Jacob Broom (1752 - 1810) MP

‹ Back to Broom surname

Is your surname Broom?

Research the Broom family

Jacob Broom, Signer of the US Constitution's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Birthplace: Wilmington, New Castel, Delaware
Death: Died in Philadelphia, PA, USA
Occupation: Civil Engineer and Cartographer
Managed by: Serenity Denice Morat
Last Updated:

About Jacob Broom

member of the Constitutional Convention representing the state of Delaware.

...the last page of the US Constitution. You'll see our cousin's signature, the last of the Delaware Delegates...

Jacob Broom

Delaware

1752-1810

Jacob Broom, born October 17, 1752 in Wilmington, Delaware, was the son of James Broom, a blacksmith turned prosperous farmer, and Esther Willis, a Quaker. In 1773 he married Rachel Pierce, and together they raised eight children.

After receiving his primary education at Wilmington's Old Academy, he became in turn a farmer, surveyor, and finally, a prosperous local businessman. Even as a young man Broom attracted considerable attention in Wilmington's thriving business community, a prominence that propelled him into a political career. He held a variety of local offices, including borough assessor, president of the city's "street regulators;" a group responsible for the care of the street, water, and sewage systems, and justice of the peace for New Castle County. He became assistant burgess (vice-mayor) of Wilmington in 1776 at the age of only 24, winning re-election to this post six times over the next few decades. He also served as chief burgess of the city four times. He never lost an election.

Although the strong pacifist influence of his Quaker friends and relatives kept him from fighting in the Revolution, Broom was nevertheless a Patriot who contributed to the cause of independence. For example, he put his abilities as a surveyor at the disposal of the Continental Army, preparing detailed maps of the region for General Washington shortly before the battle of Brandywine. Broom's political horizons expanded after the Revolution when his community sent him as their representative to the state legislature (1784-86 and 1788), which in turn chose him to represent the state at the Annapolis Convention. Like many other delegates, Broom was unable to attend the sessions of the short meeting, but he likely sympathized with the convention's call for political reforms.

Despite his lack of involvement in national politics prior to the Constitutional Convention, Broom was a dedicated supporter of strong central government. When George Washington visited Wilmington in 1783, Broom urged him to "contribute your advice and influence to promote that harmony and union of our infant governments which are so essential to the permanent establishment of our freedom, happiness and prosperity."

Broom carried these opinions with him to Philadelphia, where he consistently voted for measures that would assure a powerful government responsive to the needs of the states. He favored a nine-year term for members of the Senate, where the states would be equally represented. He wanted the state legislatures to pay their representatives in Congress, which, in turn, would have the power to veto state laws. He also sought to vest state legislatures with the power to select presidential electors, and he wanted the President to hold office for life. Broom faithfully attended the sessions of the Convention in Philadelphia and spoke out several times on issues that he considered crucial, but he left most of the speechmaking to more influential and experienced delegates. Georgia delegate William Pierce [Georgia] described him as "a plain good Man, with some abilities, but nothing to render him conspicuous, silent in public, but chearful and conversible in private."

After the convention, Broom returned to Wilmington, where in 1795 he erected a home near the Brandywine River on the outskirts of the city. Broom's primary interest remained in local government. In addition to continuing his service in Wilmington's government, he became the city's first postmaster (1790-92).

For many years, he chaired the board of directors of Wilmington's Delaware Bank. He also operated a cotton mill, as well as a machine shop that produced and repaired mill machinery. He was involved, too, in an unsuccessful scheme to mine bog iron ore. A further interest was internal improvements: toll roads, canals, and bridges. A letter to his son James in 1794 touches upon a number of these pursuits.

Broom also found time for philanthropic and religious activities. His long-standing affiliation with the Old Academy led him to become involved in its reorganization into the College of Wilmington, and to serve on the college's first Board of Trustees. Broom was also deeply involved in his community's religious affairs as a lay leader of the Old Swedes Church.

He died at the age of 58 in 1810 while in Philadelphia on business and was buried there at Christ Church Burial Ground.

Source: http://atropesend.blogspot.com/2010/08/our-cousin-and-signer-of-us-consitution.html

----------

Jacob Broom House, also known as Hagley, is a site significant for its association with Jacob Broom. It is on the Brandywine Creek in Delaware, in fact about 1/4 mile off. It was sold to the du Pont family.

It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974.[2][3]

It is located in Montchanin, one mile northeast of Wilmington.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Broom_House

--------------------

Signer of U.S. Constitution.

--------------------

Signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Jacob Broom (1752-1810) was a farmer, surveyor, businessman, public official, and philanthropist. He prepared military maps for General George Washington prior to the Battle of Brandywine (1777) and held numerous local political positions throughout his life. Broom was member of the Delaware legislature (1784-86, 1788); and a delegate to the Constitutional Convention where he signed the federal Constitution (1787). He is probably one of the least known signers of the Constitution. -------------------- Jacob Broom

    Jacob Broom (October 17, 1752 – April 25, 1810) was an American businessman and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. As a delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention of 1787, he was a signer of the U.S. Constitution. He was also appointed as a delegate to the Annapolis Convention (1786) but did not attend, and he served in the Delaware General Assembly. He was the father of Congressman James M. Broom and grandfather of Congressman Jacob Broom.
    His father was James Broom, a blacksmith turned prosperous farmer, and his mother was Esther Willis, a Quaker. In 1773 he married Rachel Pierce, and together they raised eight children.

Education and career

    After receiving his primary education at Wilmington's Old Academy, he became in turn a farmer, surveyor, and finally, a prosperous local politician. Even as a young man Broom attracted considerable attention in Wilmington's thriving business community, a prominence that propelled him into a political career. He held a variety of local offices, including borough assessor, president of the city's "street regulators;" a group responsible for the care of the street, water, and sewage systems, and justice of the peace for New Castle County. He became assistant burgess (vice-mayor) of Wilmington in 1776 at the age of 24, winning re-election to this post six times over the next few decades. He also served as chief burgess (Mayor) of the city four times. He never lost an election.
    Although the strong pacifist influence of his Quaker friends and relatives kept him from fighting in the Revolution, Broom was nevertheless a Patriot who contributed to the cause of independence. For example, he put his abilities as a surveyor at the disposal of the Continental Army, preparing detailed maps of the region for General Washington shortly before the Battle of Brandywine. Broom's political horizons expanded after the Revolution when his community sent him as their representative to the state legislature (1784–86 and 1788), which in turn chose him to represent the state at the Annapolis Convention. Like many other delegates, Broom was unable to attend the sessions of the short meeting, but he likely sympathized with the convention's call for political reforms.

Constitutional convention

    Despite his lack of involvement in national politics prior to the Constitutional Convention, Broom was a dedicated supporter of strong central government. When George Washington visited Wilmington in 1783, Broom urged him to "contribute your advice and influence to promote that harmony and union of our infant governments which are so essential to the permanent establishment of our freedom, happiness and prosperity."
    Broom carried these opinions with him to Philadelphia, where he consistently voted for measures that would assure a powerful government responsive to the needs of the states. He favored a nine-year term for members of the Senate, where the states would be equally represented. He wanted the state legislatures to pay their representatives in Congress, which, in turn, would have the power to veto state laws. He also sought to vest state legislatures with the power to select presidential electors, and he wanted the President to hold office for life. Broom faithfully attended the sessions of the Convention in Philadelphia and spoke out several times on issues that he considered crucial, but he left most of the speechmaking to more influential and experienced delegates. Georgia delegate William Pierce described him as "a plain good Man, with some abilities, but nothing to render him conspicuous, silent in public, but cheerful and conversible in private."[1]

Later career

    After the convention, Broom returned to Wilmington, where in 1795 he erected a home near Brandywine Creek on the outskirts of the city. Broom's primary interest remained in local government. In addition to continuing his service in Wilmington's government, he became the city's first postmaster (1790–92).
    For many years, he chaired the board of directors of Wilmington's Delaware Bank. He also operated a cotton mill, as well as a machine shop that produced and repaired mill machinery. He sold his mill property in 1802 to the DuPonts and it became the center of the DuPont manufacturing empire. Broom was also involved in an unsuccessful scheme to mine bog iron ore. A further interest was internal improvements: toll roads, canals, and bridges. A letter to his son James in 1794 touches upon a number of these pursuits.
    Broom also found time for philanthropic and religious activities. His long-standing affiliation with the Old Academy led him to become involved in its reorganization into the College of Wilmington, and to serve on the college's first Board of Trustees. Broom was also deeply involved in his community's religious affairs as a lay leader of the Old Swedes Church.
    He died at the age of 58 in 1810 while in Philadelphia on business and was buried there at Christ Church Burial Ground.

SOURCE: Wikipedia, online @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Broom

_______________________________________

Wilmington Feb. 24,1794

Dear James,

I recd.[received] your favor of the 27th ulti [last] & am well pleased at the sentiments expressed - whilst you go on, having your own approbation you have nothing to fear - I flatter myself you will be what I wish but don't be so much flattered as to relax of your application - don't forget to be a Christian, I have said much to you on this head [topic of discourse] & I hope an indelible impression is made -

Tell Mr. Harrison that I shall attend to his request, very soon - I am & have been very much engaged for some time past; being about to establish a Cotton Manufactory at this place - it is an arduous undertaking for an individual; but I hope to accomplish it - I have bought a valuable plantation on B. Wine and have secured a Mill seat [site] where I intend building (the ensuing summer) a Cotton Mill to spin part of the stuff [note: Broom built the first cotton mill at Brandywine in 1795 near Wilmington, DE] -

Your mamma, sisters & brothers are well & so is J.S. Littler - they join with me in love to you -

I expected sir now to receive another letter from you -

I have sold my Mercht.[Merchant] Mill & Plantations in Kent for �25,000 I am improving my other seat there - all this is nothing without economy, industry & the blessing of Heaven - I am building another Mill there -

I am, in haste yours affectionately

Jaco Broom

P.S. when will be your vacation? Your sister Nancy wishes to see you as soon as that shall take place -


From site: http://www.wallbuilders.com/LIBissuesArticles.asp?id=52

=================================================

Jacob Broom (October 17, 1752–April 25, 1810) was the son of a blacksmith named James Broom who was also a successful farmer and had numerous real estate holdings as well as investments in both gold and silver. By all accounts, Jacob’s mother was a Quaker named Esther Willis.

Broom attended school in Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware at Wilmington’s Old Academy during his primary years. After he completed school, Broom tried his hand at farming, surveying and then finally becoming a businessman within the local community. He married his wife, Rachel Pierce in 1773 and they went on to expand their family with the addition of eight children.

Jacob Broom moved into politics as a natural progression from the various positions he held locally including tax assessor, and the City President of “Street Regulators” which was a group designed to oversee the care of sewage, water and street systems within the community. He was also a Justice of the Peace in New Castle County. At the age of 24, Broom became the Vice-Mayor of Wilmington, a position he was re-elected to six more times after his initial election. In addition, Broom served as Mayor a total of four times and never lost any election that he campaigned in.

Broom never actively fought in the Revolution, because he had such clearly determined pacifist roots. He was, however, a Patriot and made great contributions towards the independence cause by helping out in different ways (aside from fighting). He used his talents as a surveyor to prepare detailed maps for use by the Continental Army in the Battle of Brandywine.

Jacob Broom was chosen and sent by his community to the legislature as a representative of New Castle Country from 1784 to 1788. After that point, he was chosen to represent the state of Delaware at the Annapolis Convention. Broom was always an ardent support of the concept of central government and he took the opportunity to express that to George Washington in 1783 upon Washington’s visit to Wilmington.

Broom was in favor of 9 year terms for all Senate members and equal representation of each state. He was also in favor of state legislatures paying their representatives in Congress. Jacob Broom attended the Convention sessions and while he did speak out on issues that he viewed as important, he did not participate in any speeches.

Following the Convention, Broom returned to his home town and continued to serve in local government. He was Wilmington’s first postmaster in 1790 and continued in that position until 1792. He also sat as chair on the Board of Directors for Delaware Bank in Wilmington. Broom continued to dabble in business endeavors including running a cotton mill, and a machine shop that manufactured mill machinery as well as making the necessary repairs to it. He eventually sold his operations to Dupont which became the center of their operations in later years.

Jacob broom died in 1810, aged 58 years, on a business trip to Philadelphia .http://www.constitutionday.com/broom-jacob-de.html

view all 26

Jacob Broom, Signer of the US Constitution's Timeline

1752
October 17, 1752
Wilmington, New Castel, Delaware
1773
December 14, 1773
Age 21
Wilmington, DE, USA
1775
January 20, 1775
Age 22
Carlisle, Cumberland, Pennsylvania
August 22, 1775
Age 22
Wilmington, DE, USA
1776
1776
Age 23
Wilmington, DE, USA
1776
Age 23
1777
September 20, 1777
Age 24
1783
1783
Age 30
Wilmington, DE, USA
1783
Age 30

When George Washington visited Wilmington in 1783, Broom urged him to "contribute your advice and influence to promote that harmony and union of our infant governments which are so essential to the permanent establishment of our freedom, happiness and prosperity."

Source: http://atropesend.blogspot.com/2010/08/our-cousin-and-signer-of-us-...

1784
1784
Age 31