue his studies with requisite at-
tention, and finally he brushed aside his legal tomes with the
confession: "I am tired of the suspense and dissipation of mind
incident to the anticipation of such an event. I long to have the
anticipation emerge into reality."

With deep respect, Ben asked Dr. Scott if he would consent
to perform the ceremony. He added understandingly, however,
"it will perhaps be an embarrassing part for the father to assume
the marriage of his daughter, yet, if it would not be too incon-
sonant with your feelings, we would be glad to have it so." Ben
felt it necessary to say a word also of the prospect he had of afford-
ing Dr. Scott's daughter a comfortable home and support:

For the present I shall offer a place in my father's house, where she
will receive the welcome of a daughter and a sister. My present design
is to "migrate" to Chicago in the Spring, when I will be able to obtain
immediate admission to the Bar, and once admitted, the energetic
and patient pursuit of my profession will insure success. ... In a word,
I pledge my best efforts for her happiness ... in the sincere hope that
the time will meet with your approval and that you will consent to
perform the ceremony.

Procurement of the marriage license proved somewhat more
embarrassing. Inasmuch as he had not yet attained his legal ma-
jority, Ben had to be accompanied by his father when he went
to Hamilton, the county seat, where they obtained the license
three days before the wedding.

On Wednesday evening, October 19, Ben arrived in Oxford
about nine o'clock and went directly to the Mansion House,
where he put up for the night.

October 20, 1853, dawned cool and brisk, and autumn wore
its finest dress. Tradition has it that Dr. Scott performed the cere-
mony in his own home, in the first-floor front room on the west
side of the house. As Carrie had desired, the wedding was a sim-
ple one, with the family, a few guests and no display of presents.
The bride appeared in a simple gray traveling dress and Ben
wore his new black suit. Immediately after the ceremony a wed-
ding breakfast was served, and, as soon as it was polite to do so,
the newly wedded couple left Oxford in a rattling old omnibus
for Hamilton, thence to The Point.

===========================================

http://www.lanepl.org/scanned/BUTLER%20BIOS/butler%20bios%2037-42.pdf

Carrie Scoff met her future husband while
he was a student at Farmers College.
In 1849, Dr. Scott returned to Oxford as
princlpal of the Oxford Female Institute, a move
which also attracted Ben Harrison to Miami, where
he graduated in 1852.

When the family returned to Oxford in
1849, "Scott was faced with providing a boarding
department for his school," Mrs. Smith wrote. "He
bought the rarnbling Old Temperance Tavern at the
corner of West High and South College, and also
the residence of Rebecca Teal which stood behind
it facing the Institute across the sfreet (South
College Avenue). He joined the two structures by
adding extra rooms between them."

The Old Temperance Tavern became the
Scott house, and there Oct. 20, 1853, Carrie and
Ben Harrison were married by the Rev. Scott.
Because he wasn't 21, then the legal age,
Harrison couldn't obtain a marriage license on his
own. His congressman father had to accompany
him to the Butler County Courthouse in Hamilton
three days before the wedding to secure the
necessary document.

1854
August 12, 1854
Age 21
Oxford, Butler, OH

http://www.archive.org/stream/benjaminharrison007546mbp/benjaminhar...

"Benjamin Harrison Hoosier Warrior"

Ben's happy turn in fortune came none too soon. At Oxford,
Ohio, on Saturday, August 12, 1854 just eight days before Ben's
twenty-first birthday Carrie gave birth to a boy. They named
him Russell. Congress had recessed, and John Scott Harrison
was at home resting when the news of Russell's birth came. In
his own quiet way he rose to the occasion and honored the proud
parents with a significantly beautiful letter. Part of his epistle
was directed to Ben:

'You now stand, my dear son, in a new relation in life a relation
that will be attended with new joys and also new cares and responsi-
bilitiesthat the former may outnumber the latter I hope with all my
heart. And yet my experience tells me that life is very much of a
mixed draught in which the bitter and the sweet are pretty fairly
or at least equally contributed afflictions, sometimes bring joys and
again, joys afflictions, and so we are all never perfectly happy, and
never so miserable, that hope does not spread a small ray on the sur-
rounding darkness.'

And to Carrie he sent warmest congratulations and love; he asked
Ben to tell her that:

'I wish her all of a young mother's joy. I will not say without a
young mother's anxiety, for I believe in that very anxiety is entwined
her pleasure and her joy but I will say that T hope she may escape
those many little pains and annoyances which so often afflict a young
mother.'

. . .

The child was named after Russell Farnura Lord who had married Carrie's
older sister, Elizabeth. They were married in 1849 and made their home in Honesdale. -- Indianapolis News, Dec. 10, 1889.

1858
April 3, 1858
Age 25
Indianapolis, Indiana

http://www.archive.org/stream/benjaminharrison007546mbp/benjaminhar...

"Benjamin Harrison Hoosier Warrior"

"On Saturday, April 3, 1858, Ben wrote in his diary for the fourth and last
time that year: "Our Little Girl Born About Noon . . . after Carrie had
gone through severe labor for about twelve hours . . . doctor had
to use forceps. " Thus it was with the arrival of Mary forever
to be called Mamie that Russell was superseded as the baby of
the family. The newcomer, according to sister Jennie, was "a
perfect little beauty . . . prettier than Russell." Poor Carrie came
in for little or no credit for this bundle of natural pulchritude,
for Jennie added: "I think she must be pretty . . . sure enough . . .
I suppose like her father ... of course."

1861
June 1861
Age 28
Indianapolis, Marion, IN, USA

http://www.archive.org/stream/benjaminharrison007546mbp/benjaminhar...

"Benjamin Harrison Hoosier Warrior"

Stillborn third child:

"Before the Civil War was three months old, a black cloud of
personal sorrow temporarily engulfed the Harrison home. Carrie
lost at birth the child whom she and Ben awaited as their "third
pet." 23 Their sorrow was intense and prolonged despite the many
consoling messages of sympathy that poured in from relatives and
friends. Yet, the rare beauty and warmth of the condolences ex-
pressed by John Scott Harrison, who knew this type of sorrow
only too well and too frequently, certainly revived their spirits: (23)

I hear with sorrow the loss and disappointment you sustained in
the death of your little babe but few will doubt that your loss has
been her infinite gain. She has exchanged a world of sin for one of
purity and bliss. . . .

You have lost a little one, too young to know and love you . . . but
God in his mercy is sparing to you two bright and intelligent children
who have learned to do this . . . and you should, and do feel grateful
that He has been disposed to withhold what would have been still a
more bitter cup. Such afflictions fall more heavily upon the bereaved
mother . . . and Carrie has our sincere sympathy. . . . M "

(23): John Scott Harrison to Benjamin Harrison, June 25, 1861, Harrison MSS,
Vol. 4.

...

On June 13, 1861, Ben noted his expense for a child's coffin and box for the
grave, amounting to $10.50.

1892
October 25, 1892
Age 60
Washington, DC, USA
1892
Age 59
Indianapolis, IN, USA

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=3590

Caroline Scott "Carrie" Harrison

Birth: Oct. 1, 1832
Oxford
Butler County
Ohio, USA
Death: Oct. 25, 1892
Washington
District of Columbia
District Of Columbia, USA

Presidential First Lady. She was born Caroline Scott in Oxford, Ohio, her father was professor of science and math at Miami University. The family moved to Cincinnati, where Caroline met the future President and grandson of President William H. Harrison for the first time, then a return to Oxford where her father founded the Oxford Female Institute. She was enrolled and graduated with a degree in music returning to teach home economics and painting. In an endeavor to be near Caroline, Benjamin Harrison pursued his education at Miami University. They were soon married in her father's parlor. The couple moved to Indianapolis to escape the fame of his father and grandfather. After returning from duty in the Civil War, Ben Harrison's law office prospered and his fame grew while becoming a political force. He was elected to the Senate then to the Presidency by electoral rather then a popular vote. They arrived at the White House with an extended family. Her daughter, Mary McKee, with her husband and two children joined them. Caroline had electricity installed, modernized and remodeled the rundown and neglected White House. She made china painting popular and opened classes in painting to anyone who wanted to learn and designed her own White House china and had a cabinet especially made to house it and past collections. It remains in the White House today. Caroline went with the President on a political trip to California and planted a tree at the future site of Stanford University. She accompanied her husband to the Nations Centennial Celebration and christened the newly constructed Battleship, The U.S.S. Philadelphia. In the closing months of the Harrison Presidency, she was diagnosed with tuberculosis. A summer in the Adirondack's failed to restore her health. She was brought home to the White House where she lapsed into semiconsciousness and passed away at the age of sixty. After services in the East Room, the family brought her back to Indianapolis for interment. She was the first President General of the D.A.R. (bio by: Donald Greyfield)

Family links:
Parents:
John Witherspoon Scott (1800 - 1892)
Mary Potts Neal Scott (1811 - 1876)

Spouse:
Benjamin Harrison (1833 - 1901)*

Children:
Russell Benjamin Harrison (1854 - 1936)*

Burial:
Crown Hill Cemetery
Indianapolis
Marion County
Indiana, USA
Plot: Section 13, Lot 57