Louis Bromfield (1896 - 1956)

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Birthplace: Mansfield, Ohio, United States
Death: Died in Columbus, Ohio, United States
Occupation: writer, farmer
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About Louis Bromfield

Louis BromfieldAmerican author

born Dec. 27, 1896, Mansfield, Ohio, U.S. died March 18, 1956, Columbus, Ohio

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American novelist and essayist.

The son of a farmer, Bromfield studied journalism at Columbia University and was decorated for his service in the French army, which he joined at the outbreak of World War I. After the war he worked as a music critic in New York City for a few years. After marrying in 1923, he moved to a village north of Paris, where he concentrated on his writing.

During these expatriate years, Bromfield produced his most highly acclaimed novels, including The Green Bay Tree (1924), Possession (1925), and Early Autumn (1926), for which he was awarded the 1926 Pulitzer Prize. Although written in France, these works, along with his best novel, A Good Woman (1927), all focused on life in the United States. Each of them dealt with the attempts of individuals to escape the domination of family and tradition.

With the onset of World War II, Bromfield returned to the United States to live and work on his newly acquired farm, Malabar, near Lucas, Ohio. There he continued with his writing, producing Wild is the River (1941), Until the Day Break (1942), Mrs. Parkington (1943), and What Became of Anna Bolton (1944). Little of his later work attained the depth or quality of the novels he wrote in France.

External Web sites

Student Encyclopædia Britannica articles specifically written for elementary and high school students.

Louis Bromfield

Louis BromfieldAmerican author

born Dec. 27, 1896, Mansfield, Ohio, U.S. died March 18, 1956, Columbus, Ohio

Main

American novelist and essayist.

The son of a farmer, Bromfield studied journalism at Columbia University and was decorated for his service in the French army, which he joined at the outbreak of World War I. After the war he worked as a music critic in New York City for a few years. After marrying in 1923, he moved to a village north of Paris, where he concentrated on his writing.

During these expatriate years, Bromfield produced his most highly acclaimed novels, including The Green Bay Tree (1924), Possession (1925), and Early Autumn (1926), for which he was awarded the 1926 Pulitzer Prize. Although written in France, these works, along with his best novel, A Good Woman (1927), all focused on life in the United States. Each of them dealt with the attempts of individuals to escape the domination of family and tradition.

With the onset of World War II, Bromfield returned to the United States to live and work on his newly acquired farm, Malabar, near Lucas, Ohio. There he continued with his writing, producing Wild is the River (1941), Until the Day Break (1942), Mrs. Parkington (1943), and What Became of Anna Bolton (1944). Little of his later work attained the depth or quality of the novels he wrote in France.

External Web sites

Student Encyclopædia Britannica articles specifically written for elementary and high school students.

Louis Bromfield

Louis Bromfield, 1896-1956, novelist and experimental farmer (wife, Mary Appleton Wood; Chalmers Wood & Ellen Appleton Smith; John Cotton Smith & Harriet Hooper Appleton; Thomas Mather Smith & Mary Greenleaf Woods, James Appleton & Sarah Fuller; Daniel Smith & Mary Smith, Samuel Appleton & Mary White, Daniel Fuller & Hannah Bowers; Cotton Mather Smith & Temperance Worthington (parents of Mary), Isaac Appleton, Jr. & Elizabeth Sawyer, see #31 above, Benjamin Bowers & Sarah Newhall; William Worthington & Temperance Gallup, Samuel Newhall & Sarah Sargent; William Gallup & Sarah Chesebrough, Joseph Sargent & Mary Green; Nathaniel Chesebrough & Hannah Denison, John Sargent & Deborah Hillier; George Denison & Bridget Thompson, Rev. William Sargent & Sarah ----; John Thompson & Alice Freeman). -------------------- Louis Bromfield (December 27, 1896 – March 18, 1956) was an American author and conservationist who gained international recognition winning the Pulitzer Prize and pioneering innovative scientific farming concepts.Louis Bromfield was born Louis Brumfield, son of Charles Brumfield and Annette Marie Coulter daughter of an Ohio Pioneer.

One of Mansfield, Ohio's most famous natives, his home was Malabar Farm near Lucas, Ohio, from 1939 until his death in 1956. Bromfield was also friends with some of the most celebrated personalities of his era, including famous architect F. F. Schnitzer, and provided the location for Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall's wedding.In the 1980s, Louis Bromfield was posthumously elected to the Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame and in December 1996, the centennial of his birth, the Ohio Department of Agriculture placed a bust of Louis Bromfield in the lobby named for him at the department's new headquarters in Reynoldsburg, Ohio.

The innovative and visionary work of Louis Bromfield continues to influence agricultural methodologies around the world. Malabar Brazil, under the direction of Ellen Bromfield Geld, has expanded the horizons of her father's principles and pursuits. To ensure the work continues well into the 21st century, the Malabar 2000 Foundation plans to develop a center for study at Malabar Farm to further the work begun in Richland County (Mansfield, Ohio) by Louis Bromfield.

Louis Bromfield was married in 1921 to New York socialite Mary Appleton Wood, the daughter of distinguished New York City attorney Chalmers Wood and his wife Ellen Appleton Smith. Mary Appleton Wood Bromfield died in 1952. They had three daughters, Ann Bromfield, Hope Bromfield and Ellen Bromfield.

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Louis Bromfield's Timeline

1896
December 27, 1896
Mansfield, Ohio, United States
1956
March 18, 1956
Age 59
Columbus, Ohio, United States
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