Frédégonde

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Frédégonde

Also Known As: "Frédégonde", "Fredegund", "Fredegunda", "Fredegundis"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Paris, Seine, Ile-de-France, France
Place of Burial: St. Denis Basilica, Paris, Ile-de-France, France
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Brunulphe de Cambrai and Chrotechilde of the Ostrogoths
Wife of Chilpéric I, King of the Franks at Soissons
Mother of Rigundis; Theuderic de Soissons, died young; Chlodébert de Soissons; Samson de Soissons, died young; Dagobert de Soissons and 3 others
Sister of Brunulphe d'Ardennes, II and Sichilde d Ardennes

Occupation: Queen consort, Queen consort of Chilperic I & Queen Regent of her son., Queen consort of Chilperic I, Dronning av Frankrike, Reine de Neustrie, [Cambrai], Queen, Evil Bitch, Queen Consort, Servant, concubine (serving-woman), then wife
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Frédégonde

Fredegund or Fredegunda (also Latin Fredegundis or French Frédégonde; died 597) was the Queen consort of Chilperic I, the Merovingian Frankish king of Soissons.

Originally a servant, Fredegund became Chilperic's mistress after he had murdered his wife and queen, Galswintha (c. 568). But Galswintha's sister, Brunhilda, in revenge against Chilperic, began a feud which lasted more than 40 years.

Fredegund is said to be responsible for the assassination of Sigebert I in 575 and made attempts on the lives of Guntram (her brother-in-law and the king of Burgundy), Childebert II (Sigebert's son), and Brunhilda.

After the mysterious assassination of Chilperic (584), Fredegund seized his riches and took refuge in the cathedral at Paris. Both she and her surviving son, Clothar II, were protected by Guntram until he died in 592.

Gregory of Tours depicts her as ruthlessly murderous and sadistically cruel; in his account, Fredegund perhaps has few rivals in monstrousness. Although she did not live to see it, her son's execution of Brunhilda bore the mark of Fredegund's hatred: Clothar II had the old queen, now in her sixties, stretched in agony upon the rack for three entire days, then watched her meet her death chained between four horses that were goaded to the four points of the compass, tearing her body asunder.

Fredegund died c. 8 December 597 in Paris, France. The tomb of Frédégonde (d. 597) is a mosaic figure of marble and copper, situated in Saint Denis Basilica, having come from St. Germain-des-Prés.

Fredegund has been proposed as one of many sources for the folk tale alternatively known as Cinderella, Aschenputtel, Cennerenolla or Cendrillion. In his book Cinderella: A Casebook folklorist Alan Dundes sites the following excerpt from History of the Franks by Gregory of Tours:

   She was jealous of her own daughter, Rigunth, who continually declared that she should be mistress (probably, as Dalton Says, because Fredegund began life as a palace maid, while she was of royal blood, being a king's daughter) in her place. Fredegund waited her opportunity and under the pretense of magnanimity took her to the treasure-room and showed her the King's jewels in a large chest. Feigning fatigue, she exclaimed "I am weary; put thou in thy hand, and take out what thou mayest find." The mother thereupon forced down the lid on her neck and would have killed her had not the servants finally rushed to her aid.

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Profile picture: Chilperic I and Fredegund.

Fredegund or Fredegunda (Latin: Fredegundis; French: Frédégonde; died 597) was the Queen consort of Chilperic I, the Merovingian Frankish king of Soissons.

Originally a servant, Fredegund became Chilperic's mistress after he had murdered his wife and queen, Galswintha (c. 568). But Galswintha's sister, Brunhilda, in revenge against Chilperic, began a feud which lasted more than 40 years.

Fredegund is said to be responsible for the assassination of Sigebert I in 575 and made attempts on the lives of Guntram (her brother-in-law and the king of Burgundy), Childebert II (Sigebert's son), and Brunhilda.

After the mysterious assassination of Chilperic (584), Fredegund seized his riches and took refuge in the cathedral at Paris. Both she and her surviving son, Clothar II, were protected by Guntram until he died in 592.

References

Search Wikimedia Commons Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Fredegund

   * Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks, Book IX. Ch. 34, Trans by O.M. Dalton, Vol. II. pp. 405-406
   * Alan Dundes, Cinderella: A Casebook, Ch. 1 The Cat Cinderella by Giambattista Basile (University of Wisconsin Press, 1982)

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Fredegund produced four more legitimate offspring:
   * Samson, died young
   * Rigunth, betrothed to Reccared but never married
   * Theuderic, died young
   * Clotaire, his successor in Neustria, later sole king of the Franks

Fredegund or Fredegunda (Latin: Fredegundis; French: Frédégonde; died 597) was the Queen consort of Chilperic I, the Merovingian Frankish king of Soissons.

Originally a servant, Fredegund became Chilperic's mistress after he had murdered his wife and queen, Galswintha (c. 568). But Galswintha's sister, Brunhilda, in revenge against Chilperic, began a feud which lasted more than 40 years.

Fredegund is said to be responsible for the assassination of Sigebert I in 575 and made attempts on the lives of Guntram (her brother-in-law and the king of Burgundy), Childebert II (Sigebert's son), and Brunhilda.

After the mysterious assassination of Chilperic (584), Fredegund seized his riches and took refuge in the cathedral at Paris. Both she and her surviving son, Clothar II, were protected by Guntram until he died in 592.

References

Search Wikimedia Commons Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Fredegund

   * Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks, Book IX. Ch. 34, Trans by O.M. Dalton, Vol. II. pp. 405-406
   * Alan Dundes, Cinderella: A Casebook, Ch. 1 The Cat Cinderella by Giambattista Basile (University of Wisconsin Press, 1982)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fredegund

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Fredegunde , c. 545–597, Frankish queen. The mistress of King Chilperic I of Neustria, she became his wife after inducing him to murder his wife Galswintha (567). Fredegunde and Brunhilda, Galswintha's sister and wife of King Sigebert I of Austrasia, were among the leading figures in the long war (561–613) between the Frankish kingdoms of Neustria and Austrasia. Fredegunde procured the deaths of Sigebert I and of her own stepchildren. After Chilperic's murder (584) she acted as regent for her son Clotaire II.

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Fredegund

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fredegund or Fredegunda (also Latin Fredegundis or French Frédégonde; died 597) was the Queen consort of Chilperic I, the Merovingian Frankish king of Soissons.

Originally a servant, Fredegund became Chilperic's mistress after he had murdered his wife and queen, Galswintha (c. 568). But Galswintha's sister, Brunhilda, in revenge against Chilperic, began a feud which lasted more than 40 years.

Fredegund is said to be responsible for the assassination of Sigebert I in 575 and made attempts on the lives of Guntram (her brother-in-law and the king of Burgundy), Childebert II (Sigebert's son), and Brunhilda.

After the mysterious assassination of Chilperic (584), Fredegund seized his riches and took refuge in the cathedral at Paris. Both she and her surviving son, Clothar II, were protected by Guntram until he died in 592.

Gregory of Tours depicts her as ruthlessly murderous and sadistically cruel; in his account, Fredegund perhaps has few rivals in monstrousness. And although she did not live to see it, her son's execution of Brunhilda bore the mark of Fredegund's hatred: Clothar II had the old queen, now in her sixties, stretched in agony upon the rack for three entire days, then watched her meet her death chained between four horses that were goaded to the four points of the compass, tearing her body asunder.

Fredegund in Folklore

Fredegund has been proposed as one of many sources for the folk tale alternatively known as Cinderella, Aschenputtel, Cennerenolla or Cendrillion. In his book Cinderella: A Casebook folklorist Alan Dundes sites the following excerpt from History of the Franks by Gregory of Tours:

She was jealous of her own daughter, Rigunth, who continually declared that she should be mistress (probably, as Dalton Says, because Fredegund began life as a palace maid, while she was of royal blood, being a king's daughter) in her place. Fredegund waited her opportunity and under the pretense of magnanimity took her to the treasure-room and showed her the King's jewels in a large chest. Feigning fatigue, she exclaimed "I am weary; put thou in thy hand, and take out what thou mayest find." The mother thereupon forced down the lid on her neck and would have killed her had not the servants finally rushed to her aid.

References

Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks, Book IX. Ch. 34, Trans by O.M. Dalton, Vol. II. pp. 405-406

Alan Dundes, Cinderella: A Casebook, Ch. 1 The Cat Cinderella by Giambattista Basile (University of Wisconsin Press, 1982)

--------------------

Fredegund or Fredegunda (also Latin Fredegundis or French Frédégonde; died 597) was the Queen consort of Chilperic I, the Merovingian Frankish king of Soissons.

Originally a servant, Fredegund became Chilperic's mistress after he had murdered his wife and queen, Galswintha (c. 568). But Galswintha's sister, Brunhilda, in revenge against Chilperic, began a feud which lasted more than 40 years.

Fredegund is said to be responsible for the assassination of Sigebert I in 575 and made attempts on the lives of Guntram (her brother-in-law and the king of Burgundy), Childebert II (Sigebert's son), and Brunhilda.

After the mysterious assassination of Chilperic (584), Fredegund seized his riches and took refuge in the cathedral at Paris. Both she and her surviving son, Clothar II, were protected by Guntram until he died in 592.

Gregory of Tours depicts her as ruthlessly murderous and sadistically cruel; in his account, Fredegund perhaps has few rivals in monstrousness. Although she did not live to see it, her son's execution of Brunhilda bore the mark of Fredegund's hatred: Clothar II had the old queen, now in her sixties, stretched in agony upon the rack for three entire days, then watched her meet her death chained between four horses that were goaded to the four points of the compass, tearing her body asunder.

Fredegund died c. 8 December 597 in Paris, France. The tomb of Frédégonde (d. 597) is a mosaic figure of marble and copper, situated in Saint Denis Basilica, having come from St. Germain-des-Prés.

Fredegund in Folklore:

Fredegund has been proposed as one of many sources for the folk tale alternatively known as Cinderella, Aschenputtel, Cenerentola or Cendrillion. In his book Cinderella: A Casebook folklorist Alan Dundes cites the following excerpt from History of the Franks by Gregory of Tours:

   She was jealous of her own daughter, Rigunth, who continually declared that she should be mistress (probably, as Dalton Says, because Fredegund began life as a palace maid, while she was of royal blood, being a king's daughter) in her place. Fredegund waited her opportunity and under the pretense of magnanimity took her to the treasure-room and showed her the King's jewels in a large chest. Feigning fatigue, she exclaimed "I am weary; put thou in thy hand, and take out what thou mayest find." The mother thereupon forced down the lid on her neck and would have killed her had not the servants finally rushed to her aid.

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Was a servant in Chilperic I of Neustria's household. He married her, then fired/divorced her, then married Galswintha. Galswintha was found strangled in bed. A few days later Chilperic remarried Fredegund. -------------------- En av de mest blodtörstiga kvinnor någonsin -------------------- Fredegund or Fredegunda (also Latin Fredegundis or French Frédégonde; died 597) was the Queen consort of Chilperic I, the Merovingian Frankish king of Soissons.

Fredegund has been depicted by Gregory of Tours as sadistically cruel and ruthlessly murderous. She was originally a servant who became concubine to King Chilperic I, who was at that time King only of Soissons. In 568 Fredegund arranged (with the full blessings of the King) for the strangulation murder of King Chilperic’s wife, Galswintha (with full support of the King), after which she became the Queen Consort, who had to deal with a raging civil war that would continue for 40 years (because Galswintha’s sister Brunhilde was the wife [and Queen Consort] to King Chilperic’s brother Sigebert.

Fredegund also arranged in 575 for the assassination of Sigebert, who had by that time almost conquered all of King Chilperic’s domain.

When her husband was murdered in 584, Fredegund seized the royal riches and took refuge in a Paris cathedral with her infant son who she declared was now King Clotaire II, and the war continued until after her death (when Clotaire II was finally triumphant in 613).

The story of Brunhilde and Fredegund could have supplied some of the source material for Richard Wagner’s Siegfried. The bloody civil war was certainly the justification the French (and the Norman nobles in England) used for the unfair “Salic Law” prohibition against women rulers, in effect in England until the accession of Queen Mary I in 1553.

Fredegund has been proposed as one of many sources for the folk tale alternatively known as Cinderella, Aschenputtel, Cenerentola or Cendrillion. In his book Cinderella: A Casebook folklorist Alan Dundes sites the following excerpt from History of the Franks by Gregory of Tours: "She was jealous of her own daughter, Rigunth, who continually declared that she should be mistress (probably, as Dalton Says, because Fredegund began life as a palace maid, while she was of royal blood, being a king's daughter) in her place. Fredegund waited her opportunity and under the pretense of magnanimity took her to the treasure-room and showed her the King's jewels in a large chest. Feigning fatigue, she exclaimed "I am weary; put thou in thy hand, and take out what thou mayest find." The mother thereupon forced down the lid on her neck and would have killed her had not the servants finally rushed to her aid."

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fredegund for more information.

-------------------- c.545–597, Frankish queen. The mistress of King Chilperic I of Neustria, she became his wife after inducing him to murder his wife Galswintha (567). Fredegunde and Brunhilda, Galswintha’s sister and wife of King Sigebert I of Austrasia, were

   among the leading figures in the long war (561–613) between the Frankish kingdoms of Neustria and Austrasia. Fredegunde procured the deaths of Sigebert I and of her own stepchildren. After Chilperic’s murder (584) she acted as regent for her
   son Clotaire II.

The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001 -------------------- Birth543, Paris, France Death597, Paris, France FatherBrunulf von Cambrai MotherChrotechilde

http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps04/ps04_449.htm

Originally a servant, Fredegund became Chilperic's mistress after he had murdered his wife and queen, Galswintha (c. 568). Galswintha, however, was also the sister of Brunhild, the wife of Chilperic's half-brother Sigebert I, king of the eastern kingdom of Austrasia. Galswintha's murder engendered a violent animosity between Fredegund and Brunhild and an irreconcilable feud of more than 40 years' duration between the respective families. Fredegund was certainly responsible for the assassination of Sigebert in 575 and made attempts on the lives of Guntram (her brother-in-law and the king of Burgundy), Childebert II (Sigebert's son), and Brunhild.

After the mysterious assassination of Chilperic (584), Fredegund seized his riches and took refuge in the cathedral at Paris. Both she and her surviving son, Chlotar II, were at first protected by Guntram, but, when he died in 592, Childebert II, who had taken over his throne, attacked Chlotar, albeit unsuccessfully. From Childebert's death (595) until her own, Fredegund intrigued on Chlotar's behalf against Brunhild, who sought to rule through Childebert's sons, Theodebert II of Austrasia and Theodoric II of Burgundy. Ruthlessly murderous and sadistically cruel, Fredegund can have few rivals in monstrousness.

-------------------- Fredegund or Fredegunda (also Latin Fredegundis or French Frédégonde; died 597) was the Queen consort of Chilperic I, the Merovingian Frankish king of Soissons.

Originally a servant, Fredegund became Chilperic's mistress after he had murdered his wife and queen, Galswintha (c. 568). But Galswintha's sister, Brunhilda, in revenge against Chilperic, began a feud which lasted more than 40 years.

Fredegund is said to be responsible for the assassination of Sigebert I in 575 and made attempts on the lives of Guntram (her brother-in-law and the king of Burgundy), Childebert II (Sigebert's son), and Brunhilda.

After the mysterious assassination of Chilperic (584), Fredegund seized his riches and took refuge in the cathedral at Paris. Both she and her surviving son, Clothar II, were protected by Guntram until he died in 592.

Gregory of Tours depicts her as ruthlessly murderous and sadistically cruel; in his account, Fredegund perhaps has few rivals in monstrousness. Although she did not live to see it, her son's execution of Brunhilda bore the mark of Fredegund's hatred: Clothar II had the old queen, now in her sixties, stretched in agony upon the rack for three entire days, then watched her meet her death chained between four horses that were goaded to the four points of the compass, tearing her body asunder.

Fredegund died c. 8 December 597 in Paris, France. The tomb of Frédégonde (d. 597) is a mosaic figure of marble and copper, situated in Saint Denis Basilica, having come from St. Germain-des-Prés.

Fredegund has been proposed as one of many sources for the folk tale alternatively known as Cinderella, Aschenputtel, Cennerenolla or Cendrillion. In his book Cinderella: A Casebook folklorist Alan Dundes sites the following excerpt from History of the Franks by Gregory of Tours:

She was jealous of her own daughter, Rigunth, who continually declared that she should be mistress (probably, as Dalton Says, because Fredegund began life as a palace maid, while she was of royal blood, being a king's daughter) in her place. Fredegund waited her opportunity and under the pretense of magnanimity took her to the treasure-room and showed her the King's jewels in a large chest. Feigning fatigue, she exclaimed "I am weary; put thou in thy hand, and take out what thou mayest find." The mother thereupon forced down the lid on her neck and would have killed her had not the servants finally rushed to her aid.

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Frédégonde's Timeline

543
543
550
550
Age 7
France
568
568
Age 25
France
569
569
Age 26
570
570
Age 27
[object Object], France
575
575
Age 32
France
580
580
Age 37
[object Object], France
584
May 584
Age 41
Paris, Neustria (Present France), Frankish Empire
584
Age 41
584
Age 41