Gundred de Warenne, Countess of Warwick

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Gundred de Warenne

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: Died in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl Of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois, countess of Leicester
Wife of William l "Tallebois" FitzGilbert de Lancaster, 5th Baron of Kendal and Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick
Mother of William de Lancaster, Baron of Kendal; Avice (Hawise) de Lancaster; Agnes de Wyndsore; Robert de Lancaster; William De Beaumont, Earl of Warwick and 5 others
Sister of Isabel de Warenne; Ella de Warenne; Radulf (Ralph) de Warenne; William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey; Adelheid De Warenne and 4 others
Half sister of Eleanor de Beaumont; Havoise de Beaumont; Aubreye De Beaumont; Sir Robert de Beaumont, Knight, Earl of Leicester, Justiciar of England; Waleran IV de Beaumont, comte de Meulan, 1st Earl of Worcester and 9 others

Occupation: Countess of Warwickshire (to 1153), Baroness of Kendale and Lonsdale in Westmoreland (after 1153), Countess or Warwick
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Gundred de Warenne, Countess of Warwick

Ben M. Angel notes:

I have had difficulty confirming where the information came from on her birth, death, and burial places that someone listed on Gundred. They were as follows:

Birthplace: Castle Acre, Norfolk, England

Death place: Warwickshire, England

Burial site: Kelso, Roxburghshire, Scotland

I have to presume that the presumption of the death place is based on her having been married to Roger de Beaumont, Earl of Warwickshire, but this completely disregards her second marriage to William de Lancaster, and unless there is documented information saying otherwise, I have to presume this is in error.

It's absolutely unclear to me where the birth and burial places came from. Have presumed these were confused with another person's information. Would welcome documented information that confirms details on these events.

----------------------------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on English Nobility Medieval:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#GundredWarenneM1RogerBeaumontWarwick

GUNDRED ([1120 or after]-after 1166).

Guillaume de Jumièges records that the elder daughter of "Guillaume II de Warenne comte de Surrey" & his wife married "Roger comte de Warwick, fils du comte Henri, frère de Robert comte de Meulan et né de Marguerite sœur de Rotrou comte du Perche" but does not name her[998]. Robert of Torigny names "Gondrada sorore uterine Galeranni comitis Mellenti" as wife of "Rogero comite Warwicensi"[999].

An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Willielmum de Lancaster” married ”Gundredam prius comitissam de Warwyke”[1000]. Her second marriage is confirmed by a charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic”[1001].

m firstly ROGER de Beaumont Earl of Warwick, son of HENRY de Beaumont Earl of Warwick & his wife Marguerite du Perche ([1101/02]-12 Jun 1153).

m secondly ([Jun 1153/1156]) [as his second wife,] WILLIAM de Lancaster "Taillebois", son of GILBERT & his wife Goditha ---. Lord of Kendale and Lonsdale in Westmoreland in 1166[1002].

From the same page, information on her first husband:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#RogerWarwickdied1153

ROGER de Beaumont, son of HENRY de Beaumont Earl of Warwick & his wife Marguerite de Perche ([1101/02]-12 Jun 1153).

His parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis[1112].

“Henricus…Warwicense consul et Margareta uxor mea et Rogerus noster filius” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter[1113].

He was installed as Earl of Warwick before Easter 1123, in succession to his father, presumably when he came of age.

“R. comes de Warwick” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter witnessed by “Roberto de Novoburgo, G. fratre eius, Gundreda comitissa, Turstino de Montfort…”[1114]. “R. comes de Warwick” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter witnessed by “Gundreda comitissa, Galfridus et Henricus fratres mei, Turstinus de Monteforti…”[1115].

He supported Stephen King of England in the civil war with Empress Matilda but joined the latter after the battle of Lincoln 2 Feb 1141, but by early 1142 he was again with King Stephen[1116].

Robert of Torigny records the death in 1153 of "Rogero comite Warwicensi"[1117].

m as her first husband, GUNDRED de Warenne, daughter of WILLIAM de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet] ([1120 or after]-after 1166).

Guillaume de Jumièges records that the elder daughter of "Guillaume II de Warenne comte de Surrey" & his wife married "Roger comte de Warwick, fils du comte Henri, frère de Robert comte de Meulan et né de Marguerite sœur de Rotrou comte du Perche" but does not name her[1118].

Robert of Torigny names "Gondrada sorore uterine Galeranni comitis Mellenti" as wife of "Rogero comite Warwicensi"[1119]. Roger Earl of Warwick confirmed a donation to St Pierre, Préaux, by charter dated to [1123/53], witnessed by "Gundr comitissa, Henrico fratre meo"[1120]. “R. comes de Warwick” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter witnessed by “Roberto de Novoburgo, G. fratre eius, Gundreda comitissa, Turstino de Montfort…”[1121]. “R. comes de Warwick” donated property to Warwick St Mary by undated charter witnessed by “Gundreda comitissa, Galfridus et Henricus fratres mei, Turstinus de Monteforti…”[1122].

She married secondly (before 1156) as his second wife, William de Lancaster "Taillebois" Lord of Kendale. An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Willielmum de Lancaster” married ”Gundredam prius comitissam de Warwyke”[1123]. Her second marriage is confirmed by a charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic”[1124].

Earl Roger & his wife had [six] children:

1. WILLIAM (-Palestine 15 Nov 1184).

The Annals of Waverley record that “Willelmus filius eius” succeeded on the death of “Rogero comite Warvicensi” in 1153[1125]. He succeeded his father in 1153 as Earl of Warwick. The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1184 of “Willelmus comes Warevici”[1126].

m firstly MARGERY d'Eiville, daughter of JOHN d'Eiville & his wife ---.

m secondly (before 28 Dec 1175) MATILDA de Percy, daughter of WILLIAM de Percy & his first wife Alice de Tonbridge (-[Nov 1202/13 Oct 1204], bur Fountaine Abbey).

A manuscript genealogy of the Percy family names “Matildem et Agnetem” as the daughters and heiresses of “Willielmus de Percy”, adding that Matilda married “Willielmo comiti Warrewyk” but died childless[1127]. “Mathildis de Percy comitissa de Warwic, filia Willielmi de Perci” donated property to Sawley abbey, for the souls of “Willielmi comitis Warwich quondam sponsi mei…patris mei Willielmi de Percy et Adalidis de Tunbrige matris meæ et Alani de Percy fratris mei et Agnetis sororis meæ”, by undated charter[1128]. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], records "comitissa de Warewyke" paying "xv l de parte sua de feodo Willelmi de Percy" in Yorkshire[1129].

2. WALERAN (-[24 Dec 1203]).

The Annals of Waverley record that “Wallerannus” succeeded “fratri suo Willelmo in comitatu Warevici” in 1185[1130]. He succeeded his brother in 1184 as Earl of Warwick.

3. [HENRY .

Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Roger comte de Warwick" and his wife had a son named Henri "plusieurs autres fils et deux filles"[1131]. However, Robert of Torigny names "Henricus filius suus" as son and successor of "Rogero comite Warwicensi" & his wife[1132], clearly confusing him with William. Assuming that the two sources are based on common information, it is likely that Henry did not exist.]

4. AGNES .

The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.

m GEOFFREY de Clinton, son of GEOFFREY de Clinton & his wife Lesceline (-after 1166).

5. [MARGARET .

Her parentage is deduced from a charter, quoted by the Complete Peerage, under which “William de Lancaster” (second husband of Gundred´s supposed mother Gundred), with the consent of “Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundrede uxoris mee”, donated property for the souls of “…Margaretæ filiæ comitisse”, witnessed by “Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundrea filia comitisse”[1133]. The Complete Peerage makes the assumption that “Gundrede uxoris mee” and “comitisse” in this document refer to the same person. The charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic”[1134], certainly suggests that this assumption is probably correct, but the point must be made that the question is not entirely without doubt.]

6. [GUNDRED (-[1200/08]).

Her parentage is deduced from a charter, quoted by the Complete Peerage, under which “William de Lancaster” (second husband of Gundred´s supposed mother Gundred of Surrey), with the consent of “Willelmi filii mei et heredis et Gundrede uxoris mee”, donated property for the souls of “…Margaretæ filiæ comitisse”, witnessed by “Willelmo filio meo et herede, Gundrea filia comitisse”[1135]. The Complete Peerage makes the assumption that “Gundrede uxoris mee” and “comitisse” in this document refer to the same person. The charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic”[1136], certainly suggests that this assumption is probably correct, but the question is not entirely without doubt.

The question of Gundred´s supposed marriages is not completely clear either. It is certain that the second wife of Hugh Bigod Earl of Norfolk was named Gundred, as documents show that “Gundred, widow of Hugh Earl of Norfolk”, disputed her husband´s inheritance after his death[1137]. It also clear that the wife of Roger de Glanville was “countess Gundred”: a charter of King Henry II confirmed donations to Bungay Nunnery by “Rogeri de Glanvill et Gundredæ comitissæ uxoris meæ” of property at Bungay[1138]. It is probably a safe conclusion that Roger de Glanville´s “countess Gundred” was the widow of the earl of Norfolk as no other countess of this name has been identified at that time in England. However, problems arise when attempting to link the supposed daughter of Roger Earl of Warwick with these two marriages.

The Complete Peerage cites a series of documents based on which, it suggests, the link is a reasonable assumption[1139]. However, on closer examination, the only one of these documents which provides any indication of a connection is the Red Book of the Exchequer, in which the 1166 return of William Earl of Warwick (Gundred´s supposed brother) shows that he had received Bungay in exchange from the Earl of Leicester[1140]. However, this provides only circumstancial evidence regarding the link and, if this is the only indication available, it cannot safely be concluded that the link is proved beyond all doubt. The safest position is therefore to show Gundred and her supposed two marriages in square brackets.

m firstly as his second wife, HUGH Bigod Earl of Norfolk, son of ROGER Bigod of Earsham, Suffolk & his second wife Alice de Tosny ([1095]- before 9 Mar 1177). m secondly ROGER de Glanville, son of ---.]

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From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on English Nobility Medieval covering her second husband:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3L-O.htm#GilbertLancasterA

WILLIAM "Taillebois" de Lancaster (-after 1166).

“Willielmus filius Ranulphi” confirmed the foundation of St Bee´s priory, Cumberland by undated charter, dated to [1105/20], which refers to donations by “Willielmus filius Gilberti de Lancastria”[138]. An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Willielmum de Lancaster” as son of ”Gilbertus”[139]. A charter of King Henry II confirmed the donation to Furness by “Willilemum filium Gilberti” also named “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys”[140].

Lord of Kendale and Lonsdale in Westmoreland in 1166[141]. A charter of King Henry II records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic”[142].

[m firstly ---. No direct proof has been found of this supposed first marriage. However, assuming that Hawise, wife of Richard de Moreville, was the daughter of William de Lancaster, she must have been born from an otherwise unrecorded first marriage, given the estimated birth date of William´s known wife Gundred de Warenne.]

m [secondly] ([Jun 1153/1156]) as her second husband, GUNDRED de Warenne, widow of ROGER de Beaumont Earl of Warwick, daughter of WILLIAM de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his wife Elisabeth de Vermandois [Capet] ([1120 or after]-after 1166).

Guillaume de Jumièges records that the elder daughter of "Guillaume II de Warenne comte de Surrey" & his wife married "Roger comte de Warwick, fils du comte Henri, frère de Robert comte de Meulan et né de Marguerite sœur de Rotrou comte du Perche" but does not name her[143]. Robert of Torigny names "Gondrada sorore uterine Galeranni comitis Mellenti" as wife of "Rogero comite Warwicensi"[144]. An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Willielmum de Lancaster” married ”Gundredam prius comitissam de Warwyke”[145]. Her second marriage is confirmed by a charter of King Henry II which records that “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” married “Gundredam comitissam Warwic”[146]. William & his [first] wife had [one child]:

a) [HAWISE de Lancaster .

William & his [second] wife had one child:

b) WILLIAM de Lancaster (-bur Furness Abbey).

An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” as son of ”Willielmum de Lancaster”[153]. A charter of King Henry II confirmed the donation to Furness by “Willilemum filium Gilberti” and names “Willielmum secundum” as son of “primus Willielmum de Lancaster, baronem de Kendale, qui prius vocabatur de Tailboys” and his wife “Gundredam comitissam Warwic”[154]. “Willielmus de Lancastre” donated property to Furness Abbey, for the soul of “Agnetis sponsæ meæ” by charter dated 6 Nov 1240 which records that “avi mei…Willielmi de Lancastre” was buried in the abbey[155].

m HELWISE de Stuteville, daughter of ---. An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire records that “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” married ”Helewisiam”[156]. A charter of King Henry II records that “Willielmum secundum” married “Helewisam de Stuteville” by whom he was father of “Helewisam” who married “Gilberto filio Rogeri filii Reynfredi”[157]. William & his wife had one child:

i) HAWISE de Lancaster .

An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Helewisia” as daughter of “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” and his wife, adding that she married ”Gilbert filium Raynfridi”[158]. A charter of King Henry II names “Helewisam” as daughter of “Willielmum secundum” and his wife “Helewisam de Stuteville”, adding that she married “Gilberto filio Rogeri filii Reynfredi”[159].

m Sir GILBERT FitzRoger FitzReinfrid Lord of Kendal, son of ROGER FitzReinfrid & his wife ---. The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records "Gilbertus filius Reinfridi" holding "feudum unius militis" in Lancashire, adding that "Willelmus de Lanc" had granted "in maritagium v caricatas terre in duobus Eccliston et in Lairbrec"[160]. Sir Gilbert & his wife had two children:

(a) WILLIAM de Lancaster .

An undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire names “Willielmus de Lancaster tertius” as son of “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” and his wife, adding that he died childless[161]. “Willielmus de Lancastre” donated property to Furness Abbey, for the soul of “Agnetis sponsæ meæ” by charter dated 6 Nov 1240 which records that “avi mei…Willielmi de Lancastre” was buried in the abbey, witnessed by “…domino Rogero fratre meo…Gilberto de Lancastre constabulario de Kirkeby…”[162].

m AGNES de Brus, daughter of ---. A manuscript narrating the family of “Willielmi de Lancastra” records that “Willielmus de Lancastra tertius” married “Agnetem de Brus”[163].

(b) HAWISE de Lancaster .

A manuscript narrating the family of “Willielmi de Lancastra” records that “Petrus le Brus senior” married “Helewisam” sister of “Willielmus de Lancastra tertius”[164]. According to an undated manuscript relating to Cokersand Abbey, Lancashire, the wife of “Petrum de Brus seniorem” was Hawise, daughter of “Willielmus de Lancaster secundus” as her second husband[165].

m PETER de Brus Lord of Skelton, son of PETER de Brus Lord of Skelton & his wife --- (-Marseille 13 Sep 1267).

--------------------------------------------

Ben M. Angel notes: the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy only acknowledges William II as Gundred de Warenne's son. Remember, she was originally married to the Earl of Warwick in 1130, and if she was 13-15 at the time of the marriage, by June 1153 (immediately after her first husband's death), she would be 36-38, toward the end of her childbearing years.

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From Darryl Lundy's page on Gundred de Warenne:

http://thepeerage.com/p36764.htm#i367637

Gundred de Warenne1

F, #367637,

b. circa 1120,

d. 1166

Last Edited=3 Jan 2010

Gundred de Warenne was born circa 1120.2 She is the daughter of William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.1

She married, firstly, Roger de Newburgh, 2nd Earl of Warwick, son of Henry de Newburgh, 1st Earl of Warwick and Margaret de Perche.1

She married, secondly, William de Lancaster after 1153.1

She died in 1166.2

Children of Gundred de Warenne and Roger de Newburgh, 2nd Earl of Warwick

1. William de Newburgh, 3rd Earl of Warwick3

d. 15 Nov 1184

2. Waleran de Newburgh, 4th Earl of Warwick+3

d. 1205

Children of Gundred de Warenne and William de Lancaster

1. Avice de Lancaster+4

d. 1 Jan 1191

2. Sir William de Lancaster, Lord of Kendal+2

d. 1184

Citations

[S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 569. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.

[S4053] Christopher Davis, "re: Barton Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 30 October 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: Barton Family."

[S22] Burke, Burkes Extinct Peerage, page 399.

[S22] Burke, Burkes Extinct Peerage, page 313.

---------------------------------------------

From the Wikipedia page of her second husband, William de Lancaster:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Lancaster_I

William married Gundreda, perhaps his second wife, who was said to be the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth of Vermandois. She was the widow of Roger, the Earl of Warwick. Note that King Stephen's son, William, married Gundred's niece, Isabel de Warenne. This implies a very close relationship with the King's party.

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Sources:

Keats-Rohan, K.S.B. Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166, II. Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum. The Boydell Press, 2002. p. 777.

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See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p126.htm#i14715 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ). -------------------- From the English Wikipedia page on Ada de Warenne:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_de_Warenne

Ada de Warenne or Adeline de Varenne (c. 1120 – 1178) was the Norman-French wife of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumbria and Earl of Huntingdon.

She was the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey by Elizabeth of Vermandois, and a great-granddaughter of Henry I of France. She became mother to two Kings of Scots, Malcolm the Maiden and William the Lion.

Marriage and motherhood

Ada and Henry were married in England in 1139 [1] . As part of her marriage settlement, the new Countess Ada was granted the privileges of Haddington, amongst others in East Lothian. Previously the seat of a thanage Haddington is said to be the first Royal burgh in Scotland, created by Countess Ada's father-in-law, David I of Scotland, who held it along with the church and a mill.[2]

In close succession both her husband and King David died, in 1152 and 1153 respectively. Following the death of Henry, who was buried at Kelso Abbey, King David arranged for his grandson to succeed him, and at Scone on May 27, 1153, the 12-year-old was declared Malcolm IV, King of Scots.

Following his coronation, Malcolm installed his brother William as Earl of Northumbria (although this county was "restored" to King Henry II of England by Malcolm in 1157 [3]), and the young dowager-Countess retired to her lands at Haddington.

On Thursday December 9, 1165 [4] King Malcolm died at the age of 25 without issue. His mother had at that time been attempting to arrange a marriage between him and Constance, daughter of Conan III, Duke of Brittany, but Malcolm died before the wedding could be celebrated. [5].

One of Ada's daughters, Margaret, was married twice:

(1) 1160, Conan IV, Duke of Brittany, Earl of Richmond (d.1171)

(2) Humphrey de Bohun of Trowbridge, Wiltshire, Hereditary Constable of England [6].

Following his brother's death Ada's younger son William became King of Scots at the age of twenty two. William the Lion was to become the longest serving King of Scots until the Union of the Crowns in 1603.

Church patroness

Religious houses were established in Haddington at an early date. They came to include the Blackfriars (who came into Scotland in 1219) and most notably the Church of the Greyfriars, or Minorites (came into Scotland in the reign of Alexander II), which would become famous as "Lucerna Laudoniae"- The Lamp of Lothian, the toft of land upon which it stands being granted by King David I of Scotland to the Prior of St. Andrews (to whom the patronage of the church of Haddington belonged).

David I also granted to the monks of Dunfermline "unam mansuram" in Haddington, as well as to the monks of Haddington a full toft "in burgo meo de Hadintun, free of all custom and service."[7]

Ada devoted her time to good works, improving the lot of the Church at Haddington, where she resided. Countess Ada gave lands to the south and west of the River Tyne near to the only crossing of the river for miles, to found a Convent of Cistercian Nuns ("white nuns" [8]) dedicated to St. Mary, in what was to become the separate Burgh of Nungate, the extant remains are still to be seen in the ruined parish church of St. Martin. The nunnery she endowed with the lands of Begbie, at Garvald and Keith Marischal amongst other temporal lands.

Miller, however, states that she only "founded and richly endowed a nunnery at the Abbey of Haddington" and that "Haddington, as demesne of the Crown, reverted to her son William the Lion upon her death". [9]

Haddington seat

According to inscriptions within the town of Haddington, Countess Ada's residence was located near the present day County buildings and Sheriff Court. Countess Ada died in 1178 [10] and is thought to be buried locally.

Her remaining dower-lands were brought back into the Royal desmesne and William the Lion's wife, Ermengarde de Beaumont, is said to have taken to her bed in Countess Ada's house to bear the future Alexander II. Miller states that when the future King was born in Haddington in 1198 it took place "in the palace of Haddington".[11]

Notes

1.^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 - 1286, London, 1908: 215.

2.^ a b Miller, James, The Lamp of Lothian, Haddington, 1900: 2

3.^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 - 1286, London, 1908: 239.

4.^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 - 1286, London, 1908: 243.

5.^ Oram, The Canmores, p. 51.

6.^ Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, Md, 2005: 99. ISBN 0-8063-1759-0

7.^ Miller, James, The Lamp of Lothian, Haddington, 1900: 173

8.^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 - 1286, London, 1908: 327.

9.^ Dunbar, Archibald Scottish Kings, 1899: 65.

10.^ Miller, James, The Lamp of Lothian, Haddington, 1900: 4

References

The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their descendants, Sovereigns and Subjects, by Messrs. John and John Bernard Burke, London, 1851, vol.2, page xlvii and pedigree XXIX.

Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, edited by Joseph Jackson Howard, LL.D.,F.S.A., New Series, volume I, London, 1874, p. 337.

Scottish Kings - A Revised Chronology of Scottish History 1005-1625 by Sir Archibald H. Dunbar, Bt., Edinburgh, 1899, p. 65.

Oram, Richard, The Canmores: Kings & Queens of the Scots 1040–1290. Tempus, Stroud, 2002. ISBN 0-7524-2325-8

The Bretons, by Patrick Galliou and Michael Jones, Oxford, 1991, p. 191. ISBN 0-631-16406-5

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ADA DE WARREN (William II3, William2, Rodolf1) of Huntingdon, daughter of (3) William II3, 2nd Earl of Surrey and (T-26) Countess Isabel (Elizabeth) (de VERMANDOIS) (BEAUMONT), was born circa 1104, died in 1178[2] and was buried in Kelso.

She married in 1139, (E-17) HENRY DE HUNTINGDON, EARL[2] of Huntingdon, son of (E-9) King David I the Saint and (ABQ-3) Countess Maud (of HUNTINGDON) (ST. LIZ), who was born in 1114, died on 12 June 1152 in Scotland[18], and was buried in Kelso, Roxburghshire, Scotland. [7, 23, 19, 13, 1]

A descendant of Charlemagne through six lines.

Children: See (E-17) Henry de HUNTINGDON, Earl

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Adalaide DE WARENNE

   * Father: William II DE WARENNE
   * Mother: Isabel DE VERMANDOIS
   * Birth: 1120, Warren, Sussex, England
   * Death: 1178
   * Partnership with: Henry Earl of HUNTINGDON
     Marriage: 1139
         o Child: Malcolm IV King of SCOTLAND Birth: 20 Mar 1142/1143, Scotland
         o Child: William 'the Lion' King of SCOTLAND Birth: 1144, Roxburg, Scotland
         o Child: Ada Princess of SCOTLAND Birth: 1145, Scotland
         o Child: David of HUNTINGDON Birth: 1146, Huntingdon, England
         o Child: Margaret of HUNTINGDON Birth: 1146, Huntingdon, England
         o Child: Marjory SCOTLAND Birth: 1150, Huntingdon, England
   * Partnership with: William DE LANCASTER
     Marriage: 1153, England
         o Child: Gilbert DE STRAINTON
         o Child: William II DE LANCASTER Birth: 1154, Kendal, Westmoreland, England
         o Child: Avice DE LANCASTER Birth: 1156, Cumberland, England

Ancestors of Adalaide DE WARENNE

                           /-Ralph DE WARENNE
                 /-William DE WARENNE
                 |         \-Emma in BELLECOMBE
       /-William II DE WARENNE
       |         |         /-William The CONQUEROR
       |         \-Gundrada of NORMANDY
       |                   \-Matilda Queen of ENGLAND

Adalaide DE WARENNE

       |                   /-Henry I King of FRANCE
       |         /-Hugh 'Magnus' Duke of FRANCE
       |         |         \-Anne Princess of KIEV
       \-Isabel DE VERMANDOIS
                 |         /-Herbert IV Count DE VERMANDOIS
                 \-Adelaide Countess of VALOIS
                           \-Adela DE VEXIN

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From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Ada de Warenne:

http://thepeerage.com/p10293.htm#i102929

Ada de Warenne1

F, #102929, d. circa 1178

Last Edited=4 Mar 2006

Ada de Warenne was the daughter of William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois.1

She married Henry of Huntingdon, Earl of Huntingdon, son of David I 'the Saint', King of Scotland and Maud of Northumberland, circa 1139.1

She died circa 1178.1

Ada de Warenne was also known as Adama de Warenne.1 She was also known as Adeline de Warenne.1

Children of Ada de Warenne and Henry of Huntingdon, Earl of Huntingdon

1. Isabella of Huntingdon2

2. Matilda of Huntingdon2 d. 1152

3. Ada of Huntingdon+3 b. a 1139, d. a 1206

4. Margaret of Scotland, Countess of Hereford+ b. c 1140, d. 1201

5. Malcolm IV 'the Maiden' of Scotland, King of Scotland b. 20 Mar 1142, d. 9 Dec 1165

6. William I 'the Lion', King of Scotland+ b. c 1143, d. 4 Dec 1214

7. David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon+ b. bt 1143 - 1152, d. 17 Jun 1219

Citations

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 192. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 195.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 194.

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From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on English Earls:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#_Toc186716618

ADA de Warenne (-1178).

Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Henricus filius eius [David rex Scotiæ]" as "filia Willermi comitis de Warenna, sorore uterine Gualeranni comitis Mellenti"[1006].

She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father[1007].

m (1139) HENRY of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon, son of DAVID I King of Scotland & his wife Matilda de St Lis of Huntingdon ([1115]-12 Jun 1152, bur Kelso Abbey, Roxburghshire).

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Ada de Warenne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ada de Warenne or Adeline de Varenne (c. 1120 – 1178) was the Norman-French wife of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumbria and Earl of Huntingdon. She was the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey by Elizabeth of Vermandois, and a great-granddaughter of Henry I of France. She became mother to two Kings of Scots, Malcolm the Maiden and William the Lion.

Marriage and motherhood

Ada and Henry were married in England in 1139 [1] . As part of her marriage settlement, the new Countess Ada was granted the privileges of Haddington, amongst others in East Lothian. Previously the seat of a thanage Haddington is said to be the first Royal burgh in Scotland, created by Countess Ada's father-in-law, David I of Scotland, who held it along with the church and a mill.[2]

In close succession both her husband and King David died, in 1152 and 1153 respectively. Following the death of Henry, who was buried at Kelso Abbey, King David arranged for his grandson to succeed him, and at Scone on May 27, 1153, the twelve year old was declared Malcolm IV, King of Scots. Following his coronation, Malcolm installed his brother William as Earl of Northumbria (although this county was "restored" to King Henry II of England by Malcolm in 1157 [3]), and the young dowager-Countess retired to her lands at Haddington.

On Thursday December 9, 1165 [4] King Malcolm died at the age of 25 without issue. His mother had at that time been attempting to arrange a marriage between him and Constance, daughter of Conan III, Duke of Brittany, but Malcolm died before the wedding could be celebrated. [5]. One of Ada's daughters, Margaret, was married twice:

(1) 1160, Conan IV, Duke of Brittany, Earl of Richmond (d.1171)

(2) Humphrey de Bohun of Trowbridge, Wiltshire, Hereditary Constable of England [6].

Following his brother's death Ada's younger son William became King of Scots at the age of twenty two. William the Lion was to become the longest serving King of Scots until the Union of the Crowns in 1603.

[edit]Church patroness

Religious houses were established in Haddington at an early date. They came to include the Blackfriars (who came into Scotland in 1219) and most notably the Church of the Greyfriars, or Minorites (came into Scotland in the reign of Alexander II), which would become famous as "Lucerna Laudoniae"- The Lamp of Lothian, the toft of land upon which it stands being granted by King David I of Scotland to the Prior of St. Andrews (to whom the patronage of the church of Haddington belonged). David I also granted to the monks of Dunfermline "unam mansuram" in Haddington, as well as to the monks of Haddington a full toft "in burgo meo de Hadintun, free of all custom and service."[7]

Ada devoted her time to good works, improving the lot of the Church at Haddington, where she resided. Countess Ada gave lands to the south and west of the River Tyne near to the only crossing of the river for miles, to found a Convent of Cistercian Nuns ("white nuns" [8]) dedicated to St. Mary, in what was to become the separate Burgh of Nungate, the extant remains are still to be seen in the ruined parish church of St. Martin. The nunnery she endowed with the lands of Begbie, at Garvald and Keith Marischal amongst other temporal lands. Miller, however, states that she only "founded and richly endowed a nunnery at the Abbey of Haddington" and that "Haddington, as demesne of the Crown, reverted to her son William the Lion upon her death". [9]

[edit]Haddington seat

According to inscriptions within the town of Haddington, Countess Ada's residence was located near the present day County buildings and Sheriff Court. Countess Ada died in 1178 [10] and is thought to be buried locally. Her remaining dower-lands were brought back into the Royal desmesne and William the Lion's wife, Ermengarde de Beaumont, is said to have taken to her bed in Countess Ada's house to bear the future Alexander II. Miller states that when the future King was born in Haddington in 1198 it took place "in the palace of Haddington".[11]

References

The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their descendants, Sovereigns and Subjects, by Messrs. John and John Bernard Burke, London, 1851, vol.2, page xlvii and pedigree XXIX.

Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, edited by Joseph Jackson Howard, LL.D.,F.S.A., New Series, volume I, London, 1874, p.337.

Scottish Kings - A Revised Chronology of Scottish History 1005-1625 by Sir Archibald H. Dunbar, Bt., Edinburgh, 1899, p.65.

Oram, Richard, The Canmores: Kings & Queens of the Scots 1040–1290. Tempus, Stroud, 2002. ISBN 0-7524-2325-8

The Bretons, by Patrick Galliou and Michael Jones, Oxford, 1991, p.191. ISBN 0-631-16406-5

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Ada de Warenne married Henry MacCrinan in 1139.

She founded the Nunnery of Haddington in 1178 at East Lothian, Scotland.

Ada was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through her daughter Margaret and her daughter Maud, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p375.htm#i7801 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

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Ada was Norman-French (from Normandy, northern France but originally peopled by the Vikings, known as Northmen - from which Normandy is derived). The Norman conquest of England began in 1066 AD with the invasion of the Kingdom of England - removing the native ruling class and replacing it with a foreign, French-speaking monarchy, aristocracy and clerical hierarchy.

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Ada de Warenne or Adeline de Varenne (c. 1120 – 1178) was the Norman-French wife of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumbria and Earl of Huntingdon. She was the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey by Elizabeth of Vermandois, and a great-granddaughter of Henry I of France. She became mother to two Kings of Scots, Malcolm the Maiden and William the Lion.

Ada and Henry were married in England in 1139 . As part of her marriage settlement, the new Countess Ada was granted the privileges of Haddington, amongst others in East Lothian. Previously the seat of a thanage Haddington is said to be the first Royal burgh in Scotland, created by Countess Ada's father-in-law, David I of Scotland, who held it along with the church and a mill.

In close succession both her husband and King David died, in 1152 and 1153 respectively. Following the death of Henry, who was buried at Kelso Abbey, King David arranged for his grandson to succeed him, and at Scone on May 27, 1153, the twelve year old was declared Malcolm IV, King of Scots. Following his coronation, Malcolm installed his brother William as Earl of Northumbria (although this county was "restored" to King Henry II of England by Malcolm in 1157), and the young dowager-Countess retired to her lands at Haddington.

On Thursday December 9, 1165 King Malcolm died at the age of 25 without issue. His mother had at that time been attempting to arrange a marriage between him and Constance, daughter of Conan III, Duke of Brittany, but Malcolm died before the wedding could be celebrated. One of Ada's daughters, Margaret, was married twice:

(1) 1160, Conan IV, Duke of Brittany, Earl of Richmond (d.1171)

(2) Humphrey de Bohun of Trowbridge, Wiltshire, Hereditary Constable of England.

Following his brother's death Ada's younger son William became King of Scots at the age of twenty two. William the Lion was to become the longest serving King of Scots until the Union of the Crowns in 1603.

--------------------

Sources:

1) The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their descendants,

2) Sovereigns and Subjects, by Messrs. John and John Bernard Burke, London, 1851, vol.2, page xlvii and pedigree XXIX.

3) Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, edited by Joseph Jackson Howard, LL.D.,F.S.A., New Series, volume I, London, 1874, p.337.

4) Scottish Kings - A Revised Chronology of Scottish History 1005-1625 by Sir Archibald H. Dunbar, Bt., Edinburgh, 1899, p.65.

5) Oram, Richard, The Canmores: Kings & Queens of the Scots 1040–1290. Tempus, Stroud, 2002. ISBN 0-7524-2325-8

6) The Bretons, by Patrick Galliou and Michael Jones, Oxford, 1991, p.191. ISBN 0-631-16406-5

Wikipedia:

Ada de Warenne or Adeline de Varenne (c. 1120 – 1178) was the Norman-French wife of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumbria and Earl of Huntingdon. She was the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey by Elizabeth of Vermandois, and a great-granddaughter of Henry I of France. She became mother to two Kings of Scots, Malcolm the Maiden and William the Lion.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_de_Warenne -------------------- Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Family and children

He married 1130 Gundred de Warenne, daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois and had children:

William de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Warwick.

Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick.

Henry de Beaumont, was Dean of Salisbury in 1205.

Agnes de Beaumont, married Geoffrey de Clinton, Chamberlain to the King and son of Geoffrey, the founder of Kenilworth Castle and Priory.

Margaret de Beaumont.

Gundred de Beaumont, married:

Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk;

Roger de Glanville.

-------------------- http://www.red1st.com/axholme/getperson.php?personID=I1748534921&tree=Axholme

William fil Gilbert, 5th Baron of Kendall, made by King Henry II, Constable of Lancaster Castle whereupon he took the surname of Lancaster.

By his wife Gundreda, 

daughter of William 2nd Earl of Warren and granddaughter of Gundreda, daughter of William the Conqueror, he has issue.

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/5/5663.htm

view all 162

Gundred de Warenne, Countess of Warwick's Timeline

1117
1117
Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
1128
1128
Age 11
Of, Warwick, Warwickshire, England
1128
Age 11
Of, Warwick, Warwickshire, England
1130
1130
Age 13
Warwick, Warwickshire, England
1135
1135
Age 18
Warwick,Warwickshire,England
1135
Age 18
Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England
1139
1139
- 1152
Age 22
Haddington, Scotland, United Kingdom
1144
1144
Age 27
1145
1145
Age 28
Warwick, Warwickshire, England
1150
1150
Age 33
Kendal Castle, Westmorland, England