Louis IV d'Outremer, Roi de Francie Occidentale

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Louis IV 'd'Outremer' de France (Carolingien), Roi de Francie Occidentale

Also Known As: "Louis IV of /France/", "Transmarinus", "d'Outre-Mer", "(d'Outremer)", "d'Outremere", "Lüdwig IV.", "Lodewijk IV", "Otremeur"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Leon, Champagne, Aisne, France
Death: Died in Rheims, Champagne-Ardenne, France
Place of Burial: Abbaye de St. Rémy, Rheims, Champagne-Ardenne, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Charles III "the Simple", King of the Franks; Karel IIi van West-Francie; Ēadgifu Ogive of Wessex, Queen of France and Eadgyfu van Engeland
Husband of Gerberge de Saxe, Reine de Francie Occidentale
Father of Lothair IV, roi de France; Matilda of France; Charles de France; Louis de France; Henri de France and 1 other
Brother of Charles de Courcy, Duke of Lorraine and Charles (Carolus) De Courcy
Half brother of Rothrudis; Ermentrudis; Gisèle der Franken, lll. Ehe 912; Hildegardis; Frédéruna, Gräfin von Ringleheim and 7 others

Occupation: King of France, Rey de Francia Occidental 936 - 954, Roi de France (936-954), Rei da França, Konge, Roi de France, Roi des Francs (15 janvier 936 - 10 septembre 954), KING OF FRANCE, Kung i Västra Frankrike 936-954, König von Westfranken, Kung, King
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Louis IV d'Outremer, Roi de Francie Occidentale

Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as king of France from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

Exile

He was only two years old when his father was deposed by the nobles, who set up Robert I in his place. When he was only three years old, Robert died and was replaced by Rudolph, duke of Burgundy. Rudolph's ally, a Carolingian himself, Count Herbert II of Vermandois, took Charles captive by treachery and the young Louis's mother took the boy "over the sea" to the safety of England, hence his nickname.

Charles died in 929, but Rudolph ruled on until 936, when Louis was summoned back to France unanimously by the nobles, especially Hugh the Great, who had probably organised his return to prevent Herbert II, or Rudolph's brother Hugh the Black, taking the throne.

[edit]Rise to the throne

He was crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936. Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France, Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles. Nonetheless, his reign was filled with conflict; in particular with Hugh the Great, count of Paris.

[edit]Marriage

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – May 5, 984). They were parents to eight children:

Lothair of France (941-986)

Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy

Hildegarde b. about 944

Carloman b. about 945

Louis b. about 948

Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)

Alberade b. before 953

Henri b. about 953

[edit]Death

Louis IV fell from his horse and died September 10, 954, at Rheims, in the Marne, and is interred there at Saint Rémi Basilica.

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Afastado do trono desde a morte de seu pai, somente após a morte de Raul I resolveu regressar de Inglaterra, adquirindo o apelido de d’Outremer.

Os domínios próprios do Rei restringiram-se, essencialmente, à região de Laon. Ele não tinha autoridade sobre todas as regiões ao sul do Rio Loire, pois quem reinava no sul de França e da Borgonha, era Hugo o Grande, filho de Roberto I. Luís IV morreu no dia 10 de setembro de 954, em Reims.

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Sepultura: na Basílica de Saint Rémi de Reims.

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From Wikipedia:

Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as King of Western Francia from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

He was only two years old when his father was deposed by the nobles, who set up Robert I in his place. When he was only three years old, Robert died and was replaced by Rudolph, duke of Burgundy. Rudolph's ally, a Carolingian himself, Count Herbert II of Vermandois, took Charles captive by treachery and the young Louis's mother took the boy "over the sea" to the safety of England, hence his nickname.

Charles died in 929, but Rudolph ruled on until 936, when Louis was summoned back to France unanimously by the nobles, especially Hugh the Great, who had probably organised his return to prevent Herbert II, or Rudolph's brother Hugh the Black, taking the throne. He was crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936.

Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France, Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles. Nonetheless, his reign was filled with conflict; in particular with Hugh the Great, count of Paris.

Louis IV fell from his horse and died 10 September 954, at Rheims, in the Marne, and is interred there at Saint Rémi Basilica.

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – 5 May 984). They were parents to eight children:

   * Lothair of France (941-986)
   * Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy
   * Hildegarde b. about 944
   * Carloman b. about 945
   * Louis b. about 948
   * Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)
   * Alberade b. before 953
   * Henri b. about 953

--------------------

Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as King of Western Francia from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

Contents [hide]

1 Early years across the sea

2 Return to France

3 Ancestry

4 Marriage and children

5 Notes

6 References


[edit] Early years across the sea

He was only two years old when his father was deposed by the nobles, who set up Robert I in his place. When he was only three years old, Robert died and was replaced by Rudolph, duke of Burgundy. Rudolph's ally, a Carolingian himself, Count Herbert II of Vermandois, took Charles captive by treachery and the young Louis's mother took the boy "over the sea" to the safety of England, hence his nickname.

[edit] Return to France

Charles died in 929, but Rudolph ruled on until 936, when Louis was summoned back to France unanimously by the nobles, especially Hugh the Great, who had probably organised his return to prevent Herbert II, or Rudolph's brother Hugh the Black, taking the throne. He was crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936. The chronicler Flodoard records the events as follows:

Brittones a transmarinis regionibus, Alstani regis praesidio, revertentes terram suam repetunt. Hugo comes trans mare mittit pro accersiendo ad apicem regni suscipiendum Ludowico, Karoli filio, quem rex Alstanus avunculus ipsius, accepto prius jurejurando a Francorum legatis, in Franciam cum quibusdam episcopis et aliis fidelibus suis dirigit, cui Hugo et cetero Francorum proceres obviam profecti, mox navim egresso, in ipsis littoreis harenis apud Bononiam, sese committunt, ut erant utrinque depactum. Indeque ab ipsis Laudunum deductus ac regali benedictione didatus ungitur atque coronatur a domno Artoldo archiepiscopo, praesentibus regni principibus cum episcopis xx et amplius.[1] "The Bretons, returning from the lands across the sea with the support of King Athelstan, came back to their country. Duke Hugh sent across the sea to summon Louis, son of Charles, to be received as king, and King Athelstan, his uncle, first taking oaths from the legates of the Franks, sent him to the Frankish kingdom with some of his bishops, and other followers. Hugh and the other nobles of the Franks went to meet him and committed themselves to him[;] immediately he disembarked on the sands of Boulogne, as had been agreed on both sides. From there he was conducted by them to Laon, and, endowed with the royal benediction, he was anointed and crowned by the lord Archbishop Artold, in the presence of the chief men of his kingdom, with 20 bishops."[2]

Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France, Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles. Nonetheless, his reign was filled with conflict; in particular with Hugh the Great, count of Paris.

Louis IV fell from his horse and died 10 September 954, at Rheims, in the Marne, and is interred there at Saint Rémi Basilica.

[edit] Ancestry

[show]v • d • eAncestors of Louis IV of France

                                 

 16. Louis the Pious 
 
         

 8. Charles the Bald   
 
               

 17. Judith of Bavaria 
 
         

 4. Louis the Stammerer   
 
                     

 18. Odo I, Count of Orléans 
 
         

 9. Ermentrude of Orléans   
 
               

 19. Engeltrude of Paris 
 
         

 2. Charles the Simple   
 
                           

 20. Wulfhard von Argengau 
 
         

 10. Adalhard of Paris   
 
               

 21. Susanna of Paris 
 
         

 5. Adelaide of Paris   
 
                     













 1. Louis IV of France   
 
                                 

 24. Æthelwulf of Wessex 
 
         

 12. Alfred the Great   
 
               

 25. Osburga of Isle of Wight 
 
         

 6. Edward the Elder   
 
                     

 26. Æthelred Mucil 
 
         

 13. Ealhswith of Mercia   
 
               

 27. Eadburga of Mercia 
 
         

 3. Eadgifu of England   
 
                           





 14. Æthelhelm of Wiltshire   
 
               





 7. Ælfflæd   
 
                     

 30. Æthelwulf of Mercia 
 
         

 15. Æthelglyth of Mercia   
 
               






[edit] Marriage and children

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – 5 May 984). They were parents to eight children:

Lothair of France (941-986)

Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy

Hildegarde b. about 944

Carloman b. about 945

Louis b. about 948

Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)

Alberade b. before 953

Henri b. about 953

[edit] Notes

1.^ Flodoard, Annales 936, ed. P. Lauer.

2.^ Dorothy Whitelock (tr.), English Historical Documents c. 500-1042. 2nd ed. London, 1979. p. 344.

[edit] References

Flodoard, Annales, ed. Philippe Lauer, Les Annales de Flodoard. Collection des textes pour servir à l'étude et à l'enseignement de l'histoire 39. Paris: Picard, 1905.

Familypedia has a page on Louis IV (c920-954). 

Preceded by

Raoul King of Western Francia

936–954 Succeeded by

Lothair

[show]v • d • ePippinids, Arnulfings, and Carolingians

Legend: → ≡ "father of", · ≡ "brother of"


Begga, the daughter of Pepin I, married Ansegisel, the son of Arnulf of Metz, and was the mother of Pepin II.


Pippinids Carloman → Pepin I → Grimoald I → Childebert the Adopted


Arnulfings Arnulf of Metz → Clodulf · Martin · Ansegisel → Pepin II, his sons:


Drogo, sons: Arnulf · Hugh · Godfrey · Pepin


Grimoald I, son: Theudoald


Charles Martel, sons: Carloman · Pepin III · Grifo · Bernard · Jerome · Remigius


Childebrand, son: Nibelung I → Nibelungids



Early Carolingians Sons of Charles Martel


Carloman, son: Drogo


Pepin III, sons: Charlemagne, sons: Pepin the Hunchback · Charles the Younger · Pepin · Louis the Pious · Lothair · Drogo · Hugh · Theoderic


Carloman, son: Pepin


Pepin



Bernard, sons: Wala · Adalhard · Bernhar



Carolingian Empire Sons of Charlemagne


Pepin, son: Bernard → Pepin → Counts of Vermandois


Louis the Pious, sons: Arnulf of Sens


Lothair I, sons: Louis II → Ermengard → Louis the Blind → Bosonids

Lothair II → Hugh

Charles


Pepin I, son: Pepin II


Louis the German, sons: Carloman → Arnulf → Louis the Child · Ratold · Zwentibold

Louis the Younger → Louis · Hugh

Charles the Fat → Bernard


Charles the Bald, sons: Louis the Stammerer → Louis III · Carloman · Charles the Simple

Charles the Child

Carloman

Lothair the Lame · Drogo · Pepin · Charles




West Francia West Francia was in the hands of the Robertians from 888 until 898. It was the last Carolingian kingdom.


Charles the Simple, sons: Louis IV · Arnulf · Drogo · Rorico


Louis IV, sons: Lothair IV · Charles · Louis · Charles of Lorraine · Henry


Lothair IV, sons: Louis V · Arnulf


Charles of Lorraine, sons: Otto · Louis · Charles



[show]v • d • eCarolingian Kings of the Franks


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Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as king of France from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – May 5, 984). They were parents to eight children:

Lothair of France (941-986)

Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy

Hildegarde b. about 944

Carloman b. about 945

Louis b. about 948

Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)

Alberade b. before 953

Henri b. about 953

--------------------

Louis IV of France

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as king of France from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

Exile

He was only two years old when his father was deposed by the nobles, who set up Robert I in his place. When he was only three years old, Robert died and was replaced by Rudolph, duke of Burgundy. Rudolph's ally, a Carolingian himself, Count Herbert II of Vermandois, took Charles captive by treachery and the young Louis's mother took the boy "over the sea" to the safety of England, hence his nickname.

Charles died in 929, but Rudolph ruled on until 936, when Louis was summoned back to France unanimously by the nobles, especially Hugh the Great, who had probably organised his return to prevent Herbert II, or Rudolph's brother Hugh the Black, taking the throne.

[edit]Rise to the throne

He was crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936. Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France, Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles. Nonetheless, his reign was filled with conflict; in particular with Hugh the Great, count of Paris.

[edit]Marriage

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – May 5, 984). They were parents to eight children:

Lothair of France (941-986)

Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy

Hildegarde b. about 944

Carloman b. about 945

Louis b. about 948

Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)

Alberade b. before 953

Henri b. about 953

]Death

Louis IV fell from his horse and died September 10, 954, at Rheims, in the Marne, and is interred there at Saint Rémi Basilica.

--------------------

Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as king of France from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

Exile

He was only two years old when his father was deposed by the nobles, who set up Robert I in his place. When he was only three years old, Robert died and was replaced by Rudolph, duke of Burgundy. Rudolph's ally, a Carolingian himself, Count Herbert II of Vermandois, took Charles captive by treachery and the young Louis's mother took the boy "over the sea" to the safety of England, hence his nickname.

Charles died in 929, but Rudolph ruled on until 936, when Louis was summoned back to France unanimously by the nobles, especially Hugh the Great, who had probably organised his return to prevent Herbert II, or Rudolph's brother Hugh the Black, taking the throne.

Rise to the throne

He was crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936. Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France, Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles. Nonetheless, his reign was filled with conflict; in particular with Hugh the Great, count of Paris.

Marriage

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – May 5, 984). They were parents to eight children:

Lothair of France (941-986)

Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy

Hildegarde b. about 944

Carloman b. about 945

Louis b. about 948

Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)

Alberade b. before 953

Henri b. about 953

Death

Louis IV fell from his horse and died September 10, 954, at Rheims, in the Marne, and is interred there at Saint Rémi Basilica.

--------------------

From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_315.htm

King of France from 936 to 954 who spent most of his reign struggling against his powerful vassal Hugh the Great.

When Louis's father, Charles III the Simple, was imprisoned in 923, his mother, Eadgifu, daughter of the Anglo-Saxon king Edward the Elder, took Louis to England. He was recalled to France in 936 and crowned on June 19 at Laon by Artand, archbishop of Reims, who became Louis's chief supporter against Hugh the Great. Louis proved not to be the puppet monarch that Hugh had anticipated; he even moved from Paris to Laon to avoid Hugh's influence. When Hugh and Herbert of Vermandois seized Reims and attacked Laon in 940, Louis valiantly defended his city; but because of Louis's earlier interference in Lorraine the German king, Otto I, sent aid to the rebels. Louis appeared to be totally defeated in 941, but he made peace with Otto in November 942 at Vise on the Meuse, and Hugh and he were reconciled after Herbert, Hugh's chief supporter, died in 943.

In 945, while intervening in Norman politics, Louis was captured and handed over to Hugh, who imprisoned him for a year. On his release, Louis closely allied himself with Otto to retake Reims in 946. In 949 Louis again received control of Laon, and Hugh, excommunicated by French and German synods and by the Pope, made a peace in 951 that lasted until Louis's death.

References: [WallopFH],[Moncreiffe],[AR7],[MRL],[RD500],[Weis1], [ES],[PlantagenetA]

--------------------

Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as king of France from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – May 5, 984). They were parents to eight children:

Lothair of France (941-986)

Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy

Hildegarde b. about 944

Carloman b. about 945

Louis b. about 948

Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)

Alberade b. before 953

Henri b. about 953

--------------------

Wiklopedia:

Ludwig IV. der Überseeische (lateinisch Transmarinus, französisch Louis IV d'Outre-Mer; * zwischen 10. September 920 und 10. September 921; † 10. September 954 in Reims[1]) war westfränkischer König von 936 bis 954. Er stammte aus dem Geschlecht der Karolinger, der Königsdynastie des westfränkischen Reichs, die damals bereits sehr geschwächt und vom Wohlwollen mächtiger Adelsgruppen abhängig war.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

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   * 1 Leben
   * 2 Familie
   * 3 Literatur
   * 4 Weblinks
   * 5 Anmerkungen

Leben [Bearbeiten]

Ludwig war der Sohn König Karls III. des Einfältigen und dessen zweiter Frau Eadgifu, einer Tochter König Eduards des Älteren von Wessex. Karl musste sich mit Gegenkönigen auseinandersetzen, die keine Karolinger waren und den Herrschaftsanspruch der Karolingerdynastie nicht anerkannten. Als Graf Heribert II. von Vermandois, der auf der Seite des Gegenkönigs Rudolf von Burgund stand, im Jahr 923 Karl den Einfältigen in eine Falle lockte und gefangensetzte, floh Eadgifu mit dem erst zweijährigen Ludwig nach England. Dort wuchs Ludwig am Hof seines Großvaters Eduard und später seines Onkels Æthelstan auf. Im Westfrankenreich regierte nunmehr allein Rudolf von Burgund, der jedoch auf die Unterstützung des mächtigen Geschlechts der Robertiner angewiesen war, während Heribert II. weiterhin den gefangenen Karl als Faustpfand behielt, um auf König Rudolf Druck auszuüben. 929 starb Karl in der Haft. Als im Januar 936 König Rudolf starb, ohne einen Sohn zu hinterlassen, kam bei der Regelung der Nachfolge dem mächtigen Robertiner Hugo dem Großen eine entscheidende Rolle zu. Hugo, dessen Vater Robert I. bereits Westfrankenkönig gewesen war, hätte selbst nach der Krone greifen können, zog es aber vor, zur Karolingerdynastie zurückzukehren, die durch Karls Schicksal einen schweren Macht- und Ansehensverlust erlitten hatte. Er wollte einem relativ machtlosen Karolinger die Königswürde überlassen, um selbst die Reichspolitik aus dem Hintergrund zu lenken. Daher verhandelte er mit Æthelstan und Eadgifu über die Rückkehr Ludwigs. Hugo war ein Schwager von Æthelstan und Eadgifu, da er damals mit einer Schwester Eadgifus verheiratet war. Man einigte sich und der erst fünfzehnjährige Ludwig landete in Boulogne, wo Hugo ihn empfing und ihm huldigte.

Am 19. Juni 936 wurde Ludwig IV. in Laon von Erzbischof Artold von Reims zum westfränkischen König gekrönt. Im Gegenzug musste er Hugo eine einzigartige Sonderstellung im Reich einräumen. Hugo erhielt den eigens für ihn geschaffenen Rang eines „Herzogs der Franken“ (dux Francorum), und bereits in einer Königsurkunde von 936 stellte Ludwig fest, er handle auf den Rat „unseres geliebtesten Hugo, des Frankenherzogs, der in allen unseren Reichen der Zweite nach uns ist“. Damit war Hugo nicht mehr nur, wie frühere Robertiner, als Markgraf und Graf für große Gebiete zuständig, in denen dem König kein direktes Eingreifen mehr möglich war, sondern er stand „in allen Reichen“, also in sämtlichen Teilen des Westfrankenreichs, zwischen dem König und den nachrangigen Vasallen. Der Titel „Herzog der Franken“ wurde somit in bewusster Analogie zu „König der Franken“ auf das Gesamtreich bezogen (obwohl im engeren Sinn nur ein bestimmter Reichsteil, das Hugo dem Großen verliehene Herzogtum Franzien, gemeint war). Damit wurde Ludwig faktisch auf die Rolle eines nominellen Königs reduziert und der Robertiner beanspruchte eine Stellung, die mit derjenigen der karolingischen Hausmeier im späten Merowingerreich vergleichbar war.

In den ersten Monaten seiner Regierung war Ludwig völlig von Hugo dem Großen abhängig und musste ihn auf einem erfolgreichen Feldzug gegen Hugo den Schwarzen von Burgund begleiten, wobei Hugo der Große sich nordburgundische Gebiete und insbesondere die Stadt Sens aneignete. 937 machte sich Ludwig jedoch von seinem "Vormund" unabhängig und begann eine selbständige, gegen die Übermacht des Robertiners gerichtete Politik zu betreiben. Dabei stützte er sich auf Vornehme, die ebenfalls die robertinische Expansion eindämmen wollten, darunter Erzbischof Artold von Reims, den Ludwig zu seinem Kanzler machte, und Hugo der Schwarze, mit dem er ein Bündnis schloss. Darauf reagierte Hugo der Große seinerseits mit neuen Bündnissen. Er verbündete sich mit Heribert II. und sicherte sich ein gutes Verhältnis zu Otto dem Großen, dessen Schwester Hadwig er heiratete, nachdem seine englische Frau, Ludwigs Tante, gestorben war. Damit bahnte sich ein Gegensatz zwischen Ludwig und Otto an, und als sich die Herzöge Giselbert von Lothringen und Eberhard von Franken gegen Otto den Großen erhoben, unterstellten sie sich Ludwig. Dadurch schien sich dem Karolinger eine Chance zu bieten, das karolingische Stammland Lothringen, das nach der Entmachtung Karls des Einfältigen in den Hoheitsbereich des ostfränkischen Reichs geraten war, zurückzugewinnen. Er gedachte militärisch einzugreifen und stieß ins Elsass vor, doch kam ihm Otto zuvor, der am 2. Oktober 939 Giselbert in der Schlacht von Andernach besiegte und damit die Zukunft Lothringens entschied. Giselbert ertrank auf der Flucht und Ludwig heiratete Giselberts Witwe Gerberga, eine Schwester Ottos des Großen. Nunmehr waren sowohl König Ludwig als auch sein Gegenspieler Hugo der Große mit Otto verschwägert und Otto konnte eine Schiedsrichterrolle zwischen den beiden Rivalen einnehmen und für ein Machtgleichgewicht zwischen ihnen sorgen. Zunächst stand Otto wegen des lothringischen Konflikts ganz auf der Seite Hugos des Großen. Er unternahm 940 einen Feldzug ins Westfrankenreich, um Ludwig zu bestrafen. In der Pfalz Attigny nahm er die Huldigung von Hugo dem Großen und Heribert II. entgegen. Die beiden hatten schon zuvor die Stadt Reims erobert und dort den Erzbischof Artold, einen der wichtigsten Getreuen Ludwigs, abgesetzt. Otto stieß auch nach Burgund vor, um Ludwigs dortigen Verbündeten, Hugo den Schwarzen, vor militärischen Aktionen zu warnen. 942 empfing Otto seine Schwäger Ludwig und Hugo in Visé an der Maas. Es wurde ein allgemeiner Ausgleich erzielt. Ludwig musste auf Lothringen verzichten.

Die Lage änderte sich zugunsten Ludwigs, als Ende 942 Graf Wilhelm I. Langschwert von Rouen, der Machthaber der Normandie, ermordet wurde und Anfang 943 Heribert II. starb. Heriberts Söhne stritten um die Erbschaft und in der Normandie war der Erbe, der künftige Herzog Richard I., noch unmündig. Ludwig nutzte diese Gelegenheit, um in der Normandie einzugreifen und dort seine königliche Autorität militärisch geltend zu machen. In den Kämpfen gegen seine normannischen Gegner geriet Ludwig jedoch im Juli 945 in einen Hinterhalt. Er konnte zunächst fliehen, wurde dann aber gefangengenommen. Die Normannen lieferten ihn an Hugo den Großen aus. Hugo behielt ihn in Gefangenschaft und forderte als Preis für die Freilassung, dass Ludwig auf die Stadt Laon, sein Machtzentrum, verzichte. Königin Gerberga sah sich gezwungen, Laon einem Vasallen Hugos zu übergeben. Im Sommer 946 kam Ludwig frei.

Diese schwere Demütigung Ludwigs erinnerte an das Schicksal seines Vaters Karl und bedeutete nicht nur für ihn persönlich, sondern auch für das Königtum als solches einen dramatischen Prestigeverlust. Das lag nicht im Interesse Ottos des Großen, der nun auf Bitten seiner Schwester Gerberga eingriff, um der Übermacht Hugos entgegenzuwirken. Im Herbst 946 zog ein großes Heer Ottos nach Westen und vereinte sich mit den Ludwig treuen Kräften. Hugo vermied eine Feldschlacht. Seine Truppen verschanzten sich in den Städten. Das Heer der beiden Könige konnte Laon, Senlis, Paris und Rouen nicht einnehmen, doch gelang ihnen die Eroberung von Reims, wo sie den vertriebenen Erzbischof Artold wieder einsetzten. Im Juni 948 traten in Ingelheim westfränkische, lothringische und ostfränkische Bischöfe unter dem Vorsitz eines päpstlichen Legaten in Gegenwart Ottos und Ludwigs zu einer Synode zusammen und verurteilten Hugo sowohl wegen seines Vorgehens gegen Ludwig als auch wegen der Vertreibung Artolds aus Reims. 949 konnte Ludwig die Stadt Laon in einem nächtlichen Überraschungsangriff zurückerobern; nur die Zitadelle blieb in der Hand von Hugos Kräften. 950 vermittelte Herzog Konrad der Rote von Lothringen im Auftrag Ottos des Großen einen Friedensschluss zwischen Ludwig und Hugo. Nun übergab Hugo dem König die Zitadelle von Laon.

Am 10. September 954 starb Ludwig in Reims an den Folgen eines Sturzes vom Pferd und wurde dort in der Basilika Saint-Remi begraben.

Familie [Bearbeiten]

Ludwig heiratete 939 Gerberga († 5. Mai 968 oder 969), die Tochter des deutschen Königs Heinrich I. (Liudolfinger) und Witwe des Herzogs Giselbert von Lothringen. Mit ihr hatte er sieben Kinder:

   * Lothar (941–986), König von Frankreich ∞ 966 Emma von Italien, Tochter des Königs Lothar II. von Italien
   * Mathilde (* Ende 943, † nach 26. November 981) ∞ um 964 Konrad III. König von Burgund († 993) (Welfen)
   * Karl (* Januar 945, † vor 953)
   * eine Tochter (Name nicht überliefert) (* Anfang 948)
   * Ludwig (* Dezember 948, † vor 10. September 954)
   * Karl (953–nach 991), Herzog von Niederlothringen (977-991), Zwillingsbruder Heinrichs
   * Heinrich (* Sommer 953, † bald nach der Taufe), Zwillingsbruder Karls von Niederlothringen

Gerberga erhielt 951 die Abtei Notre-Dame in Laon von ihrer Schwiegermutter und wurde 959 Äbtissin von Notre-Dame in Soissons.

Literatur [Bearbeiten]

   * Walther Kienast: Deutschland und Frankreich in der Kaiserzeit (900-1270), 1. Teil, Hiersemann, Stuttgart 1974. ISBN 3-7772-7428-3
   * Carlrichard Brühl: Die Geburt zweier Völker. Deutsche und Franzosen (9.-11. Jahrhundert), Böhlau, Köln 2001. ISBN 3-412-13300-0
   * Karl Ferdinand Werner: Vom Frankenreich zur Entfaltung Deutschlands und Frankreichs, Sigmaringen 1984. ISBN 3-79957027-6
   * Philippe Lauer: Le règne de Louis IV d'Outre-Mer, Paris 1900, Nachdruck Genève 1977 (grundlegende Untersuchung)

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   * Ludwig IV. bei genealogie-mittelalter.de

Anmerkungen [Bearbeiten]

  1. ↑ Zur Datierung der Geburt siehe Lauer S. 10 und Anm. 2 sowie Auguste Eckel: Charles le Simple, Paris 1899, S. 104; zum Todesdatum Lauer S. 231f. und Anm. 4 (mit Belegen).

Vorgänger

Rudolf von Burgund

König des Westfrankenreichs

936–954 Nachfolger

Lothar

Normdaten: Personennamendatei (PND): 118574914 | Library of Congress Control Number (LCCN): n 85238293 | Virtual International Authority File (VIAF): 5723015

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_IV_of_France

Louis IV of France

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

A denier from the reign of Louis IV, minted at Chinon

Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as King of Western Francia from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

Contents

[show]

   * 1 Early years across the sea
   * 2 Return to France
   * 3 Ancestry
   * 4 Marriage and children
   * 5 Notes
   * 6 References

[edit] Early years across the sea

He was only two years old when his father was deposed by the nobles, who set up Robert I in his place. When he was only three years old, Robert died and was replaced by Rudolph, duke of Burgundy. Rudolph's ally, a Carolingian himself, Count Herbert II of Vermandois, took Charles captive by treachery and the young Louis's mother took the boy "over the sea" to the safety of England, hence his nickname.

[edit] Return to France

Charles died in 929, but Rudolph ruled on until 936, when Louis was summoned back to France unanimously by the nobles, especially Hugh the Great, who had probably organised his return to prevent Herbert II, or Rudolph's brother Hugh the Black, taking the throne. He was crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936. The chronicler Flodoard records the events as follows:

Brittones a transmarinis regionibus, Alstani regis praesidio, revertentes terram suam repetunt. Hugo comes trans mare mittit pro accersiendo ad apicem regni suscipiendum Ludowico, Karoli filio, quem rex Alstanus avunculus ipsius, accepto prius jurejurando a Francorum legatis, in Franciam cum quibusdam episcopis et aliis fidelibus suis dirigit, cui Hugo et cetero Francorum proceres obviam profecti, mox navim egresso, in ipsis littoreis harenis apud Bononiam, sese committunt, ut erant utrinque depactum. Indeque ab ipsis Laudunum deductus ac regali benedictione didatus ungitur atque coronatur a domno Artoldo archiepiscopo, praesentibus regni principibus cum episcopis xx et amplius.[1] "The Bretons, returning from the lands across the sea with the support of King Athelstan, came back to their country. Duke Hugh sent across the sea to summon Louis, son of Charles, to be received as king, and King Athelstan, his uncle, first taking oaths from the legates of the Franks, sent him to the Frankish kingdom with some of his bishops, and other followers. Hugh and the other nobles of the Franks went to meet him and committed themselves to him[;] immediately he disembarked on the sands of Boulogne, as had been agreed on both sides. From there he was conducted by them to Laon, and, endowed with the royal benediction, he was anointed and crowned by the lord Archbishop Artold, in the presence of the chief men of his kingdom, with 20 bishops."[2]

Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France, Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles. Nonetheless, his reign was filled with conflict; in particular with Hugh the Great, count of Paris.

Louis IV fell from his horse and died 10 September 954, at Rheims, in the Marne, and is interred there at Saint Rémi Basilica.

Marriage and children

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – 5 May 984). They were parents to eight children:

   * Lothair of France (941-986)
   * Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy
   * Hildegarde b. about 944
   * Carloman b. about 945
   * Louis b. about 948
   * Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)
   * Alberade b. before 953
   * Henri b. about 953

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Flodoard, Annales 936, ed. P. Lauer.
  2. ^ Dorothy Whitelock (tr.), English Historical Documents c. 500-1042. 2nd ed. London, 1979. p. 344.

[edit] References

   * Flodoard, Annales, ed. Philippe Lauer, Les Annales de Flodoard. Collection des textes pour servir à l'étude et à l'enseignement de l'histoire 39. Paris: Picard, 1905.

Familypedia.jpg Louis IV (c920-954) on Familypedia

Preceded by

Raoul King of Western Francia

936–954 Succeeded by

Lothair

This page was last modified on 18 June 2010 at 14:16.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_IV_of_France

Louis IV of France

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

A denier from the reign of Louis IV, minted at Chinon

Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as King of Western Francia from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

Contents

[show]

   * 1 Early years across the sea
   * 2 Return to France
   * 3 Ancestry
   * 4 Marriage and children
   * 5 Notes
   * 6 References

[edit] Early years across the sea

He was only two years old when his father was deposed by the nobles, who set up Robert I in his place. When he was only three years old, Robert died and was replaced by Rudolph, duke of Burgundy. Rudolph's ally, a Carolingian himself, Count Herbert II of Vermandois, took Charles captive by treachery and the young Louis's mother took the boy "over the sea" to the safety of England, hence his nickname.

[edit] Return to France

Charles died in 929, but Rudolph ruled on until 936, when Louis was summoned back to France unanimously by the nobles, especially Hugh the Great, who had probably organised his return to prevent Herbert II, or Rudolph's brother Hugh the Black, taking the throne. He was crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936. The chronicler Flodoard records the events as follows:

Brittones a transmarinis regionibus, Alstani regis praesidio, revertentes terram suam repetunt. Hugo comes trans mare mittit pro accersiendo ad apicem regni suscipiendum Ludowico, Karoli filio, quem rex Alstanus avunculus ipsius, accepto prius jurejurando a Francorum legatis, in Franciam cum quibusdam episcopis et aliis fidelibus suis dirigit, cui Hugo et cetero Francorum proceres obviam profecti, mox navim egresso, in ipsis littoreis harenis apud Bononiam, sese committunt, ut erant utrinque depactum. Indeque ab ipsis Laudunum deductus ac regali benedictione didatus ungitur atque coronatur a domno Artoldo archiepiscopo, praesentibus regni principibus cum episcopis xx et amplius.[1] "The Bretons, returning from the lands across the sea with the support of King Athelstan, came back to their country. Duke Hugh sent across the sea to summon Louis, son of Charles, to be received as king, and King Athelstan, his uncle, first taking oaths from the legates of the Franks, sent him to the Frankish kingdom with some of his bishops, and other followers. Hugh and the other nobles of the Franks went to meet him and committed themselves to him[;] immediately he disembarked on the sands of Boulogne, as had been agreed on both sides. From there he was conducted by them to Laon, and, endowed with the royal benediction, he was anointed and crowned by the lord Archbishop Artold, in the presence of the chief men of his kingdom, with 20 bishops."[2]

Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France, Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles. Nonetheless, his reign was filled with conflict; in particular with Hugh the Great, count of Paris.

Louis IV fell from his horse and died 10 September 954, at Rheims, in the Marne, and is interred there at Saint Rémi Basilica.

Marriage and children

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – 5 May 984). They were parents to eight children:

   * Lothair of France (941-986)
   * Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy
   * Hildegarde b. about 944
   * Carloman b. about 945
   * Louis b. about 948
   * Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)
   * Alberade b. before 953
   * Henri b. about 953

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Flodoard, Annales 936, ed. P. Lauer.
  2. ^ Dorothy Whitelock (tr.), English Historical Documents c. 500-1042. 2nd ed. London, 1979. p. 344.

[edit] References

   * Flodoard, Annales, ed. Philippe Lauer, Les Annales de Flodoard. Collection des textes pour servir à l'étude et à l'enseignement de l'histoire 39. Paris: Picard, 1905.

Familypedia.jpg Louis IV (c920-954) on Familypedia

Preceded by

Raoul King of Western Francia

936–954 Succeeded by

Lothair

This page was last modified on 18 June 2010 at 14:16.

--------------------

Louis d'Outremer

--------------------

Acceded: 936

King of the west Franks. Also known by the nickname d'Outre-Mer or Transmarinus. Son of King Charles III "the Simplex" and his second wife Edgiva of Wessex, the older sister of Edith of Wessex. He spend his childhood with his mother at his grandfathers court in England. She had fled there after the Duke of Vermandois had imprisoned his father. In 936 Duke Hugh "the Great" called him back to France. On June 19th he was crowned King in Laon. In the fall of 939 he married the seven years older sister of Emperor Otto I, Gerberge. In the beginning the relationship with Hugh was serene. They fought together against Hugh "the Black," but the peace contract the two Hugh's signed opened Louis' eyes about the role his friend had appointed for him - the role of Hugh's marionette. The following conflict between the two lasted during much of his reign. In 946 he was imprisoned by Hugh, but was released after Otto I and Louis grandfather had pressured Hugh. For his release Louis had to hand over Laon. In 948 during a synod in Ingelheim Hugh was excommunicated. With Otto's support he was able to re-conquer Laon. In 953 the two reconciled in Soissons. On his way from Laon to Reims he hunted a wolf, fell from his horse and died from inner injuries.

--------------------

Louis IV (Transmarinus or d'Outremer - from overseas) King of France.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_IV_of_France

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_IV_of_France -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_IV_of_France -------------------- Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as King of Western Francia from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

Early years across the sea

He was only two years old when his father was deposed by the nobles, who set up Robert I in his place. When he was only three years old, Robert died and was replaced by Rudolph, duke of Burgundy. Rudolph's ally, a Carolingian himself, Count Herbert II of Vermandois, took Charles captive by treachery and the young Louis's mother took the boy "over the sea" to the safety of England, hence his nickname.

Return to France

Charles died in 929, but Rudolph ruled on until 936, when Louis was summoned back to France unanimously by the nobles, especially Hugh the Great, who had probably organised his return to prevent Herbert II, or Rudolph's brother Hugh the Black, taking the throne. He was crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936. The chronicler Flodoard records the events as follows:

"The Bretons, returning from the lands across the sea with the support of King Athelstan, came back to their country. Duke Hugh sent across the sea to summon Louis, son of Charles, to be received as king, and King Athelstan, his uncle, first taking oaths from the legates of the Franks, sent him to the Frankish kingdom with some of his bishops, and other followers. Hugh and the other nobles of the Franks went to meet him and committed themselves to him[;] immediately he disembarked on the sands of Boulogne, as had been agreed on both sides. From there he was conducted by them to Laon, and, endowed with the royal benediction, he was anointed and crowned by the lord Archbishop Artold, in the presence of the chief men of his kingdom, with 20 bishops."

Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France, Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles. Nonetheless, his reign was filled with conflict; in particular with Hugh the Great, count of Paris.

Louis IV fell from his horse and died 10 September 954, at Rheims, in the Marne, and is interred there at Saint Rémi Basilica.

Marriage and children

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – 5 May 984). They were parents to eight children:

   * Lothair of France (941-986)
   * Mathilde b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy
   * Hildegarde b. about 944
   * Carloman b. about 945
   * Louis b. about 948
   * Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953-993)
   * Alberade b. before 953
   * Henri b. about 953

-------------------- Lodewijk IV 'van Overzee' King Louis IV 'Transmarinus

Koning van Frankrijk, Roi, koning West-Francië -------------------- http://burlingham.familytreeguide.com/getperson.php?personID=I5004&tree=T1&PHPSESSID=7f32eec56d7a95e1d0b0104e5417c8f5 -------------------- Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as King of Western Francia from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty, the son of Charles III and Eadgifu of England, a daughter of King Edward the Elder.

He was only two years old when his father was deposed by the nobles, who set up Robert I in his place. When he was only three years old, Robert died and was replaced by Rudolph, duke of Burgundy. Rudolph's ally, a Carolingian himself, Count Herbert II of Vermandois, took Charles captive by treachery and the young Louis's mother took the boy "over the sea" to the safety of England, hence his nickname.

Charles died in 929, but Rudolph ruled on until 936, when Louis was summoned back to France unanimously by the nobles, especially Hugh the Great, who had probably organised his return to prevent Herbert II, or Rudolph's brother Hugh the Black, taking the throne. He was crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936.[2] The chronicler Flodoard records the events as follows:

Brittones a transmarinis regionibus, Alstani regis praesidio, revertentes terram suam repetunt. Hugo comes trans mare mittit pro accersiendo ad apicem regni suscipiendum Ludowico, Karoli filio, quem rex Alstanus avunculus ipsius, accepto prius jurejurando a Francorum legatis, in Franciam cum quibusdam episcopis et aliis fidelibus suis dirigit, cui Hugo et cetero Francorum proceres obviam profecti, mox navim egresso, in ipsis littoreis harenis apud Bononiam, sese committunt, ut erant utrinque depactum. Indeque ab ipsis Laudunum deductus ac regali benedictione didatus ungitur atque coronatur a domno Artoldo archiepiscopo, praesentibus regni principibus cum episcopis xx et amplius.[3] "The Bretons, returning from the lands across the sea with the support of King Athelstan, came back to their country. Duke Hugh sent across the sea to summon Louis, son of Charles, to be received as king, and King Athelstan, his uncle, first taking oaths from the legates of the Franks, sent him to the Frankish kingdom with some of his bishops, and other followers. Hugh and the other nobles of the Franks went to meet him and committed themselves to him[;] immediately he disembarked on the sands of Boulogne, as had been agreed on both sides. From there he was conducted by them to Laon, and, endowed with the royal benediction, he was anointed and crowned by the lord Archbishop Artold, in the presence of the chief men of his kingdom, with 20 bishops."[4]

Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France; Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles. Nonetheless, his reign was filled with conflict, in particular with Hugh the Great, count of Paris.

Louis IV fell from his horse and died 10 September 954, at Rheims, in the Marne, and is interred there at Saint Rémi Basilica.

In 939, Louis became involved in a struggle with the Emperor Otto the Great on the question of Lorraine, but then married Otto's sister Gerberga of Saxony (914 – 5 May 984). They were parents to eight children:

   Lothair of France (941–986)
   Matilda, b. about 943; married Conrad of Burgundy
   Hildegarde b. about 944
   Carloman b. about 945
   Louis b. about 948
   Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine (953–993)
   Alberade b. before 953
   Henri b. about 953

-------------------- Ludvig IV den Oversøiske. Konge af Frankrig

Louis IV eller Louis d'Outremer [Fr., = Louis fra udlandet], 921-54, franske konge (936-54), søn af kong Charles III (Charles Simple). Han tilbragte sin ungdom som en eksil i England, men på død kong Raoul blev han mindede adelen under ledelse af Hugh den Store. Men Louis energi og uafhængighed mishagede Hugh, der kæmpede mod ham med den tyske konge, Otto I, indtil 942. Fanget af normannerne (945), blev Louis overgivet til Hugh, af hvem han blev løsladt alene på overdragelse af Laon (946). Nu i alliance med Otto, Louis gjorde krig mod Hugh og fik sin indsendelse i 950. Louis blev efterfulgt af sin søn Lothair -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_IV_of_France

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/348795/Louis-IV

http://www.historytoday.com/richard-cavendish/death-louis-iv-west-franks

view all 44

Louis IV d'Outremer, Roi de Francie Occidentale's Timeline

920
September 10, 920
Leon, Champagne, Aisne, France
922
922
Age 1
England w/mother - Louis Transmarinus
936
June 19, 936
Age 15
Reims, Marne, France

Crowned king at Laon by Artald, archbishop of Rheims, on Sunday 19 June 936. Effectively, his sovereignty was limited to the town of Laon and to some places in the north of France, Louis displayed a keenness beyond his years in obtaining the recognition of his authority by his feuding nobles.

941
August 941
Age 20
Laon, Aisne, Pays-de-la Loire, France
943
943
Age 22
Aquitaine, France
945
January 945
Age 24
Laon, Aisne, Picardie, France
948
December 948
Age 28
953
953
Age 32
953
Age 32
Laon, Aisne, Picardie, France
954
April 25, 954
Age 33
Laon,Aisne,,France