Charibert I, King of the Franks at Paris

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Charibert, roi de Paris

Also Known As: "de Neustria", "de Neustrie"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Paris, (Present Region Seine), Neustria (within present France), Frankish Empire
Death: Died in Paris, (Present Region Seine), Neustria (within present France), Frankish Empire
Place of Burial: Abbaye-de-St-Vincent, Paris, Region Seine, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Chlothar I the Old, King of the Franks and Ingonde, Queen of the Franks
Husband of Merofleda; Ingoberga de Paris, Queen of Paris; Marcovefa and Theodogilda
Father of Berteflede; Saint Bertha de Paris, Queen of Kent; Clothilde and NN
Brother of Saint Guntram, King of Burgundy; Siegbert I, King of Austrasia; Chlodosinda, Queen of the Lombards and Dagobert
Half brother of Chilpéric I, King of the Franks at Soissons; Gonthaire (Gunthar, Guntram) d'Orléans; Theudebald {Thibaud, Theobald) d' Orléans; Clodoald (St. Cloud) d' Orleans and Chram of the Franks

Occupation: King of the Franks at Paris, 561/567, King of paris, King of France, 0520 - 7 May 0570, Kung, He was a King of the Franks. He was a King of Paris, KING OF PARIS, Edelman in Neustrië, King, Roi des Francs (8e, 561-567), Roi de Paris (561-567)
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About Charibert I, King of the Franks at Paris

Charibert I (c. 517–November or December 567) was the Merovingian King of Paris, the second-eldest son of Chlothar I and Ingund. His elder brother was Gunthar, who died sometime before their father's death.

In 556, Chlothar sent Charibert and his next youngest brother Guntram against their younger brother Chramn. who was in revolt. Chramn was hiding out on Black Mountain in the Limousin. Negotiations failed and the two armies prepared for battle. A thunderstorm prevented any engagement and Chramn set forged letters to his brothers, falsely reporting their father's death. Charibert and Guntram immediately returned to Burgundy to secure their positions.

On Chlothar's actual death in 561, the Frankish kingdom was divided between his sons in a new configuration. Each son ruled a distinct realm, which was not necessarily geographically coherent but could contain two unconnected regions, from a chief city after which his kingdom is called. Charibert received Neustria (the region between the Somme and the Loire), Aquitaine, and Novempopulana with Paris as his capital. His chief cities were Rouen, Tours, Poitiers, Limoges, Bordeaux, Toulouse, Cahors, and Albi. Guntram received Burgundy, then Sigebert received Austrasia (including Rheims) with his capital at Metz, and the youngest brother Chilperic received a compact kingdom with Soissons as its capital.

Charibert and his wife Ingoberga had a daughter, Bertha (539–c. 612). Charibert also had several concubines. By Merofleda, a wool-carder's daughter, and her sister Marcovefa, he had daughters: Berteflede (a nun in Tours) and Clothilde (a nun in St. Croix, Poitiers). By Theodogilda (or Theudechild), a cowherd's daughter; Charibert had his only son, who died in infancy. This behavior resulted in his excommunication, the first ever of a Merovingian king.

Charibert was scarcely more than king at Paris when he married his daughter Bertha to Ethelbert, the pagan King of Kent. She took with her Bishop Liudhard as her private confessor. Her influence in the Kentish court was instrumental in the success of St. Augustine of Canterbury's mission in 597.

Though Charibert was eloquent and learned in the law, he was one of the most dissolute of the early Merovingians. He was excommunicated, and his early death in 567 was brought on by his excesses. He was buried in Blavia castellum, a military fort in the Tractatus Armoricani. At his death his brothers divided his realm between them, agreeing at first to hold Paris in common. His surviving queen (out of four), Theudechild, proposed a marriage with Guntram, though a council held at Paris in 557 had outlawed such matches as incestuous. Guntram decided to house her more safely, though unwillingly, in a nunnery at Arles.

The main source for Charibert's life is Gregory of Tours' History of the Franks (Book IV, 3,16,22,26 and IX, 26), and from the English perspective Bede's Ecclesiastic History of the English People.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charibert

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charibert -------------------- Charibert I (c. 517–November or December 567) was the Merovingian King of Paris, the second-eldest son of Chlothar I and Ingund. His elder brother was Gunthar, who died sometime before their father's death.

In 556, Chlothar sent Charibert and his next youngest brother Guntram against their younger brother Chramn. who was in revolt. Chramn was hiding out on Black Mountain in the Limousin. Negotiations failed and the two armies prepared for battle. A thunderstorm prevented any engagement and Chramn set forged letters to his brothers, falsely reporting their father's death. Charibert and Guntram immediately returned to Burgundy to secure their positions.

On Chlothar's actual death in 561, the Frankish kingdom was divided between his sons in a new configuration. Each son ruled a distinct realm, which was not necessarily geographically coherent but could contain two unconnected regions, from a chief city after which his kingdom is called. Charibert received Neustria (the region between the Somme and the Loire), Aquitaine, and Novempopulana with Paris as his capital. His chief cities were Rouen, Tours, Poitiers, Limoges, Bordeaux, Toulouse, Cahors, and Albi. Guntram received Burgundy, then Sigebert received Austrasia (including Rheims) with his capital at Metz, and the youngest brother Chilperic received a compact kingdom with Soissons as its capital.

Charibert and his wife Ingoberga had a daughter, Bertha (539–c. 612). Charibert also had several concubines. By Merofleda, a wool-carder's daughter, and her sister Marcovefa, he had daughters: Berteflede (a nun in Tours) and Clothilde (a nun in St. Croix, Poitiers). By Theodogilda (or Theudechild), a cowherd's daughter; Charibert had his only son, who died in infancy. This behavior resulted in his excommunication, the first ever of a Merovingian king.

Charibert was scarcely more than king at Paris when he married his daughter Bertha to Ethelbert, the pagan King of Kent. She took with her Bishop Liudhard as her private confessor. Her influence in the Kentish court was instrumental in the success of St. Augustine of Canterbury's mission in 597.

Though Charibert was eloquent and learned in the law, he was one of the most dissolute of the early Merovingians. He was excommunicated, and his early death in 567 was brought on by his excesses. He was buried in Blavia castellum, a military fort in the Tractatus Armoricani. At his death his brothers divided his realm between them, agreeing at first to hold Paris in common. His surviving queen (out of four), Theudechild, proposed a marriage with Guntram, though a council held at Paris in 557 had outlawed such matches as incestuous. Guntram decided to house her more safely, though unwillingly, in a nunnery at Arles.

The main source for Charibert's life is Gregory of Tours' History of the Franks (Book IV, 3,16,22,26 and IX, 26), and from the English perspective Bede's Ecclesiastic History of the English People. [edit] Sources Search Wikimedia Commons Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Charibert I

   * Bachrach, Bernard S. Merovingian Military Organization, 481–751. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1971.
   * Historia Francorum Books I-IX at Medieval Sourcebook.

Charibert (?)1 M, #168134

Last Edited=20 Nov 2005

    
    He was a Merovingian king at Paris.1

Child of Charibert (?) and Ingoberg (?)

   * Bertha (?)+1

Citations

  1. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 12. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.

-------------------- Charibert (?) (1) M, #168134

Last Edited=20 Nov 2005

    
    He was a Merovingian king at Paris. (1)

Child of Charibert (?) and Ingoberg (?) -1. Bertha (?)+ (1)

Forrás / Source: http://www.thepeerage.com/p16814.htm#i168134 -------------------- Charibert I From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Charibert I (c. 517–November or December 567) was the Merovingian King of Paris, the second-eldest son of Chlothar I and Ingund. His elder brother was Gunthar, who died sometime before their father's death. In 556, Chlothar sent Charibert and his next youngest brother Guntram against their younger brother Chramn. who was in revolt. Chramn was hiding out on Black Mountain in the Limousin. Negotiations failed and the two armies prepared for battle. A thunderstorm prevented any engagement and Chramn set forged letters to his brothers, falsely reporting their father's death. Charibert and Guntram immediately returned to Burgundy to secure their positions. On Chlothar's actual death in 561, the Frankish kingdom was divided between his sons in a new configuration. Each son ruled a distinct realm, which was not necessarily geographically coherent but could contain two unconnected regions, from a chief city after which his kingdom is called. Charibert received Neustria (the region between the Somme and the Loire), Aquitaine, and Novempopulana with Paris as his capital. His chief cities were Rouen, Tours, Poitiers, Limoges, Bordeaux, Toulouse, Cahors, and Albi. Guntram received Burgundy, then Sigebert received Austrasia (including Rheims) with his capital at Metz, and the youngest brother Chilperic received a compact kingdom with Soissons as its capital. Charibert and his wife Ingoberga had a daughter, Bertha (539–c. 612). Charibert also had several concubines. By Merofleda, a wool-carder's daughter, and her sister Marcovefa, he had daughters: Berteflede (a nun in Tours) and Clothilde (a nun in St. Croix, Poitiers). By Theodogilda (or Theudechild), a cowherd's daughter; Charibert had his only son, who died in infancy. This behavior resulted in his excommunication, the first ever of a Merovingian king. Charibert was scarcely more than king at Paris when he married his daughter Bertha to Ethelbert, the pagan King of Kent. She took with her Bishop Liudhard as her private confessor. Her influence in the Kentish court was instrumental in the success of St. Augustine of Canterbury's mission in 597. Though Charibert was eloquent and learned in the law, he was one of the most dissolute of the early Merovingians. He was excommunicated, and his early death in 567 was brought on by his excesses. He was buried in Blavia castellum, a military fort in the Tractatus Armoricani. At his death his brothers divided his realm between them, agreeing at first to hold Paris in common. His surviving queen (out of four), Theudechild, proposed a marriage with Guntram, though a council held at Paris in 557 had outlawed such matches as incestuous. Guntram decided to house her more safely, though unwillingly, in a nunnery at Arles. The main source for Charibert's life is Gregory of Tours' History of the Franks (Book IV, 3,16,22,26 and IX, 26), and from the English perspective Bede's Ecclesiastic History of the English People.

Forrás / Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charibert_I -------------------- Född: mellan 520 och 525 Frankrike -------------------- Charibert I king of the Franks


died 567, Paris


Main Merovingian king of the Franks, the eldest son of Chlotar I and Ingund. He shared in the partition of the Frankish kingdom that followed his father’s death in 561, receiving the old kingdom of Childebert I, with its capital at Paris. Eloquent and learned in the law, he was yet loose-living and died excommunicate. At his death his brothers Guntram, Sigebert I, and Chilperic I shared his realm between them; a tripartite division of the lands north of the Loire thenceforth remained normal, the areas concerned being the east (Austrasia), the west (the future Neustria), and Burgundy. His daughter Bertha married King Aethelberht of Kent.

Related Links Aspects of this topic are discussed in the following places at Britannica.

Assorted References history of Gaul ( in France: The grandsons of Clovis ) ...agreement was based on that of 511 but dealt with more extensive territories. Guntram received the eastern part of the former kingdom of Orléans, enlarged by the addition of Burgundy. Charibert I’s share was fashioned from the old kingdom of Paris (Seine and English Channel districts), augmented in the south by the western section of the old kingdom of Orléans (lower Loire...

Sigebert I ( in Sigebert I ) ...four sons; Sigebert became king of the northeastern portion, known as Austrasia, as well as of portions of Aquitaine and Provence, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother, Charibert I, in 567 or 568. Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe, compelled him twice to repel their attacks (562 and c. 568). About 566 he married Brunhild, daughter of the...

-------------------- Charibert I (c. 517–November or December 567) was the Merovingian King of Paris, the second-eldest son of Chlothar I and Ingund. His elder brother was Gunthar, who died sometime before their father's death.

In 556, Chlothar sent Charibert and his next youngest brother Guntram against their younger brother Chramn. who was in revolt. Chramn was hiding out on Black Mountain in the Limousin. Negotiations failed and the two armies prepared for battle. A thunderstorm prevented any engagement and Chramn set forged letters to his brothers, falsely reporting their father's death. Charibert and Guntram immediately returned to Burgundy to secure their positions.

On Chlothar's actual death in 561, the Frankish kingdom was divided between his sons in a new configuration. Each son ruled a distinct realm, which was not necessarily geographically coherent but could contain two unconnected regions, from a chief city after which his kingdom is called. Charibert received Neustria (the region between the Somme and the Loire), Aquitaine, and Novempopulana with Paris as his capital. His chief cities were Rouen, Tours, Poitiers, Limoges, Bordeaux, Toulouse, Cahors, and Albi. Guntram received Burgundy, then Sigebert received Austrasia (including Rheims) with his capital at Metz, and the youngest brother Chilperic received a compact kingdom with Soissons as its capital.

Charibert and his wife Ingoberga had a daughter, Bertha (539–c. 612). Charibert also had several concubines. By Merofleda, a wool-carder's daughter, and her sister Marcovefa, he had daughters: Berteflede (a nun in Tours) and Clothilde (a nun in St. Croix, Poitiers). By Theodogilda (or Theudechild), a cowherd's daughter; Charibert had his only son, who died in infancy. This behavior resulted in his excommunication, the first ever of a Merovingian king.

Charibert was scarcely more than king at Paris when he married his daughter Bertha to Ethelbert, the pagan King of Kent. She took with her Bishop Liudhard as her private confessor. Her influence in the Kentish court was instrumental in the success of St. Augustine of Canterbury's mission in 597.

Though Charibert was eloquent and learned in the law, he was one of the most dissolute of the early Merovingians. He was excommunicated, and his early death in 567 was brought on by his excesses. He was buried in Blavia castellum, a military fort in the Tractatus Armoricani. At his death his brothers divided his realm between them, agreeing at first to hold Paris in common. His surviving queen (out of four), Theudechild, proposed a marriage with Guntram, though a council held at Paris in 557 had outlawed such matches as incestuous. Guntram decided to house her more safely, though unwillingly, in a nunnery at Arles.

The main source for Charibert's life is Gregory of Tours' History of the Franks (Book IV, 3,16,22,26 and IX, 26), and from the English perspective Bede's Ecclesiastic History of the English People. -------------------- Wikipedia:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robertiner

Robertiner

aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie

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Robertiner (französisch les Robertiens) ist die moderne Bezeichnung für eine fränkische Adelsfamilie, die auch als "Rupertiner" bekannt und seit dem Beginn des 7. Jahrhunderts bezeugt ist, bzw. für den westfränkischen Zweig dieser Familie, der ab der Mitte des 9. Jahrhunderts im Westfrankenreich eine wichtige Rolle spielte.

Benannt wurden die Robertiner ursprünglich nach dem Grafen Robert dem Tapferen (Mitte des 9. Jahrhunderts), der im 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert noch als Ahnherr des Geschlechts galt. Die gesicherte Stammreihe beginnt mit Robert I., der um die Mitte des 8. Jahrhunderts Graf im Worms- und Oberrheingau war.[1] Erst Karl Glöckner hat in einem 1937 veröffentlichten Aufsatz gezeigt, dass Robert aus dem rheinfränkischen Geschlecht der Rupertiner stammte und seine Abstammung somit bis ins 7. Jahrhundert zurückverfolgt werden kann. Die Bezeichnung "Rupertiner" bezieht sich auf den Leitnamen Rupert, auch Chrodobertus oder Robert, der den Stammbaum der Familie durchzieht. Meist wird nur der von Robert dem Tapferen abstammende Familienzweig der Rupertiner als "Robertiner" bezeichnet.

Aus dem Geschlecht der Robertiner stammte Hugo Capet, der die französische Königsdynastie der Kapetinger begründete. Da auch die späteren französischen Königsgeschlechter (Haus Valois, Bourbonen) in ununterbrochener männlicher Linie von Hugo Capet abstammen, ist das ganze "Haus Frankreich" (Maison de France) ein Zweig des Robertinergeschlechts. Eine Nebenlinie der Robertiner sind die fränkischen Babenberger.

Die bekanntesten Mitglieder der Familie sind:

  1. Robert der Tapfere, Graf von Tours und Graf von Angers
  2. Odo von Paris, König des Westfrankenreichs
  3. Robert I., König des Westfrankenreichs
  4. Hugo der Große, Herzog der Franken (dux Francorum), Herzog von Burgund und Herzog von Aquitanien
  5. Hugo Capet, König von Frankreich

Inhaltsverzeichnis

[Anzeigen]

   * 1 Stammliste
         o 1.1 Die merowingischen Generationen
         o 1.2 Die karolingischen Generationen
   * 2 Literatur
   * 3 Einzelnachweise

Stammliste [Bearbeiten]

Die merowingischen Generationen [Bearbeiten]

  1. Charibert, † vor 636, nobilis in Neustrien
        1. Chrodobertus I. (Robert I.) nobilis in Neustrien, 8. April 630 referendarius[2] des Königs Dagobert I.
              1. Lantbertus I. (Lambert I.), † nach 650, nobilis in Neustrien
                    1. Chrodobertus II. (Robert II.) nobilis in Neustrien, 653 Hausmeier des Königs Chlodwig II., 658 Kanzler des Königs Chlothar III., 2. Oktober 678 comes palatinus (Pfalzgraf) ∞ Doda, † vor 12. September 678
                          1.  ? Landrada ∞ Sigramnus, nobilis in Austrien[3], die Eltern des Bischofs Chrodegang und Großeltern des Grafen Ingram
                          2.  ? Tochter ∞ Liutwin der Heilige (Liévin), 698/720 Bischof von Trier, gründet 713 Mettlach (Guidonen)
                          3.  ? Grimbert, 691/720 comes palatinus (Pfalzgraf) von Neustrien
                          4. Lambert II., † vor 741, comes in Neustrien und Austrien 706/715
                                1. Robert I. (Rupert I.), 722/757 bezeugt, † vor 764, 732 dux im Haspengau, 741/742 comes palatinus (Pfalzgraf), um 750 Graf im Oberrhein- und Wormsgau, 757 königlicher missus in Italien;[4] ∞ um 730 Williswint, † nach 768, stiftet am 12. Juli 764 Kloster Lorsch, Erbin am Oberrhein und von Hahnheim in Rheinhessen, Erbtochter des Grafen Adalhelm
                                      1. (Rupert) Cancor, † nach 782, 745 Graf im Oberrheingau (vielleicht auch Thurgau), 758 Graf im Breisgau, 775/778 Graf im Zürichgau, 764 Mitstifter von Kloster Lorsch, ∞ Angila
                                            1. Heimrich (Heimo), X 5. Mai 795 bei Lüne an der Elbe, 764 Mitstifter von Kloster Lorsch, 772/782 Graf im Oberrheingau, 778 Graf im Lahngau, 784 Abt von Mosbach – Nachkommen siehe: Popponen (fränkische Babenberger)
                                            2. Rachilt, 776 geistlich in Lorsch
                                            3. Euphemia, geistlich in Lorsch wohl 776
                                      2. Anselm, † 778 in der Schlacht bei Roncesvalles comes palatinus (Pfalzgraf)
                                      3. Rupert, † nach 786, 779 Abt von Saint-Germain-des-Fossés
                                      4. Thurincbertus (Thüringbert), † nach 1. Juni 770, 767/770 mit Besitz in Lorsch
                                            1. Robert II. (Rutpert II. o. Hruodbertus), 770 bezeugt, † 12. Juli 807, 795/807 Graf im Worms- und Oberrheingau, 795 Herr zu Dienheim; ∞ I Theoderata (Tiedrada), 766/777 bezeugt, † vor 789; ∞ II Isengarde, 789 bezeugt;[5] – Nachkommen siehe unten
                                      5.  ? Landrada ∞ Sigram, die Eltern des Bischofs Chrodegang und Großeltern des Grafen Ingram[6]
                          5.  ? Rupert der Heilige (Robert), † 24. Februar 717 oder 27. März 718 in Salzburg, Bischof von Worms, 696/717 erster Abt und Bischof in Salzburg, begraben in Salzburg
                          6.  ? Galaberge die Heilige
              2.  ? Chrodobertus (Robert) Rat der Königin Bathilde, macht 662 Grimoald zum Hausmeier in Austrien, wohl 654/664 Bischof von Paris und 663/667 Bischof von Tours
        2. Albert
        3. Erlebert
        4. Tochter ∞ NN

Die karolingischen Generationen [Bearbeiten]

  1. Robert II. (Rutpert II. o. Hruodbertus), 770 bezeugt, † 12. Juli 807, 795/807 Graf im Worms- und Oberrheingau, 795 Herr zu Dienheim; ∞ I Theoderata (Tiedrada), 766/777 bezeugt, † vor 789; ∞ II Isengarde, 789 bezeugt; Vorfahren siehe oben
        1.  ? (wohl I ) Tochter ∞ Theobald Graf von Madrie
        2. (I) Robert III. (Rutpert III.), † vor 834, 812/830 Graf im Wormsgau, Graf im Oberrheingau, 825 kaiserlicher missus im Bistum Mainz; ∞ um 808 Wiltrud (Waldrada) von Orléans, 829/834 Erbin von Besitz in Orléans, Tochter des Grafen Hadrian und Waldrat aus dem Haus der Widonen
              1. Guntram, Graf im Wormsgau 815/837
              2. Oda ∞ Walaho IV. (Werner IV.), † wohl vor 891, Graf im Wormsgau nach 840 (Walahone, mutmaßlicher Stammvater der Salier)
              3. Rutpert IV. (Robert I. der Starke), X 15. September oder 25. Juli 866 in der Schlacht von Brissarthe, 836/nach 840 Graf im Wormsgau, 852 Laienabt von Saint-Martin-de-Marmoutier bei Tours, 853 Graf von Tours, 861/866 nobilis Franciae (Île-de-France) und Graf von Paris, ∞ I NN, wohl Agane; ∞ II Anfang 864 Adelaide (Aelis) von Tours, † nach 866, Tochter des Grafen Hugo von Tours (Etichonen) und Bava (Ava), Witwe des Konrad I., Graf von Aargau und Auxerre, Graf von Linzgau (Welfen)
                    1. (I) Sohn, erbt 866 den Besitz in Burgund
                    2. (I) Tochter, wohl Richildis, Erbin von Blois; ∞ Theobald der Alte Graf von Tours – Stammeltern der Grafen von Blois und Chartres (Haus Blois)
                    3. (II) Odo (Eudes), * wohl Anfang 865, † 1. oder 3. Januar 898 in La-Fère-sur-Oise, 866 nobilis Franciae, Graf von Paris und Aquitanien, vor dem 27. Oktober 886 Herr von Anjou und Touraine, Ende 887 Vormund von König Karl III. und Regent von Frankreich, 888-898 König von Frankreich, begraben in der Basilika Saint-Denis; ∞ wohl 881 Theoderata von Troyes (Thierrée de Troyes), 890 bezeugt, wohl Tochter des Aleram, Graf von Troyes [7]
                          1. Rudolf (Raoul), * wohl 882, bezeugt 898, König von Aquitanien
                          2.  ? Oda, * wohl 883, † nach 952; ∞ um 897 Zwentibold, X 13. August 900 bei Susteren, 895 König von Lothringen (Karolinger)
                          3. Arnulf, * wohl 885, † 898 kurz nach dem Vater
                          4. Guido (Guy), * wohl 888, 903 bezeugt
                    4. (II) Robert (II.) I., * posthumus 866, X 15. Juni 923 bei Soissons, 893 Graf von Poitiers, Markgraf in Neustrien und Orléans, 898 Graf von Paris, Laienabt von Saint-Denis und Saint-Martin de Tours, 29. April 922 König von Frankreich; ∞ I Aelis, ∞ II um 890 Beatrix von Vermandois, † nach März 931, Tochter des Grafen Heribert I. (Karolinger) und der Bertha, wohl Bertha von Morvois[8]
                          1. (I) Hildebrante (Liégarde), † nach 931; ∞ vor 907 Heribert II. Graf von Vermandois, wohl 902 bezeugt, † 23. Februar 943 (Karolinger)
                          2. (I) Emma, † 935 wohl vor 13. September; ∞ 910 Rudolf (Raoul), † 15. Januar 936 in Auxerre, Herzog von Burgund, 923-936 König von Frankreich, begraben in der Abtei Sainte-Colombe in Sens (Buviniden)
                          3. (II) Hugo I. der Große (Hugues I. le Grand), * wohl 895, † 16. Juni 956 in Dourdan, 922 Herzog von Neustrien, Burgund und Aquitanien, Graf von Paris, Orléans, Vexin usw., 923 Graf von Le Mans, 936 dux Francorum, 938 Herzog von Burgund, 943-956 von ganz Burgund, 946 Graf von Laon, Laienabt von Saint-Martin de Tours, von St. Germain-des-Prés und Saint-Denis, verzichtet 923, 936 und 954 auf die französische Krone, 936-945 und 954-956 Regent Frankreichs, begraben in der Basilika Saint-Denis; ∞ I 922 Judith, † wohl 925; ∞ II 926/927 Edhild (Eadhylde) von England, † 14. September 937, Tochter des Königs Eduard der Ältere (Haus Wessex) und wohl Aelflede; ∞ III 9. Mai/14. September 938 in Mainz oder Ingelheim am Rhein Hadwig, † 10. Mai nach 965, vielleicht auch 958, Tochter des deutschen Königs Heinrich I. (Liudolfinger)
                                1. (III) Beatrix, † 23. August nach 987; ∞ 954/955 Friedrich I. Herzog von Oberlothringen, † 978 (Wigeriche)
                                2. (III) Hugo II. (Hugues Capet), * Winter 941, † 24. Oktober 996 in Les Juifs (Prasville) bei Chartres, 956 Graf von Poitou, Orléans usw., 960 volljährig, Laienabt von Saint-Martin de Tours, Saint-Germain d'Auxerre, St. Aignan in Orléans, Saint-Quentin, Saint-Vaast usw., 986/987 Regent, 987 König von Frankreich, begraben in der Basilika Saint-Denis, ∞ um Sommer 968 Alice von Poitou, * wohl 950, † 15. Juni 1006, wohl Tochter von Wilhelm I. Graf von Poitou, als Wilhelm III. Herzog von Aquitanien (Ramnulfiden), und Gerloc-Adele von Normandie (Rolloniden) – Nachkommen siehe Stammliste der Kapetinger
                                3. (III) Emma, * wohl 943, † nach 19. März 968; ∞ 956/960 Richard I. Ohnefurcht (Sans Peur), 942 bezeugt, † 20. November 996 in Fécamp, Graf von der Normandie, Regent von Frankreich 956/960, begraben in Fécamp (Rolloniden)
                                4. (III) Otto, * wohl 944, † 22./23. Februar 965, 956 Herzog von Burgund, ∞ um Ostern 955 Luitgard (Liégard) von Autun, Erbin von Burgund, Tochter des Grafen Giselbert (Gilbert) und Ermengarde, Erbin von Burgund (siehe Buviniden)
                                5. (III) Heinrich I. der Große (Henri I le Grand), * wohl 946, † 15. Oktober 1002 auf Burg Pouilly-sur-Saône, Graf von Nevers, 965/1002 Herzog von Burgund, begraben in Saint-Germain d'Auxerre, ∞ I um 972 Gerberga von Mâcon, † 11. Dezember 986/991, Tochter des Otto (Othon), Witwe des Markgrafen Adalbert II. von Ivrea, 950/961 König von Italien (Haus Burgund-Ivrea); ∞ II vor Juni 992, geschieden 996, Gersende von Gascogne, Tochter von Wilhelm (Guillaume) Herzog von Gascogne (Haus Gascogne); ∞ III 998 Mathilde von Chalon, † 1005/1019, Tochter des Grafen Lambert, heiratet in zweiter Ehe Gottfried I. (Geoffroi I.) von Semur (Haus Semur)
                                      1. (III) Aramburga von Burgund, * wohl 999; ∞ um 1015 Dalmas von Semur (Haus Semur)
                                      2. (unehelich, Mutter unbekannt) Eudes, 1004 Vizegraf von Beaune, 25. August 1005 Patron der Kirche Saint-Étienne-de-Beaune; ∞ vor 1012 Inga (Hingade) [9]
                                            1. Aguion (Azelin) de Beaune, 1042 bezeugt
                                            2. Jean de Beaune, Herr von Marcy (Mazay), 1042 bezeugt
                                6. (unehelich, Mutter: Ringare/Raingarde, niederer Herkunft, † 23. August ... auf Burg Toucy) Heribert, † 23. August, vielleicht auch 16. August, 994 wohl in Auxerre, 969/994 Bischof von Auxerre, begraben in Notre-Dame in Auxerre[10]
              4.  ? Tochter ∞ Megingoz I., 876 bezeugt, wohl Graf im Wormsgau (Wilhelminer)

Literatur [Bearbeiten]

   * Detlev Schwennicke: Europäische Stammtafeln II (1984) Tafel 10–11
   * Karl Glöckner: Lorsch und Lothringen, Robertiner und Capetinger, in: ZGO Neue Folge 50, 1937, S. 301-354
   * Hervé Pinoteau: Héraldique capétienne II, Paris 1947 und 1955
   * Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Bände der Fürstlichen Häuser 1951–1978
   * Eberhard Winkhaus: Ahnen zu Karl dem Großen und zu Widukind, Ennepetal 1950, Ergänzungen 1953
   * Wilhelm Prinz von Isenburg: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der europäischen Staaten, 2 Bände, Marburg 1953
   * Hervé Pinoteau: Les origines de la Maison Capétienne, Brüssel 1958
   * Jean-Dominique Comte de Joannis: Les 16 quartiers généalogique des Capétiens, 3 Bände, Lyon 1958
   * Gaston Sirjean: Encyclopédie généalogique des Maisons Souveraines du Monde, 13 Bände, Paris 1966ff
   * Alfred Friese: Studien zur Herrschaftsgeschichte des fränkischen Adels, Stuttgart 1979 (Geschichte und Gesellschaft, Bochumer historische Studien, Band 18), S. 98ff

Einzelnachweise [Bearbeiten]

  1. ↑ Friese Alfred: Studien zur Herrschaftsgeschichte des fränkischen Adels. Der mainländisch-thüringische Raum vom 7. bis 11. Jahrhundert. Klett-Cotta Stuttgart 1979, S. 98 ff.
  2. ↑ Berichterstatter – der Vorläufer des Kanzlers unter den Merowingern
  3. ↑ vergleiche die Ehe Landrada/Sigram zwei Generationen später (und die Fußnote dazu) sowie den Artikel Ingram (Franke)
  4. ↑ Vgl. auch: Robert I., Graf im Oberrheingau, bei Genealogie Mittelalter
  5. ↑ Vgl auch: Robert II. Graf im Oberrheingau, bei Genealogie Mittelalter
  6. ↑ vergleiche die Ehe Landrada/Sigramnus zwei Generationen früher. Der Tod des Sohnes Chrodegang im Jahr 766 passt im Übrigen nicht in die folgende Generation (seine Vettern starben 795 bzw. 807 und Chrodegang war bereits 748 als Stifter von Gorze aktiv), eher in die Generation des Dux Robert im Haspengau (757 bezeugt, † vor 764). Die Gruppe Landrada/Sigram/Chrodegang wurde mit Respekt auf die Literatur hier stehen gelassen.
  7. ↑ Schwennicke bezeichnet Aleram als Angehöriger der Familie der Nebelungen, womit er offenbar eine jüngere Linie der Arnulfinger meint, Nachkommen von Karl Martells jüngerem Bruder Childebrand (siehe auch: fr:Nibelungides). MedLands Carolingian Nobility Chapter 1.O Family of Adelramn Comte (de Troyes) sieht Aleram als Sohn von Aleran (Barcelona) († 852) und Ehemann einer Angehörigen der Familie der Nebelungen, jedoch nicht als Graf von Troyes.
  8. ↑ siehe dort zur Richtigkeit dieser Angabe
  9. ↑ er und seine Kinder: Europäische Stammtafeln III.2, 1983, Tafel 297
 10. ↑ Europäische Stammtafeln III.2, 1983, Tafel 297

Von „http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robertiner

Kategorien: Adelsgeschlecht | Robertiner | Stammliste -------------------- Charibert's ancestry is continued elsewhere on this tree.

Charibert I's father was Chlotar I (The Old) Franks and his mother was Radegonde (Ingunde) Thuringian de Ingonde. His paternal grandparents were Clovis I (The Great) Franks and Clotilde de Bourgogne; his maternal grandparents were Balderic von Thuringia and <Unknown>. He had two brothers named Chilperic I and Sigbert I. He was the oldest of the three children. -------------------- Charibert I Of Paris 1 •Sex: M •ALIA: The Old or /Lothar/ •Title: King of the Franks •Birth: ABT 497 in Rheims, Marne, Loire-Alantique, France 1 •Death: 23 NOV 561 in Braines, Loire Atlantique, France 1 •Burial: UNKNOWN Saint Medard Abbey, Soissons, Aisne, France 1 •Note:

Charibert I, (died 567, Paris), Merovingian king of the Franks, the eldest son of Chlotar I and Ingund. He shared in the partition of the Frankish kingdom that followed his father’s death in 561, receiving the old kingdom of Childebert I, with its capital at Paris. Eloquent and learned in the law, he was yet loose-living and died excommunicate. At his death his brothers Guntram, Sigebert I, and Chilperic I shared his realm between them; a tripartite division of the lands north of the Loire thenceforth remained normal, the areas concerned being the east (Austrasia),

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charibert_I -------------------- Cariberto I [ou Charibert Ier]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(517 - 567)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Rei merovingio de Paris (561-567) nascido em Soissons, que herdou o reino de Paris por causa da morte de seu irmão mais velho, Gunthar, ter morrido logo após a morte do pai. Com a morte do rei Clotário I, ocorreu uma nova divisão territorial (561): Austrásia, Burgúndia, Nêustria e Paris, distribuídas entre seus filhos: Sigeberto recebeu a Austrásia, incluindo Rheims, mas com capital em Metz; Chilperico recebeu a Nêustria com capital em Soissons; e Guntram recebeu a Burgúndia, com capital em Orleãs. Segundo filho de Clotário I, Rei dos Francos, e de Ingonte, e assumiu também o reino de Paris (561) compreendido no território entre Somme e Loire e boa parte da Aquitânia, com Paris como capital, e ainda tendo como importantes cidades Rouen, Tours, Poitiers, Limoges, Bordeaux e Toulouse. Era um grande conhecedor e advogado das leis e dado à extravagâncias. Organizou um casamento entre sua filha Berta e o rei pagão de Kent, Ethelbert, visando vantagens políticas, mas que resultaria em um acontecimento importante para a conversão futura dos reis anglo-saxões. Também viveu marital e paralelamente com Ingeberge/Ingoberga, Méroflède/Merofleda, Marcovèfe/Marcobefa e Théodechilde/Theodogilda. Morreu em Paris e foi enterrado na Abadia de Saint-Vincent, depois Saint-Germain-des-Prés, nos arredores da hoje capital francesa. Como não tinha descendentes homens vivos, após sua morte seus irmãos sobreviventes, Guntram, Sigeberto I e Chilperico I concordaram em administrar conjuntamente o reino de Paris. 

Figura copiada do site MEROVINGI/TEMPLARI:

http://www.templaricavalieri.it/merovingi.htm

view all 17

Charibert I, King of the Franks at Paris's Timeline

517
517
Paris, (Present Region Seine), Neustria (within present France), Frankish Empire
539
539
Age 22
Paris, Paris, Île-de-France, France
561
561
Age 44
(Not Married)
562
562
Age 45
(Not Married)
567
May 7, 567
Age 50
Paris, (Present Region Seine), Neustria (within present France), Frankish Empire
567
Age 50
King of Paris
567
Age 50
Paris, Region Seine, France
1992
September 3, 1992
Age 50
1993
April 27, 1993
Age 50
May 14, 1993
Age 50